32 Burst results for "Stanley Kubrick"

Fresh update on "stanley kubrick" discussed on Weird AF News

Weird AF News

03:20 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "stanley kubrick" discussed on Weird AF News

"I helicopter pilot finds a very strange monolith in a remote part of utah. A mayor won't require cove masks until the holy spirit says so in native can very high on hallucinogenic plants and painted rock art. A new study finds. These are the weird stories for the wednesday of this week. The day before thanksgiving. Yes this is weird af news that you're listening to the only podcast that's daily. That's weird and is hosted by comedian. I'm happy to say i'm jones e. your host. Let's do it. A mysterious metal. Monolith was found in the desert of utah. theories abound. Ooh what could is metal. Be a giant metal. Mystery slab has captured the attention of millions as people speculate over how such a structure came to be in a very remote part of southern utah. The object was first spotted by a helicopter pilot and wildlife officers who were flying above the rugged area to conduct an annual count of bighorn sheep for the state of utah. Will they do the bighorn. Sheep count just imagine is officers flying around in a helicopter. Okay this one over there. Two three four never mind. That's a bush. Five six is that three or just two. I can't tell sandy. Can you take a look. There is that three or just two. I can't tell man these bighorn sheep. They look so tiny from up above. We need a better method than this. What is that slab. That was my that was acting out how they discovered the slab as they counted the bighorn sheep from a helicopter above. You have to have majored in accounting to get that bighorn sheep counting job anyways. This drew immediate comparisons. Of course this metal monolith to what can you imagine. I mean if you know your movies if you know specifically your seventies movies you know the deal. Although i think it was made in sixty nine two thousand one space odyssey by stanley kubrick One of my favorite directors they come they come upon the monolith that coming up coming and i can't get this out. They come upon the monolith on two occasions in that film. The astronauts find the model with on the moon and the monkeys find the monolith on earth If you guys and So there's a lot of comparisons of this metal monolith to the one in the film Let's get into the article. See if there's any parallels this could just be a prank. I mean we don't know that the helicopter pilots name is brett. Bread had the opportunity to see the big metal slab up close and guess it was probably the work of an artist. Yeah yeah sure. I'm sure it was an artist. Artists shit like this. Here's my impression of brett. I'm assuming it's some kind of like new wave artist or something or you know somebody. That was a big two thousand one space odyssey fan. You know you know. i don't know i just. I just fly helicopters bro. What do i know about monoliths man. I'm i don't even let me count the sheep man. I'm just. I don't have those kinds of skill. Just fly the chopper bro. That's what i'd do. I don't know nothing about sheep. This work was compared to those of many minimalist sculptures including artist. John mccracken who died in two thousand one. Oh poor john mccracken. That last name is just terrible. Also david's werner. Well this is not a work by the late. American artist john mccracken. We suspect it is a work by fellow artists. Paying homage to crack in mccracken. What did this mccracken guy. Put weird shit in the desert all over the world. Well one thing is known about this structure. It is illegal. Of course everything's legal. It is illegal to install structures of art on federally managed public lands according to the utah's department of public safety. This is true no matter what planet you're from it's illegal to install the art on the public lands. The agency said it does not plan to reveal the exact location of this monolith. Yeah they say it is in a very remote area and if individuals were to attempt to visit this area there a significant possibility they make become. I can't even get this out man. There's a significant possibility. They may become stranded and require a rescue. Well it's in the middle of nowhere then this whoever put this there didn't expect it to be seen by too many people for sure for sure. Well i'll tell you right now. I love this metal monolith that we just can't seem to wrap our heads around. I love mystery. I love the unknown. It just makes the world's a weirder place and in my opinion a weirdo world is a better world. A mayor won't require covid masks until the holy spirit says so. The mayor of tennessee county on alabama's northern border says covid nineteen cases are increasing their. But he won't order residents and visitors to wear masks until the holy spirit moves him to do so. I hope the holy spirit gives you a cough brother that way you're moved to save your community. It isn't that he's anti-science it says here. He's an auburn university. Trained veterinarian understand understand science. I don't think so. I don't think he understands science. I really he says the virus is science. And it's true. And i do believe mask and helps prevent the spread of it. But i don't feel. I should mandate people wearing masks at this time. I don't think so. It's not about the science man. i just don't want to tell people what to do. I don't i don't feel comfortable. I don't know why they put me in charge of this place. I just don't understand. And did i even run for this position. Sheesh man sheesh. I just wanna stay home and drink. My whiskey newman says he keeps up with the covert nineteen numbers in lincoln county. Well good good for you. You're.

Monolith Utah John Mccracken Brett Mccracken Stanley Kubrick Lincoln County Auburn University Utah. Sandy Bread David Tennessee County Alabama
Fresh update on "stanley kubrick" discussed on The Greg Hill Show

The Greg Hill Show

01:58 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "stanley kubrick" discussed on The Greg Hill Show

"Time on CBS Sports Network. Amy Happy Thanksgiving. Thanks as always, for joining you as well. Hey, maybe trash joining us this morning here on the show. Alien invasion time. So going back to that monolith story that bogus brought up and stunt to a news mysterious 10 FT. High. Metallic don't have anything else on it. Box statue. Whatever it is dropped in the middle of the desert. Now this seems to be an ode to Space Odyssey, 2001 that great Stanley Kubrick legendary iconic sci fi movie from Late sixties early seventies. So is this simply Man made by some jokesters trying to pull a prank and everybody Hey, we're gonna drop this in the middle of the desert. People will think it's an alien type of of statue. I mean, because Bogue's here's what's incredible about it. People were only led to this authorities were the Department of Conservation was as they were tracking bighorn sheep. So If this was truly put there by people. This is a real long con. This is we're gonna drop this the middle of the desert. We don't know when anybody's gonna find it. We're just gonna build it. Drop it there and then wait for to show up in the news because, remember It might not show up in the news, either. People might come across it and just take it home or destroyed to the government just didn't say anything about it. There's no way they could have known that this would ultimately be found. Which leads me to believe that it might be dropped there by extraterrestrials, right? It's a terrible Frank exhibition piece like some kind of interpretive art, because all of those things like you want as you said, You want someone to find them like you do something at night. When the sun comes up, it goes. Oh my God, What is that, like there's there's no guarantee that was ever going to be seen by any other humans. So why would you go to the effort off constructing it dragging into this remote, remote, remote speck of this remote desert? And then leave it there sturdy enough, by the way, the last for a while. And if you're still gonna wonder what it looks like to me, looks like the base of the Lombardi Trophy. That's a nice see when I look at him. I missed the space. You know, the Space Odyssey reference. It looks like the thin the football sitting on with the Lombardi Trophy in the middle of this desert, like what An effort took to make it and get it there for possibly and really likely, no payoff. I mean, they're just lucky to this helicopter caught a reflection of the sun off this thing at a perfect time to see it. Otherwise, that would have been there for forever without any other human eyes, finding it. Absolutely. And so I don't know how you get it there because there's no roads that get to this point in time to get to this geographic location. It's too far off the map into the wilderness into the desert. So you would think that if you're going to get it there, You've gotta drop it from a plane. And how is that not spotted? Unless you're driving hundreds of miles off of roads to get there, then just drop it off and then leave without any tire tracks. By the way, there is no tracks around it, either. There's no sign of human life to get it there. Which is why I'm starting to believe that this thing is extraterrestrial and I have to laugh. Because there is a quote in this from one of the authorities that came across it. And this is from Nick ST Lieutenant of the Utah Highway Patrol. Who says quote This thing is not from another world. In other words, this is man made. This is human made. With all due respect, that I have ultimate respect for for law enforcement authorities and training and all things that go through that. I mean, our expert on extraterrestrial things is going to be Nick Street from the Utah Highway Patrol. Could I please get 60? And so can I at least get somebody from NASA or somebody from the CIA or somebody who has some type of aeronautics background like One of the state patrol guys in Utah is like no way this is human made. I'm gonna need something a little bit more in depth than that. This is a great story. When.

