21 Burst results for "Stanley Mcchrystal"

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

07:24 min | 2 months ago

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"States who instead put their fingers waiting to see which way the wind is blowing and they tried to get in front of it and my fear. Is that the end of this crisis. They are going to spike the football and claim success. Yeah and we'll put it the numbers and we'll say no. You weren't successful and they go avs other factors. Actually we were and were at this weird time in history when you can literally say white is black and you could to a degree get away with it. Yeah it is. It is weird this lack of accountability. That seems to be kind of what's everything's pointing to. And even for example. Going back. What i wish would have seen a to me. It's he take at the very beginning when when there was this communication Confusion about our masks effective or not. You had foul. She out there saying don't wear master not effective and then he admitted layers like well. I said that because there was a shortage of masks and unlike world you realize mean that plan to the seeds of like i can't i mean you and i know from an integrity standpoint. You would have done something like that in afghanistan like if you would. That's disinformation right. If you knew that you know if you intentionally. Because i wanted to protect you from or protect the country that i just don't buy that i don't buy that at all and i think that did more damage than in any good that it that he was hoping i think it did. We say we're not going to cause the nation to do things which are counterproductive panic. And so we're going to use disinformation again. It corrodes your credibility in the next time. You cry wolf. Nobody bridge well. It's kinda even the thing that really upset me too. We're talking about risk. Mitigation communication accurate communication. I think if like when this whole thing happened a month ago when afghanistan and going started going south. I think if the president would came out and said honestly if you just said look this surprised me here. this this one a little. I wasn't expecting this. So therefore i'm gonna put some more guys in and we're going to focus on this and getting our people out. I think people would have been. He would sound like a hero. But instead it just made in my opinion worse. And i know that's probably real close to you and i didn't mean to talk about afghanistan on this thing but but just from a communication standpoint. I don't understand why leaders don't do that in those moments just be candid and accountable like man i okay. I made a bad decision here. I'm and here's how. I'm going to try to fix it. You know and be forthright and forceful. I think people would rally behind him. I think you're right. And i'm fine to go to afghanistan because if you look at afghanistan and you say we'll why did it collapse so suddenly. They had a military of three hundred thousand people problems with and whatnot but i think it was a crisis of confidence and at the end of the day. It was a lack of confidence on their on the afghans. Part that they could solve the problem and so they believed that the government was corrupted ineffective. They believe that necessary things. They need support from the united states. Logistics air power and whatnot. Weren't there and so. It corroded their ability to be confident that we can stand. We can do this and of course. The taliban were masterful at doing information care campaign across the country reinforcing that so their risk immune system became completely compromise right the afghans and so it just collapsed and so i think that it really reminds us that. It's not the magnitude of the threat. It's the vulnerabilities we allow. Because only seventy thousand taliban yeah. Mathematically it's a great point. You know we study right before this conversation as we speak. They're having they're talking to two million into mckinsey and i forget the defense. What his name forget his name. But roy austin laid austin and mackenzie said pretty much what you just said right there. When they were asking him they said. Look i mean they lost their will to fight when you are and week. And he said he communicated this that when we pulled out the lack of more. I mean what that message that sent to the afghanistan you know in that. Hey we're not gonna have this air support we're gonna we're really moving really leaving now you know and it was. It shouldn't have been a surprise so it was interesting. Hearing those guys talk about that today. What so what do you hope. I mean this book i asked you before we started recording. What did you wanna make sure we got across. And you said why i'm what people are saying. Why are we getting this wrong. So have we hit upon that. Why are we getting the so long. Do you think yeah. I think it's because we keep looking for something else to blame it on. Yeah and reality is the greatest risk to us is us which needs solution lies with us which that's the good news because we have it within our power to make our selfless vulnerable. But we aren't willing to do that. We we wanna say that. It's external risks that we couldn't do shouldn't have been able to predict and therefore that gives us a an excuse for for not being resilient is we need to be yeah. I love that message that first of all we're own worst enemy. It's up to us. That's the good news. We have the ability to kind of improve the resiliency of our immune system as you put it. What do you mean by holistic though as you talk about in the book you know rely. It's the system make it work. What does that mean. Yeah we have a tendency or most people do to work one or two muscles in your body that you like to work and not work others and to have certain real weaknesses like if a leader is very decisive and very charismatic. And very this but dishonest. Yeah then you gotta problem. You got a hold the boat and so when i say holistic what i mean is all of those risk factors operating perfectly ever will but you can't have holes in the boat right. Yeah i love that. I love that perspective. It's so true. And then. I think what i really as we kind of sum up here. What i love about your work stand is that this is easy to understand when i read this book. It's like yes of course it's either stand but it doesn't mean it's easy it's i mean. It isn't complex. But it's hard right doesn't move and i love how you kinda end with that right. I mean that's what we got to walk away with that this is it's easy to understand but that's leadership in a nuts. L. isn't it mean. Leadership concepts are very easy to understand but it takes. It's difficult to me. Because i think it takes a tremendous amount of authenticity transparency invulnerability things we kinda suck at us human beings. I think right in. And i think if we can embrace that i think to your point we can start to build those blocks of resilience in get get the team's focused on leadership and communication and action. And all that. I mean what. What do you think does that resonate with you. Yeah perfectly..

afghanistan roy austin taliban football mackenzie austin united states government
"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

05:34 min | 2 months ago

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"You don't know anybody all you know in them at a distance there those people in there just wrong. it's easy to hate. Yeah well that gets to the point of like organizations. And i think they treat. I think they treat diversity and bias the wrong way to you talk about it in your book and i love the way that you approach it and i think back to even like of great leader. Think about lincoln like what he did with his cabinet right. I mean you talk about a diverse. An unbiased approach right. I mean for the most part for the time he didn't. He didn't bring sycophants into his cabinet. He brought people. They didn't like him. You know and i think that attributed to a lot of success i mean. Would you agree with that. You're better student of history than me. But i would absolutely agree and i agree with you. We think about diversity wrong we think about gender at edge and things like that you really need diversity of perspective exactly and we in the book. We look at the cuban missile crisis. I was the bay of pigs when kennedy had a bunch of old white guys got together and they screwed it up right then for the cuban missile crisis. He got a bunch of old white guys together but they weren't the same guy note. What he did was he got people who he knew had different perspective right and so he achieved diversity and use some process to reinforce that and the key thing was. He challenged their thinking and his thinking and he he avoided group. Thank which a problem from the cuban missile crisis. So i don't think we should put a woman on the board and say solve the problem. There are a lot of women in winter ivy league business school. they go to corporate and they're the same as the male. Sit next exactly unless we get a different real difference in perspective. Yeah that's what. I really appreciated what you write in. The book is that diversity perspective. You're right everybody kind of goes to the kind of identity stuff and that example of of the bay of pigs of the cuban missile crisis. And how kennedy change. That is one of the great examples of learning from your mistakes. I think at least from a political perspective leadership perspective. That is one of the great examples. You right groupthink verses having a diversity perspective yeah alone that can we teach people to be resilient. Do you think it's kind of like one of those things. I always think back to all my training. And i think about kind of curiosity to me. I teach somebody be curious. Can teach somebody resilient i guess my thought is. It's in all of us. It just needs to be unleashed what are your. What are your thoughts. I think some people are going to be more talented. Naturally this others but the reality is. I think you can if you teach people how to do. Certain things in the military run a battle drill do a very set procedure. You can train them to be competent in that. I think we've got to train people in problem solving which means creating situations of uncertainty creating problems that can't be solved and and make them do that and i think that the more you do that the more confident you get in your ability to respond to changes and so i think we can't now again some people take it easier but i think you can train individuals and organizations to be better. I just made me think about when i was an officer candidate school. They put us in the situation. That was like some of the best training when they were evaluating us. If we were going to be marine corps officers they'd put us in those impossible situations and it wasn't. They didn't care if he had the solution. They wanted to see how you brought everybody together. Inc everything so it wasn't pass fail. If you solve the problem they could be solved but they are very difficult to solve right. And i love that. What going back to that covert nineteen. I'm curious so in your if you could wave a realistic magic wand. I mean what what were the type of leader what type of leadership that we need for that to go like you talked about there a few minutes ago. What would you descend interesting. Because covert hit across the us and the world. We have a bunch of different examples essentially against the same problem. And i think the places it came out best probably the the most effective is been just send art earned of new zealand now. She's got a unique island nation with limited population. But what she did at the very beginning was she said. I'm going to be absolutely candid with you. And she did very forthright communication on an aggressive level. The second is she outlined the process for their responses. What they were going to do they were gonna try to defeat cove by keeping out. They were going to be very disciplined. They were gonna make tough decisions so if you look at leaders. That communicate candidly and constantly. And in a way that communicates clear plan and those that are also willing to make decisions and sometimes decisions are gonna be unpopular or difficult but make them and stick to them now. You can change if conditions changed dramatically. But don't change just because political winds blow a little bit and make it hard those of the leaders. I think that it proven best here now. Unfortunately we've seen a number of leaders across united states who instead put their fingers waiting to see which way the wind is blowing and they tried to get in front of it and my fear. Is that the end of this crisis..

