36 Burst results for "Stanley Stanley Stanley Stanley"

Fresh update on "stanley " discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:35 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "stanley " discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Sports at 15 and 45 powered by maximus. Moving people and technology forward. Two 45 is J Brooks. Well, Ralph, the Padres still holding a four zero lead top of the 8th at Nat's park in this rubber game earlier today, team recalling outfielder Alex Cole, who's wearing number 62 and led off today's contest. Patrick Corbin, the lefty threw a bullpen yesterday all set to start on Tuesday, keep that in mind because the cubs are in town for the first of three starting tomorrow, a 7 O 5 first pitch. And the American League, the O's down three zero bottom of the third as Randy arozarena, a three run Homer for the race. He has 15 homers and 38 RBI in 37 career games against Baltimore. Jose half game back of the race for the third and final wildcard spot in the AL. NFL preseason Washington dropped their opener yesterday, of course. They're off today at 2 o'clock practice to Mars. They're ready for Saturday's game at 4 o'clock in Kansas City. Also, WNBA has sold out a fair for fan appreciation day regular season finale against Indiana fever Elena delle donne is going to start. Keep that in mind. Add to the ice. Former cap great Peter bondra. Inducted into Slovakia's hockey Hall of Fame bondra who helped Washington to its first Stanley Cup final back in 1998, scored the gold medal and the game winning goal against Russia back in 2002 giving Slovakia. It's only world championship title. By the way, the capital sees an opens up on October 12th as the bruins are a kept one arena pre season start September 25th against the Sabres also in D.C., they'll face off at two. Jay Brooks, WTO P sports

J Brooks Nat's Park Alex Cole Patrick Corbin Randy Arozarena Padres Ralph American League Elena Delle Donne Cubs Peter Bondra Homer Bondra Washington Baltimore Wnba Jose Slovakia NFL Kansas City
Bell crashes NASCAR playoff field with win at New Hampshire

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 3 weeks ago

Bell crashes NASCAR playoff field with win at New Hampshire

"Christopher Bell didn't have the best car for most of the race at New Hampshire motor speedway but his crew kept working on it and it came alive as he chased down the leaders and drove away with his first win of the season My car was the fastest one out there especially on the long run And I did my job to maximize that With 6 races left in the regular season bells win has huge implications for the NASCAR playoff stanleys as he becomes the 14th driver to lock himself into the round of 16 They cut off line kept creeping up and up and up So it feels really good to hopefully get myself above that cut off line by a couple spots Chase Elliott finished second Bubba Wallace was third I'm Jerry

Christopher Bell New Hampshire Nascar Chase Elliott Bubba Wallace Jerry
The Latest in Sports

AP News Radio

00:59 min | Last month

The Latest in Sports

"AP sports I'm Bruce Morton Tradition reigns supreme Thursday when the British open returns to the old course at saint Andrews The weather forecast calls for just a slight breeze Baseball the mets won in Atlanta 7 three while the twins scored a four one victory over Milwaukee The Blue Jays have fired manager Charlie montoyo replacing him with bench coach John Schneider for the rest of the season Toronto's next opponent the royals won't be at full strength Ten players on Kansas City's roster are in violation of Canadian restrictions against travelers who are not vaccinated against COVID-19 College football at the conference's media day knew big 12 commissioner Brent your mark says the league will consider all possible realignment possibilities Hockey along line of NHL free agency moves among them Stanley Cup winning goaltender Darcy Kemper going from Colorado to the capitals and Johnny goodrow leaving Calgary for Columbus Bruce Martin AP sports

Bruce Morton Charlie Montoyo Saint Andrews John Schneider AP Covid Blue Jays Mets Twins Milwaukee Brent Your Mark Baseball Atlanta Royals Kansas City Toronto Darcy Kemper Football NHL Hockey
NHL free agency: Rangers get Trochek, Senators land Giroux

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last month

NHL free agency: Rangers get Trochek, Senators land Giroux

"The defending Stanley Cup champs lost two players and kept two on the first day of NHL free agency The avalanche re signed forward artillery lechon and defenseman Josh Manson but they lost goaltender Darcy Kemper to a 5 year contract with the capitals The abs also said goodbye to Andre burakovsky who signed with the kraken The hurricanes added veteran blue liner Brent burns and the red wings picked up center Andrew cop left winger Dominic kubala and defenseman Ben sharat the rangers picked up center Vincent trochek and netminder Jack Campbell went for the Maple Leafs to the oilers I'm Dave

Josh Manson Darcy Kemper Andre Burakovsky Avalanche Brent Burns NHL Andrew Cop Dominic Kubala Ben Sharat Red Wings Vincent Trochek Rangers Jack Campbell Maple Leafs Oilers Dave
We're Still Waiting on That Nathan MacKinnon Extension

Schlereth and Evans

01:16 min | Last month

We're Still Waiting on That Nathan MacKinnon Extension

"We are kind of living in the afterglow if you will of the Stanley Cup for the Colorado avalanche and Joe sakic sort of retooling a couple things still waiting on the Nathan McKinnon extension, assuming it's just a matter of time right here if they're working on a Mark. Yeah, I would imagine. I mean, there's a lot of work to be done. That one's going to get done. Those ones just take time, right? They time and a little bit of a little bit of caressing. You know, they've got to make sure you do it the right way. But McKenna is going to get one of them contracts like the Joker got. You know, like the big time Superman supermax. Supermax. You get a soup. You ever get a super max contract? I never quite did. So close a few times to just slip through my hands there. Yeah, I mean, Nathan McKinnon. The opposite is super max. That's what I got. So you never got one either. No, no, no, no, I never. I never was in a position to negotiate. Mine was my whole life has been organized begging. I go, can I have more money and they say no. Okay. Thank you. No, but seriously, can I have more? No, okay. I think they're going to say yes to Nathan McKinney. They are. Just a matter of time before we before we get that

Nathan Mckinnon Joe Sakic Colorado Avalanche Supermax Mckenna Nathan Mckinney
Blackhawks trade DeBrincat to Senators before NHL draft

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | Last month

Blackhawks trade DeBrincat to Senators before NHL draft

"NHL draft day began with several moves involving veteran players the biggest of which was forward Alex to brink at going from the Blackhawks to the senators Chicago received the 7th and 39th picks in this week's draft along with the third rounder in 2024 The 24 year old to bring it just tied a career high with 41 goals and established a personal best with 78 points The Stanley Cup winning avalanche acquired goaltender Alexander georgiev from the rangers for three draft picks And the penguins signed veteran defenseman Chris la Tang to a 6 year $36.6 million deal I'm Dave

NHL Blackhawks Alex Alexander Georgiev Chicago Stanley Cup Avalanche Rangers Chris La Tang Penguins Dave
Red Wings hire Lightning assistant Derek Lalonde as coach

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | Last month

Red Wings hire Lightning assistant Derek Lalonde as coach

"The red wings have hired Derek Holland as head coach ending a lengthy search The lawn just won two Stanley cups since an assistant to lightning head coach John Cooper and made a third straight trip to the final this summer The 49 year old lalan won a U.S. Hockey League title with Green Bay and coached in the ECHL and AHL before joining the lightning He replaces Jeff flash who recorded a four 47 winning percentage over 7 seasons in Detroit The second worst in the league during that entire span The wings have missed the playoffs the last 6 seasons I'm Dave

Stanley Cups Derek Holland Lalan U.S. Hockey League Red Wings John Cooper Jeff Flash Echl Green Bay AHL Detroit Wings Dave
Avalanche dethrone Lightning to win Stanley Cup for 3rd time

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last month

Avalanche dethrone Lightning to win Stanley Cup for 3rd time

"Nathan McKinnon nets one and assists in the game winner as the Colorado avalanche defeat the Tampa Bay lightning two one to win their first Stanley Cup championship since 2001 Kale mccart was awarded the Khan smythe trophy for the most valuable player of the playoffs Throughout this whole whole game environmentality was just when that period and when the next one get the next shift and so on and we're never looking too far ahead to the outcome and we definitely we definitely feel like we earned that one for sure Lightning captain Steven stamkos broke the ice early but that was the last Tampa Bay would score McKinnon found a crack at Andre vasilevsky's right side to tie the game at one 54 the second then fed arturi lechon who would give Colorado the lead midway through the game and Darcy Kemper stopped 22 shots to earn the series clinching win Walter marsicano