Lombardi Trophy Utah Highway Patrol CBS Stanley Kubrick AMY Bogue Utah Nasa Department Of Conservation CIA Frank
Fresh update on "stanley kubrick" discussed on KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

01:58 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "stanley kubrick" discussed on KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

"I know that all of us here on the D a show always appreciate your time with us. It's always so much fun to catch up with you. And so tomorrow at the Thanksgiving dinner table will be thanking. Our powers above for health and wellness and hopefully, world peace and an alien invasion at some point in time during our lifetimes, and just to be clear, my dad said, either the threat of an alien invasion or the perceived threat So maybe we'll go with the latter. But I do you know what if we can achieve world peace and world friendship? We think the aliens are coming. Bring on the alien. Tomorrow on CBS is Texans in Lyons 12 30 Eastern Kick and then that other pregame show on Sunday Nude eight until noon, Eastern time on CBS Sports Network. Amy Happy Thanksgiving. Thanks as always, for joining you as well. Hey, maybe trash joining us this morning here on the show. Alien invasion time. So going back to that monolith story that bogus brought up and stunt to a news mysterious 10 FT. High. Metallic don't have anything else on it. Box statue. Whatever it is dropped in the middle of the desert. Now this seems to be an ode to Space Odyssey, 2001 that great Stanley Kubrick legendary iconic sci fi movie from Late sixties early seventies. So is this simply Man made by some jokesters trying to pull a prank and everybody Hey, we're gonna drop this in the middle of the desert. People will think it's an alien type of of statue. I mean, because Bogue's here's what's incredible about it. People were only led to this authorities were the Department of Conservation was as they were tracking bighorn sheep. So If this was truly put there by people. This is a real long con. This is we're gonna drop this the middle of the desert. We don't know when anybody's gonna find it. We're just gonna build it. Drop it there and then wait for to show up in the news because, remember It might not show up in the news, either. People might come across it and just take it home or destroyed to the government just didn't say anything about it. There's no way they could have known that this would ultimately be found. Which leads me to believe that it might be dropped there by extraterrestrials, right? It's a terrible Frank exhibition piece like some kind of interpretive art, because all of those things like you want as you said, You want someone to find them like you do something at night. When the sun comes up, it goes. Oh my God, What is that, like there's there's no guarantee that was ever going to be seen by any other humans. So why would you go to the effort off constructing it dragging into this remote, remote, remote speck of this remote desert? And then leave it there sturdy enough, by the way, the last for a while. And if you're still here, I wonder what it looks like to me. Looks like the base of the Lombardi Trophy. That's it. I see when I look at him. I missed this space. You know, the Space Odyssey reference. It looks like the thin the football sitting on with the Lombardi Trophy in the middle of this desert, like what An effort took to make it and get it there for possibly and really likely, no payoff. I mean, they're just lucky to this helicopter caught a reflection of the sun off this thing at a perfect time to see it. Otherwise, that would have been there for forever without any other human eyes, finding it. Absolutely. And so I don't know how you get it there because there's no roads that get to this point in time T get to this geographic location. It's too far off the map into the wilderness into the desert. So you would think that if you're going to get it there, You've gotta drop it from a plane. And how is that not spotted? Unless you're driving hundreds of miles off of roads to get there, then just drop it off and then leave without any tire tracks. By the way, there is no tracks around it, either. There's no sign of human life to get it there. Which is why I'm starting to believe that this thing is extraterrestrial and I have to laugh. Because there is a quote in this from one of the authorities that came across it. And this is from Nick ST Lieutenant of the Utah Highway Patrol. Who says quote This thing is not from another world. In other words, this is man made. This is human made. With all due respect, that I have ultimate respect for for law enforcement authorities and training and all things that go through that. I mean, our expert on extraterrestrial things is gonna be Nick Street from the Utah Highway Patrol. Could I please get 60? And so can I at least get somebody from NASA or somebody from the CIA or somebody who has some type of aeronautics background like One of the state patrol guys in Utah is like no way This is human paid. I'm gonna need something a little bit more in depth than that. This is a great story. When we come back, we've got your.

Lombardi Trophy Utah Highway Patrol CBS Stanley Kubrick Bogue AMY Nasa Utah CIA Department Of Conservation Frank
Fresh update on "stanley kubrick" discussed on WCCO Morning News

WCCO Morning News

01:59 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "stanley kubrick" discussed on WCCO Morning News

"But I do think that maybe you know it's hard to use a word like complacency because I don't think there's a complacent bone and John Harbaugh's body. I don't believe there's a complacent phone in Lamar Jackson's body. But, you know, maybe kind of get used to winning and maybe take it a little bit for granted and Maybe a lost down the road would have been a wake up call, But as I said, could've should've would've never played it down. Well, Amy Trask. I know that all of us here on the D a show always appreciate your time with us. It's always so much fun to catch up with you. And so tomorrow at the Thanksgiving dinner table will be thanking. Our powers above for health and wellness and hopefully, world peace and an alien invasion at some point in time during our lifetimes, and just to be clear, my dad said, either the threat of an alien invasion or the perceived threat So maybe we'll go with the latter. But I do you know what if we can achieve world peace and world friendship because we think the aliens are coming Bring on the alien Tomorrow on CBS is Texans in Lyons 12 30 Eastern Kick, and then that other pregame show on Sunday nude. Until noon. Eastern time on CBS Sports Network. Amy Happy Thanksgiving. Thanks as always, for joining you as well. Hey, maybe trash joining us this morning here on the show. Alien invasion time. So going back to that monolith story that bogus brought up and stunt to a news mysterious 10 FT. High. Metallic don't have anything else on it. Box statue, whatever it is dropped in the middle of the desert. Now this seems to be an ode to Space Odyssey, 2000 and one that great Stanley Kubrick legendary iconic sci fi movie from Late sixties early seventies. So is this simply Man made by some jokesters trying to pull a prank and everybody Hey, we're gonna drop this in the middle of the desert. People will think it's an alien type of of statue. I mean, because Bogue's here's what's incredible about it. People were only led to this authorities were the Department of Conservation was as they were tracking bighorn sheep. So If this was truly put there by people. This is a real long con. This is where to drop this the middle of the desert. We don't know when anybody's gonna find it. We're just gonna build it. Drop it there and then wait for to show up in the news because, remember It might not show up in the news, either. People might come across it and just take it home or destroyed to the government just didn't say anything about it. There's no way they could have known that this would ultimately be found. Which leads me to believe that it might be dropped there by extraterrestrials, right? It's a terrible Frank exhibition piece like some kind of interpretive art, because all of those things like you want as you said, You want someone to find them like you do something at night when the sun comes up goes, Oh my God. What is that, like there's there's no guarantee that was ever going to be seen by any other humans. So why would you go to the effort off constructing it dragging into this remote, remote, remote speck of this remote desert? And then leave it there sturdy enough, by the way, the last for a while. And if you're still here, I wonder what it looks like to me. Looks like the base of the Lombardi Trophy. That's nicely when I look at him. I missed this space. You know, the Space Odyssey reference. It looks like the thin the football sitting on with the Lombardi Trophy in the middle of this desert, like what An effort took to make it and get it there for possibly and really likely, no payoff. I mean, they're just lucky to this helicopter caught a reflection of the sun off this thing at a perfect time to see it. Otherwise, that would have been there for forever without any other human eyes, finding it. Absolutely. And so I don't know how you get it there because there's no roads that get to this point in time to get to this geographic location. It's too far off the map into the wilderness into the desert. So you would think that if you're going to get it there, You've gotta drop it from a plane. And how is that not spotted? Unless you're driving hundreds of miles off of roads to get there, then just drop it off and then leave without any tire tracks. By the way, there is no tracks around it, either. There's no sign of human life to get it there. Which is why I'm starting to believe that this thing is extraterrestrial and I have to laugh because there is a quote in this from one of the authorities that came across it. And this is from Nick ST Lieutenant of the Utah Highway Patrol. Who says quote This thing is not from another world. In other words, this is man made. This is human made. With all due respect, that I have ultimate respect for for law enforcement authorities and training and all things that go through that. I mean, our expert on extraterrestrial things is gonna be Nick Street from the Utah Highway Patrol. Can I please get six? And so can I at least get somebody from NASA or somebody from the CIA or somebody who has some type of aeronautics background like One of the state patrol guys in Utah is like no way This is human paid. I'm gonna need something a little bit more in depth than that. This is a great story. When we come back, we've got your.