ivy league business school cabinet kennedy lincoln new zealand united states
"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

01:40 min | 2 months ago

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"What we've all lived through here and seen on the news a really great fun conversation. Great forty five minutes to spend with stan mcchrystal so excited to talk to him. Hey this episode is brought to you by my brand new sponsor. Awesome bro so tequila. If you haven't checked out the episode with ricardo tomorrow. Please check it out so excited that he's a fan of this show. After a conversation he loved the show so much. She loved her conversation. Wanted to be a sponsor. And i couldn't be more thrilled. And he sent me some of this tequila. And i gotta tell you awesome. Roseau is one of the best tequila. I have ever had. It is crazy. Good guys and i'm not a big drinker. I am not. I don't like the taste of alcohol. But i love this tequila. It's a great sipping tequila. I know you probably have bad experiences with tequila or jose. Cuervo something like that and the steers you away from it. I'm telling you you're looking for something. That's easy to sip. If you're looking for that perfect unique gift check. Awesome bro so tequila. When i first tasted this tequila it literally blew my mind especially the grandmas. Urva ulta ho man. This tequila is insanely smooth. With hints of caramel and butterscotch is so good all the friends i've given it to and my wife go nuts when i pour them a shot at so good. The best part is that awesome so makes it easy to purchase by the bottle by shipping. It direct to you. Don't go to the liquor store. Go to a tequila dot com. That's a the letter a tequila dot com and use the code legend at checkout. You get ten percent off your first order. It's so good guys. Check him out awesome tequila. Hey thanks for being a supporter of the show and just a simple reminder. If you're finding dose of leadership take the time to follow me on your favorite podcasts application and take the time to write a.

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

02:00 min | 2 months ago

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Hey welcome dose of leadership so happier tune in man. What a fantastic. Yesterday i got general stanley on the show talking about his new book. Risk a users guide. Look today's world is rife with risk be it the global pandemic that. We've all been through the steady churn of uncertainty. That permeates both business in life. We struggled to respond. Right and so retired. Four-star general stanley. Mcchrystal who is on the show. Today is the best selling author of my share of the task team of teams with chris. Fussell on the show talking about a few years ago in leaders brings us an entirely new way to understand risk and master. The knows what this conversation is. All about we talk about their new book. Risk co-authored with Any anna boutique. You and they argue that we must develop both interface for dealing with risk in an appetite for action. I couldn't agree more suspicious. This book is great. I love how he writes. It's easy to understand as a systematic approach to detecting and responding to risk and it builds on t- ten key dimensions of control. What he calls risk control factors which we touch on some of them here and these control factors you can be leveraged adjusted in real time to forge ineffective path forward and we talked about this risk. Immune system. I love his approach to that so many times. You've heard me talk about on the show that you know when i worked in corporate arena. I saw so many times. It's about detailed planning and coming up with the best plan so we can avert risk. Well it's just not realistic. And so what stanley mcchrystal talks about. Is this building and maintaining a healthy risk immune system which allows us to detect threats. Assess the risk and respond to me. It's about being the composed force in the chaotic situation. That is having a healthy risk. Assessment or being risk fit as stan talks about it his book so i love this book. I love this concept. We talk about cove. Nineteen we talk about. The current kind of buckling on afghanistan. It's relevant to.

general stanley Risk co Fussell Mcchrystal stanley chris stanley mcchrystal stan afghanistan
"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

05:19 min | 2 months ago

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"The problem is the corrective times also much slower so you can't just put out the fire to your neighbors house. It takes a long time so climate change and then finally i would throw it education on a national level. If you don't have an educated population then you're not going to be competitive internationally. Because the days of the united states having this huge geographic and social advantage are gone. There are so many other places that educate a lot of young people analogy. They can compete. So that's the one and second if you don't have an educated population you get ignorant stuff happening many of the great ills in life because people just don't know and when you are subjected to the kind of misinformation in our society you arm people with knowledge you give them the ability to understand. We used to deal with many people who had come in as terrorists into afghanistan and many had been taught in madrid in pakistan. They've been taught the koran and they memorized it but they didn't speak arabic so then understand what they were reading. They required the interpretation of whoever was teaching them and so they were entirely vulnerable on someone else telling them what was right or wrong. They couldn't do the critical analysis because they didn't have the education for it so as a consequence they became vulnerable. When we are ignorant we are vulnerable. We're ignored as society. We are societally vulnerable. Let's return to you. Arming with knowledge. I would look to explore communication a bit. It just seems like the glue. The connective tissue. That holds so much together. Could you elaborate on your thoughts about the four tests leaders and teams can use to evaluate their communication. If we think about communication we say well i got a cell phone. And she's got a cell phone so we're in communication. I think that means you could potentially communicate but there are four tests that decide whether you actually communicate. And the first is technically. Can i get my message to the person or people that i'm trying to communicate to. Can i send a letter writing email or whatever mode you need to use. Can it get there. The second is more subtle but more often a big issue. It's will i do it. Will i communicate my message. Will i tell the people in other silos in my company or in other places. Will i pass them the information and it might be. I won't pass them. Because i don't like them. It might be. I don't pass it. Because i don't know they exist. It might be. I don't pass it because my boss hasn't given me approval there any number of reasons not all of which are black and white evil but the reality is the second test. If you won't pass information there is no communication the third starts to be..

madrid afghanistan united states pakistan
"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

06:13 min | 2 months ago

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Well. Why would i do that. Because become blind to our vulnerabilities. There's a great story from a wargame call millennium challenge which happened before the first gulf war and a marine general named van. Riper lieutenant general was made the commander of the opposition essentially in a red team role and he looked at how this was likely to play out because he was playing a mideast nation. And so he said. I'm not gonna let the americans do what they're good at. I'm going to do a preemptive strike and so we did a preemptive strike. Any in the game he kill the equivalent of twenty thousand americans and he really screwed up the american plan and so they stopped the war game and they re cocked and went back and they said okay. We're going to continue but don't do that again. And it was like wait a minute. The whole idea of a red team is defined clever people who will come and find the holes in your plan. Where are there gaps and seams or flaws that you have become blind to where will they as you inflate Tire innertube that. You've been working on a new patched. You inflate it and you see if there are any more leaks. Where or the leaks. A good read team is people who are a step outside your organization. You can have people inside but they have to be fenced off and so that they are not wedded to the plan. Because if they're wedded to the plan they're incentivized not to find flaws in it and so you've really got to have a red team that's incentivized to find flaws. And then the leadership has got to act on those when they find those problems gaps and seams. The leadership has got a follow up and got a close them and they can't make the red team pariahs. They can't say you know you. People are bad people because you you're disloyal to our plan. No the greatest loyalty you can ever do is to make it stronger. And so. I'm a great believer that red teaming takes us out of being comfortable and we're all guilty. I members as commander in combat. You work plan for a long time. You do all these things and if somebody questioned it or poked a hole in it right when it was time to execute you got mad because dammit we're about to execute us plan. Don't don't distract me. Don't do that. That's irritating but you need them to do that. And so red teams are really effective. Way to pressure test because when you look at we could say this country we could speak globally also but what threats most either most concerned you or which threats do you think people are not paying enough attention to. I'll let you define threats and people as you like. I think not surprisingly. I'll tell you that the one that literally leaves me up at night is the failure of our system to be able to do routine things routinely and what i talk about is when our government is seized up with partisanship and we are unable to do the normal functions as outlined in the constitution. If we're unable to have the normal political debate to make processes work without doing a huge pendulum swings to one side of the other. Then the machine is working right as long as the american government and society are working. We'll get dinged up with threats that will come but we will always be able to respond when the system. Is it working. I think we are fundamentally vulnerable to cove nineteen or to potential foreign aggression or to terrorism. You cybersecurity you. Pick any number of Threats then there are some other issues that of course jump out cyber security of course is the one that i would spend most of my time worried about because i think it's immediate. I think that climate change is one of those cases. Where if your neighbor's house was on fire. You would go do something about it. The reality though is if there was a fire ten miles away that was burning up all the fields that produce the food you eat. It wouldn't be apparent to you. And so you might not run outside and call the fire department and i think climate change is one of those cases where we are literally destroying that which we are dependent upon but because it's not happening in crisis speed. We think of in fast rolling time and it's happening more gradually is doesn't seem as dangerous. The problem is the corrective times also much slower so you can't just put out the fire to your neighbors house. It takes a long time so climate change and then finally i would throw it education on a national level. If you don't have an educated population then you're not going to be competitive internationally. Because the days of the united states having this huge geographic and social advantage are gone. There are so many other places that educate a lot of young people analogy. They can compete. So that's the one and second if you don't have an educated population you get ignorant stuff happening many of the great ills in life because people just don't know and when you are subjected to the kind of misinformation in our society you arm people with knowledge you give them the ability to understand. We used to deal with many people who had come in as terrorists into afghanistan and many had been taught in madrid in pakistan. They've been taught the koran and they memorized it but they didn't speak arabic so then understand what they were reading. They required the interpretation of whoever was teaching them and so they were entirely vulnerable on someone else telling them what was right or wrong. They couldn't do the critical analysis because they didn't have the education for it so as a consequence they became vulnerable. When we are ignorant we are vulnerable. We're ignored as society. We are societally vulnerable..