Nathan Mckinnon Kale Mccart Khan Smythe Colorado Avalanche Nets Tampa Bay Andre Vasilevsky Steven Stamkos Arturi Lechon Mckinnon Darcy Kemper Colorado Walter Marsicano
AP Sports SummaryBrief at 11:27 p.m. EDT

AP News Radio

01:59 min | Last month

AP Sports SummaryBrief at 11:27 p.m. EDT

"AP sports time gethin cool bar the three Pete was denied as the Colorado avalanche are Stanley Cup champions for the first time in 21 years After a two one win over two time defending champion Tampa Bay in game 6 Nathan McKinnon scored the tying goal one minute and 54 seconds into the second period before arturi lechon and netted the game winner midway through the second As defenseman kale mccart took home the Khan smythe trophy as the playoff MVP Overall this team is just a bunch of fighters and our model throughout the year was just Pascal so we never wanted to go away and that was kind of what we stuck with and I think it showed tonight Major League Baseball the American League leading Yankees bounced back from being no hit with a walk off 6 three win over the Astros correspondent Tom Miriam has more Aaron judge hit a three run Homer on Seth Martinez in the bottom of the tenth to win a game that looked like another Astros win for much of it Judge also won the first game of the series with a 9th inning single on Thursday Kind of remind me of some postseason games Big clutch hitting Other AL winners the Red Sox twins rays angels White Sox and athletics In the national league the Marlins walked off the Met three to two on Nick fortes solo Homer with two outs in the 9th Which was awesome I did not want to get swept against those guys Other NL winners the Dodgers brewers Phillies Diamondbacks cubs nationals and reds Ole miss has won the college World Series after scoring three times in the 8th to complete a sweep of Oklahoma with a four two victory Brandon Johnson struck out all three batters he faced in the 9th to close out the rebels first national title It was a dream come true Ever since you're a little kid you dream of being on the mound in those situations And then when it happened you just like go of yourself because you realize that you did do it And engulfed Xander schauffele ended a three year winless drought on the PGA Tour after coming from one shot back on the final hold to post a two stroke victory at the travelers championship Guess and cool bot AP sports

Gethin Cool Stanley Cup Champions Nathan Mckinnon Arturi Lechon Kale Mccart Khan Smythe Tom Miriam Astros Seth Martinez Colorado Avalanche Homer American League Tampa Bay Nick Fortes AP Pete NL Pascal Major League Yankees
Lightning win Game 5, deny Avs chance to take Stanley Cup

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last month

Lightning win Game 5, deny Avs chance to take Stanley Cup

"The lightning pulled it within three games to two by topping Colorado three two Tampa Bay center Steven stamkos As good as it feels to extend the series you know we realize how hard we had to work to get that tonight and we're gonna have to replicate that at home The bolts went ahead for good on a third period goal by Andre pilat His no nonsense drive from the slot came at 1338 and went 5 hole past Darcy Kemper It was just easy shot for me I was just trying to one time it and lucky enough when Tampa Bay never trailed in this game leading one nothing in two one thanks to goals from January and Nikita Khrushchev valerian registered a goal and an assist for Colorado Bruce Morton

Tampa Bay Center Steven Stamkos Andre Pilat Darcy Kemper Colorado Tampa Bay Nikita Khrushchev Valerian Bruce Morton
National Review: SCOTUS Strikes Historic Blow for 2nd Amendment Rights

Mark Levin

01:05 min | Last month

National Review: SCOTUS Strikes Historic Blow for 2nd Amendment Rights

"There's a very good summary of this by Charles cook at national review In New York rifle versus brewing the court affirmed the gun rights or do the same protection as all other constitutional rights Stanley the most important Second Amendment ruling In recent times it is potentially the most important second ruling in American history And one of the reasons for that is it's author clarence Thomas For all the bru ha ha the question at hand was rather straightforward from the state of New York required that applicants for gun carry permits Demonstrate a special need for self protection distinguishable from that at the general community Where's New York obliged by the constitutional offer a shall issue regime of the sort that 43 of the other 49 states have adopted So the left is trying to suggest this is some kind of a radical decision because they're nuts That's what they are They don't believe in individual liberty except when it comes to their ideology

Charles Cook National Review New York Clarence Thomas Stanley
'Until Unity' Author Francis Chan on the Gospel and Eternity

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:41 min | Last month

'Until Unity' Author Francis Chan on the Gospel and Eternity

"Back, I'm talking to Francis Chan, he's written a new book called until unity. So Francis is a huge idea unity and what you said when you spoke the other day in San Diego, I was very moved by it because you're right that we're supposed to love our enemies and when somebody says, I have Jesus living inside me. I'm a Christian. That's like a next level of what you just think, wow. This person, we may disagree, but I have to honor them and I have to talk to them in a way that takes that very seriously. But at what point, you know, because you have people now saying any Stanley wrote a book recently that kind of says we shouldn't be political, right? So on the surface of it, I get that. But then I think to myself, it feels to me like I kind of false posturing because you think, wait a minute, if I'm talking about truth, if I talk about the unborn, if I talk about slavery, if I talk about Nazis or fascists or whatever, like I have an obligation to truth, to speak on that, but there's some people that it's almost like they just have a dislike of that tension. And so they say, let's just talk about the gospel. As though you could talk about the gospel, but avoid some of those issues. So that's where I can't take them seriously. I feel like they're missing something big. Yeah. Well, you know, I recently read this book called bahn hoffer. And powerful, powerful book. I suggest it. And when you think about his life, how do you ignore human life? Like, I mean, that is the gospel. And so I hear what they're saying, though, because again, like I said earlier, there's things that we can get caught up in, and we're talking about eternity. I mean, we're talking about a person possibly spending eternity in torment a part from God or spending eternity forever, not these few years that you and I have left on the earth. We're talking about forever and ever in the presence of God and perfection, you know, for thousands, tens of thousands, millions of years, and that's huge. There's nothing bigger than that. We're talking about believing in a God who we can't even look at or we would die and him sending his son to die on a cross and suffering across so that we can be forgiven and spend eternity with him in perfect fellowship. And so that needs to be so high above every issue.

Francis Chan Bahn Hoffer Francis San Diego Stanley
Stanley Kurtz: Why Republicans Won't Stop Civics Secures Democracy Act

Mark Levin

00:49 sec | Last month

Stanley Kurtz: Why Republicans Won't Stop Civics Secures Democracy Act

"Well why aren't the Republicans speaking out against this Do they not know what's taking place I think some many Republicans do frankly to be honest I think that they don't want to take a swipe at cornyn I think cornyn has been in leadership And I think he aspires to succeed Mitch McConnell This is my speculation but it's informed speculation And I think Republican senators have bottled up the bill up to now But corn is making another big push He's roped in a few other people and I don't know whether they can stop him but I don't think they like the internal fighting amongst themselves So now that there are three Republican senators on this I worry that the others won't be willing to speak up

Cornyn Mitch Mcconnell
Stanley Kurtz: Dems Are Rushing to Pass Civics Secures Democracy Act

Mark Levin

00:59 min | Last month

Stanley Kurtz: Dems Are Rushing to Pass Civics Secures Democracy Act

"This passing if the people listening in this audience don't act immediately I'm worried about it because the Democrats of course are going to go forward completely They've already signed up three Republicans I've seen a fourth Republican on a somewhat related bill It's getting a lot too close for comfort They want to pass this bill it's called the civics secures democracy act a very misleading name that ought to be called critical race theory destroys democracy But it's called the civic secures democracy act and they want to pass it before the August recess because we're talking about many many hundreds of millions of dollars that will go into the coffers of the leftist civics groups pushing their political protests And this is their last chance to get that money before Congress has taken over by the Republicans So they're hoping to sneak it by this summer and they've already signed up almost an effort Republicans to break a filibuster So I'm worried

Congress
Avalanche rout Lightning 7-0 to take 2-0 lead in Cup Final

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

Avalanche rout Lightning 7-0 to take 2-0 lead in Cup Final

"The avalanche on a two games to non Stanley Cup final lead This after they humiliated the lightning 7 to nothing Two goals came off the stick of kale With some good goals and stuff like that but at the end of the day we know next game is gonna bring their best And it's always the next game is the hardest Colorado parlayed an eye popping territorial advantage into a three zero lead after the first period Those goals came from valerian Andre baray and Josh Manson At the other end of the ice the two time defending champs rarely tested as gold tender Darcy Kemper who turned away 16 shots Bruce Morton Denver