Amy Trask Lombardi Trophy Utah Highway Patrol John Harbaugh CBS Lamar Jackson Stanley Kubrick Bogue Nasa Utah CIA Department Of Conservation Frank
Polish composer Penderecki dies at 86 after long illness

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:19 sec | 8 months ago

Polish composer Penderecki dies at 86 after long illness

"Celebrated Polish composer Krzysztof Penderecki has died he was eighty six he was a four time Grammy winner and his music was used in films including Stanley Kubrick's the shining Poland's ministry of culture said in a tweet today the Penderecki died after a long and serious illnesses daughter says he had tested negative for the

Krzysztof Penderecki Stanley Kubrick Poland Grammy Ministry Of Culture
Top Five Mark Wahlberg Movies: Say Hi to Your Mother for Us | The Big Picture

The Big Picture

15:27 min | 9 months ago

Top Five Mark Wahlberg Movies: Say Hi to Your Mother for Us | The Big Picture

"Unfortunately this Shithole has more fucking leaks in the Iraqi navy. Fuck Yourself. I'm tired from fucking your wife. How's your mother good? She's tired from fucking my father. You have a job Tom. I'm a firefighter. Oh God bless you a hero. I'm not hero. We'd all be here. We could use the petroleum. No excuse me Christmas. Utah a lot of fucking money. What did you do? I mean if you take away nothing else for my class from this experience let it be this. If you're not a genius don't bother right. The world needs plenty of electricity and a lot of them are happy and they can help. It really can't be that we can always do. Better let me keep trying. If you guys keep trying I'm shawn fantasy and this is the big picture. A conversation show about Mark Wahlberg. This episode may break the all time record for big picture dissonance later in the show. I have an interview with Kelly. Reichardt the writer and director behind independent film classics. Like old joy. Meek's cutoff in the new film. First cow which might be the best movie of Two Thousand Twenty so far. I hope you'll stick around for that but I were joined by the frog. Sheriff Chris Ryan. I heard that Mark. Wahlberg actually dropped out of first cow. He was gonNA play the cow Alao. But you're already doing animal. Humor here on driver too is calling. Chris. You're here because you're a fan of Mark Wahlberg work. He's The star of a new movie. That is hitting Netflix. This Friday called Spencer confidential. I think gets his fifth film with Peterberg. The actor turned director of such films as lone survivor and deepwater horizon. This is a very strange movie but I think it's going to be a a very watched movie because the corona virus is scaring America into staying inside their house. And so I think that there's a potential for a lot of viewership of this movie. So we're talking about Mark Wahlberg one of the most resilient and persistent movie stars. I guess of the past twenty five years so let's just start with WHO is Mark Wahlberg. How did this happen? That Mark Wahlberg became one of the signature figures of movies in the twenty first century. I would not say I'm a fan of Mark Wahlberg as like I'm a I'm agnostic as a citizen. Yeah I would say that. I am very interested in the way that he has conducted his career. Which is kind of a weird throwback to a studio systems our he makes three to four movies every eighteen months somehow and just releases them at like a hugely prolific rate at. I'm fascinated by all the little pockets of his career that he has created where he repeats. You know he goes back to these little micro genres that he and he works a lot of people over and over again by the way he kind of has conducted his career to me is almost unique among Hollywood movie stars anymore. I mean most of the time when people achieve a certain level success. They just like see in three years for my next blockbuster or award fodder and he's just like nope. I'm grinding out. Family movie violent action film and then every once in a while Raunchy comedy and it's just like pretty pretty like unique among all Hollywood stars so I'm fascinated. What do you make them Amanda? I was fascinated when going back to you. Remember how many great directors he's worked with and how many actually excellent movies he's been in. Chris was asking me how much we watching I had to do for this podcast and the answer is a lot. Because I wouldn't say that Mark Wahlberg stays with me besides certain shots that will certainly be discussed on this podcast but he especially I guess in the first decade of this century just goes on a tremendous run. I really from Boogie nights on and works with a does a lot of really great movies and then kind of decides to just become like the Peterberg comedy guy in the second decade of the century. And I it's a really interesting shift. He just Kinda decides no. I'm going to do this now. And it's very fascinating to me I can't really make sense of. I also is Christmas talking about his efficiency. Just pulled up his daily schedule. Do you guys remember the days? Will he wakes up. Like four o'clock in the morning posted this on his own instagram typical daily scheduled to thirty. Am Wake Up. What don't you forty five prayer time. Three fifteen am breakfast. There's a lot of work work. He's golfing from seven thirty to eight. Which is the golf people? And there's a chamber recovery at nine thirty that takes more time than golf workout number two lunches and our so our meeting slash work calls also an hour and he goes to bed at seven thirty PM and which in Los Angeles for. I'd say six at least six months of the year. That is still broad daylight. Yeah Yeah Su. There is real efficiency baked into this. He's clearly very deliberate guy. He's making choices. And I think that pertains to his daily life and also his his career. There is clearly thought going into this. It's not a type of thought. I can access. I still don't know why you would wake up at two thirty and I don't know why you would do like five deep water horizons. There's a rumor that he has a routine. I think you. I'm speculating here. But I think he's a member of Wilshire Country Club here in Los Angeles. My husband told me this last night and he likes to play alone. He likes to play. And that's why he's playing so early in the morning and he's trying to get in like a quick nine or quick eighteen. I don't know five days a week which I'm who among? Us would love to do that if I could wake up before five. Am I would do it. I'll tell you I would love to do that. I'll tell you something else I am. I find golf to be social and I get crippled like when I play by myself. I'm like all the neurosis is creeping like. Should I take another shot now like it really playing golf? If you're not playing with anyone can just tell you. He's got three snacks on the schedule. Including one that takes an hour and a half from eight to nine thirty. Am is snack after seven. Thirty to eight am golf. Probably a euphemism. Oh Okay so you think. His sessions are ninety minutes. So you're saying to jump off something. Amanda said You know who? He reminds me of a bizarre way Cruz. Where it's like that run. Where cruises like I'll just work with Barry Levinson Stanley Kubrick and Steven Spielberg and every great director at it seems like I'm just the most important factor in the whole world and then one day he wakes up and says I'M GONNA make action movies for the rest of my life? It's very unlikely though. I mean his origins restraints obviously member of this very well known family. He's from Massachusetts. He starts out as a a rap artist and ultimately becomes a Calvin Klein M. C. An. Mc Yes we watched the vibrations video. Recently I took my top five twenty two. Would you make of good vibrations? And and how did you feel about the funky bunch all these years later? It's just really bizarre that this was a thing that we lived through. Who is the funky bunch? I I still don't know who's in it. Were you in a Chris? Thought it was the backup dancers. I mean yes. That's who they were but like do you know anything about them and where they are now. I was pretty. Yeah I was pretty. I was pretty authentic back then so I was. I was already listening to deep deep newer. Grab I love talking about the early nineties with you. Can we talk about the Calvin Klein ads for a second really really important? You're almost put these on my list. And it's and my honorable mention boxer briefs. Yeah I was still a boxer sky back then that was not interested in the product. Would you just tear the ads out of the magazine? Crumpled them up and throw them in the garbage. I think that the those are the signature moment in his career without the advertising campaign he would not have become weirdly Tom Like sub Tom Cruise but he you know. He soared to a of fame on that ad campaign. They're just extremely important. Ninety s imagery obviously came as also in them. And that's where the whole K. Moss thing starts Them Hating each other. Great early celebrity feud they're very important that's all and also it looks great. I mean he and his image was of basically like a tough guy with a bad attitude whether that was true or not he obviously got into some altercations and his his personal history is pretty complicated. We're not gonNA spend too much time talking about on this show. But I think that he basically leveraged his complicated persona in the public into a movie career and if you look at the first few movies that he makes replays these kind of like weird intimidating Undeveloped YOUNG MEN. You know in the basketball diaries in. Ryen Russillo favorite movie fear And even in boogie nights. There's something like violently adolescent about his his persona which is very different from the kind of actor and movie star that he is right now so a lot of times. I think that we could. You could write like a series of essays about how much actors of his generation have attempted to mimic the kind of like rough and tumble blue collar upbringing. That Walberg apparently had like how how often like DiCaprio Damon or these guys have tried to be like no I'm Jim Carroll and he's just a function Carol I'm the real thing but it's weird like even in his authenticity. If you WANNA call it that he still lacks like any kind of emotional intelligence or psychological depth to portraying those things and you could write all these essays. But you could just watch the departed. Because that's what this does that. Do you need that from an actor? Do you need to feel like this person is like in control and has that depth that Chris was talking about? I think I do ultimately. I think that there is a reason that I gravitate to Matt Damon instead of Wahlberg. And I think that you not just because of the departed and the Boston. Bill will talk about that a lot as a comparison but I like I said I really remember a lot of Walberg performances. Even though he's been given a lot of great ones and I think that's because they have a I don't WanNa say surface level. That's unfair. They're actually a lot of depth but they aren't the emotional depths and I think I personally don't hang onto those. I think I'm always wondering how in command of the Ark of his career. He is because you pointed out he makes he's. I mean he's just been a lot of great movies a lot of movies that are going to stand the test of time and it always seems like he's being cast the way that a lot of young actresses or cast as the. Nayef as the like the naive and innocent who gets corrupted when put into a system and like did someone in a room. Say That to him. This is your lane man will early like you think so. Well I just don't think that he I think he's largely in charge of the movies that he makes. Now he's like. I think that the movies that we see our movies that Mark Wahlberg once made for the most part and my suspicion is the reason he made that transition. Amanda was referencing about just mostly doing action. Comedy movies now is because those movies are more fun and easier to make for him there either like a physical challenge there like a day on the set whereas making boogie nights as hard Russell Smart. Yeah I think that he is both like sinking very strategically as the schedule would suggest and also like not over thinking it i. That's the VIBE. I guess sometime at the end of the day he's going like it very much is what it is. He is a very Surface level or just immediate actor. That's that's what you're getting and so I think he wants. He gets to produce the movies himself and make the decisions. You just kind of like. Yeah action comedies. Got There before we get into our top fives and I think we should figure out what we mean. When we say top five if it's five performances or his top five movies because there's some complexity. There is a very strange celebrity. The the nine eleven thing is you're staring right at. It's just hanging over my head as I think about him as a public person. So in twenty twelve Walberg was quoted in a magazine interview regarding. What would have happened if he had flown aboard American Airlines Flight? Eleven on September eleventh. Two thousand one. He'd been booked on a flight on flight. Eleven but his plans changed the day before the scheduled flight and he cancelled his reservation. Walberg received public criticism for stating quote. If I was on that plane with my kids it wouldn't have went down like it did and there would have been a lot of blood in that first class cabin and then me saying okay. We're going to land somewhere safely. Don't worry Warburg apologized for those statements. But they're actually the sort of thing that kind of inform his public persona and when we watch him in an action movie. We think that he's the kind of guy who's like I would have kicked some ass on nine eleven which I don't know if you like complicates the quality of the films that he makes but I can't get stuff like that. Outta my head once I've read or heard about it and I feel like we've referred back to it even in a joking fashion over the years right. Yeah it is definitely one of the top three things that I think about. When someone says Mark Wahlberg schedule yeah nine eleven yeah and the last night of prosthetic but like you know. I'm human beings. It's the point of the movie full movie as leading to that so yes I agree. It's funny he is both. I think very funny as a comedic actor like entirely humorless and it's that some things he's in on the joke on some things he's just kind of being like no I would have save. I would have stopped nine eleven. Which is just a ridiculous thing to say. And that's the joke of Andy Sandberg's say Heidi Mother for me. Yeah you know portrayal of him is this is like he's kind of total rube but also not. There's something very elusive about. Whatever's going on with an entourage thing it's like. Do you watch entourage because you think it's completely ridiculous or do you watch entourage because you think it's like six awesome representative drama and I dare to say that Mark Wahlberg is like Yup? That's how it went. I you probably think you're right. Insulin entourage Ari comes on and it's really like Whoa but most but he's like that's accurate me. Like Vince is very much living my experience. He's like we should make a show about it. I think. I think that you guys are right. Do you think that this should be five performances or top five movies I choose? I don't know I don't know where I landed. I think I did I tried to be interesting here but I I wouldn't say that any of these performances leap out at me except for my number one and number two as like excellent performances. They're more like movies. I really like was he ever given a truly great performance. Yes I I think. There's one and a half great performances on this movie and it's just a half is the end of boogie nights. No no I. Well that might be the case now. There's another movie I still did performances but I think they are. They are a little bit also an award for the movie knowing how best to use him right. Okay well then let's get into it. Let's go into our top five Mark Wilbur performances slash movies number five Amanda. Why don't you start us off? This goes out to Bill Simmons and apparently to right who I still have never met. Hello Ryan. I'm going with fear. Why not whow revisit? Yes I did okay okay seen Djing