Riper american government united states madrid afghanistan pakistan
"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

05:19 min | 2 months ago

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Effort. Thank you for answering that. It's been on my mind and a number of my friends who are veterans. Have texted with me about the events which have been very disheartening to many people who who served site really. I'm grateful for you shedding some light on your perspectives. Since it would be only guesswork on my part let's jump straight to it. And i do this very rarely. I very rarely jumped to the new book. Usually there's a lot of background. We have though had previous conversations. We've talked a lot about your history of talked about everything from your one meal. A day policy for yourself not for everyone else to exercise to training and will perhaps refer back to some of those and in fact i'll start with a reflection i was looking back at a recap of our first ever conversation on the podcast and i asked you. This will tie into risk. I think because most things tie into risk in some fashion. I asked you how you train one hundred athletes to become as my team. Put it here soldiers. And the athletic part was simply to check off the box of physical prerequisites and the answer as it was paraphrased from here. Is that given that they have all the basic technical skills you'd push them in endurance live fire training and in making decisions with incomplete information decisions through which they'll be forced into bad outcomes and have to deal with those bad outcomes and that last portion is extremely interesting to me because certainly the last year has highlighted how difficult it is for most people if not all people in some circumstances to make decisions with incomplete information and i spent a lot of time thinking about risk mitigating risk and even just defining risks. So could you maybe start with how you define or think about risk and why write an entire book. Called risk a scud. I hit a point in my life. I'm sixty seven now. Where much of my life. I had been experiencing risk trying to deal with it..

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

07:53 min | 2 months ago

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Can also find the mcchrystal podcast which started last year and that is called no turning back general mcchrystal. Welcome back to the show. It's good to see you sir. Tim please call me stand. And it's a play. I am so thrilled to have you back on this. Is i think around three. If we count the follow up episode and a tremendous amount happened both in the world and in both of our lives since we last spoke and i wanted to start with afghanistan and i'm looking at a paragraph that i pulled from an older interview. This is from the financial times with you and you were giving a tour. I believe of your home to the journalist. And you've pointed out a map and you said this is a handwriting map of kabul by british officers from eighteen forty two. This is the route they took to jalalabad. One guy made out of fifteen thousand. I keep it on my desk in afghanistan as a reminder. Let's not be too sanguine. And i wanted to begin with the current day. Everyone is seeing so much news about afghanistan. And i can only look at it personally through the lens of a lay person with very minimal understanding having never been there. What do you see when you look at recent events. If i may ask such a broad question. I think naturally i look at it probably two ways i look at it emotionally because i see our opponent taliban now running the country and of course already there indications that their regime is going to be very difficult. Parts of the country particularly females. But we'll wait and see how that develops over. Tom and then. I also look at it. Someone who has been involved at least in the military part of foreign policy. And so i asked myself. What does it mean going forward. The first thing i'd say is though people always ask me about. What's in the review mirror. And they say why did it come this way. It's all touch on that. And i'll say that there's a temptation over-simplified to find out the critical mistake the wrong decision. The evil policymaker. The unknown accepted reality. That sort of the graveyard of empires and to say this is. Why didn't come out the way we wanted it to. And i think that when we do that we do two things one. We missed many other factors but we also let ourselves off the hook. I personally don't believe that afghanistan in what we tried after two thousand one was impossible. I don't believe that the taliban were ten feet tall. I've seen too many up close to believe that. What i believe is in fact. Many of the things that failed us was us. It was our weaknesses in putting together a coherent well coordinated effort overtime and sometimes that involved mistakes in decision making or half-hearted policies but often it was just not being able to make the team of teams work and that's frustrating because someone goes to the doctor and wants to know why they're suffering a certain pay normality and the doctor says whoa year in poor health. Smoked too much. You drink too much. don't sleep you don't work out. You got all these things correct. Those and many of these other things will not happen and yet we don't like that advice we'd rather say well. Here's the pill or the procedure. I will do to solve that problem. And so i think afghanistan was as much a case of us needing to look in the mirror and say why do we struggle with big efforts like that as anything else. Would you think it means looking forward when you're looking at windshield instead of at the ruby mirror. Actually think the implications are quite large. Tim and the first is our nation's in ability to do big things like this it will undermine our confidence to take on efforts and maybe we there many we shouldn't but there may be some we should and yet we will be averse to doing that because we will lack the confidence in our ability to pull things together and execute. Well maybe the other side of that coin is the world will look that way. Most people of my generation who was born after the second world war enjoyed a very distinct environment for our nation where people may disagree with things that united states did. There was this extraordinary respect for our capability in many cases for accomplishments. I think that has worn thin. I think in fact we can't assume we have the same level of credibility walking into any situation that we did even a few years ago. We will have to rebuild that credibility overtime and it will. It will take a significant effort. Thank you for answering that. It's been on my mind and a number of my friends who are veterans. Have texted with me about the events which have been very disheartening. To many people who who served really am grateful for you shedding some light on your perspectives. Since it would be only guesswork on my part let's jump straight to it. And i do this very rarely. I very rarely jumped to the new book. Usually there's a lot of background. We have though had previous conversations. We've talked a lot about your history of talked about everything from your one meal. A day policy for yourself not for everyone else to exercise to training and will perhaps refer back to some of those and in fact i'll start with a reflection i was looking back at a recap of our first ever conversation on the podcast and i asked you. This will tie into risk. I think because most things tie into risk in some fashion. I asked you how you train one hundred athletes to become as my team. Put it here soldiers. And the athletic part was simply to check off the box of physical prerequisites and the answer as it was paraphrased from here is given that they have all the basic technical skills. You'd push them. In endurance live fire training and in making decisions with incomplete information. Decisions through which they'll be forced into bad outcomes and have to deal with those bad outcomes and that last portion is extremely interesting to me because certainly the last year has highlighted how difficult it is for most people if not all people in some circumstances to make decisions with incomplete information and i spent a lot of time thinking about risk mitigating risk and even just defining risks. So could you maybe start with how you define or think about risk and why write an entire book called risk a users. I hit a point in my life. I'm sixty seven now. Where much of my life. I had been experiencing risk trying to deal with it. Trying to mitigate it in some cases trying to avoid it in other cases and watching other leaders do the same and i came to the conclusion. We don't do it very well. We never really done it very well. We had matrices and calculations we use but the end of the day. Most of the decisions were pretty subjective. And they weren't made on data and they were made on sometimes experience and sometimes just we'll call it good feel and our outcomes were uneven at.

afghanistan general mcchrystal taliban jalalabad mcchrystal Tim kabul Tom united states
"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

