19 Burst results for "Stanley Nelson"

"stanley nelson" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

04:15 min | 3 months ago

"stanley nelson" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"In jackie robinson he grew up in new york city and started his career in music recording. He moved into editing for television. Then the filmmakers saint clair born brought him into long form documentaries in addition to working as an editor lewis also taught at. Nyu's tisch school of the arts. Here he is speaking to a class at city college in two thousand nineteen many of the things that were taught to me as an editor were not taught to me by at i taught myself to edit. I did not. I didn't have the benefit of being an apprentice. And sort of coming up behind. Somebody i was kind of. I was kind of handed the kind of handed the stage and they said go and so i learned on the job but much of what i watch much of what i feel like i know about editing. I know from music arrangement. I know from choreography. My my aunt manage to dance company. When i was young and we would sit in the theater and watch this dance company perform and then we would go backstage and she would talk about you know. The the audience gave a standing ovation. What i was saying. Okay your foot was here. It should have been made right to somebody who was in the back of the law so so that kind of attention to detail and making sure that actually everything is right from a distance. I learned that kind of stuff. And that's i take that into the as i've crossed paths with louis over the past fifteen years at new york film screenings and festivals. He was a striking figure with short dreadlocks. An often stylish hat. I'd seen him on the dance floor. Outlasting almost everyone else a year ago in an email exchange. He mentioned that he hit some health speed bumps in his words and he was working on getting better last week. The news of his death triggered an outpouring of memories from his friends and colleagues on social media. I spoke to three people who knew him from different vantage points. Stanley nelson was his friend and collaborator for over thirty years. He's a great great editor But he wasn't even greater a human being and every body treated everybody with kindness and respect. And you know he. He was truly a model for me. You know tom. i'll never live up to that. But least it's something that you know. I can strive for sabrina schmidt gordon. I got to know louis over twenty years ago as his assistant release. Take about your relationship with people who is very singular. I know like meeting songs. Like the tributes. Didn't and i realized i shared with so many people this so many people who talked about him. Shala lynch met lewis when she was a researcher for ken burns years later when she was directing her second film. Free angela and all political prisoners. She brought louis on to edit so he's of this nation of ego and ego less. He's combination of kindness and toughness. He's this combination of greatness. And you know teacher. We'll hear more from each of them. We start with stanley nelson with distinguished career making films on black history many of them in collaboration with his wife. Marcia smith lewis worked on five of those projects over two decades. I asked stanley how they first met. I think i i. I met louis at wnet. I believe he was working at the nightly news show pbs nightly news. Show and I was working on something in the building and You know we just kinda started talking knowing the elevator or something and When i started working for bill moyers in ninety one or so They asked.

Stanley nelson sabrina schmidt gordon stanley stanley nelson jackie robinson last week second film new york city Shala lynch a year ago Marcia smith lewis over thirty years new york three people louis tom two thousand first ninety one each
3 Documentaries You Should Watch About the Tulsa Race Massacre

All Things Considered

02:06 min | 3 months ago

3 Documentaries You Should Watch About the Tulsa Race Massacre

"Marks the 1/100 anniversary of the beginning of the Tulsa Race massacre, one of this country's worst recorded incidents of racial violence. Starting on May 31st 1921 and armed white mob aided by complicity or complacent officials killed as many as 300 men, women and Children in the area known as Black Wall Street. Burning it to the ground. Numerous events are taking place this long weekend to mark the centennial, although disputes rose when particularly high profile event was canceled, reportedly in a disagreement over compensation for three elderly survivors who were supposed to take part. But other events are proceeding and there are lots of opportunities to learn more about this traumatic but consequential moment, including numerous TV projects. NPR TV critic Eric Deggans has picked three documentaries, which he says you should not miss. For a long time. The Tosa race massacre was the attack America forgot and obliterated Tulsa, Oklahoma's prosperous black own Greenwood district, also known as Black Wall Street. The riots by white moms was hushed up by local officials and overlooked in history books. But that is changing as several TV outlets mark the centennial with documentaries on the massacre and its aftermath. It's an effort educate Americans on a horrendous attack, which burned down over 1200 homes and killed between 103 100 people. Among the best and most cinematic of these efforts is the history Channel film Tulsa Burning the 1921 Race Massacre Co directed by Emmy winner Stanley Nelson and executive produced by MBA star Russell Westbrook. This film opens with Reverend Robert Turner, pastor of Historic Burn in a M E Church who regularly visits Tulsa City Hall with a Bible in a bullhorn, reminding residents of the atrocity You are standing in a crime scene referred Turner Pastors. The church where black people hit in a basement tow avoid white moms 100 years ago. He now supports efforts to excavate a local cemetery where victims of the massacre rumored to have been dumped in unmarked graves in passing the

Tulsa Eric Deggans Greenwood District NPR Stanley Nelson Reverend Robert Turner Oklahoma Tulsa City Hall America Russell Westbrook Emmy MBA Turner
"stanley nelson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:21 min | 8 months ago