Mark Wahlberg Chris Ryan Amanda Director Tom Cruise Walberg Bill Simmons Iraqi Navy Mark Shawn Fantasy Meek Utah Netflix Kelly Los Angeles Golf Calvin Klein Ryen Russillo Mark Wilbur
Kirk Douglas, Towering Icon of Hollywood’s Golden Age, Dies at 103

Q

07:24 min | 10 months ago

Kirk Douglas, Towering Icon of Hollywood’s Golden Age, Dies at 103

"So that's from the nineteen sixty film Spartacus it's Kirk Douglas in one of the best known scenes of his long Hollywood career Kirk Douglas died yesterday at the remarkable age of a hundred and three throughout the fifties and sixties he embodied a certain romantic idea of Old World masculinity in his films he often made movies about cowboys and soldiers prize fighters and rebels his most famous movie was Spartacus but the movie that made him a Hollywood star with the nineteen forty nine boxing movie champion the person he was in real life often mirrored the tough man that he portrayed on screen Kirk Douglas had a difficult childhood he grew up in New York in extreme poverty he actually was a wrestler and spent time in the navy before his success on Broadway he later went on to make movies that now define the era of Hollywood classics in nineteen eighty one Kirk Douglas received the presidential medal of freedom and fifteen years later he earned an honorary Oscar for lifetime achievement Jason Gorder he's a movie critic and a big fan of Kirk Douglas is work and he's here to reflect on the actors impact on the film world to chase and thanks for being here my pleasure and honor to speak about this giant of talent what do you think when you think Kirk Douglas I think somebody that helped change what we think of of modern cinema frankly he's he bridge is very much the gap between sort of the traditional Hollywood leading man that's sort of you know the beautiful dimple in the middle of his chin the incredible physique a sort of sense that we had of the strong man the strong big actor but is also somebody that brought a great deal sensitivity to his character system the steps two wasn't simply a matinee idol who somebody that sort of brought through his performance a dramatic richness that would we'd be exhibited in many of his contemporaries people like Burt Lancaster but also into people like Marlon Brando who get celebrations and more but he also brought a very political a sophisticated political angle to his films he somebody that absolutely shifted the conversation but what it was like to be a performer not simply studio tool but somebody that could take charge of his own career and shift at and that's when the look of the great things that he did everything that we saw after the fact of of these performers that are able to shape their careers much more explicit way he was a pioneer on that front would you consider that is greatest contribution or what for you just it gleams above all the rest I mean for me my personal connection or to serve master pieces which are the films that he did with Kubrick puzzle glory was a film that nobody wanted to make nobody wanted to make this sort of anti war sophisticated look at World War one it was sort of it was a war that nobody was particularly interested in such a grisly film that about moral ambivalence that wasn't really to be taken up and he and his production company Brina named after his mother foster got the money together now a great deal the budget went towards him but nonetheless he gave a shot to this this quirky New York filmmaker called Stanley Kubrick an fifty seven nineteen sixty while he was doing Spartacus the other our grand collaboration there's another director and after a week Douglas realize this is not going to work and he brought in correct now that the dynamic between the two of them was a little tenuous but none the less he brought this to start the superstar director to one of the sort of last big epic Hollywood cast of thousands films and still injected with the with this real subtlety and real intelligence of performance and finally with Spartacus again the connection Douglas Trumbull is it was Kirk Douglas who unapologetically said this blacklisted armed writer is going to get credit actually John F. Kennedy cross the picket line in order to see Spartacus this is what broke the blacklist the famous arms those that were accused of being communists so in so many ways I Kirk Douglas of star power was used for good he was used to bring stories to screen that would have been brought otherwise he brought directors that otherwise Hollywood didn't think that were I'm sufficiently commercial and you brought to light the hypocrisy of actually bring these writers to to dream if for the if you only watch two forms of Kirk Douglas these are ones actually fully sober in you know a lot of people will be doing that tonight I want to play you a clip from almost thirty years ago no looking back I realize I was much more successful when I forgot about being a hit for years I proclaim loudly that a movie must be good entertainment no messages for me but I've changed it must in some small way touch improve humanity that was Kirk Douglas accepting a lifetime achievement award from the American film institute and you can hear that Douglas was ingesting this chiseled jaw line or a typical Hollywood celebrity of the era is like you say he was a man of principle and you're quite cranky I hear that a lot of people didn't get along with him but is that how he will be remembered do you think is a man of principle was incredibly philanthropic and and again his story is fascinating he has for his father was a smart the dealer a rag command in upstate New York came from nothing I'm dealt with severe anti semitism the sun changes name sort of inculcates himself into Hollywood as a sort of brash fully American leading man from that he saw the the division between high and low and he really took that film trophic spirit that's that moral spirit the moral conviction through his career what a hundred three is a long time to live but he lived a very very full life and I believe when he was getting at AFI award he had just been in a tragic helicopter accident then here he is again I'm coming to the fore because he was called his performance he was there to actually have the signs that he also had a stroke he's kind of had nine lives and his son Michael Douglas was watching all of this and he's an acting icon in his own right do you think that that what is it from Kirk Douglas that you see that Michael Douglas has it has in him I mean I've said the drive the conviction but of the the big deal is that once a problem OR one flew over the cuckoo's nest was a Kirk Douglas production he actually did the stage production he got the rights again he saw this very quirky very politically charged project his son would eventually produce the film in the Afghan Oscar glory because of that so so the the tradition certainly carries along with Michael Douglas but the I mean it's it's for for viewers who are not familiar with this film we just don't really have a Kirk Douglas anymore the system doesn't really work with that but we have certain people the Brad Pitt's of this world who are stars but also bringing in these films after their production so it's quite remarkable thank you so much Jason Jason is a film critic he joins us live in the studio to talk about the death of Hollywood actor Kirk Douglas who died yesterday at the age of a hundred