05:07 min | 2 months ago

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"And you can also find the mcchrystal podcast which started last year and that is called no turning back general mcchrystal. Welcome back to the show. It's good to see you sir. Tim please call me stand. And it's a play. I am so thrilled to have you back on this. Is i think around three. If we count the follow up episode and a tremendous amount happened both in the world and in both of our lives since we last spoke and i wanted to start with afghanistan and i'm looking at a paragraph that i pulled from an older interview. This is from the financial times with you and you were giving a tour. I believe of your home to the journalist. And you've pointed out a map and you said this is a handwriting map of kabul by british officers from eighteen forty two. This is the route they took to jalalabad. One guy made out of fifteen thousand. I keep it on my desk in afghanistan as a reminder. Let's not be too sanguine. And i wanted to begin with the current day. Everyone is seeing so much news about afghanistan. And i can only look at it personally through the lens of a lay person with very minimal understanding having never been there. What do you see when you look at recent events. If i may ask such a broad question. I think naturally i look at it probably two ways i look at it emotionally because i see our opponent taliban now running the country and of course already there indications that their regime is going to be very difficult. Parts of the country particularly females. But we'll wait and see how that develops over. Tom and then. I also look at it. Someone who has been involved at least in the military part of foreign policy. And so i asked myself. What does it mean going forward. The first thing i'd say is though people always ask me about. What's in the review mirror. And they say why did it come this way. It's all touch on that. And i'll say that there's a temptation over-simplified to find out the critical mistake the wrong decision. The evil policymaker. The unknown accepted reality. That sort of the graveyard of empires and to say this is. Why didn't come out the way we wanted it to. And i think that when we do that we do two things one. We missed many other factors but we also let ourselves off the hook. I personally don't believe that afghanistan in what we tried after two thousand one was impossible. I don't believe that the taliban were ten feet tall. I've seen too many up close to believe that. What i believe is in fact..

general mcchrystal afghanistan mcchrystal jalalabad kabul Tim taliban Tom
"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:49 min | 2 months ago

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"By far and away the crowd favorite. I mean people were just raving fans of this. So i used it and here we are at the pod pro coverage your current mattress and start sleeping cool as fifty five degrees fahrenheit or as hot as one hundred and ten degrees fahrenheit. It also splits your bed. Beden half so your partner can choose a totally different temperature. My girlfriend runs hot all the time. She doesn't need cooling. She loves the heat and we can have our own bespoke temperatures on either side. Which is exactly what we're doing now for me. And for many people the result eight sleep users fall asleep up to thirty two percent faster reduced sleep interruptions by up to forty percent and get more restful sleep over all. I can personally attest to this track. It and all sorts of ways. It's the total solution for enhanced recovery. So you can take on the next day feeling refreshed and now my dear listeners. That's you guys. You can get two hundred and fifty dollars off of the pod pro cover. That's a lot simply go to eight. Sleep dot com slash. Tim or use code. Tim that's eight all spelled out. E. h. t. sleep dot com slash. Tim or use coupon code. Tim t i m eight sleep dot com slash tim for two hundred fifty dollars off your pod pro cover more at this altitude. I can flat out for a while. Rand starts shake your personal question now. It organism living will endoscope. Hello boys and girls ladies and germs. This is tim ferriss and welcome to another episode of the tim. Ferriss show my guest. Today is general stanley mcchrystal. Who.

Tim E. h tim ferriss stanley mcchrystal
"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

03:21 min | 8 months ago

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Who with whom we have. <Speech_Male> Let's say complicated <Speech_Male> relationships to <Speech_Male> say <Speech_Male> Least <Speech_Male> yeah as <Speech_Male> most people know <Speech_Male> right after world war <Speech_Male> two the united states <Speech_Male> was forty six <Speech_Male> percent <Speech_Male> of the world's gross <Speech_Male> national product <Speech_Male> equivalent subs at <Speech_Male> aspirational <Speech_Male> over waiting of a single <Speech_Male> country with <Speech_Male> economic power. <Speech_Male> And that's not at <Speech_Male> all the case anymore <Speech_Male> but most <Speech_Male> of us have grown <Speech_Male> up in some <Speech_Male> version <Speech_Male> of that reality <Speech_Male> then we went <Speech_Male> into the cold war. We <Speech_Male> had big <Speech_Male> power competition <Speech_Male> with proxies <Speech_Male> whatnot <Speech_Male> and then we entered <Speech_Male> into a period after the <Speech_Male> fall of the soviet <Speech_Male> union or the <Speech_Male> united states was <Speech_Male> described as a hyperpower <Speech_Male> we <Speech_Male> tremendous capability <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> united states particularly <Speech_Male> the corporations <Speech_Male> from it had the ability <Speech_Male> to operate <Speech_Male> in somewhat <Speech_Male> of a pure capitalist <Speech_Male> mode. They could <Speech_Male> go out and see what's <Speech_Male> best for <Speech_Male> their particular <Speech_Male> company maximize <Speech_Male> profits for shareholders. <Speech_Male> And things like <Speech_Male> that. I <Speech_Male> would argue whereabout date. <Speech_Male> We have already <Speech_Male> entered <SpeakerChange> an era <Speech_Male> of what. I'd called <Speech_Male> almost cold <Silence> competition. <Speech_Male> It's <Speech_Male> not war <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> so it's not <Speech_Male> cold war but <Speech_Male> it's pretty darn close <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> it is going to <Speech_Male> be relentless <Speech_Male> and i will <Speech_Male> even use the word <Speech_Male> louis competition <Speech_Male> between <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> china particularly <Speech_Male> but also <Speech_Male> anyone else <Speech_Male> that can get the with <Speech_Male> all due to include <Speech_Male> russia. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> i think that we <Speech_Male> in the world <Speech_Male> now have got to wake <Speech_Male> up to that reality. <Speech_Male> We've got to conduct <Speech_Male> our business. <Speech_Male> And our foreign policy <Speech_Male> in a <Speech_Male> way that that makes <Speech_Male> ourselves as strong <Speech_Male> as possible international <Speech_Male> alliances <Speech_Male> for foreign policy <Speech_Male> affirm <Speech_Male> status <Speech_Male> around the world <Speech_Male> but recognize <Speech_Male> that. We are not <Speech_Male> the overarching <Speech_Male> power. <Speech_Male> Dominant power <Speech_Male> that we might have once been <Silence> <Speech_Male> but also <Speech_Male> our company <Speech_Male> gotta understand. <Speech_Male> This is a team sport. <Speech_Male> This is a team <Speech_Male> of teams now. <Speech_Male> Companies <Speech_Male> operate in their own <Speech_Male> interest but they also <Speech_Male> operate in the <Speech_Male> interests of <Speech_Male> their nation <Speech_Male> and so <Speech_Male> companies are going <Speech_Male> to be most successful <Speech_Male> if our <Speech_Male> economic system. our <Speech_Male> our ecosystem <Speech_Male> is most successful. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> we've got to pull things <Speech_Male> together in a way <Speech_Male> for cybersecurity <Speech_Male> for trade relations <Speech_Male> all these things <Speech_Male> in a way that <Speech_Male> are mutually supporting <Speech_Male> in. That's a bit <Speech_Male> different than we've done. <Speech_Male> In the past <Speech_Male> there are going to be some leaders <Speech_Male> who say wow <Speech_Male> that smacks of industrial <Speech_Male> policy <Speech_Male> that smacks of <Speech_Male> a controlled <Speech_Music_Male> economy. And i'm not <Speech_Music_Male> talking about that. <Speech_Music_Male> But <SpeakerChange> i am talking <Speech_Male> about an intentional <Speech_Male> <Silence> effort <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> to make the healthiest <Speech_Male> economy. <Speech_Male> We can't starting <Speech_Male> with education <Speech_Male> for a workforce <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> security <Silence> of supply chains <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Precious or <Speech_Male> key natural resources <Speech_Male> all of <Speech_Male> those things. We've got <Speech_Male> a look at the world differently <Speech_Male> and we've got <Speech_Male> to act to <Silence> further <SpeakerChange> those interests <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> very <Speech_Male> important points <Speech_Male> complicated <Speech_Male> days ahead <Speech_Male> certainly but with the <Speech_Male> advice that you've shared <Speech_Male> here some <Speech_Male> crates nuggets for us <Speech_Male> to take back as we <Speech_Male> do our own planning <Speech_Male> general stanley mcchrystal. <Speech_Male> I'm honored <Speech_Male> to join us today. Thank <Speech_Male> you so much for sharing <Speech_Male> your wisdom your experience <Speech_Male> with us that <Speech_Male> you again for your service. <Speech_Male> Our country in <Speech_Male> monitored to call you friend. <Speech_Male> Thank you so much. <Silence> Thank you peter in all the best. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Thanks for tuning in. <Speech_Male> Please join us on monday. <Speech_Male> When my guests <Speech_Male> will be to rollins <Speech_Male> tech -secutive <Speech_Male> lee crump the incumbent <Speech_Male> chief information officer. <Speech_Male> Who's on the cusp of <Speech_Male> retiring and his <Speech_Male> hand selected successor. Thomas tesche the new chief information officer rollins.