"stanley nelson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So one could understand why, by Biden is just trying to more start may be nearer one of the political polls. And then started negotiation from there. I know you got to go in a minute. Cash it for you as a Midwest correspondent for politico these last few years. And the Midwest Swing states being so key to Biden selection. Is he doing anything early on, and I realize it is only day three. But that zoo reinforcement of them whether that means white, working class people who didn't vote for him or white, suburban or black and brown voters who did. I think the number one issue right now for everyone is Cove it. They want to go back to schools. They want to go back to restaurants. They want to go back to normal life, and they if he is conveying, which I think it is a smart move. Some forward movement. You know some plan? Here's a plan. You know, this is what I'm gonna do. We had no plan and vaccinations as we're learning under Trump. I think those things are very pertinent to people in the Midwest, Illinois, Wisconsin with every state, but Wisconsin's numbers have been going through the roof. And I'm talking for months. They've been through the truth and so to the extent that there's someone out there, saying there's hope down the line, and that's what he's saying. I mean, 100 million vaccinations. That sounds Very hopeful to people and, um s Oh, yes. I think those things speak to Midwesterners. Um, who just want to get back to normal life? Um, you know, as they know, And of course, you know, there's there's harsh winters and in the Midwest, um, you know, I'm in D. C right now you can walk around outside. It's a lot more difficult to even go for a walk right now. Um, it's cold, So it's you know, people are antsy and they want they want to have some hope and some, you know a path forward and I think that's what he's trying to provide. Now. By the way. One linguistic comment from a listener on Twitter. You could tell your White House correspondent colleague Mike Sheehan at the Times. This says, I think you meant by an extending an olive branch to Republicans, not a fig leaf. Although they would probably would prefer the latter likes this listener, But the reporter did say FIG leaf in the question. I'm pretty sure so. There you go. Natasha. Correct correctly newly minted White House correspondent for Politico. Thank you so much for coming on with us on day three. Let's do this again. Okay. Thanks so much. That'll take some calls and coming off that interview. I'd like to invite three great groups of you in particular. One is anyone in that position We talked about where you don't want to go back to your old job because of coronavirus exposures that the job involves. 646435 70 to 80. Biden wants to let some of you in that position. Collect unemployment, which is not the case Now. Does anyone listening? Have a story to tell to humanize and personalize? That issue anyone declining to return to work or who would prefer to decline but can't afford it because of covert exposures that the job entails. But you can't get unemployment insurance while you look for a different kind of job. President Biden seems toe Be open to your story, and we invite you to call and tell it at 646435 70 to 86 46435 70 to 80. Also, Biden is reversing some of Trump's executive action immigration policies. Is anyone listening now, who's personally affected by one of those may be ending the Muslim dance or technically travel bands from certain countries with majority Muslim populations, But we know what they were. It's hard to get into the country without a covert test from anywhere right now, but not based on your religion. So does lifting the Muslim bands affect you or a loved one. Call in with your story. About that 646435 70 to 80. Let's document change as it's happening, and one more. Biden is trying to get faster action for people who qualify for the stimulus checks. It never got them in the mail. People with no direct deposit and for various bureaucratic reasons. Never received a paper check for stem Juan or stem to, So if that includes you, we invite you to call in and tell your story. How come you didn't get your stimulus checks? You qualified for under the rules. And what do you think it'll take to get it to you now? So in any of those three groups wanting to leave your job because of its covert risks. Getting some personal relief from reversing the Muslim bands and other trump immigration policies. Or if your stimulus checks that you qualify for having come in all these months, 646435 70 to 80 and we'll take your calls right after this. On the next all of it. The new documentary crack cocaine, Corruption and Conspiracy examines the factors that created the crisis of the 19 eighties from police corruption to the Iran Contra deal. Rector Stanley Nelson joins us plus writer Nadia Allusive, winner of the Whiting Award in nonfiction, joins us to discuss her memoir titled Aftershocks. I'm Alison Stewart joined me.

President Biden Um White House correspondent politico Midwest Trump Alison Stewart Twitter Wisconsin crack cocaine reporter Nadia Allusive Iran Whiting Award Illinois Stanley Nelson Mike Sheehan
"stanley nelson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"stanley nelson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of burning which is on the cover of yesterday's New York times book review and is slated to be number three on The New York Times hardcover bestseller list next week so that's the only way to let's get started on Friday night president trump announced he would delay a campaign rally that had been scheduled in Tulsa Oklahoma for this Friday June nineteenth which is Juneteenth the commemoration of the end of slavery in the United States the trump rally will now be held on Saturday but it will still be in the Tulsa a city that witnessed one of the deadliest events of racial violence in U. S. history ninety nine years ago this month and will be held in there in the midst of a nationwide uprising a protest against anti put black police brutality so with the president and his team unaware of the history of the Tulsa race massacre when white looters and rioters destroyed thirty five blocks of the fluid black neighborhood known as black Wall Street that left a hundred injured thirty six dad to understand this moment we need to know what came before and there are few people who know that better than my next guest in two thousand sixteen filmmaker Stanley Nelson received a Peabody Award for quote his pursuit of social justice his continuing commitment to documenting the civil rights movement and the soaring talent as a documentarian filmmaker his award winning docs include the murder of Emmett till freedom riders and the black Panthers vanguard of the revolution which won the two thousand sixteen and double ACP image award for outstanding documentary film and which will be streaming free F. R. E. E. on PBS dot org through July fourth alongside new and existing PBS programming focused on race in America the doc tell the origins of the black Panthers its impact take some misconceptions and eliminate its goals including its goals for the black community here is a clip about the black Panthers free breakfast program for school kids the first where you're going to hear is Black Panther defeat them year studies came out saying that children I didn't have a good breakfast in the morning were less.