Kirk Douglas Hollywood
"stanley kubrick" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:03 min | 10 months ago

"stanley kubrick" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"One who hired Stanley Kubrick it over direction of it having worked with them successfully one of the great film this career paths of glory millions of Americans are under the threat of severe weather overnight and through tomorrow from the Deep South the New England heavy rain tornadoes snow and sleet CBS meteorologist David Parkinson got twenty six million people that could see tornadoes more than forty million people they could see some form of severe weather and then by Friday morning Burlington Vermont is barely seen snow there probably switching over to sleep same goes for all those here is there and so this is not in the winter to be in eastern skiers on Wall Street the Dow gained four hundred eighty three points or one point seven percent to twenty nine thousand to ninety the nasdaq was up forty record close this is CBS news you can listen to CBS news radio twenty four hours a day seven days a week on radio dot com or the radio dot com app downloaded today this is no ordinary sub shop this is firehouse subs tired of over priced lunches that hundred deliver on flavor head to firehouse subs we are for a limited time you can get a four ninety nine choice up choose from a medium smoked Turkey Virginia honey ham or roast beef custom made hot subs at a price ready made to make you smile just for ninety nine only a firehouse subs enjoy more subs save more lives participating locations plus tax on the time of the prices may vary for delivery you look amazing what's the secret of the sleep number three sixty smart he chooses the comfort on his side to sign we feel great can help keep you sleep senses are movements and a chance to keep us both comfortable all night I don't think it is only for a limited time see fifty percent on the sleep number three sixty limited edition smart plus special finance find your local sleep number store go to sleep number dot com special financing subject to credit approval minimum monthly payments required to store details.

Stanley Kubrick David Parkinson Vermont firehouse subs New England CBS Burlington
A Look Back at '2001: A Space Odyssey'

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

08:58 min | 1 year ago

A Look Back at '2001: A Space Odyssey'

"Wasn't step to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb and Joe McCormick and Robert. Do you remember about seventeen years ago. How disappointing it was that? The year two thousand one was not like the year two thousand one in the movie. The two thousand one a space odyssey. Well certainly it did not resemble the nineteen sixty eight film. Two thousand one space Odyssey did not resemble that that vision of the future. Not Not exactly. We were not not traveling. We didn't have a moon base. I I want my milk. Carton of corn destructor Straw. Well that can be arranged if if that's if that's the definite futuristic experience you're looking for but yeah this is the this is a classic science fiction film perhaps the League Classic Science Fiction Film. I mean you can. You can certainly make the case for other pivotal works of sci-fi cinema but Stanley Kubrick and and Arthur C Clark's two thousand and one has a film that has stood the test of time inspired countless other sci-fi visions. And and and yeah definitely gave us this sort of benchmark to look for in the future so the reason we're talking about two thousand one space odyssey. He is because this year. That movie is actually fifty years old. Yeah it's hard to believe it half a century old. It was released in April. The one thousand nine hundred sixty eight and so because of the fiftieth anniversary because the movie so endlessly fascinating to talk about. We thought we would vote today to a discussion of two thousand one the film itself. It's ideas and its legacy Robert. How old were you when you first saw two thousand one? ooh I saw it when I was pretty young so I don't have a very very concrete memory of it. I think my dad he either he had headed the H. S. copyrighted playing or it was on TV. I'm not sure but I'd I'd say cu maybe eight or something. I'm not sure about Barack being a very interesting film to watch because it was it. has this dream like in quality to it. That is is there no matter. What level of a awareness You're approaching with viewer. You know whether you understand the more complicated science fictional or philosophical aspects of its message. They're still this hypnotic quality to the film that draws as you in I have a weird question about it I wonder if a kid For whom the plot pretty much goes over their head actually understands the the movie better than an adult who can grasp more of the content of the plot because the movie is in many ways. It's almost almost like a more like a painting or like a work of art that is radically open to interpretation where the stuff that the characters do. Well I'm not so sure that it matters as much as more the kind of visual themes established in the questions raised by you know the the spectacle gold before your eyes. Yeah the spectacle is Is a huge part of it. I actually was tempted. I I'd I thought well should. I let my six year old seat at least part of two two thousand and one I am just see what his take is on it and I did not quite get around to to to performing a test of that sort But I have a feeling he would be drawn in by the visuals for sure. Just thinking about the visuals alone. It's hard to believe this movie's half a century old. Like we were saying a minute ago. It still feels so weird and so fresh and so intellectually adventurous. Apparently you know when it premiered. One of the things about the movie is that it's it's mostly silent. They're only actually very limited parts of it were characters are speaking to each other. And according to the stories about the premier the first audience is just Hayden. Hayden not everybody. There were some people who saw okay. This is revolutionary something very different and new and original is happening here but a lot of the Hollywood hotshots shots who were in attendance just hated it There were tons of people. Walking out of the theater. Allegedly Rock Hudson walked out saying out loud. Will someone tell me what the hell this is about. Talk it's interesting because it is a film in which a lot of stuff does not happen. A lot happens. It's a film that that that kind of sums comes up the scent of humanity and where humanity might go beyond the beyond our planet but at the same time every any time. Something seems to be happening. We kind of get a cut. The scenes where characters are having pivotal discussions about what's happening is becomes just sort of a staple of so many other film like most films are missing. The murder that occurs to in the film is not actually seen so it. When you're watching two thousand one space odyssey there is almost this sense that someone is messing with you by removing these key? Bits of information. That should tell you what you're supposed to think about well. I can understand people hating it at first because it is in a way an intentionally challenging film it's it it goes against narrative conventions in a very Deliberate Way and another thing about it is just. I'm not usually a person to call out special effects. I as a thing I love about the movie but the visual effects in this movie movie are just unparalleled in so many ways. They look astonishingly realistic for for a time in the nineteen sixties when we hadn't even been to the Moon in yet when this movie was made we had not been to the moon. Space photography was very limited. So it's amazing. They could get something looking as accurate to the experience of outerspace as as they did. But then at the same time it so D- realized so monreale and It has almost kind of a Dario are Gento kind of quality though. Of course predates are Gento. But I mean like the you know the strange lights and The way the colors color our moods. I it's so oh good I'm glad Argenta did not directed by the way is very different than the monk. The the the the the dawn of man sequence might have been similar but The yeah the special effects in this film are just so breathtaking. I feel like if anyone out there is wondering what is it like to watch two thousand and one a space odyssey with Robert Atlanta. It's like every five minutes may saying aloud. Why can't we make? Why don't we make movies? That looks like this now. Why can't why can't why don't spaceships look like this anymore? Films and basically they don't look this good in anything else for instance nineteen seventy-two silent running another one of my favorite sci fi films was directed by Douglas. Trumbull who worked on two thousand one worked on the effects and silent running looks fabulous but it. It's not as pristine as two thousand and one in garbage can point to a lot of different reasons for that. But then there's you know you can. You can say well. These other films were not directed by Kubrick they. Maybe they did not have the budget. They didn't have the right key key. Artistic people in place this kind of perfect storm of creativity and intent. But but but you end up with this film that yeah just look so unlike unlike anything else and every single frame of this film I feel like you could you could print out and you could put on the wall and and no one would question the choice. It's also somehow a movie that many people I think have tried to copy and been unable to. It's a movie the style of which is uncopyrightable In my I've talked about this a bit with my friend Dave. He's he often points out that you have the the sequel to the two thousand and ten which which correct Kubrick did not direct came out in the eighties. Oh who was the guy who directed two thousand ten who is the same gentleman and directed outlandish alcohol Peter and not just outland. He made time cop. Oh The guy who made two thousand ten made time cop was interesting just if you just look at the trailers the between the two and you see just to start different because on one on one hand you have again the pristine white you know. Almost hermetically sealed all edible seeming. Like you feel like you could just crowd bite into the white chocolate goodness of the spaceships in two thousand one space Odyssey and then by two thousand ten everything is industrial grimy and not just the says the order of the day was the not only the sets but also also the character interactions because suddenly it's not this this very subdued performance limited interaction limited discussions between characters. No you have Roy. Scheider Heider Running Center Mayor Not Mayor of Amity from Jaws Chief of police. Chief Brody. Yeah chief Brody's just right up front getting into you know loud our discussions with with all of the characters We're GONNA need a bigger space craft