monday forty six two today Thomas tesche stanley mcchrystal russia china lee crump world Speech_Male war united
"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

05:30 min | 8 months ago

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"We should react to people make mistakes in a way that we'd like our bosses to react. Does it mean just forget them. It does mean corrective action but it means in a way that understands. We all make mistakes. Well you've spoken and written about in in many many areas stan about how the generals role a leader in the military's role. Used to be one of chessmaster that you had a board in front of you Figuratively speaking that you were setting. The strategy in those pieces moved around based upon the ideas that the person at the top was coming up with and you recognize the need to be less the chessmaster and more the gardener Which really was about empowering people and and put making decisions the possibility for those people who are closest to the inputs and recognizing how change was happening on the ground. A talk a bit about that inside initially from your military brat background and we'd love to of course here for perspectives on the application of those ideas to the business realm as well. Sure if you go back again and military history do you think of a battlefield A mile in with a general can theoretically see all of his or her forces on the battlefield and therefore they can move them like species. That's an oversimplification. But the reality is you see it in almost real time you can direct movement once you spread across hundreds and thousands of miles suddenly. Not only can you not see all your forces even with technology but the conditions in every part of the battlefield battle spaces we call. It is different. So the procreate actions are different and so telling people what to do becomes impractical. And so what you do. Is you tell them what outcome we need. What are we trying to achieve. Now i need you to use your best judgment to do whatever it is. Best supports that way to say in afghanistan that we said if if we give you an order on the ground and when you get on the ground the order that we gave you is wrong execute the order we should have given you and suddenly it's shown a lot of responsibility to young and less experienced people but the reality is they are the people that connect that back to what the overall mission is there. The right people now in the speed in the modern world. Not only is this important. It has to be done in real time and has to be done across the entire organization. So now you've got an entire chessboard. A pieces who are all making communists decisions and moving. And i know a chessmaster might be upset by that but in a big organization whether it's business or not if you don't unlock that the organization will necessarily be too sluggish..

afghanistan hundreds and thousands of mile A
"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:54 min | 8 months ago

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"You're doing much the same. And of course as i mentioned at the outset during these times especially finding ways to to foster resilience you know drawing out the cultural attributes do so become that much more important. Talk a bit about what you've learned as well as what you have brought to you and taught out with many of your your clients in terms of the ways of best to do so sure i touch on military history if you go back to world war two at blitzkrieg. The all idea. The german vermont tactic of running armor columns supported by air was not to destroy the enemy forces it was to fragment them into shock their communications to destroy their command and control in. The cohesiveness is an organization. And so now we talk about..

world war two blitzkrieg german
"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

05:39 min | 8 months ago

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Thank you for your service Thank you also for the the wonderful forward that you included in my book. It's an honor to collaborate with you once again and appreciate you making time for our session today. Well thanks and congratulations on the new book. I'm truly excited by it. The only thing it should have done is come up ten years ago. Well i can't turn back time but over. there will be some benefits. You thank you so much. Many of you will know. Stand as i mentioned is a retired four-star general former commander of us and international security assistance forces in afghanistan and the former commander of the nation's premier military counterterrorism force Jay sock the joint special operations command For the past ten years actually just this january. He celebrated a ten year anniversary of the mcchrystal group he He is now an adviser to chief executive officers and other executives of companies here in the us and around the world and providing them innovative leadership solutions to To that help them transform and succeed in challenging in dynamic environments and stan what what's challenging and dynamic an environment we have found ourselves in. May we live in interesting times. We certainly do. And i must say Speaking of books. This is one that i recommend as much as any other certainly and comes up again and again a team of teams new rules of engagement for a complex world and talk about a book that now has five or six years old and thank goodness. It came out when it did because of the ways in which it applied not only during the good times in the for several years after the book's publication but applying all the more so now during these trying and in many cases unprecedented times. And i wonder if you could maybe take a moment and talk a bit about some of the now that you've spent a decade in the private sector after the your long and distinguished career in the military. I wonder maybe if you could talk a little bit about some of the ways in which you're you you've seen some of these ideas working best in. Fostering cross functional collaboration right and peter. Thanks gannon what. We see both from the military in my earlier years and incident companies. Now is that cross functional..

five afghanistan ten years ago peter today Jay sock four-star both mcchrystal six years old ten year anniversary gannon one this january ten years a years past
"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

02:00 min | 8 months ago

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"I'm peter hi. My guest. Today is general stanley mcchrystal. General mcchrystal is a retired four-star general in the us army the former commander joint special operations command and the.

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

08:39 min | 1 year ago

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on 710 WOR

"As the president said it's a battle we're in a war let's talk to too great war heroes first the general Stanley McChrystal of McChrystal consulting and navy seal Chris Fussell the author of the book one mission they do great work general McChrystal let me start with you the average person sitting at home on the couch terrified fear panic as a great war hero can you give me any tips mentally on how to get through this sure I think the first thing is don't feel special or weak because you're scared this is an amorphous by will threat and it and it gets under your skin once you get that past that don't be callin to inaction what we need now each of us to be a leader each of us to stand up each of us to show commitment to getting through this crisis and we will yeah Fussell navy seal I mean you did the most dangerous stuff on earth what would you tell people mentally how to how to keep cool yeah well I appreciate that thanks robin Amazon and you know to echo a bit what Stan was saying there one thing that we're encouraging all of our all the leaders were talking with over the last few weeks is be present yes you step into this fight there's a saying in the seal teams run the sound of the guns well we know where the fighters and leaders need to get it into it right and then you don't gauge their people their families their communities and start communicating pulling people into dialogue coming up with solutions at sector there's a there's a tendency in times of crisis to retract into your did your cubicle into your small unit your tribe more than ever now leaders need to be broadcasting out down into their organizations and speaking with as many people as they can on a regular basis and they can manage otherwise especially with social isolation our distance from one oh one another's gonna get even worse so it's gonna be harmful to industries can be harmful to communities and so leaders need to step in now and start to solve that so you were the seal so I would imagine in your work there were times were totally alone and isolated in the woods what is the secret of mentally not feeling L. alone well it it didn't interesting point there were times when we were physically alone separated around the world into small teams two person unit of tetra but you were never alone or separated from from the culture because what we did in this it is also a very remote shepherded environment under the leadership of Stan McChrystal it's a layer and a what we started called a digital leadership a culture that existed through digital means and we communicated each with each other every single day seven days a week for it for years on end constantly and there was there were daily forms were McChrystal would bring together thousands of us literally from around the world into one video conversation just to get update what's going on around the world what's happening in your corner at centra and so you never felt why you might be physically separated you were never felt like you were alone in the fight and that's critical for leaders to to start to corporate and other running organization right now general McChrystal you talk about communicating so the president does these briefings where he'll stand there for two and a half hours and answer every question is is that is there too much communication or is they're never too much communication well I don't think there's ever too much communication I think that what a leader could do is potentially stand up in front of for example show a map of the United States and tell people this is a national challenge is actually a global challenge it's one that we should hi as a nation not as fifty separate states and give people the sense that together we are stronger we make people get the sense of what beyond what they she just from a personal perspective and a sense that everyone else is in this together we're going to share resources we're going to share lessons learned will connect communicate constantly not just from top to bottom but the cost to our peer cities between Sunni states between states I think we get a lot better the general what would you tell an employer right now who's got employees their home they're not working and they're not getting paid to tear for what would you tell employer to do for those employees mentally I think the first thing is to reach out to them and communicate very candidly with them tell them exactly what the real situation is financially which is Clive and the decisions that have to be made and that you're committed to trying to move on for the next thing I remember is when people go to work from home a couple of things happened one although the connected digitally they can feel very alone they should talk about with Christian the shields pourtant thing is connecting to them on a very frequent basis not making people think they're in their kitchen working on a laptop and it got no connection to anybody and also remember that everybody's life is multiple angles to it you can have a person who may be working from home with your company and still being paid but their spouse may have been laid off their parents may be under threat of cold in nineteen there are all these things that certainly make life complicated and I think that we as employers which is to make sure we only have to take that into account yeah Hey Chris you guys the navy says you got the toughest missions in the world you're on this mission like you know the president says the next couple weeks will be very bad so imagine a mission it's going well then it goes very badly when you try to turn that around so how do you how do you do that yeah there's there's a a a natural sort of personality in the in the communities that stand I both grew up inside out that teaches you how to compartmentalize very quickly and and and build a personal and team level resilience this is in all of our all of our DNA humans are just naturally good at that and in case studies throughout history have proven this to us this will be a forging for our country and for the world but I think the mindset of taking each individual challenge as as a unique situation work through it and then be ready for the next one so breaking your view on the pointer for six months you have good days and bad days some really horrible times but the best team in the best leaders could immediately compartmentalized that learn from it do you agree with the team and get ready for the next challenge they were saying I can't do this for next six the next six months they were saying we've got to do one more thing and they were gonna get the rest of them we didn't do another thing and right now we have to see the big picture like Stan was just saying but also individuals families etcetera look for little goals get through the day gets through the afternoon get through the next window I don't think every single morning when you wake up there's another six months twelve months of tetra best good advice the general McChrystal I guess you've this is what you guys know how to do logistics talk about that from a because when you set up a base or you know certainly gonna get five hundred thousand beds and meals let's talk about how logistics works it's interesting when in the military they say that amateurs talk strategy of professionals talk logistics just extra terminal what you can do or not do and so at the end of the day I think that this is largely operational logistics problem you know there is the science to do with developing vaccines and what not but the reality is we have to get ventilators protective equipment all the things that hospital beds that will allow us to be as effective as possible and taking care of people I would argue that across the fifty states there's an awful lot of equipment that isn't all needed at the same time the reality is it's needed very badly in New York now and a few other places but in other parts of the country the way the military would do this they would inventory everything and then they would search it to where it's needed and then when the need shifted they would shift quickly just like you chipped forces to fight an enemy threat I I think it would make us more efficient yeah well you guys have been great Chris Fussell has it above book of cold one mission and general Stanley McChrystal you do you run a consulting firm now Christian I Christian the president and the CEO of McChrystal group okay and give them a call if you need any.