Stanley Cup Avalanche Valerian Andre Baray Josh Manson Colorado Darcy Kemper Bruce Morton Denver
Avalanche beat Lightning in OT to open Stanley Cup Final

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

Avalanche beat Lightning in OT to open Stanley Cup Final

"Colorado blew a two goal lead but bounced back to defeat the lightning four three in overtime Andre borovsky took a pass from valerian to cushion and delivered the game winner at one 23 of the extra session Just trying to get it get out as quick as possible And then obviously I'll get to park back and met a great play to me and it was just for me to shoot it like it went in The avalanche had not played since June 6th but jumped out to a three one lead in the first period However in 48 seconds Tampa Bay got goals from Andre palant and Mikhail sergachev to tie the game at three in the second period Game two is Saturday Bruce Morton

Andre Borovsky Valerian Colorado Avalanche Andre Palant Mikhail Sergachev Tampa Bay Bruce Morton
Update on the latest sports

AP News Radio

02:00 min | 2 months ago

Update on the latest sports

"AP sports on day ferry and the lightning are in the Stanley Cup final for the third straight year after beating the rangers two to one Steven stamkos scored twice including the game winner just 21 seconds after Frank Fernando tied the game for the blue shirts Nikita kucherov says he's proud of his team's finals run It means a lot not many teams have done that before and be one of them and it's huge and we were really happy with the result but we still have more important games ahead Lightning avalanche begins on Wednesday Baseball and the braves won their tenth in a row with an 8 run 7th to beat the pirates ten four Gary McKinley was there After dansby Swanson drove him three runs with a bloop single the braves again loaded the bases and this time Ozzy albie sent one over the right field wall to give Atlanta their biggest inning of the year Albie said winning has been a team effort Pitching in the defense and hitting you gotta just keep going and never give up and you know we keep our focus and our energy height to win games The Giants were three two winners in the return of Los Angeles pitcher Clayton Kershaw Other than losing which is no fun no matter what building block you want but overall you know I feel I feel good about it for the most part and be ready to go for the next one The podracing rock he split a double header Other NL winners were the Phillies cardinals nationals in Marlins The Yankees made it ten wins in 11 games by slamming the cubs 8 zero Aaron judge belted two of the yanks 6 solo homers off Matt swarmer I'm a sucker for a good rally and a nice you know double in the gap with runners and scoring the position but 6 solo shots with one single looks looks pretty nice too Other AL winners were the twins and rangers along with the angels Orioles a's tigers and Mariners Modale won the Belmont stakes ahead of nest and Skippy longstocking Trainer Todd pletcher finished one two and now has four victories in the Belmont Golf and Tony finau and Rory McIlroy are co leaders through three rounds of the Canadian open Female birdied his final hole for a 62 and an 11 under total I'm Dave ferry AP sports

Frank Fernando Nikita Kucherov Lightning Avalanche Gary Mckinley Dansby Swanson Braves Ozzy Albie Steven Stamkos Stanley Cup Rangers AP Albie Clayton Kershaw Pirates Matt Swarmer Baseball Atlanta Giants Marlins Phillies
Stamkos scores twice, Lightning beat Rangers 2-1 in Game 6

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

Stamkos scores twice, Lightning beat Rangers 2-1 in Game 6

"The rangers have been eliminated from the Stanley Cup playoffs with their fourth straight loss two to one to the lightning The blue shirts didn't win after beating Tampa Bay in the first two games of the Eastern Conference final Frankfurt Toronto tied it for the rangers on a power play goal with 6 53 left in regulation but it took just 21 seconds before Steven stamkos restored the lightning's lead with his second goal of the night and 9th of the postseason Igor shishkin made 29 saves for the rangers who were seeking their first birth in the cup finals since 2014 New York put just 21 shots on Andre vasilevsky I'm Dave

Rangers Tampa Bay Steven Stamkos Igor Shishkin Toronto Andre Vasilevsky New York Dave
'God, Caesar and Idols' Author Rick Boyer on Absolute Truth

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:10 min | 2 months ago

'God, Caesar and Idols' Author Rick Boyer on Absolute Truth

"Back. I'm talking to the author of God, Caesar and idols, Rick Boyer. So Rick, let's keep going. What is it that churches are missing a book came out very recently. It really was like a nightmare to look at it. It's by Andy Stanley, very prominent pastor. And talk about getting it wrong. Talk about writing something that's potentially going to mislead millions. He talks basically makes the opposite case that you make in this book. And or that Nancy makes, or that I make, and I just think, wow, this is scary when a leading pastor is getting something this basic wrong, because we're in the lip of catastrophe in this country. If we don't bring our faith to bear, so what other issues do you go into related to this? Well, talking about truth, we devoted an entire chapter to the concept of absolute truth. And if you look at the George barna surveys, the number, the percentage of American Christians who don't believe in absolute truth, we believe that all roads lead to God and anyone who believes in some kind of a God sincerely at some point is going to be okay on the other side of the grave. Just this sort of the idea that anything goes that anything is okay, your truth is your truth and my mind can be mine. The Bible is absolutely intolerant of that idea. I mean, the Bible is insistent, make Paul talks about if Christ does not risen in our preaching his vein, your faith is in vain. You are yet in your sins. If God is wrong on even one little point, then how do we trust him on anything? And eternal security is a giant game of Russian roulette, as I say in the book. If Jesus is wrong, when he says it's one man for one woman for one lifetime because in the beginning God created it this way and the world sees us in the church as schizophrenic. When we tell them we believe in this God somewhere in this Jesus somewhere up in heaven somewhere who's going to take us to this great place called heaven when we die, but we don't take this Jesus seriously when he's here on this earth telling us in very plain terms that what God has joined together let not man put

Rick Boyer Andy Stanley Caesar George Barna Rick Nancy Paul Jesus
"stanley  " Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"stanley " Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"Was low. But now fan man. I well ours Found while but now i see he. Nah i see. The book is titled men have constant sorrow. Dr ralph stanley. Thank you so much. Thank you robert enjoyed talking with you. And i you thank you. Thanks for listening. Oh i'm diane Won't just to Well what is is an hvac school hand taken. Hold of me he will. I am has none canny. How open the door to have an hour. Ooh that was my two thousand nine conversation with dr ralph stanley award winning singer and banjo player. He died in two thousand sixteen at age. Eighty nine toll for today. We hope we've act with eight new episode on fridays timber. Hit in the meantime you can find this all tastes again. Twitter for san nail de our podcast had wmu. Four kids can pose by jim. Brandenburg landsberg of one year late. This show is reduced by alison brody. Our engineer today is michael. Thanks for listening on be. Well stay safe. I'm diane rick.

Dr ralph stanley dr ralph stanley diane robert Brandenburg landsberg alison brody Twitter jim michael diane rick
"stanley  " Discussed on I Weigh with Jameela Jamil