murder ACP U. S. New York times black Panthers America F. R. E. E. Emmett trump Peabody Award Stanley Nelson president Tulsa United States Oklahoma
"stanley nelson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"stanley nelson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You know in the casual you know he's a burger and and and and the woman okay I'm not gonna call my dog on you I you know I'm going to call the police and on the black man is doing something to me and that kind of casual racism that that that kind of white supremacy that says you know yeah this is my country the leader of my log in and you know I can do what you want so I think that that is really important that we that we don't you know in a week or so go back to the to do business as normal and that we keep our eyes open two what's the reality of how many people live in this country what advice might you give to a to white filmmakers at this moment what could they do they can help black filmmakers and filmmakers of color make films you know definitely will be dedicated to that file letting people tell their own story you know I I I personally interested in seeing you know a white filmmakers view of of what's happening to black people you know and and and that that's also part of white supremacists you know as a white filmmaker you could walk into the the people with the power and and and the money and you're likely to get that contract to make a film but there's there's filmmakers of color out there struggling who can really talk about that story and really go deep into I think why people have to understand that No Way filmmakers and that they are not a blank slate if there is a there's something called quite Nathan is very there's lots of books and lots of studies on whiteness in info you are approaching things from from a white point of view and your if you go into a black community you're kind of surfing on the top of of this water anywhere within a filmmaker of color from that community can can dive deeply understand the cultural reference and understand the issues in a in a very very different way anyway filmmakers can help that that those things happen you know if they're if they insist on making those films and then work with somebody of color and work with them when they have an equal voice that you don't you don't put somebody on on the on the phone to at the window to documentary filmmaker Stanley Nelson his work includes the murder of Emmett till freedom writers freedom summer and his latest film Vic thank you so much thank.

Nathan Stanley Nelson murder Emmett Vic
"stanley nelson" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"stanley nelson" Discussed on Amanpour

"The great man or woman of history. Now, the film that's coming out soon, which I just loved what I got to see of it is on miles Davis. And that seems a bit of a departure. I mean, you're doing somebody who is an artist and it just wakes up every morning with his music. In fact, let's do it clip about the importance of music to him. Music has always been like a curse with me. I've always felt driven to play it. It's the first thing in my life. Go to bed thinking about it and wake up thinking about it. It's always there. It comes before everything. Yeah. I mean, that's a just a beautiful clip. I mean, I think for me, I'm I'm a real music lover. I listen to music from the time. I go to bed that time. I wake up go to bed. It's just something that I've always wanted to do a pure music film, and you know, who who's better than miles because one miles is music is so great and so important, and I believe will last forever, but two miles a really complicated individual, you know, he's really complicated. And and and it makes it makes for a much richer film. He was complicated to in his feelings about race. Right. 'cause he gets beaten up by white deputy here in New York City. And it's sorta scars them for the rest of his life. There's an anger there that in his music sometime. Yeah. I mean, I think that that again, you know, miles of this so many facets two miles to to understand and try to unpack. And I always say that I think before you try to unpack any anybody or anything you have to. As I say that, you know, different people react to different stimuli in different ways. So you might have lived or I might have lived the same thing and reacted differently. But miles grew up. His father was a dentist and miles grew up in east Saint Louis, and they were for this standard for African African-Americans time, they were rich. Okay. They had a farm outside of the city miles had a horse. You know that you ride. I mean, you know, miles grew up rich, but he also grew up black in segregated America. You know, an e Saint Louis, so we had all that to pack on top of it also miles was very very dark skinned and miles was beautiful. You know, so we had that going on. Let let us show us up about the black death. So this is an amazing part of the movie yet think the darkness mouse, Davis's skin instead of seeing that as a liability he saw that as an asset. It was very different from anything that was projected on television or in movies at that time Maoz turn that into something. Cool something desirable. Cool, and that's what invite the birth of cool call this because that's what he does with his music is birth of cool miles of miles was making the film where like okay, so miles is just the coolest guy that ever lived. He just is you know, I mean. Somebody says in the film, you know, miles head the cars fast cars, the snappy close the miles head is closed..

miles Davis east Saint Louis Maoz e Saint Louis New York City America
"stanley nelson" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"stanley nelson" Discussed on Amanpour

