3 Burst results for "Stanley coonskin"

"stanley coonskin" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

16:35 min | 1 year ago

"stanley coonskin" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Play. Do it. They comes he comes in, and I said to the costumer Roger fork said, Gilbert Gottfried is Hitler about the same size as Hitler, but I don't want him to be a glorious Hitler. I want to see him in the socks later. I wanted to be Gilbert Hiller. Gentler legs and great walk. So I thought we got to show off Gilbert has beautiful ankles. Yeah. It's like like Brando Stanley coonskin. Yeah, you don't want just any any hip. He's played the part before. Yeah, I was right. Yeah, it was in a movie where I did a small parts Hitler. But I weigh the hell. Yeah. And in, in highway, the hell it was funny are in the credits. And it was in the movie this time, it was funny. This time you to use the maybe a poor word murdered. It was such a. Really? And Gilbert, Canada hersal. He got there before the before the camera people. He was so excited. First thing the lighting's guy in the customer, they put the armband in the Ma Sean Gilbert, to make sure everything fit for the and that was it Gilbert, didn't take it off until he left on the airplane. Did he make a beeline to craft services? We've Hitler Hitler. He's. It was wonderful. He really got into character. And, and I think if Hitler saw it, I think he'd probably be really proud. Bruno gones are the are the definitive Hitler's and, and. Yeah, it was the row stuff and Frank. How did you feel when you were looking like Hitler? What did it make you feel like I finally in my element? As a Jewish person. Did you have any sort of mixed feelings about doing the role none, none, none? That's the way I prayed Mel Brooks used to talk about revenge through ridicule. This is how the Jews take on the Nazis. We mock them O N. He did a lot of it. It did a lot of it. Yeah. I'm I'm proud of the work. We did. I think it came out, great. Yeah. I did too. I think you should win. And a German, EMMY. Let's give a nod to John Lovett says as FDR. Yes, sir. Wonderful and Fred Willard, planet, drillers, Feinstein, of course, played and Frank and I played myself as Jewish comic during the Nazi occupation. Yes, you're wearing one of those old suits with the star of David on it. Right. And it made me it made me. It gave me a certain seriousness. I didn't I wasn't silly about it. I didn't have to, you know, it made me feel like comedies important. And when we say is important as comedians I didn't want to, I didn't wanna be cavalier about wearing that Jewish star of David I wanted it to mean something and I'm not even a religious person. But, you know, this is this is our world Gilbert, this is our, our arena. We don't make films we make jerk growth. And, and there's no very few documentaries or movies about Anne, Frank anywhere. I couldn't find any even as to show. My writers for research is the diary of aunt only diarrhea van Frank. Yeah. And, and as a resource so eh it gave me great pride to see my, my writers, who were young. My, my Vietnamese writer taking home, a copy of the diarrhea van Franken coming back the next day with. Ideas and jazzed about it, and completely all in on her story. So we talk about the holocaust say, never forget, how can we, we to know about it? The younger generation has to know about it for us to really for the story to go on for the cautionary tale. And one of your riders thank me a bunch of times during the show, but playing Hitler on him. And the reason was that his grandmother was camp survivor. Right. As the he thought this was so important, right? Like to make a fool out of Hitler. Right. And that she survived, and, you know, Hitler's being left at his that's Eddie Firth, who's one of the originators of the historical roast, and he his grandmother, Molly, I believe aim is wrote a book and she survived an and he his family. Very proud of the work proud, proud that he his show took on this thing. And, and I think it's if you can say who, why would you roast and Frank? Well, how could you not? Yeah, what do I get a row someone something, I don't care about this is perhaps, one of the people I care about the most in the world are book, change the way, I think about humanity and, and have writer kept thanking me throughout the whole production. Yes, it was so important for him. Yeah. Also, I want to mention the, the Lincoln roast with our friend. Bob sag it. Yeah. And stay most as John Wilkes booth really fun. And who was the comic who was playing Harriet Tubman? She