I Weigh with Jameela Jamil

06:55 min | 1 year ago

"stanley " Discussed on I Weigh with Jameela Jamil

"The like it's okay. I think to be angry. I think angry as the part of the human experience. But i thought that i was supposed to be angry all the time they if i was not being critical of the world around me than i was not really paying attention to. What's going on. And now i really feel like everything happens for reason and that good bad have to be there that the the darkness has to be there in order to be able to experience the light and i feel gratitude in moments. That are very very difficult for me. And so i think that it has allowed me to be more okay with the fact that there are ups and downs on mental health. I think they were always kind of searching for like that final resting poisoner like like yes. I'm okay permanently. I never need to think about this mental health thing ever again to my knowledge. That's not really thing short of death. So that i'm kind of like as long as i'm alive we're good. I'm doing good and i can try to find something to smile at in win. The shit smells. It's okay for me to complain about it. It's okay for me. Not like it. And i don't have to be anything for any one person before. I definitely before are practicing. I definitely used to feel like. I need to fix myself so that i can be acceptable. Mba accepted by the other people in my life. And now i don't really feel that way i think that's incredibly par empowering and i hope that anyone who's listening to this who may be you know thinks that will look like gwyneth paltrow vessel people people on this because but you know because he looked certain way. This isn't worthwhile. Fear that the that your end goal is too far away. You know you want to lose one hundred pounds or twenty pounds or you want your you want this part of your body to be super defined at that. We'll take too long if that's the lens through which you're looking at all movement then of course you're going to be daunted of course you're not going to do anything but if you think about it as i will definitely feel better in an hour after an hour of exercise often arabic. Whatever you can do than i did before. I will feel more in control of my life. I will have chemicals in my brain that are actively enhancing the quality of my life. If i just do this exercise then you will have an instant reward. I love instant rewards. I hate long-term fucking promises i loved. I love instant gratification. And that's why now like exercise. Because i immediately have have acquired something that i didn't have before for moving on just for. Twenty minutes is conferred gentle. You know. I don't do yoga. And i think maybe that's because i haven't felt comfortable in yoga spaces and maybe you're giving me some more clarity as to why because i still feel as though is a loss out the aesthetic. Maybe i need your yoga In order to feel safe All yoga i feel like all the postures are literally an opportunity to connect with your breath and so i feel like as long as you're breathing. You're practicing yoga. And i think that some things like especially like everything we are saying about exercise so real like just moving your body just to feel good like human beings are meant to be in motion were meant to be leaping and lunging and and hunting in like going through this huge life experience and instead all day most of us sit at deaths we hold devices. We pretend to be robots ultimately so i feel like anything that you can do. That reminds you that you're not a robot is the best thing that you could possibly do. And it doesn't need to be about looking plant or doing anything different. It's just kind of whatever. But yoga. I mean i do think obviously his head a really profound impact for me and i think you know what you're saying about the aesthetic a so legit and i'm like joe if it does not feel real if it feels like just some bullshit the please don't they just don't but but at the same time also part of me that's like whatever that is is somebody's yoga that's somebody's experienced so it's all it's all a wash. It all comes out in the end. These beliefs style is more than just fashion. That's why everything they make is exceptionally comfortable. Totally sustainable and fully machine washable from slip on sneakers and classic flats to sheikh handbags and spacious totes. Rossi's makes getting dressed easy and they are made with one hundred percent recycled materials. Like threads spun from plastic water bottles. Many people don't regularly wash their shoes or bags. 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There are so many reasons why quality sleep is important. People who get enough quality sleep have more energy. I like this company. Because i am bad at sleep when i need help. I can get and i really appreciate that. Not only do they make really good products but they also pay so much attention to the data. They collect so much.

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"stanley  " Discussed on I Weigh with Jameela Jamil

I Weigh with Jameela Jamil

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"stanley " Discussed on I Weigh with Jameela Jamil

"Is not indicative of anything other than anything and you really judge a book by.

"stanley  " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"stanley " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

"Emergency away. One car breaking down away from complete economic instability. And at the same time. We don't have child care system. We don't have an elder care system. We don't have the infrastructure for all of it and so we think what the pandemic did was it just revealed how precarious all of it has been. We did in fact have a childcare system wants in the us during world war two. The government realized that if it was gonna make rosie a riveter they have to figure out who was going to look after rosie's kids so the government gave grants to community groups to run nursery schools and daycares for the war effort. Ben we're fighting the war. They needed someone to work so they actually wanted women to work therefore they created the system so that women could go to the factories that rosie the riveter could be out there making weapons. Basically what you're saying is within the society and the government valued women working. It addressed the problem. I think that is what i am saying. Yes but when the war ended so did publicly funded childcare then along came the nineteen fifties images of the happy housewife that were sold really pro actively sold advertising as this is the right thing and then you also had pop science and kind of junk science telling you about the only way that you can successfully raise a child that the mom is there right. So we've internalized all of these different pieces and we continued get conflicting messages about it where women do feel the sense of responsibility in the sense of guilt over. Not figuring it out in for not being able to do it. All in the early nineteen seventies when women were entering the work force. Congress passed the bill that would have funded childcare across america. Fifty years ago in december president. Nixon vetoed the comprehensive child development. Act and that is the last time we came this close to having a comprehensive childcare and early learning system now the birth rate is the lowest been in forty years and it is not hard to imagine why part of the reason people aren't having kids because they heard the story. They know how hard it is to do. All the things that they need to be able to work and have a family and they're they're not having it but they might reconsider. If childcare wasn't such an obstacle. It's the scaffolding that holds everything else up. It's just that it's been invisible for so long. We need to have a childcare structure. That's what enables there to be productivity. That's what enables people to hold jobs and show up every day for work and when it comes to scaffolding and stimulating the economy julie sees caregiving as an infrastructure investment. You can't build out the important infrastructure we need. You know roads bridges broadband if workers are worried about their families and so the economy is really about making sure that from the time a child is born until the time that you are in your older years or that your aging or l. That there is support for you and to that we need that care system so that women and parents could equally participate in building the roads and bridges and broadband. So i think it's kind of all comes back together. That way has this. Pandemic pushed us to a breaking point where something has to give something has to give doesn't it. We can build a fighter jet and also a submarine but we can't seem to do that and children's issues or social services or human services issues. But i cannot leave on that note. Because i am an optimism. I don't think we're gonna sprints went up. Julie does not think that we'll screw this up. But even as people and corporations are waking up to the importance of the care economy so much depends on every sector including government coming together to create a childcare system that everyone can use. So what's going to happen with this real moment of well one of the things we've learned in this series and over the pandemic there are so many opportunities to do better when we think about. What's next can we imagine a world where well i don't know you don't have to remortgage your entire house to care for your elderly parent pay for childcare. Heck i can imagine a shopping mall. That didn't

rosie america Ben Nixon Congress julie Pandemic Julie
"stanley  " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"stanley " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

"Is not cheap. A year of daycare can cost upwards of eleven thousand dollars per child. It is a huge issue. And i actually go through the county or assistance and it helps out a lie. It goes by your income. If i did not get that assistance through the county. Might kids wouldn't even be able to go to this day care center and then what was sonia. A working single mother do. Many parents are watching at this moment to see what happens with president. Joe biden's proposed one point eight trillion dollar american families plan it would fund education paid family leave and childcare. Now it's still has to go through congress but it calls for a system where low and middle income families with paid no more than seven percent of their income for daycare for kids under five it would also raise wages and provide training for childcare workers now congress is gonna do what congress is gonna do but this announcement signals a huge shift for wealthy country. The us is way behind when it comes to women in the workforce and it is not good for anyone. Here's a number for you. Fifty seven billion dollars. One study found that. That's what the. Us economy is losing every year because of the lack of reliable childcare options. I asked you if she thinks. This is a hopeful moment for mothers especially women of color a deal. I think that you know you have janelle jones as the economist at the department of labor who coined the phrase black women best. Which is this concept that if black women are doing well everyone's gonna be doing better until sonia is just going to have to keep going..

congress sonia Joe biden janelle jones Us department of labor
"stanley  " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"stanley " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

"Sometimes i feel like i can't do it anymore or i'm overwhelmed and i feel like it's just too much. My husband has an essential job so he was outside working all the time. I mean i cannot tell you the number of times that i called him crying and then i get to the point where sometimes i do break down and cry in privacy. You my own room. Because i was like. I don't know if i could do this. This is so insane. Sunny mcdaniel and sierra mall are two of the working moms on our show today. Sorry really loud right now julie. Cashman is an expert on women and the economy and she's the third. Why does it take having women in the legislature to get movement on an issue as important as childcare..

Sunny mcdaniel sierra mall Cashman julie legislature
"stanley  " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"stanley " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

"One of the women turned on her phone and started playing mariachi music. All of the staff came out and lined the driveway and they were singing. She was the queen latina like our psyche. She was the queen of the house here and they pay tribute to her by playing one of her favorite songs as she left. Who was very touched that this is what it looks like. When we value our elders sylvia was able to make the best choice for herself and her mother just like. Irene and iris fu so taguchi made a different but equally good choice in hawaii because well they had good options.