"I think there were so many, you know, I mean at first and for a long time as we show in the film, African Americans really only soul to African Americans. You know, you could have a store that sold the black folks. But what people really sometimes I don't understand is that in most of this country, if you were even a black grocer. It was very hard to have a black grocery store that whites would frequent. So basically for a lot of the history of the United States after the civil war. Black people were having businesses that sold to black people. And so you know that in some ways limiting. Can't borrow capital. You could not go to a Bank and borrow money. That was somehow in some ways alleviated one black people started having their own banks. But you know, you you. And so many places you can even walk into a Bank. But if you could you couldn't get alone one of the obstacles seems to be the big corporations. You have a wonderful sequence of Arcelor Barnes who moved from being the executive suspense to the CEO Xerox to being the CEO or self. But she's a very unusual case. Why is it that it's hard for African Americans become the boss why there's this ceiling above you? And and it's not a glass ceiling. It's it's a real ceiling one of the things that are. So the says in the section we have on our slow is she says it was hard for me. Because what this what business looks at as excellence our white bid. That's what they that's what he says. That's what it looks like that's what it sounds like, you know, that's the model, and it's very hard for a black person apply, and especially for a black woman to fit into that model. How do you how do you fit it? If that's your standard of excellence. How would how do you break in people do it? But you have. Extraordinary one of the entrepreneurs you've done a documentary on before. And then as part of this one is Madame CJ Walker. Tell me about who she was and how she created a business. Yeah. So Madame CJ Walker was a woman who, you know, pretty much started out with nothing in the south. She started working for a woman named Annie Malone had a company called Perot products, a black beauty company in Chicago out of Chicago. And Madame Walker's said to self, you know, I could do this, and I could do it better. And so Madam Walker moved Indianapolis started her own company and just raised it from nothing until she had a whole series. I think it was one thousand nine hundred twenty different products that that that she had an and again is kind of in the Guinness Book of records as the first woman to start with nothing and earn a million dollars all of your documentaries almost deal with race from different angles. How does the arc of your career? How do you? You put those together deci. Here's the story. I'm trying to tell I feel that people should tell their own stories that stories are richer and deeper and more meaningful and more heartfelt. If they're told by the people who live them. So I try to tell stories that I live, you know, that I think are important, but I also think in very general terms, I'm really interested in an institutions, and and movements and things that are bigger than just, you know, the great man or woman of history. Now, the film that's coming out soon, which I just loved what I got to see of it is on miles Davis..

Madame CJ Walker Annie Malone Chicago United States Arcelor Barnes Davis Indianapolis CEO Xerox CEO Perot products executive million dollars
"stanley nelson" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"stanley nelson" Discussed on Amanpour

"When the smoke cleared in the early morning of June first, nineteen twenty one black Wall Street lay in ruins. This is by far the largest single incident racial violence in all of American history. I think one of the most amazing things about that clip is the footage. You know, is that we're able to tell the story because of this newly discovered footage of Greenwood, and you actually see the the people in their homes, and and the right before what we saw is. You see them kind of building the town. You see them planting their gardens, you see black people on horseback hurting cattle 'cause they're in Oklahoma and all of those things, and then you see the destruction of of that. And it's just it's very moving to me, you know, partly because you can really see it you can visualize. What the town was one of the things I learned was that the first wheel businesses, which sort of services, whether it'd be barbershops, beauty and other things how did that help pave the way for building of wealth? One of the things that happened in the south was after the time of enslavement has African Americans became free many times they at black people took up. The jobs that they kind of already were doing. So, you know, if I was a barber, you know, if I would that you know, that was one of my duties, and I became a at my own barbershop. If I worked in the field, then I became a farmer. So a lot of those things led to the first businesses that African Americans had and lead to a certain amount of economic freedom. What were the obstacles though to we'll wealth accumulation?.

Greenwood Oklahoma
"stanley nelson" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"stanley nelson" Discussed on Amanpour

"Is production company, Firelight media and his upcoming film on jazz musician miles Davis, which is set released this summer. Stanley nelson. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me. I was blown away by watching boss, and we've all known the problem that African Americans have had since the civil war in doing wealth creation. But what you show is how systematically the problem of wealth creation was even starting right after the war with the forty acres on the mule not being fulfilled. Promise. Tell me why you got onto that. And what you were trying to show. Well, I mean, I think the story of African American businesses is just such a poignant one, and that it's a story that we don't know and the resiliency of African Americans in fighting through that and starting banks and hair care companies and insurance companies and in the tech industry now. And I thought it was I mean, I thought if I didn't make the film who's gonna make it. And that it's not something that people like, oh, yeah. That's a great idea for a film. But that it could be made as a film and. And that's what we tried to do. And it seems a break a lot of stereotypes that also disrupt sort of this theme of America that we all have equal opportunity. Yeah. I mean, I think it's very clear that that so many times, and there's so many different stories in the film. Where African Americans start businesses or towns, even and they destroyed systematically. But I think that that's, you know, just to be clear that's not the focus of the film. The focus really is on the starting of the business and then making the business succeed. You talked about towns being destroyed because freed slaves and African Americans went out west to places like Oklahoma and started their own self contained enclaves. We have a clip here at part of Tulsa called Greenwood, and is one of my favorite parts of the movie less show. Thirtieth nineteen twenty one the mob came to Greenwood..