president Stanley McChrystal Chris Fussell
Retired Army general Stanley McChrystal to review Boston's emergency plans

WBZ Afternoon News

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Retired Army general Stanley McChrystal to review Boston's emergency plans

"Boston Boston mayor mayor Marty Marty Walsh Walsh bringing bringing it it out out big big gone gone to to try try to to help help the the city city deal deal with with the the coronavirus coronavirus crisis crisis WBZ's WBZ's Karen Karen regal regal as as that that part part of of the the story story the the city city of of Boston Boston is is hiring hiring a a consulting consulting firm firm to to tighten tighten the the city's city's emergency emergency response to the covert nineteen pandemic the goal is to update our plans and service to reflect our needs of our residents who have today prevent any gaps in service that might arise in court make the best use of our resources moving forward it's a team being led by four star general general Stanley McChrystal among what's being done examining how city agencies and direct and communications to residents well she could not say the cost

Marty Marty Walsh Walsh Karen Karen Boston Stanley Mcchrystal
"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

10:30 min | 3 years ago

"stanley mcchrystal" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Now, the Brian Kilmeade on news ninety six point five WDBO. Pull American influence out you're likely to have greater instability. And of course, it will be much more difficult for the United States to try to push Vincent direction. There's a lot of intelligence that says they're actually more ISIS fighters around the world now than there were a couple of years ago, you were asked to join the Trump administration. What would you say well, and then of course, the president United States tweeted back at the dumb what he says is a dumb general. He is not. Who was fired by Obama, which he was and he was through his staffers, evidently to the rolling foolishly spoke to the Rolling Stone spoke badly about Joe Biden in particular as many people in the military do and then against the president, and then the resignation put portray us in general Stanley mcchrystal who I'm a big fan of. But he is not a fan of the president. And they don't they're not shy about speaking out about not being a fan of the president. And the president. Does we always does he fights back? With tenant Colonel Allen west joins us now. Colonel. Where do you stand there with the general with the president? Well, happy new years. Good to hear you back. And look I have to stand with someone that has been on the ground and has experienced that's a general Stanley mccrystal. And he's right. If you would draw your troops out of there, and we'll just talk about two thousand again, Brian you create that back him you you allow boy to be established and someone's gonna fill that void. I think that having that presence there in Syria with the amount of troops that we have the long term gains are much more important when you look at keeping Russia at bay Iran at bay Hezbollah Islamic jihadists and also Turkey and Furthermore, you know, we have a commitment. We should have a combat back to the people that after Israel, our best allies belly said after Kurds that would not have been a reduction of ISIS, territorial integrity. If it had not been for the Kurds fighting on the ground, and we enabled that with you know, our technological support. And you know, our ability to bring in other resources like the air. Support and what have you? Yeah. I mean, he went right after mcchrystal particular does that divide the military being that you spent decades there when he comes out and says gentleman Chris got fired like a dog by Obama last assignment a total bust known for big dumb mouth Hillary lover. Does that divide the military when when a president or when a higher up goes after a general, well, I will tell you that there is a there's a little club of senior military leaders. And when you don't respect the opinion of those that have been on the ground, and they're expert they're experiencing their expertise when you make such statements like that. And and let's be very honest. I mean, the President Trump is listening. That's fine. But President Trump didn't serve and for you to demonize, denigrate and disparage man who have given thirty thirty five close to forty years of their lives and services space in combat that doesn't reflect too good on your character. I wish she back off it. I, you know, I thought gentleman crystal because out after him early, but I thought that it would take a lot for him. After President Obama disparage Tim in his career over a coach weren't even attributed directly to him in the Rolling Stone that wasn't right. I always thought that maybe he come back administration. But he like betray said, they will not serve and also would Mattis being, you know, bass we're going to go anyway in February anyway, and the way he went out and the way the president pushed him out. I'm just hoping that there isn't backlash among those at the Pentagon. Well, I don't know if they'll be backlash among those in the Pentagon. But as far as finding a replacement for someone like General Mattis that has the same type of stature status expertise experience. It's going to be very difficult because you know, there's a very small about those three to four star generals who have been in the Middle East and Iraq, Afghanistan, central command. What have you that are going to want to expose themselves to this type of potentially toxic environment? All right. So we'll talk about that. Big good news is the president's slowing down. He spoke extensively Lindsey Graham, and some others and said, listen to this is what happens a land bridge from from Syria to Lebanon. It helps the Iranians it helps the Russians it helps the Turks. It helps aside and two thousand men are it's dangerous. But they're not fighting every day. They're supporting training arming and gathering intelligence. There's no rush and the president's responded that way is that encouraging to you. That's very encouraging to me. And and I think that's the most important thing. And. You know, I'm glad that he would listen to the advice and counsel, Lindsey Graham. But, you know, also, there are many military leaders. Alexei Joe Jacquin is is another one that understands that situation there, you know, what we should be talking about is how we can you know, somewhere reshape the failures of the Middle East. I mean, you go all the way back to World War One and the sex trade is falling apart. So how can the United States maintained its influence there? But not so much be the big major player, but in Naple, our allies like Israel, like the Kurds to really step forward and block some of the the the advances like I say Russia, Iran because Iran, you think about the countries of the capitals that they're controlling, you know, in Yemen in Iraq in Syria in Lebanon, Iran is trying to become a hegemonic power in the Middle East. And we need to do everything we can to block that. Yeah. Of course, we don't know. What's going on with Yemen? That's getting complicated. Because you have a you have a fight in Yemen. Okay. The Hootie rebels. Rub backed by the Iranians the Saudis. Upset that rockets are coming from Yemen border into their country. I get it. But when you when the UAE is combining with Al Qaeda leader fighting against the rebels. This makes things very complicated doesn't it when the UAE is supposed to be allied with us. Yeah. It does. And that's the thing that we should explain this that we're not being conservative or about Sunni. Shia we're just concerned about this. Either you stand with liberty and freedom or you stand. What's his lobby Jihadist is very simple. Because what you're finding is that the age maximum of the Middle East, the enemy of enemy is my friend. And that's how you see this playing out when you look at the fact is not an ally to the United States, and his, you know, his autocratic, you know means. And also the fact that they have been supporting Michigan Slavic Jihadist group as well as with cutter cutter where we do have, you know, Al UD airbase, but yet cutter is the home for the HAMAs leadership. So there's a lot of computer things that I think that that's where the president should be focused on is, you know, length, folks. No. Here's a lot of the sad. Which is you're gonna be on. All right. Colonel Ann tapping your political background to Mitt Romney came out. And I'll get around eight o'clock. I see this editorial pop up. There will be. Out on Wednesday for Mitt Romney. And I'm thinking to myself. That's interesting. He's going to outline his goals. Instead, it was basically six paragraphs of how Donald Trump has disappointed him. And he never liked him to begin with. And just an excerpt to give you an idea when he won the election. Trump Romney rights, I hoped he would rise to the -cations early appointments of Tillerson sessions Haley, and Gary Cohn in HR McMaster, Kelly Mattis, where courage but unbalances conduct over the past two years, particularly his actions. This month is evidence that the president is not risen to the mantle of his office. And it gets worse from there. How does it benefit Mitt Romney before day one of work to go after the president? What am I missing? Well, it doesn't benefit him. But what that tells you is that there is a thing called the GOP establishment. And they do spell, you know, blood in the water, and this is the beginning of them trying to make the case to have someone come up and they primary situation against President Trump. And what really does unnerved me is that we're not gonna have a very. Unified GOP Senate. I mean with the last thing we want GOP Senate that is against the president a Republican president, you know, regardless of his personality, quirks and and misgivings. But he's already going to have a house of representatives gonna come back gangbusters last night. You think he would want is a is a GOP Senate is going to do the same thing is if you run for office make an impact as possible. No one's asking check your moral compass at the gate, but he's president. And let me see you have an expertise in international business is this thing called a trade war with China. I bet he's got some unique elements to bring to the to bring to the fray, I bet you he has some great backgrounds of running state as well as as as running for president. He's got political savvy. He's got political connections. So Mitt Romney could at least try to get on board. When you have to distance yourself you distance yourself. I mean, we've seen that over overcommit Lizzie Graham, for example, I keep bringing him up, but he he was all over the president for the responsible way in which he made the. Announcement on Syria, but at the same time, he credited him for taking a stand on the wall. And then he went in and talk to him and they've made progress because he's not out there. Judging every day he's doing what's best for the country not himself with president. That's gotta be the approach or don't serve. Yeah. I agree that that should be approach in which you just brought up about with Senator Lindsey Graham. I mean there are points where he disagrees with the president. There are points where he supports the president. And he's willing to sit down as you saw have lunch and talk about serious situation. But what Mitt Romney did just kind of reminds me of house, the confederacy fired on fort Sumter. And then, of course, they said, it was the war that aggression. So you know, Mitt Romney his fired an opening salvo. And we know what's going to happen. You know, there will be a tweet at some point in time. I wish it would not be. But there'll be something that comes back at Senator Mitt Romney who will get sworn in tomorrow. And that should not be the case the GOP going into this thing needs to be United because the the left they've come after the president's administration. They're gonna come after Republicans on Capitol Hill with everything that they can't. Yeah. By the way, I'll take calls in just a moment on this. But you are man. A who understands the president because he's already tweeted this out. About an hour ago on Mitt Romney says here we go with Mitt Romney. But so fast question will be is he a flake, I hope that would much prefer that mid focused on border security, and so many other things that he can be helpful on I won't beg. He didn't. He should be happy for all Republicans be a team player and win. And that I give the president credit for that's restraint you saying. I don't really need. I don't really wanna corker and flake work this out, you know. And you know, I'm sure John thune Senator thune is not thrilled everything the president's done. But he's in leadership..