"stanley  " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"stanley " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

"It's not going to work out for everyone for some of us a nursing home. Maybe our final destination over the last year. The prospect became a lot less appealing to a lot of people. So what can we do to make these facilities safer and more invited so i'm really so I lived in new rochelle new york. And i worked as a registered nurse at the hebrew. Hopefully each is one of the biggest nursing homes in new york city and despite the unprecedented challenges in the last year rudy gets into the elevator at work every day and pumps themselves up so that when the doors opened on his floor. He's got his game face on. I'm there were skates ready to go. You know so they give a report letting me know what's going on the floors on quarantine somebody's started. Id glove cultures if they gotta get swabs. So it's like is exciting at the same time on. I'm like pump ready to go. You gotta be. I can't go in there feeling depressed and feeling. Oh my god. How am i going to do this. I go in there with suzy. Everyday day with the best. I can do. Even in the middle of a pandemic even the middle of the pandemic and this pandemic has been pretty brutal for rudy in early spring last year he caught cove it from one of his residents one of the fifty residents in his care at any one time. I just had a face mask on. And when i gave him the medication she spit it. Back out onto my face and i could feel going into my eyes and i was like kind of scared at the time win. Washed it out this route. She died at the hospital couple of days later. I i really don't get sick. I started literally getting like one hundred and three. Fever thousand chills. I was reading for like three days. It was kind of hard for the and agreed to. My mom also got sick. She works in a healthcare field and she was sick for like maybe three months. I was trying to help her out with different things. My uncle contracted it he died. She's i'm sorry for your loss. Yeah so i mean and then my patients also you develop relationships. I had at least at least ten. I can remember that passed away. So i've been working woman twenty four years. It's going to be twenty four years now. I'm maybe we'll look at you. You don't look like you've been working anywhere for twenty years. What can i ask. How old are you yeah. I'm forty forty one next week. So he's seen a lot in those twenty four years and you might think with all he's seen in this past year alone rudy. Wouldn't want his own loved ones in a nursing home. Well think again his mother and his aunts care for his grandmother and he's watched the toll it's taken on them and it's very difficult or what the nursing home. You have a lot of different resources. You have the doctors the nurses during the aids. There you know you have physical therapy. This food. their desire titians. There's a lot of different services that we provide for residents and it takes the burden off the families. You know so i. I don't see a nursing home as a bad thing. I see as community but rudy often struggled especially over the pandemic to give his community of seniors. The care he felt they deserved even pre. Kobe would happen every so often that you'll be having one nurse for fifty patients. I'm telling you during this time right now. Recently last week was three or four days. I was working by myself with fifty patients with four. Cna's and difficult let that sink in. How much can one registered nurse and four certified nursing assistants or cna's do for fifty patients will crying out that we need more staff because we have more hands on deck were able to tackle the heart situation. Here's one thing that could make it easier. This past spring the new york state legislature passed the safe staffing bill. It requires homes to have enough staff to make sure each resident gets at least three and a half hours of one on one care each day plus the state cap the prophets for nursing homes. Which means they'll have to spend a least seventy percents of their revenue on caring for residents and forty percent of that on staffing. It's hoped that these changes will improve the quality of care for residents and working conditions for caregivers like rudy. But these changes won't solve the problems of low wages or shortage of workers. A recent study found that nearly three quarters of homes had difficulty finding enough staff to cover shifts but rudy is more committed than he's ever been there to take care of these people who've been through their lives ready already to like this is like there's sunset they're like you know. I don't think you can just like sometimes abandoned ship. I'm the union delegate. So i'm there for my residents and my coworkers are are you. Are you hopeful. I wouldn't be here. I wasn't hopeful. That's why i'm sticking around. I i don't know maybe i'm too optimistic or too much enthusiasm but that's how i live my whole life anyway. So if you wanna change the sunset years as rudy likes to call them then we have to value the people who care for the elderly. They've been essential to getting through this crisis and while rudy and his union advocated for better conditions for his residence and co workers. There's another revolution happening. The nursing home and caregiver industry is beginning a huge thing of the facilities themselves. Now if you close your eyes and imagine your standard nursing home you probably see something that looks like a hospital floor long hallways rooms with two or more people in them. A nursing station medical carts in wheelchairs. Iv's modern nursing homes resemble hospitals. Because well they grew out of hospitals after world. War two the. Us government shifted funding away from welfare homes for the elderly to facilities that gave medical care to the elderly. Now many of those facilities were built and managed by hospitals and when medicare arrived in the us in nineteen sixty five seniors with low incomes. Got money to pay for long term care homes. Then by the nineteen seventies the number of us nursing homes had more than doubled while there have been efforts to tighten regulations and improve the nursing. Home industry not much has changed in the last fifty years that is until a global pandemic encouraged us. So look around and see if there's a better way of doing things hello sylvia. How're you doing fine. thank you scenario. How are you today. i'm all right. I was Well i i. I have to say i'm sorry for your loss Well thank you very much. Sylvia's mother we bay mendoza died. In february she was ninety one years old and survived. Cancer had dementia and diabetes but sylvia literally beans when she talks about her mother as a young woman. She kind of looked like live taylor instead of the purple. Is she had green. Is she would wear her little gloves. In the early fifties and sixties and as she became older she'll always matching pantsuits. In fact one of the instructions she had for the funeral directors a little rouge a little pink lipstick part my hair to the side.

rudy new rochelle cna new york state legislature suzy new york city Fever new york Kobe aids Us government bay mendoza sylvia medicare Sylvia us dementia
"stanley  " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"stanley " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

"Her mother irene. You fuso ran it for decades. After he died she would get up to thirty in the morning. Go to work. Get the bakery all setup and at seven o'clock she would come home and pick me up and bring me back to the bakery and feed me my favorite pastry which was a butter horn. Fresh couple orange juice which i had every day for at least fifteen years of my life. And that's why. I look the way i look now but she did that. And then after i ate iris's mom blended two fulltime jobs into one single mother and business owner and a tool club. Do it all over again. You don't get a sense at any flower landed.

fuso irene iris
"stanley  " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"stanley " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

"Hello i'm scenario clinton. I've been thinking a lot about this conversation. I listened in on recently. Beat lauren right and her father. Willie right thirty degrees. I'm thirty three. I am getting older. And i'm having to do adult things. Like talk to my father about him getting older and being his. What's it called catty. I'm here power of attorney s and that's that's all you everything. Is you so as to reality of living as it. Were you know we have to be prepared to leave. We have to prepare to die. Listen i know this sounds like a dark way to start a show but let's face it. We're a year plus into a pandemic that has been deadly for elderly folks. We're all thinking about how we ourselves will spend our senior years. And if we're lucky we're having conversations just like this with love humor and a bit of francs. I told you can't die. And i will. This is a weekly conversation for lauren. And willie right. It's a conversation that feels more urgent because of the pandemic right. now willie loves living in cleveland. God bless him where he's a program manager for the national caucus in center on black aging. But he's getting older. He lives alone far from lauren. And he has diabetes. He thinks about his future every single day. I don't wanna be in anybody's nursing hall thing that's just not my. I saw not an option like and you're also not like ninety but eventually that will be ninety god willing and but what does that look like for me. What is what is what is seventy five. What is eighty look like. What does that look like for me. Baby boomers like willie right are redefining. What the golden years can look like or lease. They're trying they're going to live longer. That could also mean. They're living with more health complications. Like dementia the pandemic has forced us to reckon with how we treat in value our elders and the people who care for them. So how can we make that care better if we tackle that. Now what could seventy five eighty or fingers crossed ninety. Look like for willie right for our parents or even for us. He's just like a beacon of light. When you have that program. Like i spent on debbie get through high can finally get her in a place. That has a private room where she does have some dignity and respect. I'm scenario clinton and this is now what's next an original podcast from morgan.

lauren willie Willie clinton cleveland diabetes dementia debbie morgan
"stanley  " Discussed on The Roots of Leadership Podcast

The Roots of Leadership Podcast

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"stanley " Discussed on The Roots of Leadership Podcast

"Welcome to the roots of leadership with anthony grupo. Hello everyone this. Is anthony grupo and welcome. Today's episode on the roots of leadership. I'm here with dan stanley. Dan welcome to the show. On-scene good afternoon. Thank you dan. I'm really glad that you took time from your incredibly busy productive scheduled to be on with us so as as a little bit of background for the listeners. Dan is an expert in the field of human development and performance Former owner of successful fitness company and until recently which will have to come back dan until recently to see you took it away from you was the national champion in his sport of indoor rowing across multiple distances and he's also a retired senior army commando which he'll speak to later around a.

anthony grupo dan stanley Dan field of human development and dan rowing
"stanley  " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"stanley " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