Stanley nelson Firelight media Greenwood Davis Oklahoma Tulsa America forty acres
"stanley nelson" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"stanley nelson" Discussed on Amanpour

"Especially at this particular moment, we have seen how Saudi Arabia and the Saudi regime itself got away with murdering a journalist in the consulate in Istanbul on the second of October. And Mr. Trump at the time said, maybe they did it maybe they didn't. And even when he was confronted with the report of his own intelligence services. Here refused to take any. Notice. So at the moment, those who are calling for human writer coating for open trials open representation, and lawyers to defend those people who in an independent court are really having no support from governments in the west in the west what they are getting is quite a lot of media coverage and also support from the international global human rights organization, such as Human Rights, Watch Amnesty International and from the UN, of course, energy amnesty has talked about sham trials that violated international federal standards, which relied on confessions extracted through torture. We'll talk about that in a moment. And you mentioned the UN the head of the UN human rights commission. Michelle Basch lead is particularly important that at least three of those killed were minors at the time of sentencing. What do you think is going on? What do you think is the real reason some people say it's because they had links to. Iran. Obviously, there's a war of words at least between Iran and Saudi Arabia. Well, it is a message to Iran. But I think they're real victims are the community in Saudi Arabia, and that is the shack community of the eastern province, which is a minority minority in Saudi Arabia, and it had been at the forefront of protests in a very very peaceful way and the Saudis did this kind of execution in two thousand sixteen when they executed an important Shiite cleric by the name of number. Never. And what happened was that? Iran. Condemned the execution of the Shiite cleric, and then at immediately after that the Saudi embassy in Tehran was attacked and then there's relationship deteriorated. So the Iranians didn't stop the mobs attacking the Saudi embassy. But I think the execution are actually a domestic matter. Although the message might get to Iran domestically hammered man is ruling by. I fear on by repression, and this kind of mass executions which amount to a massacre at thirty seven people in one day. It's quite a lot and also lumping together different people different categories of people. One of the executed was shot. Religious caller who has invited to the national dialogue forum established under the road of king. Abdullah to talk about some Nishii relations quite a lot of the executed. We have evidence we have YouTube clips saying those people are giving lectures or mobilizing others. And I did not see any kind of sectarian tone in their speeches that they were given after two thousand eleven some of those people are very very young when they were arrested. They were only like under the age of sixteen and they were peaceful demonstrators who got really carried away with the uprising of two thousand but. They were arrested at the time. And then we are in two thousand nine hundred nine when they were execute briefly. All you surprised that we hearing. And this is what our Damon's report was that significant numbers of of these who executed told the court that they didn't mean what they said that it was only extracted under torture, and they were told what to right? Yes. Absolutely. I'm in torture and Saudi prison is concerned is confirmed by one woman activist illusion and hood lewd who told her family during their monthly visit that she was tortured that she was sexually abused physically. Abused? And she didn't want to talk about this issues early on Feerick that that might make her situation worse in prison. But at the end, she had lost hope and told her family her brother and Canada when did and her sister and brussel they were both talking to the media about the exact detail of horrific sexual. Abuse and torture in Saudi..

Saudi Arabia Iran Saudi embassy UN Mr. Trump Istanbul Amnesty International YouTube Michelle Basch Tehran writer Feerick Abdullah brussel Damon Canada one day
"stanley nelson" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"stanley nelson" Discussed on Amanpour

"February twelfth subscribed today at apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. Now, as these confrontations continue it is not the only area where the Trump administration. I'm congress clash Saudi Arabia is another major flashpoint while President Trump has been keen on building the relationship with the Saudi Kim gun. Come. What may the legislative branch is denouncing the nation for its role in Yemen's four year war, and of course, for the murder and dismemberment of journalists Jamal kashogi inside the Saudi consulate inter key last October less than two weeks ago. Saudi Arabia executed thirty seven men quote terrorism. But court documents revealed that defendants told the judge they were tortured into confessions are Damon has an exclusive interview with a Saudi lawyer who defended some of those men he told her that he started receiving messages trying to make him come home just like Jamal kashogi received messages. His report. Seventeen and arrested for protesting. Oh, sleep-deprived tortured and coerced into confessing something I didn't do an interrogator threatened this six year old if you don't validate your confession. I will kill you father and your mother and this young man also claiming he was abused. In custody. Conversion was written by the entire gator. I signed it only after torture and threats. These are statements made an ace Saudi court by some of the thirty seven whose death sentences were carried out in the second largest mass execution and the kingdom's recent history. Taha and has haunted by their stories. He was a lawyer in his former homeland of Saudi Arabia where he briefly represented some of those executed in April on what he calls trumped up and bogus spying and terrorism charges the day of their execution. The Saudi government said Justice had been served, but hundreds and hundreds of pages of documents exclusively obtained by CNN lay. Bare another narrative. The how to court documents are proof of torture and injustice, and they still have the audacity to say, they are merciful, and humane. The defendants say that they confessed because they were being tortured that should have been investigated under Saudi law alma who'll Covey at the judge is supposed to take this seriously to ask the interrogators for an answer to these allegations. But what happens in most of these cases that the judge ignores it Saudi Arabia has denied accusations of torture in the past and the Saudi government has not responded to CNN's numerous queries about the allegations of confession under torture. As stated in the court documents among the crimes are accused of committing demonstrate violence spine, organizing demonstrations, filming misleading videos and communicating with soaring media. Toss suspects that the government might help. Also accused him a false crimes while still in Saudi he received a call asking him to appear Eddie police station. He fled the same day..