was great yarmulke Saunders. Larry. He's one of our writers, a dear friend of mine really funny, Yemeni really attack that Harriet Tubman. He was great. I hung out with her on Memorial Day. She took me in a bunch of us on a on a excursion to the to the Staten Island ferry. She likes to ride the ferry on national holidays. It's free. It's fun. It's patriotic to go past the statue of liberty, so Yama nica, definitely. Let us around Staten Island, the Hudson river the way, Harriet, Tubman, led those people out of slavery. Great job, everybody, and one thing, I'm proud of. And I think you are too. You're already getting in trouble for these roles. I might have seen something about that online. Well, I mean, anytime you take on things that are sacred, you know, if it doesn't offend somebody somewhere, it's not funny. It's probably not funny. So you, you know you have to it's I feel it's my responsibility. If you're comfortable watching a roast of and Frank or Martin Luther King junior, which we do follow that, discomfort. Maybe you'll learn something about yourself. Maybe you'll learn something about other people. What's wrong with being uncomfortable? What was carlin's line that you like to talk about Gilbert, George Carlin said, it's the duty of a comedian to find out where the line is drawn and deliberately crossover, it right comics without borders. Yeah. I like that. What is your t-shirt say right now when you're wearing a tee shirt, I'm offended by people who are always offended? Perfect. Website. Everyone's offended in the internet age because everybody has a bully pulpit. Now we talk about it and the old days you had to write a letter people are trying to get mad. They wanna be offended because they know that they have a better punch down at you. Absolutely are waiting for you to say anything where they can have the one in the chamber set to go the fire back. It also gives them access to the conversation to what's going on. Right. And if you don't answer these, these idea, by the way, people who are might be complaining that the holocaust should not be mocked. They're probably right. I agree with them. Yeah. This is not the perfect way to learn about this. But I'm the only one talking about an Frank. I'm sorry. I'm not on the evening news. Like this is my my thing, some would say these are, there are survivors out there in these things are trigger to them. So I don't know how many ninety year olds are watching our Netflix historical rose. But I mean, does that mean any talk is a trigger? We, we laugh through the pain if we don't laugh, we cry. It's been a long time since the holocaust. This is how we're going to learn. I can't expect my teenage nephews to, to go to the Anne Frank house in an Amsterdam to, to learn about the hall. Let everybody could afford that, you know, I'm talking to teenagers who are all over the country all over the world, you know, with this show. So this is a way to at least get them curious enough to Google and Frank or Martin Luther King or Muhammad Ali, or some of the other. People. We talk about, you know, we talk about Frederick Douglass, Harriet Tubman in this show. These are names that adults are getting confused about who's who it was strangely educational right realizes. I was watching it. So, you know, to me, there's so much fake news. We talk about fake news. That's gonna evolve in a fake history. I felt an obligation to give a people's history to every joke in the historical roadshow. They're six episodes, every joke is based. In fact, you know, it's a, a trustee narrator. And what what's funny, too is like. It. It's it is respectful. There's something like it's both extremely offensive and extremely respectful at the same time, right? Well, that's what rose are. Yeah. It's a great device to be. You know, it's like. A Pat on the back and kick in the ass. You know what I mean? Speaking laughter through pain. I we were talking before we turn the mic on about the prison special. Uh-huh. That you did which I watched with my wife, which is absolutely fascinating. Thank particularly the part where you were performing for the women. Right. The incarcerated women. Right. And how you bonded with these people. Well, this is show I did a couple years ago and. I had been trying for a long time to get access to maximum security jail or prison. And everybody said, no but there's. There's a jail in Texas. Brass's county jail, where the sheriff and the jail administrators. They have a lot of autonomy over their jails, and they saw the good in bringing in an entertainer, and I and they