"Where <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> we are <Speech_Music_Female> restaurant <Speech_Music_Female> startup phase. <Speech_Female> We're not able <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to employ a <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> hundred carriers fulltime <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> but <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that's the job of the co <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> op and <SpeakerChange> the worker owners <Music> will party. <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> In addition <Speech_Male> to the food stores united <Speech_Male> co op. jennifer is <Speech_Male> leading gig workers <Speech_Male> united. That's <Speech_Male> toronto union. <Speech_Male> For all at <Speech_Male> base careers <Speech_Male> now. Is that just <Speech_Male> couriers. Unionizing <Speech_Male> in canada <Speech_Male> and the us workers <Speech_Male> have been organizing <Speech_Male> industries previously <Speech_Male> not <Speech_Male> known to be union <Speech_Male> friendly in january <Speech_Male> more than six <Speech_Male> hundred google employees <Speech_Male> in the us <Speech_Male> voted to unionize <Speech_Male> while workers <Speech_Male> at an alabama <Speech_Male> amazon <Speech_Male> plant voted <Speech_Male> against a union. <Speech_Music_Male> In april after <Speech_Male> a protracted <Speech_Male> and very <Speech_Male> expensive campaign <Speech_Male> and a <Speech_Male> recent gallup poll <Speech_Male> shows the <Speech_Male> highest support <Speech_Male> for unions in the <Speech_Male> us in <Speech_Male> almost twenty years <Speech_Male> at <SpeakerChange> sixty <Speech_Female> five percent <Speech_Female> in that we <Speech_Female> we stand at <Speech_Female> a precipice of <Speech_Female> change for <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> labor rights for <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> workers. <Speech_Female> Are we going to maintain <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> the same standards <Speech_Female> that we have or <Speech_Female> improve on them <Speech_Female> or are <Speech_Female> we going to see ourselves. <Speech_Female> Go back to <Speech_Female> you know. Maybe <Speech_Female> what work was like <Speech_Music_Female> in the early nineteen <SpeakerChange> hundreds <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> think of the <Speech_Male> decades though centuries <Speech_Male> that workers pushed <Speech_Male> to shorten work <Speech_Music_Male> hours in the first place <Speech_Male> jennifer sees <Speech_Male> her work as <Speech_Male> an extension of <Speech_Music_Male> that movement. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> I <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> think and i believe <Speech_Female> that

"stanley  " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"stanley " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

"In eighteen. Seventeen manufacturer robert owen proposed breaking the day into three equal parts. Eight hours for work eight hours for play an eight hours for sleep over about one hundred years that idea too cold but slowly finally it was in one thousand nine hundred eighty six after last global pandemic after decades of fighting by labor activists that henry ford was eventually convinced that workers were more productive when they didn't work until the breaking point an eight hour workday allowed him to run three shifts in a manufacturing plant two shifts to make the cars one for maintenance and in one thousand nine hundred forty. Us congress standardized the forty hour. Work week that was essentially the end of the movement to short workout. Back to celeste. Who came to a point when she realized something had to change okay. This isn't sustainable. So i'm gonna quit my day job. And i'm gonna focus just on the writing and occasional journalism and i think i had this idea that a big part of the stress and overwork was because of my job or my boss and it wasn't because when i did that it got worse it got so much worse. Many of us cannot quit our day jobs. But many of us can relate to what made this situation worse for seles. Especially if you wanna fantasize about working from home and then you found yourself doing that during the pandemic only to realize that when you work from home you're not working from home you're living at work. Sound familiar cova. Took the work anywhere anytime. Ethos to a new annoying extreme. It just meant that works started to claim every single corner of lives. People would get tired of working at their dinner table or their desk and they'd get up and take their laptop out on the porch not realizing that what you're really doing is training brain to think. Oh the porch is also a place for doing work. I mean you can see. It's just led to a situation in which ray are never relaxed. Its my my example would be my nephew closing his work laptop and then opening his personal laptop. Yeah that's like a that's not a transition brother. Exactly exactly says we have to remember that technology is just a tool and if it's stressing you out that simply means you're using it rights user error what everybody hates to hear from their. It department right. It's just user error and you just have to fix the way that you're using it. Our brains have simply not evolved to allow us to in a healthy way. Have our hands on a tool. All day long celeste. Points out that our brains can't really distinguish between work and play when it comes to how we use our devices that means that slack. Sedova coup merge into one creating untouchable time away from work away from electronics. That goes a long way to relieving stress when you're doom scrolling for updates or just on instagram keeps you in sort of a heightened state flight or fight for me. I often go on long walks. And i try not to listen to anything or anyone. It's so great so glad that you said this pretty much everybody does or close to everyone can find five ten fifteen minutes and let those minutes untouchable and those are for you and you alone for no intrusions by as you say the news manmade sounds anything else. Let them simply be free from electronics. Just you and the world but time isn't going to solve a hall of our overtime problems for a lot of us working more sustainably which means not burning out means understanding the pressure. We're putting on ourselves. And why something. I kind of know firsthand. It was around my forty six. Th birthday that it was like oh i'm not an underachiever literally lake. You had thought before that that you were yes. My entire life and celeste camera late. Yeah i mean. I i feel you hard because you know. My grandfather was the dean of african american composers. He's like genius with a capital g. My great grandmother was born in slavery and then went on to have her life story. Read into the congressional record. So yeah i also was like i just. I just work a job. The idea that's west is getting to is that. We're not allowed to feel burnt out because our elders didn't have it is good or because we think that the work we're doing just isn't as meaningful or important and you know what honestly it was thinking about my family that helped me you forgive myself and also realize that i was doing it wrong because when i started reading like my grandfather's journals and stuff he did a lot of nothing now by nothing. She means he grew vegetables. He had hobbies. He did things other than work and was still extraordinarily successful. So what's going on with us. Celeste says it all goes back to what she said. At the start our culture makes us feel like we can't stop grind it. This is all working on our subconscious. That when you sit down and watch a movie or check your social media feeds or any of the other things that you do. You should feel guilty. This makes me think about children when my favorite questions to ask kids is what they want to be when they grow up. And you know what's funny. They almost always rhyme off some job. Like pilot dr astronaut. Here's an idea. What about being no happy. We need to really examine our goals because most of us are living by means goals and their means to an end. And we've lost sight of. What is that end. Is it to be happy. Is it to be healthy. Is it to have a loving family. And when i'm talking about how monumental this task is. That's what i'm talking about like this is reorienting your life reorienting. Our lives rethinking. How and when and why. We're working hours we do. Sometimes it takes a personal health crisis to start asking those questions. Sometimes it takes a harrowing national experience like nine eleven sometimes well seems like it takes a pandemic and a strange as it may sound the breaking point so many of us have reached working through this past year. That's exactly where seles finds the hope. I think globally and especially in the united states people are daily coming to that realization. I had in that plane. And they're thinking. Oh god i can't keep doing this. I can't keep doing this. I can't keep doing this. And that means that you either have to give into it. Which i hope nobody does or you have to think. How do i change my daily life so that this doesn't happen again no matter who you are what you do. You've likely asked yourself some version of that question. Over the last year and that personal question has led to a lot of difficult conversations row. Childcare family leave paid sick days and a new focus on mental wellness. All things we've talked about already in this podcast and yet most of us don't have control over our work hours and kansas clock off when we've had enough but as joe maria can attest that doesn't mean big sustainable work life. Changes are possible changes.

robert owen Eight hours eight hours Celeste joe maria forty hour congress instagram one thousand five ten fifteen minutes united states two shifts forty six three equal parts one thousand nine hundred fort last year three shifts about one hundred years past year nine eleven
"stanley  " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"stanley " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