Stanley Kubrick Chief Brody Hayden Robert Lamb Barack Heider Running Center Robert Rock Hudson Joe Mccormick Murder Robert Atlanta Arthur C Clark Dave Gento ROY Peter Hollywood Argenta Dario Trumbull
The 'Doctor Sleep' Trailer is a Terrifying Return to 'The Shining'

Financial Issues with Dan Celia

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

The 'Doctor Sleep' Trailer is a Terrifying Return to 'The Shining'

"The teaser trailer is out for Dr sleep the sequel to the shining, which picks up four decades after the Stephen King novel and Stanley Kubrick movie adaptation left off this centers on Dan Torrance. He was the child in the original this time he's played by you and

Dan Torrance Stanley Kubrick Stephen King DR Four Decades
"stanley kubrick" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

14:47 min | 2 years ago

"stanley kubrick" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Welcome back back with Mark dice, the luminosity in Hollywood. And Mark let's talk a little bit about some of these other things going on in all he would the church of Satan, still very active here, aren't they? Not so much the concept, very very active sort of morphed. They were very popular in the nineteen sixties that was Anton Levinas organization author of the Janik bible started quote church, which is really just out of his house up in San Francisco, but he was very appealing to a lot of Hollywood stars at the time Jane's ma- Jayne Mansfield. Sammy Davis junior claimed in is authorized biography that he had a relationship with Marilyn Monroe. And so at the time in the sixties, it was pretty appealing kind of faded out sort of seen as just a little childish things. But it's that they they satanism has morphed in is is very hard core. I mean, we see a lot of celebrities and musicians just openly embracing satanism and the aluminum body, and they literally are open about. Their belief that Satan is their savior, and they are arguing that he has freed mankind and is the ultimate liberator. And obviously when you start following down that path that self destruction. It's quite obvious to those who have is to see. But unfortunately, it's so appealing to so many people part of the reason I wrote this book is because we've been talking about the eliminate you've been talking about the aluminum body you and I for last year ten years. I mean you for decades. I'm sure before that. And in the last few years, we've seen it morph from what originally was seen as a secret society of politicians and bankers and news media to this sort of in the minds of the masses, a celebrity secret society. And so we've seen a lot of celebrities embrace this aluminum body, which is a modern day version of of satanism the LUSA ferry and we've seen it go. Oh from sort of underground or on the internet with the emergence of social media. Now, it's brought the ideas in front of everybody where before that you had to want to go and look at that information, you have to find shows like yours yet to search on the internet for certain websites. And now with social media becoming very popular in two thousand ten two thousand eleven all the social media apps started becoming part of everyday buddies life. So people who are interested in this information would post that and then their friends who had no idea. No concern. No interest would then see it. And that's how it sort of has spread. And that was really one of the reasons I decided to write the book is to clarify. What is the real luminosity? What is the conspiracy version why is this morphed into this celebrity secret society? So I'm trying to set the record straight because unfortunately, there's so much misinformed. Nation. Even made by well-meaning people who was simply a a re tweet can just send out a video or a picture or some articles that debate not be very accurate at all what percent of the people working in. Hollywood writers producers talent, do you think might have been tainted by the aluminum body? You know, it's that whole city the industry at the top is just incredible and you can see from the popular films from the popular musicians artists like cash a- this very popular singer who is in a court battle with her producer trying to get out of her contract. And she has performed songs where she drinks blood out of fake hearts and Tannock pentagram. And now she's trying to get out of her contract. And unfortunately, most of our fans don't understand most people who work outside of the entertainment industry. Don't know when these artists actors musicians with musicians are after space, and they sign up they're not necessarily they can't do or say what they want. They are happy. Upi held to the studio wants. And so the studio says we want you to sing the song. And put these symbols in our video you sign the contract, and we're gonna pay you millions of dollars and you can't disagree. You can't talk disparagingly about us. You can't reveal the details of the contract. It's all in the contracts. And so that's how this works in. It's I mean, we see at the Grammys at the Oscars last night. We see them rolling out in promoting fifty shades of grey again, which is just despicable. The movie was terrible failure. It has an F on fandango one star on rotten tomatoes at step popular, bondage, and sadomasochism movie that was glorified by all mainstream media. Why would that movie be promoted again at the Oscars when it was nominated for nothing? It was a terrible failure. But they sung the soundtrack with the the fellow the backup band having a bondage. And choke collars on at the same time when they're supposed to be fighting and raising awareness about. Sexual assault. And I know that was so contradictory. Wasn't it? Terrible in lady Gaga who was the figurehead of fighting against this. I mean, she's done music videos with R Kelly just in infamous pervert, I don't even want to mention some of the things that he's been in dieted for found innocent third thrown out, but due to technicalities, but just horrific things that you can get it in the book is a this is a family show. But these are the kinds of people that are manipulated. Even if lady Gaga didn't want to do that with our Kelly. She has signed a contract the record studio heads say it says your contract, you'll do whatever we say and work with the artists that we want you to work with you won't talk disparagingly about them. So even if she personally feels totally despise which I would hope that she would buy some terrible demon like R Kelly. She can't she's solar salt the same essentially. Stanley Kubrick, delete Stanley Kubrick, did a movie called eyes wide shut which I had to see three times before I began to understand it. But there's a message there Mark isn't there? Yeah. And that was the last movie, and he died before it was completed. And so some people think that certain aspects were left out of it a lot of critics and movie goers. Just confused. Didn't didn't quite understand it? But those who got it those understood what it was it's to be a thinly veiled reference to orgies that are believed to occur amongst actions of secret societies elite sex magic practitioners bringing images of the bohemian grove to mind sort of a modern day version of the hellfire club, which was a sex club in England back in the eighteenth century that was hosting sex orgies free Europe's elite and the name was calm. It was derived from. The fire from hell that sin brings. And the club's motto is do without wilt D'amoto that Alastair Crowley in from a satanist would adopt a hundred years later, and so it appears that eyes wide shut with for those who don't know. It's stars Tom Cruise and his then-wife, Nicole Kidman, and it involves Tom Cruise infiltrating this secret society in a very upscale area of the east coast. Burs people are involved in black magic rituals in all kinds of orgies. And at the very end of the film, one of Tom Cruise is good friends says, hey, if you understood who was there, you wouldn't sleep. Masks on masks. Now, we have a Christian singer who names name Jeannie Ortega, who wrote a blog post last year that says that one of her music producers who worked with Jay Z's record label said that he was that's producer was allegedly invited to an eyes wide shut type of sex party where he was giving a poker chip, he said, he didn't go. But he says that he was invited where he's giving a poker chip, that's the entry tag. And it was going to be a eyes wide shut type of a sex orgy. We have there's a company out there called killing kittens which actually hosts these parties for two hundred and fifty bucks killing kittens kitchens is the name of the sex party. And it started in London, and it has branches in Los Angeles in New York where couples go and pay two hundred fifty bucks or whatever it is to go and participate in masked orgies wearing Venetian mass. Six with strangers. So I think in many others think that Stanley Kubrick was trying to raise awareness that the hellfire club is still operating today. And we have a very strange case of one of Bill Clinton's good friends, a billionaire named Jeffrey Epstein who's a convicted sex offender whose rubbed elbows with callous political in Hollywood elite on his island somewhere. Right. Yes. Doug, orgy island. This guy has an luxurious Caribbean island home where multiple people have come forward and claims that they were sex slaves on the island and prostitutes on the island in in court documents, and this is all detailed and polished up in my in the book, which people get on Amazon dot com or download it onto any of your tablets. The court documents accused him of having set up hidden cameras in his house. So that he can videotape is Hollywood elite, friends and blackmail them. Yes. So this is entrapment one. Oh one and this is just a conspiracy. These are the court documents which claim that he she coolly had cameras set up in the guest rooms. So that he could videotape his guests encounters with prostitutes to then use those videotapes as blackmail little power. Let's take some calls waiting for you hear Mark. Let's go to Mark in Reno Nevada to get things started. Hey, mark. Go ahead. Hey, thanks for having him on your thing. You know, I'd like to ask your guest question in regards to a book called the Franklin cover up by Senator Johnson camp who Representative poor little boy named Paul Benassi. He's now grown up, but he's taking up there. Oh, he mean grove and raped brutalized made into a snuff film, and he won a million dollar judgment. I was wondering if your guest knows anything about that. And also about Michael Aquino, the former national security agency guy who lives there on Leavenworth street in San Francisco. There's your baby rate for devil, worship and murderous pedophile. Now, I just like to say to hear Michael Aquino. He's listening the lab of God is watching you buy gold. He's going to get you this this caller brings up actually of a very good question. I have to be very tactful with how I describe this. No, please it's detailed in the book. And what he's talking about is are these allegations surrounding the bohemian grove and actually high level members of parliament and the accusations of the high level members of parliament, come from very well respected news, sources not. Just a book that someone wrote John camps book he's talking about which claims that there's a certain secret society or a sect within the aluminum body or bohemian grove who engage in child abuse rituals sort of like eyes wide shut, but very very much more disturbing involving child abuse and ritual murders to supposedly get magical power. That's on the surface. Sounds totally insane. But at the same time that these allegations are being made about this supposedly happening in the bohemian grove. Even recently allegations have surfaced about this happening in high level amongst high level members of parliament over in London. And they have had many police officers come forward and claim that they had been blocked from investigating a black magic secret society that had abused children in murdered them as part of their rituals. And so this is detailed in my book. Unfortunately, it has to be addressed. Because this. Needs to be known in investigated by the proper authorities which were actually when it was attempted to be investigated in London. They were given what you're called D notices, which is the equivalent of a national security letter, which says you will stop investigating this because of national security, and that's what John decamp said that he was faced with essentially from the head of the CIA when he was doing this investigation in the nineteen eighties surrounding the bohemian grove in similar situations. He says that the former head of the CIA said, look, dude, just just turn walk away. This is so dark you don't want to get involved in there. So even though the caller's question might have seemed fanciful it brings up some very serious points with very serious evidence behind it. Do these people think they can get away with anything Mark? I think that they believe that they are social darwinist, and that they believe that there's no afterlife or reincarnation and so. They think that this is like the big Manati secret that they are given kingship here on earth. Through their social darwinistic might is. Right. Breaking the essential golden rule of what Jesus taught which is just simply love your neighbor as yourself which sums up the whole teaching of Jesus which these people obviously willfully break. And so I don't think that they believe in an afterlife..