Saudi Arabia Saudi government Saudi consulate Taha Jamal kashogi CNN President Trump apple Yemen Damon Covey murder Justice four year two weeks six year
"stanley nelson" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"stanley nelson" Discussed on Amanpour

"I'm does he have a point in a as a constitutional matter. What is the constitutional significance of Mullah, for instance, being called to testify? Well, Christiane I think this is an important point. First of all Trump is making a ridiculous argument in many ways, the notion that it's a redo to have Muller testify and tell the public about this two year investigation that the public paid for, you know, of course, that's not a redo. That's how the system is supposed to work. It's it's literally an absurd argument, and that goes to your broader point, Trump would love nothing more for the American public just to see him as some sort of a truth teller, who's telling uncomfortable facts to the snooty elite and just challenging political correctness, but you know, the legal theories and the view of the presidency itself that he and his advisors are advancing is a direct contravention of the system of government that that the founders envisioned, and it's not just, you know, telling uncomfortable truths to have the attorney general of the United States testify under oath as he did last week in the United States, Senate and. William bar said it was a breathtaking moment he said, the president of the United States in his view has so much power that he can shut down any investigation of himself. If he believes it to be unfair. That is the most sweeping assertion of executive power. That Americans have heard since Richard Nixon said to David Frost that actually it's not illegal. If the president does it, and I don't think that's just being politically, correct. Or politically incorrect as the case, maybe that's just a shocking statement to that point of former congressional council tells the Wall Street Journal, quote, the entire system of checks and balances depends on congress constantly looking at how the country is being goven. He was a former general counsel who says that. So clearly that is the foundation of what makes the United States this bastion of democracy rule of law and all the other values at the United States stands for. And I wanna put it that way. Because no you. In poland. You're in Warsaw at the heart of what is a very close US ally. Fort, the certainly suddenly the non-communist polls Ford joining the war on the allied side. They've had concentration camps in their own country. You've just witnessed commemoration of some of that. And you've seen you're seeing what they're doing in terms of trampling the rule of law. Just explain what Poland is doing. And what kind of I suppose contagious effect that can have in our democracies? You know, what we're seeing in Poland as we have seen across Europe, not just central and eastern Europe. But now in western Europe in Italy with the rise of power on the right in Spain in so many countries, and we're seeing it here. Obviously tangibly now is a move away from democracy back towards autocracy and in some countries. It's moving more rapidly than others. There's a challenge to fundamental authorities and to the democratic norms and Trump has accelerated that when we see other strong, boop figures like Erta, Juan and duty using the term enemy of the people to jail their own press. We're seeing this play out in a lot of places it's not just the United States and many of the forces that brought us to where we are in the United States, preceded Trump, and he's just. Accelerated them. But once you've lost some of that sense of how democracy is supposed to work, and how checks and balances are supposed to work. It's not easy to get them back and one of the things about Trump is he knows as he said himself two years ago, I could shoot somebody in broad daylight on Fifth Avenue, and I wouldn't lose a single vote forty percent or so of Americans are with him. No matter what they don't care that. He's shattering the norms a substantial number of them would be perfectly happy with the dictatorship. And that makes it much more difficult, and it makes it particularly difficult because his own party is acting in the phrase of Lindsey Graham, who's been as big a perpetrator as anybody for party over country. That's a dangerous thing..

United States Trump poland general counsel president Christiane Wall Street Journal Europe Lindsey Graham Warsaw Ford Muller Richard Nixon Senate executive eastern Europe William bar
"stanley nelson" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"stanley nelson" Discussed on Amanpour

"We don't wanna be so right now, it's all about oversight. Throw a lot of it is about oversight and trying to hold the administration the president accountable. So to that end congressman Jerry Nadler was saying that if we cannot. Get request met, for instance, with attorney general William Bob that really does affect the way the American democracy is able to remain healthy and transparent for the people. But he also injected a bit of a fear for the future. I'm just going to play this little bit of what he said last week. This is a grave danger from Eric in democracy. And we must do all we can in the name of the American people to ensure. That when the Trump administration ends we have as robust a democracy to hand to our children, which was handed to us. So I it's very interesting the way he puts it and to both of you. And I'll ask you for Susan. He also said in a different part of that address to the press that you know, what's going on is a little bit the difference between democracy and dictatorship democracy. Requires the consistent checks and balances of the institutions and transparency and accountability. What what do you make Susan of what he said? And the way he threw the gauntlet down there. I mean is that is that over egging it, or is it that dramatic do you think? Well, he has used fairly apocalyptic language. The other day an antigen that nothing less than the future of democracy is at stake in whether or not attorney general bar complies with this subpoena for the unredacted Mullah report and the underlying evidence, you know, it's an interesting debate. You said earlier in the program is this the constitutional crisis. What's amazing about the Trump presidency is at almost every? Single day since he was inaugurated people have been asking themselves one way or the other is is it is this the crisis. Is this the moment and to me that's number one that actually President Trump himself is the crisis, right, and it takes many different forms number to the issue of the role of congress and the role of the courts is really come into focus in a way that it hasn't in any other presidency of my adult lifetime, certainly is it a crisis for congress to move forward with investigating the president or for the courts to enact decisions against the executive branch. Arguably not arguably that's exactly how our system of government is supposed to work. Right. Those checks and balances that you referred to on the other hand for Trump to pursue again. And again, a strategy of confrontation with other branches of government in hopes of testing their limit and their boundaries. I think that's what chairman Jerry Nadler is referencing here that have cars doesn't act. That's when you might. Have a crisis..