"You have to kind of go in with open eyes and understand the the monumental task ahead of you that you're literally have been brainwashed and you have to be deprogrammed. Celeste headley journalist and author is talking to you and me and she's talking about the forces that keep us all grinding to the point where we feel like if we're not working. We should be ashamed of ourselves. That if we're not productive we're not valuable all right. I've been there. She's been there is good chance. You've been there yourself celeste. Experience led her to write a book called. Do nothing how to break away from overworking overdoing and under living now. Do nothing sounds enticing. Especially for those of us addicted to the grind culture. You know that guilt you feel the need to keep working just a little bit longer thinking that may be it will be better tomorrow. I mean scenario. When was that actually true. When you worked the extra two hours and then the next day was to our shorter ever never know. So why do we keep doing it before. The pandemic are workdays. Were already long and too often. They were getting longer the so-called forty hour work week for many of us was stretching to fifty sixty seventy hours. We were already in such an epidemic of burn out globally that the w. h. o. Had recognized burn out as a an actual health risk in a syndrome for a lot of us. Things just got worse this last year people working from home saw the edges of their workdays gets even blurrier parents trying to fit zoom calls and slack messages around naps virtual school and those sacred hours after bedtime frontline workers powering through their days after nights after days. Then there are those of us who lost jobs and had to turn to the gig economy with this unpredictable. Ncaab hours actually unpredictable. Everything to be honest. This past year has been hard but it has forced us to examine how we work. And why we've been doing it like this for so long. We're going through life. Like people watching a movie with a doritos bag and at some point it just becomes mindless to constantly get another dorito out of the bag and then you get up at the end and you're like oh why do i have a stomach ache on this episode of now. What's next at original podcast from morgan. Stanley we are going to put down the doritos bag. And we're taking stock of the forty hour workweek and turning the people who thought long and hard about making work more sustainable from personal shifts. And when i'm talking about how monumental this task is. That's what i'm talking about like this is reorienting your life cultural shifts. The made the bold announcement to the company. We're going to move to the four day workweek two shifts. That could change the whole economy. How do we use the economy to create for ourselves. Sustainability and ownership and empowerment. I was scenario glutton. Let's go to work. I found myself at some point so over scheduled so over committed and just so unhappy and sick so for me. It didn't start as a book. It was just me trying to figure out what was going on. And how i could solve it celeste. The author of do nothing hit breaking point after a speaking engagements. She just couldn't cancel even though she was very sick. I was just like gripped with fear that i would lose my voice that i would sleep through the gig. 'cause sleep very well when you have bronchitis and so i was just pouring whatever over the counter drugs. I could get into my body. Just try to get through the next day and give that speech. She did it but pushing through actually pushed her over the edge and on the plane ride home. She felt awful. I started thinking. Why like wh why is my life. Why did i set myself up. So that i can't take a sick day and that's when i realized i have to figure out what's going wrong so i started researching. How she got there and she quickly realized she wasn't alone so many of us have crazy. Work lives that are simply unsustainable. It would help if we pause for a moment to get into the.

Stanley forty hour fifty sixty seventy hours tomorrow two hours last year two shifts Celeste four day This past year next day celeste doritos
"stanley  " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"stanley " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

"Now. The group somewhere. Don't wanna frisbee the wobble but we have this to while we have to come party on the yard come on did not go to choir college staff while a new version of the electric slap on electric five. That's dr brenda allen. She's president of lincoln university in chester county. Pennsylvania is a public historically black university. Where all the students in normal times live on campus. Now dr allen taught at yale and smith she started in administration at brown university. She wanted to bring what she learned in. The ivy leagues back to lincoln her alma mater. I'm telling you i loved it here. I loved every bit about it. And again i tell. My students mini the skills. I use today in this job. That i have. I began to hone those skills on this campus. Planning balancing work in school. Listening doctor allen. I can't help but wonder how things might have been different for lassana if she had gone to a black college. What really matters. I think is how a student feels on campus. And i think it's also what they may need both personally and professionally so it historically black colleges one of the things that really important about this environment is that it's a very supportive environment. And i think that's consistent across most hughes now. Let's face it when it's the right fit a college. Campus can be transformative if not downright magical but during the pandemic well. It's been empty and that quiet has given us time to look at what's working. And what isn't i. Want to find out what doctor allen learned from this past year and how she saw the experience of college changing she says skill specific training like what lassana had has its value but for dr allen the real value of college in person not virtual is that it introduces you to ideas and whole possibilities. You could never have considered. I don't think you can take the place of for example. A student just wandering through our student success building seeing a sign the talked about study abroad and just wandering in and the next thing you know. They're spending the summer in ghana or in egypt or in ireland or something like that. The is serendipity sort of things that can happen. I think in a real environment is harder to do that in the virtual world. I mean i really wonder about this because you don't with the move to remote learning in some ways doesn't open up the question. About how much of that serendipitous experience do i need to. I need four years of it. S so again. I think that there are some people who will make the choice. In can thrive in a partial environment. Are you know do some years online. Do some years on campus on people do community calls i and save money. And then transfer and finish their baccalaureate degree at a four year college and for many habit for years on campus can be the most transformative experience that they can have also was a statistician for a while. And i look at this. From the perspective of data and that the online environment is the same but disproportionate. Numbers of african americans have gone to online schools and the graduation rates. The completion rates for them is just not as great. You know what. I can't help thinking about that. I keep thinking about the students and graduates all over america carrying a crushing one point seven trillion with a t dollars in student debt. A number that goes up every single semester and some of those students. Just like with sean. That end up with debt but no degree now. No one felt good about paying full or even discounted tuition for zoom courses over the last year but any signs that a year of remote learning is making colleges rethink the return on investment. They're offering not counting scholarships and financial aid a new student at georgetown. The private university. Where dr graham teaches will pay around seventy five thousand dollars for a year of tuition room and board and a year at lincoln a public university so full cost of attendance. Tuition fees. Room and board is about twenty two thousand dollars so in the scheme of things. We're still pretty affordable but but then you think about it though every night. Twenty two thousand dollars saying deputy. That's a lot of money. Well you know it's really. It's really about the total experience. These are good questions because these are things that people are really grappling with right now. So surely you can probably deliver education much more cost effectively if you do it. Virtually but it's really not the same. And i think as a residential campus. We offer a special experience that really our data shows helps individuals to go on and become very productive citizens so lincoln university for example is number one in pennsylvania for moving students from the lowest socioeconomic level to the highest they graduate and are able to be employed and earn at the highest socioeconomic ladder. That's social mobility mobility transformation belonging employment. There are no easy answers when it comes to evaluating the impact of college or a higher education on the quality of our lives is there. Of course. I should have asked you now that you were hard. You're pushing me. So you know i appreciate that. I think walking away really still committed to my about the importance. But you got me thinking about some other things that i need to consider this as well so i appreciate that growing reconsidering our ideas. These are all things that are supposed to happen in and around college but they happen off campus as well. remember jacob. My friend's son who opted to step away from online college to become an emt. Well he's going back. I think post pandemic life for me is ideally. It's you're finishing school. But i think it comes with all these experiences and understanding that this little bubble that i've existed in that i want to go back to is so small compared to all of the whole world the irony of that is knowing you a bit. I feel like it's leaving school for you to grow up. You're like a grown ass man. Now i think so. I think so and for me there are so many things that college teaches me that i could learn anywhere else but college.

ghana pennsylvania ireland Twenty two thousand dollars egypt america jacob allen today yale and smith seven trillion lincoln university around seventy five thousand d both lassana four year brenda allen about twenty two thousand doll brown university four years
"stanley  " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"stanley " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