Mark dice Hollywood London Stanley Kubrick John decamp Tom Cruise San Francisco Sammy Davis hellfire club producer lady Gaga Marilyn Monroe CIA Jesus R Kelly Anton Levinas Caribbean island Alastair Crowley
"stanley kubrick" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"stanley kubrick" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"And then you had even Spielberg's energy where it's like the man can do everybody's job better than they can. And so you better get it. Right. And he's still wonderful, and like charming, and like I said before you know, has that childlike enthusiasm. But he also expects a lot from his crew. And then you work with Richard Attenborough who we stopped for teatime guys every day filming stopped for twenty five minutes every single day at three thirty. So that we can have our T you think you could get away with that. Now today in like this age making there's no away. But. Lord, Attenborough do what he wanted. And it was just so civilized the entire shoot. It was just like, and we had it was a very emotional story. It's still one of my favorites. He was my dad's all time favorite that. I did. And working with Anthony Hopkins in that scene for people know the movie up in the attic. It was one of my fondest memories of ever shooting a scene. It was just an absolute pleasure and a privilege to do that with Anthony Hopkins and Richard Attenborough came. That's mind-blowing. Yeah. Mind-blowing? Did you call him? Tony. No never. It's just such a beautiful CNN's one that I just cherish in like think back on us like in my career, if I could pick one scene that is my all time favorite will be that one. And it's because of what the scene means. And because of who was there and because of just how. What a pleasure was to work with those people. Boy, what a what a wonderful experience. It was my first time in London, and I only got to sort of in the weeds. But I was only able to work nineteen days on the film because I was actually signed on contract it to do a Stanley Kubrick film, and he needed me for twenty one days in London. So I can only work nineteen which meant I was in London for like two and a half months, mostly just like vacationing and having. Sightseeing and then going to work every once in a while. And all because. Yeah. Stanley Kubrick who who I got to meet and speak to but never actually got to work with because he didn't end up doing the film. Ironically because of Steven Spielberg. So it was it was a holocaust film. You know, it was Aryan papers. Tomorrow's another upper for you. Yeah. Which I really wish I mean boy looking back that's one that got away. I wish he had done that film because that would been incredible. But yeah. Because of Schindler's List, he said, oh, I don't I don't want to do a holocaust film right on the back of that. And then also because a dresser park because he said, oh, we now have the technology to do. So maybe I'll start getting that one going. And so it was sort of funny. How? I don't know ironic. I guess that my career for the people I've worked with is the reason I couldn't have done that one which was. Any impressions you can share with us, Mr. coober? Yeah. You know, again, another one of these crazy things where I didn't realize who I was meeting, but I was flown out to London was flown out to England. He was just after drastic park was nine years old with my mom and. Essentially, I went to his brother-in-law's house, which was sort of near Stonehenge that I remember because we went to Stonehenge, but I went there, and they brought my mom into this room. That was basically like I don't know if you'd call it a what you would call it a study. But like a really big almost like ballroom esque room that had nothing in it nothing. It was just like wood floors, and there's a chair in there. And there was like a what felt like thousand page manuscript that was like half book half script, and that couldn't leave that room. And so they said to my mom, we would like to read this because this is what we want, you know, your son to do. So she was in there for hours, maybe like a five hour since I remember, I watched airplane. It was I was just waiting for my mom. I watched it on VHS is brother-in-law took me to Stonehenge. I this little chocolate treats that I really like I'm just like waiting, and my mom was in there. Like, I can't get through this..

Richard Attenborough Steven Spielberg London Anthony Hopkins Stanley Kubrick Mr. coober CNN Schindler Lord England twenty five minutes twenty one days nineteen days nine years five hour
"stanley kubrick" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

Piecing It Together Podcast

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"stanley kubrick" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

"So I know you guys can't have me on without me mentioning Stanley Kubrick. Of course, I have a reason to do it just as wedge in there for no reason, I think it was pretty out there with my my rock movie with connection, but this one makes because I read an article, what was a skyscraper. Sorry. I going to talk about size. I was like the shining and building that was pretty fatty about it. But anyway, so. No. So I read an article it really interesting article about about Jona hill and his process of making this movie and. He said that he went home, and he watched a movie every night, or at least part of it every night to learn how to make a movie, and can you guess what movie that was Barry Lyndon, my all time favorite movie? So and he talked about which is for those of you who don't know. And you definitely should know this movie called Barry Lyndon. I made by Stanley Kubrick in nineteen seventy five was a huge success in America, but has gone on to be appreciated as one of the finest films ever made I would agree with that that's the consensus anyway, and watch it and judge it for yourself. But I understood what he meant which again gave me insight into Joan hill sensitivity to the craft of filmmaking. I think he thing about Barry Lyndon is that if you don't like the story. That's okay. That's a subjective thing, it's not going to be everyone's Cup of tea, and I understand that. But if you do look at it, objectively as a filmmaker there are few films in my opinion that could rival how competent it is at the actual craft of. Having a vision for film, and then executing that vision in the language of cinema. I I would go up against anybody say, there's no film that truly does that as well as Barry Lyndon, it's Stanley fully in control of the craft of cinema and nailing it, and so it made me feel really happy. When I read that join a hill would watch it every night and learn how to make his movie who is movie, which is about an eighteenth century. Irish rogue who kinda like goes worked his way up the system has nothing to do with with kids growing up or the past of the cross Tang clan. And though not not a lot of Wutang. I mean, you can make the argument that berry goes from being a child to not really child book, a young man to a man you could make that argument. But that's really not what it's about. Right. So so it's not it's kind of a tradition like Frank Darabont when he was making Shawshank, Redemption, he would watch goodfellas every night when Orson Welles was making citizen Kane, he would watch stagecoach. Every night. And so I love the idea that there's kind of weird tradition where you get a sense of actually had a craft of film. If you know how to read the film, if you not understand how films are made you can read them and they're like textbooks. And so even though Barry Lyndon definitely has nothing on the surface with with mid nineties every day Jonas showed up to make that movie. It was fresh on his mind, and it it does live in its bones. And so it's really cool to hear that and to hopefully, bring more attention to to bury Linda and have people see it. So that's radically different movie. But we have midnight is the way that it is because of Stanley. So that's really nice. I'm glad you got to. A lot better. Right. So the finished puzzle for mid-nineties. We've got the tree of life Amer cord clerks slacker, boyhood dazed and confused. Where the wild things are no country for old men kids dope. The way way back berry Linden any s classic skate. That's pretty eclectic. That's pretty good. Yeah. It's hard to say what the running theme is exactly. But I guess a little bit of coming of age in there for the most part, but not quite all of it. But slice a life beautiful phrase that you used to describe it. I think very apt. Nah. So absolutely..