president Senator Mitt Romney President Trump Syria United States Middle East Obama Lindsey Graham Stanley mcchrystal Brian Kilmeade GOP General Mattis Israel Rolling Stone Colonel Allen west Yemen Iran Joe Biden Iraq UAE
The appendix is implicated in Parkinson's disease

The Big Biz Radio Show

17:37 min | 3 years ago

The appendix is implicated in Parkinson's disease

"News. Now, there may be a connection between your appendix and your chance of developing Parkinson's. USA radio's Chris Barnes with details. Study finds that proteins believed to cause Parkinson's are present in everyone's appendix. But individuals who get their appendix removed early in life are then nineteen to twenty five percent less likely to develop Parkinson's later. The researchers now say they want to find a way to keep the protein from leaving the appendix and causing the illness. The study finds removing the appendix after the onset of Parkinson's. Doesn't cure it or slow it down. The study was done by the van Andel institute in Grand Rapids. Michigan and the Lund university in Sweden, our retired US army four star general out with a new book and some new ideas on how to bring civility back to politics USA radio's Timberg with the story Stanley mcchrystal's a former US army general he served for over thirty four years in the military. He has a new book out, titled leaders myth and reality. It's funny almost can't give advice to politicians because they're responding to the environment. They learned that if they are civil in the other person's negative the other person wins and the further to the edges that they moved better for them. We've gotta look in the mirror as Americans and say, we're all complaining about it. The only way we. Fix. It is to change things with voting with demanding people more in the center, they may not be as exciting. But the reality is if we're going to make the government work, we've got gotta move it towards the center from both sides for USA radio news. I'm Robin will landscape. This is an urgent health notice for all residents. Suffering from back, neck knee pain. You may qualify for our pain relieving brace at little or no cost to you. But the deadline is fast approaching simply call the health alert hotline. Now you heard right. You may qualify for a pain relieving neck or wrist brace. These items may even be covered by Medicare or your private insurance. The health alert hotline is your brace company, specialized braces have been tested for pain relief. Call us toll for right now to determine your eligibility and to learn how to use your private insurance or Medicare to minimize your out of pocket costs. Don't wait at the deadline passes. You may lose your opportunity to get a pain relieving back neck or wrist brace at little or no cost to you. Eight hundred three zero six one seven six zero eight hundred three zero six one seven six zero eight hundred three oh, six one seven six that's eight hundred three oh, six seventeen. Sixty. This is the best show. What's so funny about investing money? You ask the big show with Russell Sally hope to answer that top rated inciteful financial analysis. If you're looking for insightful, financial perspective on key market strategies. Keep looking this is Michelle. This is Russ and Sally. Television studios and sunny City, California a hundred and ten million broad fat. Don't forget. We're also on the radio. We're talking. Iheartradio. Local updates during the radio. Yeah. The reason we started start tie TV show. Started the top radio shows hammer you with news traffic weather today. Big show dot com. Take a look very quickly. Just once again at the chart of the Dow Jones because I want to spend a little bit of time. Just because sure. So you have a point. You got a two and a half week moving average ten weekly blue line. That you see trending down. Here is a ten day moving average Redline, right? There is a fifty two and a half weeks crossed paths crossed paths. It's a technical indicator saying that the world is going to come to an end. On the bridge, and you should start investing in things like street, Canada's personal turns cryptocurrency, no, I mean, this is this is this is where you see the emotions in the market is to steer ingredients. Fine. No, fundamental reason for the market crash other than a couple companies have bad earnings what it's really top heavy. We we've had. Oh, I don't know. I'm going to say twenty five hundred updates overall. I mean, I know we've we've got a couple of pullbacks. But overall we've been we've been on a town this market and we've hit support levels here. You can see the same support back in may and June a little bit in July. We touched on it for the day. But the problem is is that now every new low is lower than the previous slow. Okay. You only hope you can show is the very bottom. There's so cast the cost later. It's cheap. Now, get the pool. But here's what I have to warn because something is cheap. Doesn't mean. It's not going to get cheaper confirm that with me. Because these are things are now. You gotta be careful. But this is the difference between term investing long term. I mean, I'm new technician. But if I'm looking at a chart like that minds usually a little longer term. I have just a fifty fifty zone. We we looked at. We're looking at a six months. Television. So, but if you look at what are you looking at forty quarters, he'll look at like ten years years, absolutely. Jerry, pull up that one chart that shows when we went from two thousand nine hundred thousand sixteen is exactly what you're talking about. If you take a fifty thousand foot. It's it's not as panicking, smooth Salat. The other part of this thing too. Is that when you see a thousand point drop over two days? Look at that. There's two thousand nine hundred two thousand sixteen you take it back. That's looks pretty good. Start doesn't. To hone in on Twitter. Terrifying. I was to go. So the long story short is Christina zorich. I'm gonna give you a cell phone number. So. We're not gonna do that. Feel scared. So how'd you guys handle in? Your phone's ringing off the hook and days like the last couple of weeks, something they don't because you're drained. Your clients. And the a lot of them have been investing for so long that people understand the elderly with you. I. People understand this is what the market does long-term investors. We say, we're investors not traders for the long term. So well, by the way, stock market corrections. Don't always mean a bear. Mark all bad news. That's a big piece of sometimes it's healthy. You take some money on the table. Sometimes strategically for me, personally, if I don't do a lot of day trading. My individual stocks. Senator I'm gonna take that money off the table. Over the course of several months, if it goes up ten percent of a not a long-term holder or something like that. I usually take everything back to the kospi philosophy because I'm a little more risk than my time. Looking at a computer, that's probably not the philosophy of long-term by and and it's not so explain to us because we haven't talked about the titans. We'll flash now. Talking about the long-term holder versus the trader because there's there's two philosophies long-term holders win every time. Although the traders way more excited about yes. The trader may have a little more fun in the short term is also a lot more agony. I think you know, when the markets are going down, you know, the the long-term investors gonna look at, you know, deep fundamentals of a company, we're going to pick a broader asset allocation fixed income versus equity that we think is appropriate. You know for your stage in life your retirement goals. All those exist is a multi year process. It's not a matter of months or days or weeks. We're looking at really long term. This is the return of volatility. We haven't seen volatility like this for a while exciting since earlier this year it hasn't been that long. October ten months ten months of sleeping giants. Yes. Yes. Philosophy where if you buy today, you keep it if you wouldn't buy today, you pull it out of your portfolio. You do that every technical. Revisit every year, depending on your quarterly. I mean, I'm looking at things more often. Sometimes we do. So we have some tactical equity portfolios where we'll have a specific dividend stocks or whatever, and we'll have a specific allocation for each sector and reach stock, and as they move we we rebalanced so we go back to like, you're saying whatever the initial allocation was. The other thing too is you know, sometimes selling selling because the market runs on