"So i i got my hands on a commodore sixty four. That was used in john from one of my mom's family rents and it. It really started getting interested in electric's general and computers specifically and then. That's when i was told about how people go to college for these kinds of things will. Shana grew up in east. Saint louis and her mother had her at fifteen. The shana was the type of kid that in fifth grade. She had already won her first scholarship for years. She knew more about computers than teachers. She got accepted to all the colleges. She applied to and a recruiter convinced her to choose a college in northern michigan. That was well aware that this was supposed to be the gateway for me to not be poor anymore not to be in the projects anymore. College was her ticket out. That's what they told her but when she had trouble with coursework and asked instructors and classmates for help. She kept hearing things like this. Maybe you shouldn't do this major at all and at the time. I didn't know what implicit bias was. So i didn't know that at the time they were saying that because i was black because i was a black female trying to be something that was stereotypically white male. But that's pretty much has classmates lasana. The only black woman in her program was at a loss and she turned to counseling where she was told. This is what discrimination as and. That's what you're going through. And i had to do all of this learning. I'm what seventeen eighteen nineteen years old Away from home for a long time for the first time. And i had to figure all this out and then finally talking to my counselor. And she's like you're out of money. You are stressed out. You're going through discrimination. You need to possibly considered leaving. So i did. How did that moment feel for you. Leaving college Our felt like giving up. I felt like i failed. Lake if you could paint a scarlet f. on the front of my closer on my forehead. That's what like even though you had been in school and one black girl in the computer science program. I mean even after the therapist tells you. Hey look this is what discrimination. You still felt like you had failed and not you know your teachers or desist. Found me yeah. My mom was actually very supportive of because she knew how depressing this would be for me but from within my community was like. Oh you're leaving. you're never going back. You're just going to be a dropout. The spider strong skills and three and a half years of college as well as experienced doing an office internship without a degree. Las shauna kinville get an. It job what she could get a job driving high school students to an after school tutoring program. She somehow managed to turn that into tutoring and then eventually with a lot of work a job at a different college as the it helpdesk manager. And i i kinda got the same spill again. You know you are really good at what you do but unfortunately you don't have a bachelor's degree so you can't move up certain ranks so i said you know what. Let me sit down. Take some courses. The shauna was back at college. This time in saint louis sixteen years after she left six credits short of graduating shanas. Instructors noticed her skills immediately and told her to apply to a new apprenticeship program called launched code. It did not take long before she got noticed. There's this facilitators like winking you start and i'm like start. What susan witkin you start your apprenticeship program to be a systems engineer at mastercard and i was like what are you talking about. Just two months after leshan started as an apprentice at mastercard. They her a fulltime job. Seven years later shawna is now the director of it at give and the ceo of her own consulting firm. Her experience her that traditional college is definitely not the best fit forever. I would be remiss to kind of still send people collar down a path that could end up in financial ruin for some when there are other viable. pass that. I with launch code. I paid zero dollars. And i didn't pay anything apprenticeship actually paid me. I was paid at that time. What fifteen dollars an hour. Which ironically was more than the job that i had left and i was a manager at that job now for her. The apprenticeship program was life changing in more ways than one. Let me wrap up with just the example of one person A woman named lana lewis in twenty fifteen president. Barack obama invited leshan to washington for the launch of tech hire a talent initiative that built on the success of launch coat and as she sat in the audience he suddenly called her by name worzel shauna. She's here today. There's a shot points me out in audience. And i stand up in the whole entire room like ranches and looks at me. I blink out. Because i was just like everything is kind of a slow motion so we got to create more stories. Like la- shops the tech hire initiative was all about pipelines helping people like shannon get pass barriers them out of the tech industry. Now companies like google apple. Npr ibm no longer require all applicants to have degrees especially protect jobs. Kind of going through that whole entire process. The first thing that comes to my head is that people to me. They lied to me about all of these things that they need. And the type of person that i needed to be in order to to get to this level you know and it made me feel sad you know still kind of tear up at this point to say twenty years of just going through all of this and what i knew was actually more than what i needed to know to do. The job that i was doing these days. Shopping sits incredibly important to share her story with kids. And when i tell kids the story. And i tell them. The obama story. I say i get. They're using traditional ways because we need to let people know what our stories are. So i tell them whatever you're doing as long as you've taken the time to think about it and explore options i say to keep going when you think of how much leshan had to push through to keep going. You gotta wonder about all the people who were chess-like her who did who couldn't or who were told not to have to think about. Also how much we all lost and yet the us still lags behind when it comes to earn and learn programs like the one that launched leshan but there is some hope after winning bipartisan support in the house of representatives the national apprenticeship. Act the twenty twenty. One is now working. Its way through the senate. Now if passes that means three and a half billion dollars would go to creating one million new apprenticeship opportunities.

Barack obama Shana lana lewis zero dollars one million twenty years google leshan worzel shauna shawna washington six credits three and a half billion dolla three and a half years northern michigan fifteen susan today shauna Seven years later
"stanley  " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

07:20 min | 1 year ago

"stanley " Discussed on Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

"So i packed one travel sized suitcase and i got on a plane. I was the only person on the plane. And i flew home from chicago and a soon as i landed. Wield my suitcase into my parents house. I realized this is real. This is something bigger than a little break from school. That's jacob sarasin. I'm currently twenty. One years old. And i go to school at arden's to chicago or at least he did when classes. I went online last spring. Jacob and his friends were thinking. Let's just get through this month. We can all handle it and we'll figure it out and the next year it'll be it'll be different but it wasn't a weakened zoom classes in september and he began to weighs options. I thought that i could do something else with my time. That's more valuable. It wasn't worth paying that much money to take classes that i felt were subpar not because of the professors or the students or the content but because of the delivery so the idea of you stopping school in my mind was lake kind of crazy because i think of all the angst and anxiety and i had about you choosing your damn school like you should know jacob's mom is a very good friend of mine and he's kinda like family and you get into the frigate art institute of chicago and now you like this not interesting. I'm going to go do something else. So what did you decide to do. I decided to take a course to become an emt which is a little different from art. School i will say a little different a little different. But i wanna be clear. Jacob left in-person art school because he felt it was too dangerous to be in classrooms during the pandemic then. He decided to become an emergency medical technician. You wanted to learn. It just didn't wanna do it over a computer screen. I'm doing cpr. For the first time. Or i'm trying to help out on a patient that was pulled from a vehicle in emergency room now. Those are lessons that you definitely won't get an art school studio. There's those moments. Where i'm i'm sweating and stressing out but it's never a yearning to go back. It's just a broad understanding of how privileged. I am just expanding landscape of of how i see things. I have to admit it is hard for me not to admire that choice. We all know that college can lead to great things better. Earning potential a longer healthier. Your wife even having healthier children then of course there's learning for the sake of learning the intellectual and spiritual growth. That happens college. It can make us better people and better citizens but when the pandemic pushed college into a long pause it made way for big questions and new insights that could change how we think about higher education for good from how we teach. I acknowledged my own personal vulnerability in ways that i never would have done in class before to the rewards of living on a college campus. Those are life skills negotiating a bathroom and you share it with sixteen other women you know if you can figure that one now you can probably close the biggest deal ever in business to the deeply held beliefs about what it takes to succeed. The first thing that comes to my head is that people lie to me. I'm scenario clinton and on this episode of now. What's next and original podcast from morgan stanley. We're looking to get school on higher education. These are good questions because these are things that people are really grappling with right now. That will take continue being an emt or willie go back to school. Well we'll find out about that later in the show. One thing is certain. Jacob is not going back to zoom classes. I don't blame them. But would you have stayed if he could have gone to an online course. That made him feel something like this. I would be engaged energized. When i imagine international law just imagine like a bunch of happy students. I just think of like having this motivation to learn but also the positive energy. That's like so hard to get across on zoom. That's bushra shake. She's a long way from her home and family and kashmir. She's finishing a very strange senior year at georgetown university in washington. Dc now the course bush was talking about international law is taught by dr elizabeth grim. I've taught it for many years. Many different semesters many different situations. And i thought that he'd been working really well. If i had not had the forcing mechanism of covid to change the class. I would not have changed the class in the way that i did that. The top of course last fall when the long term reality of the pandemic really started to set in. I think all of us at the beginning of march went into it sang artwork. We've got this. We're tackling this and that sort of adrenaline. Very much had evaporated. I think by. August twenty twenty and given rise to frustration and given rise to loneliness now. That's summer instructors. At georgetown got training in online teaching and every training session we received this guidance. Of just a you know students. Attention span on. Zoom is eight minutes long now as she sat through those zoom classes. Dr grim had to think about how her own lectures that clocked about fifty minutes with translate in this new world. I spent the whole summer basically about an hour two hours every day. Reworking the lectures into about ten or fifteen minute videos. Because let's be honest. I mean unless beyond records a fifteen minute video. I'm not going to watch a fifty minute video and so not gonna ask my students to do that either. Writing recording and editing video lectures was an easy at. I would say as we're recording this. I'm looking at my paper. Planners my multiple colored posted notes and colored pens. I mean i'm very much. A child of the eighteen eighties as far as technology is concerned but dr grim realized that teaching online during a pandemic was about much more ben the course material. Georgetown university said jesuit university and so one of the things that that means that at the core of our mission at the core of what it means to be a georgetown. Is this concept called share personal- so that means caring for the whole person. Taking into account their individual stories individual needs i was educated by the jesuits by self and the tradition is that who the graduate is graduating is as important as any skill set and i think in the old world for me what would be important as both the grasping of the details of the law and facts in various key tenants in two weeks and also the ability to critically analyze st precautions. But in this new world. I think for me the emphasis on empathy. The emphasis on humanity.

chicago Jacob jacob jacob sarasin september washington next year twenty frigate art institute two weeks last spring fifty minute first grim August twenty twenty about fifty minutes this month fifteen minute eighteen eighties last fall