asked for a month notice, so that they could use it as good behavior. In other words, you had to be a in order to see my show, and when word got out in the jail, that I was doing a show for the guys, the women, obviously. They wanted the same incentive. They wanted to say they had a show and this wasn't part of the plan. I was always up for it, but there were security issues with, with how to make that work force, and to put all the women in one room at the same time is not their normal routine. So I did an off the cuff. You know, I was looking at all the solitary confinement cells, and doing sort of the documentary part of the special and the jail administrator at the time, Wayne Dickie said, the women seem to be really super jealous that you're doing a show for the guys. How do you feel about doing a show for the women in half an hour? Okay. Well, I worked months on my act for the guy pulled it off. So I went into the women's jail, and you know you can see this if you'll watch the special and I did it like a nightclub performance, it wasn't social commentary was barely a roast until I said stuff, like you know, you know, you know. If they were all upset about all wearing the same outfit. Yeah. Like some easy jokes. But there was the pregnant woman to pregnant women in the row and big mama. Joe big mama. Joe? Yeah. Yeah, they were they were really into it. So it became an easy almost like a nightclub show, and I brought women up and roasted them one at a time and, you know, some heartbreaking stories and they all had a pretty good sense of humor. And then afterwards Wayne told me that the women were buzzing for weeks afterwards because no one had talked to them as women in a long time. It was a human nizing experience. An enormous sizing experience for the ladies and the chil. So, yeah, it was cool. It was that was a cool way to bring roasting into the incarceration were all, which is something that I'm always really curious about that. They put the murderer is up front the front row security. That was a security thing where my murderers. That was your opening line. Yeah. I asked where the where the real. Dangerous people where they said, they'd be up front, Wayne said, they'd be a front because. Because it was easier to get them out. If something happened. And I said my opening joke. So we're my murder is at and three guys in the front raise their hands. And I remember one time you came over to my house. I guessed on your podcast. Right. And you brought my two. My two kids on. And while they were on with you, they were saying, you know, you're not funny, that he's hidden. And I remember your reaction was got a big smile on your face and said, you're roasting me. Yeah. Well, it's the my podcast is called thick skin. Jeff Ross, and it's about that. It's about taking a joke. You gotta have thick skin, especially me if I dish it out or I'm required to take it. I mean, otherwise, I'm a hypocrite, and I am sensitive, the way we all are. And also it digitally. Delighted me to see. Your son understand as a boy, an eight year old and nine year old ten year old, what roasting is. Hey Gilbert, you know, like this shit was corny. When I was a kid. Now it's cool. We didn't I didn't. I didn't know from that stuff as a kid. It was like it was funny to see some of the old time, comics on Johnny Carson and stuff like that. Of course, that was a big influence me obviously love that type of humor. But when I first started doing the rose they were antiquated. Yeah. They were it was like saying, I joust, or I know, Latin lost art, and, you know, through through a lot of hard work and love like roasts are more popular than they've ever been and not only that, like boys and girls will roast a bully. You know, that makes me so happy, I always thought roasting as form of self defense. You know, I studied karate kid when I was your son Max's age, I was already probably a Brown belt, and take Cuando. So I understood the power of. Being quiet. I understood that, you know, you, you can let a bully mouth off. And then a certain point you could shut it down to either with your words or with a good solid front snap. Kick was the kid. You talk about in the book the one that would hide around corners, and you're in the crotch was he was he a catalyst. Yeah. Or, you know, if you get picked on you, you either break or, you know, it's like fighter flight. Right. And you can only fly so many times, you have to fight back. If you're going to exist in an environment, and I don't know I think roasting sort of like that, I only roasts volunteers, and.