these emotions yesterday. Yeah. People get scared and they're going to jump out, and they don't take that fifty thousand foot view. How do you guys do that? By the way is a money manager. Two and the walls are Romans Romans burning and you're sitting. She was a robot. Do they teach your psychological training on how not to jump off the cliff everybody, hold her do study behavioral investing? I mean, we have this incredible incredible research team at UBS. So there we have this constant stream of research, and we're always educating ourselves also about how to manage your emotions as an investor too, much info and not enough gut. You know, I don't think it's ever much info. I think there's so much out there. I think it's all she uses paralysis by analysis, and you're not you're missing. Sure. What are you guys? I don't I don't wanna say what are you guys looking at? But anybody here to talk about specific sector you wanted to him. Yes. So oncology, our research team put together what they call longer term investments team. So they're saying beyond market cycles. Maybe multiple market cycles. Are these mega trends like population growth, aging and longevity the world getting cancer? And the fact that the longer you live in more likely, you are to get cancer muzzle invested your sickness us. Cancer therapy right now is a hundred billion dollar business. Okay. And they're saying that the incidence of cancer is going to outstrip the population growth by factor of three to one. So there's opportunity there and a lot of people that say they want to align their portfolios the misery index. This is like you don't like by shorting stocks betting against anything. Right. Bad for the company. But honestly, you're talking about something that you can actually capitalize you can capitalize. And you can also encourage this. You know, the increase in the excessive ability of these treatments the affordability of these treatments. The cancer trends are going faster and higher in the emerging markets where people don't have access to healthcare like we do. So so my question about those type of companies always look at a million companies that are in clinical trials. Let's say. Clinical trials is getting close. But you're still a couple of years out. Is that is that isn't that still a risk? The fact that they may never hit. So it's definitely risk in this. Pressure medicine. Here's a new protocol Viagra. Hey, I'm not kidding. Sometimes that happens. But that doesn't happen all the time. Clinical trials, and they never ever make. This won't surprise you. When we're putting together a c Matic portfolio like this. We're going to recommend stocks across the spectrum of what stage of clinical trials do they have the FDA approval yet? Are they going to market how how commercialized they become? And as a sector is this is this something new for you guys are always been involved in the biotech, we have. But, but I think just in a broader way, this is more kind of sustainable responsible investing focused on on the team specifically among college. You know, we I met you Christina Guston, by the way from UPS, and she's she's a regular on the program when you first came to us, we did this would be a perfect millennial investment millennials are one of the leaders and asking us for these socially responsible, investing themes. This is something that they call it socially responsible. What they're really saying. Hey, my parents are dying. The big little sales. A little bit more money when they want. I just wanted to go to a doctor right now, they want strategies that are aligned with their values. They wanna have meaning in their investments. So a way to do that is by improving healthcare, Arthur, relentless investing more. They're saving. I'm getting more investors now. Yeah. The top. But they're willing to take. Yeah. Christina. Thank you so much Christine Augusta and UBS bringing that up today. Arcadi wealth management for the company that is under the UBS umbrella through San Diego. So if you're in southern California. Retrieved out yourself from the toll free number right now, she's the tallest one of the office. Christina. It may have been a messy divorce that suddenly cut your income in half. But not your bills. It might have been an injury or illness or your boss, just cutting back your hours. It doesn't really matter. How you got in over your head? It only matters that you are and that we're here to help. If you've got over ten thousand dollars in credit card debt, and you can't ever see breaking free call action and do it now being in over your head is a vicious cycle one day late. They charge. You miss a payment w rate. You just don't think it's fair. And neither do we. This is not bankruptcy or just as simple rate reduction plan. 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That's when I knew I needed life alert with just one press this button. I'm connected to the life alert center where I can get the help I need even when I cannot reach a phone with life alert. I'm never alone. One eight hundred four one four nine thousand nine hundred eighty eight for your free life alert brochure. That's one eight hundred four one four nine thousand nine hundred fifty eight one eight hundred four one four nine thousand nine hundred fifty eight call for your free life alert brochure today at one eight hundred four one four nineteen fifty eight. Greece is cheap. But the airfare costs a fortune Paris not much closer. And again, airfare. What about Puerto Vallarta? Let's face it. Flying anywhere is just too expensive. Wait, what's this low cost airlines with one call to low cost airlines, you'll drastically slash your travel costs. We're talking insanely low airline prices to any of your favorite destinations. Where would you like to go? 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Retired General Stanley McChrystal on new book

The Big Biz Radio Show

00:45 sec | 3 years ago

Retired General Stanley McChrystal on new book

"Our retired US army four star general out with a new book and some new ideas on how to bring civility back to politics USA radio's Timberg with the story Stanley mcchrystal's a former US army general he served for over thirty four years in the military. He has a new book out, titled leaders myth and reality. It's funny almost can't give advice to politicians because they're responding to the environment. They learned that if they are civil in the other person's negative the other person wins and the further to the edges that they moved better for them. We've gotta look in the mirror as Americans and say, we're all complaining about it. The only way we. Fix. It is to change things with voting with demanding people more in the center, they may not be as exciting. But the reality is if we're going to make the government work, we've got gotta move it towards the center from both

United States Stanley Mcchrystal Timberg Thirty Four Years
Army General Weighs In On Trump's Order To Send Troops To Border

Bucket Strategy Investing

01:23 min | 3 years ago

Army General Weighs In On Trump's Order To Send Troops To Border

"A four star general weighs in on. The president's latest move to combat an immigrant caravan that's making its way from southern Mexico to the United States with more. Here's USA's Timberg. The Pentagon announced they're sending over five thousand troops to the US Mexico border. The troops will be helping to build fencing assists border patrol agents in hot hotspots and provide support as the government braces for the migrant caravan heading towards the United States. I had a chance to chat with retired US army general Stanley mcchrystal he also has a new book, titled leaders myth and reality. And I asked him about the president sending troops to the border wherever you use the US military. There is a practical side of it. And then there is a symbolic part of it. You know, they announced we're sending five thousand troops to the border. It almost sounds like we're going to relieve the Alamo where we're going to defend the borderline if that's what we're gonna do. We're gonna shoot the bikers when they come then that's one sort of middle picture people. Get. And so didn't use our military in something like that always carries great risks of symbolizing something we don't want our nation or military to be. So I would urge real caution here. I would urge you know, we've got some time before the convoy gets here. We've got a decide how we want this to play out. It's a chance for the United States to show our values in very overt way.

United States Stanley Mcchrystal President Trump Mexico Alamo Pentagon