Eric Jerry Nadler president Trump William Bob Susan attorney congressman congress chairman executive
"stanley nelson" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"stanley nelson" Discussed on Amanpour

"I think a fairly accurate reading of the situation here in Washington. But as is typical with President Trump he is going to the. Ends degree with this strategy. And that's where I think is right to say it's something different than we've experienced in the past. Previous president didn't wanna dial up the confrontation with congress. They often wanted to dial it down. And it seems that President Trump is almost daring the house of representatives to go farther, perhaps even daring them to him beach him and see that there's potential political benefit for himself in a l'armee his Republican base in advance of the twenty twenty presidential election. But it really what it means is that we're headed down a course of confrontation because these are co equal branches of government under our constitution. And so that leaves potentially the courts to referee this fight, which is always a risky situation. So you've just you've just brought in the courts, which is obviously the other branch of the American government gnome, you know, it's really fascinating to hear what Susan just said. And what you've. Said what would a constitutional crisis, and I ask because many people say and particularly people around the world, and obviously people in the United States as well that the health of the American institutions is robust, and that no matter what happens no matter whether a president challenges the more than another one the institutions still remain, and they can still carry out their constitutional requirements that constitutional duties. So we have seen some heartening things over the course of the last two years, we have had some independence on the part of the judiciary. When it came to for example, they travel bans that the president instituted. We've seen a few instances where courts have stepped up. But one thing that I've learned from my visit this time in Europe is something that I knew before, but it's been reinforced no society is immune from a slide towards autocracy, a direct challenge to the fundamentals of this system won't necessarily hold, and we have seen our judges become tribalize d- and a partisan is along the same lines that we've seen in congress, and in our politics more generally, and it wouldn't be surprising with the degree to which Trump has been able to stack the courts. He's now picked about a sixth of all the appeals court judges in the country. There is a clear Republican majority on the supreme court. That they might uphold the level of executive power that would pretty much make congress and impotent body. Now, that's not to say that it would hold for a long time. It wouldn't surprise me. If there were a democratic president down the road with a Republican congress that they would say never mind just as we saw with Bush v gore, which was a one time thing, but this is dangerous territory and a president and a broad set of institutions stonewalling like this. And as Susan said, not just on the Muller report. A an attorney general who who's only parallel would be John Mitchell during the Nixon administration, but many more cabinet officers who are in the same category. This is really a place..

President Trump president congress Susan Washington United States Nixon administration supreme court Muller Europe John Mitchell attorney executive Bush gore two years
"stanley nelson" Discussed on WBAI

WBAI

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"stanley nelson" Discussed on WBAI

"Now, here's another film that is part of this black world history series that you can definitely check out. And if you pledge forty dollars. You can definitely. Check out this film. And this film is called boss. Excuse me, boss. The black experience in business, and this is directed by Stanley Nelson. The little known story of African American entrepreneurship from post enslavement and reconstruction to the present where skill industrial industriousness, ingenuity and share courage in the face of overwhelming odds provide one of the backbones of this nation's economic and social growth directed by Peabody and award an EMMY award winning filmmaker Stanley Nelson. Who also did the film tell them. We are rising the story of historically black colleges as well as the Black Panthers. Not Black Panthers. The Black Panthers van guard of the revolution and freedom summer, which all excellent films, boss. The black experience in business shines a light. On the story of resilience and resistance within the black community within the black American experience in the face of overwhelming odds, including racial hostility and violence, economic exclusion. Segregation and discrimination. And I actually have a let's see where is it? Do. I have. Oh, I thought I had thought I had a preview of thought I had a. Darn it. I thought I had a. I thought I had a. Let me just check to make sure I thought I had a. A trailer of that. And apparently, I don't, but that sucks, but anyway, boss, the black experience in business is a film that is being featured. And it's an east coast premiere. Okay. And that's directed by Stanley Nelson. And this is one of the films that are.

Black Panthers Stanley Nelson EMMY award Peabody forty dollars
"stanley nelson" Discussed on This American Life

This American Life

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"stanley nelson" Discussed on This American Life

"And so you know as these kids were like in the story a little bit rambunctious but you start taking their orders going to come to realize that it's like you made a huge assumption not every drinks frappuccino somebody's ordering a hot chocolate somebody's getting carmo makihata somebody likes passion tea with like ten pumps classic like this i guess that's an example of beverage bias or maybe frappuccino shaming there were also videos about baristas assuming patrons were homeless one was about gender identity one was about a barista who suspected that a group of black kids was plotting to steal the tip jar one was about a guy with an accent so thick that the barista couldn't spell his name on his cup i'm just gonna call you bob and i wrote bob on the cup he had other parts were surprisingly ambitious and more provocative like a video by stanley nelson the documentary filmmaker which argued that african americans have been systematically excluded from public spaces his film included violent footage from the civil rights era changing the law doesn't always change reality and it also included footage of a police officer choking a young black man in a prom tux that's from just last month it happened outside a waffle house in north carolina we just need to recognize that black people are navigating the public space differently than white people everyone room seemed pretty affected by a couple of people even had tears in their eyes.

bob officer north carolina stanley nelson
Starbucks closes 8,000 stores for anti-bias training