Hitler Sean Gilbert Frank Harriet Tubman Anne Frank Gilbert Hiller Wayne Dickie writer Staten Island Canada Brando Stanley coonskin Martin Luther King Gilbert Gottfried Mel Brooks van Frank John Lovett John Wilkes David I Fred Willard Johnny Carson
"stanley coonskin" Discussed on Popcorn with Peter Travers

Popcorn with Peter Travers

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"stanley coonskin" Discussed on Popcorn with Peter Travers

"Afford to live in Manhattan how I couldn't afford a studio apartment in Manhattan. The time probably couldn't now but see new. You'd get rich being an actor. Well, I don't know. It's one of those things like you. You go all I've done it, so it's either make it or just digesting it. And I don't. I don't know. I guess it'd be like becoming a priest. I compare it to that somewhat vocation. Yeah. Yeah. So where did you did you train? Did you go to? Yeah. Well, I I did supplies college, and then I did a couple of plays in Kansas City. Then then I got to New York, and then I did plays in New York off Broadway and off Broadway and regional theater. And then I got casted in looking for Mr.. Good bar out of New York. I got casted for that. And you were the one that did that off? Yeming. Two Dane Keaton in that one. Yeah, I've had some. I'm sure you had many people come up to you and say, oh, creep. You do that. Yeah, but you got recognized that even though he only comes in, I know, I yeah. know this, I think is one scene earlier a little bit set up. You go wise that halfway watching that, you know, and then there's the payoff at the end, but. That was also Richie gears first movie. Was that the one that sort of started everything for you where people were interested in see. Because I think people when they look at you, we go through this whole period of you. I remember you in the big chill specially that was early eighties, right? Yup. We shot it in eighty two followed to into January they, but I remember your character being this TV star of all of them. He's into one. He's, he's in this show that he basically hates even though TV's now everything. He gets verse when they bring it up. It's like, you know income out here to listen to that, but they're remembering themselves very young when they had political stance where something was happening that you did you feel any by brations from that about your own life? Well, I would be it's a little weird because I, I actually wanted to go to West Point. It'd be a career army officer and that didn't happen two guys in my class went and. I gave that up and said the home of that and ended up acting. And of course I played a few generals. And colonels and captains and teddy Roosevelt teddy Roosevelt don't. Yup. In relaunch street. All relief. General played an Admiral once and I was a cheap petty done, illicit cheap, petty guns. At home. Become a very conveniently. I really, truly I try to doesn't always work. It doesn't work. Yeah, doesn't work with wives and children. She says, go off white wall. Okay. Yeah, yeah. Just doesn't work much. Nobody listens to. But I remember when I guess platoon is eighty five eighty six, right? And this guy with the scars on his I remember the line he has in that you can take me through it because it's still such a great movie. But. You say, I am reality. One of those. Great. It was here right? You know, it's about, you know if the machine breaks down everything breaks, we all break chain of command to happen in, which is true of do, which is true. I mean, you know. He's not writing this stuff. He was taught it to enter those characters that I played Stanley coonskin streetcar named desire. They're like really blue collar, but the stuff that comes out of their mouth just prophetic, it's it's like, it's like our street blow injuring is really. Yeah, the way they talk. Yeah. And just go, whoa, where's he come up with that. We'll put tune said she rob. You get an Academy Award nomination. How does that change your career and your life in a major way did up? Yup. Well, for example, I had a then had four movies in a row. This went for entire year. And I, I, I can't go to work again. You know, I've got. I've got to take some time off. I'm getting whippy was concert on the road. And while I was doing one job, I was studying for the next doing some homework and sound work..

Manhattan teddy Roosevelt Academy Award Dane Keaton Kansas City Richie Stanley coonskin officer West Point tune
"stanley coonskin" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"stanley coonskin" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"John rogers we're allowing is all off this thing here doing doing football and i was fifty three and a half now i'm nineteen go get by i wing that's why did twenty minutes on football practice because i thought it was all right that's me i like it's so it's the city a champion pittsburgh pa it's new orleans which for food and for nightlife and beyond i've always wanted to live in new orleans for a little while but mike august quite a bit about this and he's always like he move you wanna talk about bad football moves he went from boulder colorado that's good football practice area to louisiana and should practice with miserable and he just says about louisiana new orleans says you'd like to visit there but you do not wanna live there people always say that i'd like to be there i'm talking about like august for one month of my life i wish there was some reason i at the live in new orleans for one month but i'd want it to be an august not when it's cool out i want no one else around there i want to be like stanley kowalski where a wife beater shooting pool getting drunk and getting into fights that's what i'd like to do i'm sort of the somatic twentyfirstcentury version of stanley coonskin raw unchecked brian i i and other no one's ever tried to be fair showing enough interest 'cause they're smart they know intellect tells them instinct says this is not one to grapple with run with damage shak he's wild.

football pa new orleans mike august colorado louisiana stanley kowalski John rogers pittsburgh one month twenty minutes