Frank Beckmann

02:09 min | 3 years ago

Starbucks closes 8,000 stores for anti-bias training

"The flowing lava on hawaii the big island the rolette endless eruption about killer whale continues to take its toll he gamble and maybe they didn't win steve gebbie is one of an estimated two thousand people who had to evacuate of the twenty four fishers that have opened up since the eruption began on may third several are still spewing and using lava changing the landscape forever more than twenty four hundred acres have been consumed by the two thousand degree liquid rock so far as also destroyed dozens of homes and there's still no end in sight that's correspondent jim rupe four people shot and wounded on detroit's greektown pre are in critical condition before victims males in their twenties police say they got into a fight and then the shooting occurred the second shooting in greek town in the last three days a seventeen year old was stabbed and robbed in bloomfield township on ward road this victim was riding a bike last evening northbound on ward police say that he was about to ride past the robber who stepped in front of the bike demanded the victims bike wallet and backpack at knife point and then stabbed the victim in the abdomen and threatened to kill him the stabber is described as a black male in his mid twenties about six three he wore a white hoodie the victim is recovering on the oakland county lakes of vigil was held for a sixteen year old boy who who drowned unclear lake in oxford township county sheriff's office says ten people suffered minor burns in a boat fire on lake orion kresge foundation says it'll give one point five billion dollars in grants for eighteen new projects to improve the neighborhood of the grants are part of a six million dollar program called kresge innovative projects detroit empty lots in virginia park will be transformed into a new park retail space will be created by this money in southwest detroit the projects were picked from one hundred seventy eight different applications from people in groups living in the city of detroit starbucks will close more than eight thousand stores this afternoon they'll conduct anti bias training what will this be the employees will also be watching a film by the award winning documentarian stanley nelson who has done films on the african american experience on racial bias in the past and in.

Hawaii Steve Gebbie Jim Rupe Detroit Bloomfield Township Lake Orion Kresge Foundation Virginia Park Starbucks Stanley Nelson Greektown Oakland County Oxford Township County Kresge Twenty Four Hundred Acres Five Billion Dollars Two Thousand Degree Six Million Dollar Seventeen Year Sixteen Year
"stanley nelson" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"stanley nelson" Discussed on On The Media

"On the media is supported by ziprecruiter hiring ziprecruiter has revolutionized how you do it they're technology identifies people with the right experience and invites them to apply to your job they find great candidates for you try it for free at ziprecruiter dot com slash opm ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire listener support it w in why c studios here we are again another mass shooting in a school this time in florida children are dead politicians send their thoughts and prayers gun restriction advocates call for new laws the nra lobbies hard against them nothing changes rents and repeat it's also predictable and so depressing unmik show this week we'll be looking at the one new factor how the survivors of this shooting high school children themselves are taking on legislators and the gun lobby and demanding action but for this podcast we will reply a couple of interviews were recorded in the wake of other mass shooting tragedies the first is with adam winkler ucla law professor and author of gun fight the battle over the right to bear arms in america who we spoke to after sandy hook in 2012 he told us that there was a time when the end our airspace supported gun control roll back when the black panthers were the ones passionately advocating gun rights the panthers determined that the government was either unwilling or unable to protect the lives of black people so they started publicly packing heat here's one of the movement's leaders huey we newton from a documentary called the black panthers vanguard of the revolution by filmmaker stanley nelson the us california pinnacle section twelve all twenty through twelve all twenty seven and also second amendment of the constitution guarantees citizens the right to bear arms on public property adam winkler one of the surprising things i discovered in writing gunfight was that when the black panther started carrying their guns around in oakland california in the late 1960s it inspired a new wave of gun control laws it was these laws that ironically sparked a backlash among rural white conservatives who are concerned that government was coming to get their guns knacks the nra mimic many of the.

ziprecruiter c studios professor america panthers stanley nelson us adam winkler oakland california nra florida unmik
"stanley nelson" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"stanley nelson" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Well what a cast yeah i can't wait to see it it's got some ma bleed runner aesthetics of its own have you seen the other new m netflixing life i show altered carbon new i haven't i've actually been watching and dark which is amazing the pierre also not flakes also in afflicts edsa speaking of germany it's netflixing is first german funded note the first show they funded for germans something along those lines um it's basically a much more cerebral um and better stranger things officer who well i'm been watching altered carbon and in some probably a better version of the remake of goes in the shell geico it kind of as like a similar premise to ghost in the shall but it's way better i'm all hooked anyway tell them we are rising is now streaming for free until march twenty second on the pbs independent lens website this is the latest from celebrated documentary and stanley nelson who's won every major award and broadcasting in 2016 alone he was honoured with a lifetime peabody award a lifetime emmy award and a lifetime achievement award from the international documentary association of this film was also codirected and coproduced by marco williams so tell them we are rising which premiered at sundance last year is the middle film of nelson's trilogy on black american history the first was the black panthers vanguard of the revolution which i believe was the most watched independent lens show of all time this one is the first film ever to focus on the one hundred fifty year history of the historically black colleges and universities or hb see use and the impact they've had on american history culture and national identity our writer scout to foyer interviewed nelson and i thought nelson had a really interesting take on making historical stories phil modern one way he's done this as to counter conventional wisdom and not.

pierre officer geico peabody award emmy award lifetime achievement award marco williams sundance edsa germany stanley nelson writer one hundred fifty year twenty second