Barry Lyndon Stanley Kubrick Jona hill Wutang Frank Darabont Joan hill berry goodfellas Orson Welles America Linda Jonas Kane
"stanley kubrick" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"stanley kubrick" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Jason and JV Jason and JV Jason and JV. Want? True. Good evening. Everybody. Welcome. It's beyond reality radio. And I know you're gonna you're going to say is that I told a fifth, right? Because last night I said Jason we'll be back with us tonight. He still under the weather is not going to be with us tonight. So I will be your host solo tonight. That's okay. Because we have a great show planned. I've been really excited about this one for a while. We've got Rodney Ascher joining us in just a little bit. He is a filmmaker whose feature debut film was a subjective documentary called room to thirty seven. This film takes a look at one of my favorite movies of all time, not only my horror film fan. But I'm also a good film fan, and this one this film actually fits the Bill on both counts. It's Stanley Kubrick's the shining and one of the things about the shining is that it is reported to be from certain conspiracy circles to be a message build film, where students Stanley Kubrick was trying to get. Secret messages out to people he was trying to encode things in the film that could deciphered later. So that he could tell a story that he wasn't allowed to tell directly and one of those things was about the faked moon landing. Either way guest. Funny, Asher is gonna talk all about this. Plus there's other series and other things that the film is supposed to be by according to some of these conspiracy theorists. And we also are going to talk about another one of his films, which is called the nightmare, which you may or may not have seen. I saw it on Netflix believe and it's about sleep paralysis. And some of the things that go on with people that have sleep paralysis. It includes things like seeing shattered people and top hat, man. It's very very bizarre and very, very frightening. Events that happened to folks that experience this phenomenon known as.

Jason Stanley Kubrick Rodney Ascher Asher Netflix
"stanley kubrick" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"stanley kubrick" Discussed on KNSS

"Gonna you're gonna say is that I told a fifth, right? Because last night I said Jason would be back with us tonight. He's still under the weather. He's not going to be with us tonight. So I will be your host solo tonight. That's okay. Because we have a great show planner then really excited about this one for a while. We've got Rodney Ascher joining us in just a little bit. He is a filmmaker whose feature debut film was a subjective documentary called route thirty seven this film takes a look at one of my favorite movies of all time, not only my horror film fan. But I'm also a good film fan, and this one this film actually fits the Bill on both counts. It's Stanley Kubrick's the shining and one of the things about the shining is that it is reported to be from certain conspiracy circles to be a message filled film, where students Stanley Kubrick was trying to get secret messages out to people he was trying to encode things in the film. That could decipher later. So that he could tell a story that he wasn't allowed to tell directly. And one of those things was about the faked moon landing. Either way. Our guest gonna talk all about this. Plus there's other series and other things that the film is supposed to be about according to some of these conspiracy theorists. And we also are going to talk about another one of his films, which is called nightmare, which you may or may not have seen. I saw it on net. Flicks. I believe and it's about sleep paralysis. And some of the things that go on with people that have sleep paralysis. It includes things like seeing shadow people and top hat, man. It's very very bizarre and very, very frightening. Events that happen to folks that experience this phenomenon known as sleep rouses..

Stanley Kubrick Rodney Ascher Jason
Douglas Rain, voice of HAL in "2001," dead at 90

Frank Beckmann

01:03 min | 2 years ago

Douglas Rain, voice of HAL in "2001," dead at 90

"Company died in Stratford. Douglas, rain was ninety hell was the creation of Arthur Clark, the author in nineteen sixty eight Clark, and the director of the movie Stanley Kubrick said how was supposed to be artificial intelligence and that conflicts like the one between Hal and commander. Dave could be expected as robots with rains would handle human activities, and there would be many conflicts between the humans and the robots and the robots would win most of the world thought they were crazy. I'm dick Haefner. WJR news more news at twelve or whenever news breaks. The Frank Beckmann show. News talk seven sixty WJR. Yes. And hooted how here the most

Arthur Clark Dick Haefner Stanley Kubrick Frank Beckmann Douglas Stratford HAL Commander Dave Director
"stanley kubrick" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"stanley kubrick" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"And I I was a little I was a little concerned that maybe I had my memory had either made it better or I was a different person. When I watched it the first time, and I that change though, by the end, and especially after reading some some good articles analyzing it, I think I'm back to liking it. But it's a more mature kind of liking. Yeah. I think there's a couple reasons why I had that same worry going into it. And as I was watching it, especially are these ideas, kind of sophomoric are these ideas, the kind of ideas, you would think, you know, I- deep when you're in college or after college. But then, you know, you take a couple of philosophy classes you or you become a philosophy. Professor, I guess and some of the dichotomies that are being painted seem like caricatures or are overly simplistic. There's definitely some elements of that. But. I actually think that some of that isn't the fault of the movie, it's the fault of like college sophomores who. The movie is certain way. And and in fact, a lot of people who interpret the movie is certain way, and one of the things I'm excited to talk about is. I is this idea that I think that the movie is portrayed in a way that it's it's definitely not this imp- Listrik defensive free will against the I definitely don't think it's that. And I thought it was before coming into it, exactly. I had that same thought that this is, you know, there there is this sort of critical period in at least for me in early college where you're exposed to a whole bunch of new ideas and everything's like, you know, that's deep like, you know, what if what if this world is just an illusion like, you know, how do I know that anything really exist that kind of of of realization what if we don't have free will which not to knock on it. I think everybody you have to go through that. But my thought was is this trait was this. Trite. And then I saw so I agree. I agree with you, though that I think especially given like what I think I know about Stanley Kubrick that that that level of understanding the point of the movie is very very surface level. Yeah. There's there's more going on. So so we go through it. She goes you want to give the the gist of it soon. People have one. I mean, it's a horrific young violent killer and rapist. Rapes and kills people in the first third of the movie goes to prison, and then is given this conditioning technique, obviously, if you haven't seen the movie, you got to see it before this discussion is given this conditioning techniques that makes him feel sick whenever he engages in acts of violence. But also if you hear Beethoven that's by accident and then in the third part of the movies released and. Is sort of. Goes out in the world with that conditioning..

Stanley Kubrick Professor Beethoven
"stanley kubrick" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"stanley kubrick" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"So I think that all that factored in and you have you know, people who met met each other a sixteen year old Iraqi horror and then ended up getting married as adults. And as I've I've seen that that I've seen the shadow cast and the stage for a performance that goes along with the movie performed in very very different markets all over the country and over and over again, I flew people who have met at that show and gotten married. So I don't know what it is about that. But you definitely find your people if you if you really are into that movie, Houston, Texas, we go Roberts with us on coast-to-coast. Hey, Robert, go ahead, sir. Good morning, George, and Mr Lobo either. And I sure enjoyed the show. Thank you. I'm sixty one years old. I haven't been to a theater since about three years ago. When I went to see a rush the Canadian band, Don. Okay, interesting. Yes. Go really quick thing. The shining is a fantastic horror movie anything that. Who was it? Mr. the movie Stanley Kubrick Stanley Kubrick, I've seen five of Stanley Kubrick movies, and everyone I'm with antastic. Don. Love Cooper, orange. They're all amazing. Yes. You mentioned Sinatra earlier the best movie I ever saw Frank Sinatra. Han was the Manchurian candidate. He did. Well, there he did very well, very well. That was a fantastic is a pretty good actor. He really was you really especially in that. That's just had so many twists in it that you didn't know about right away. But. Some diabolical. One other thing. Oh. The first horror movie that really scared me. And nowadays. I I still have to see one occasionally. Okay, they're not my favorite. But I was about ten years old at my grandmother's house. Everybody was in bed, and I had to turn the TV, Dan, very Lois lay on the floor about to be from it. When they hear it. So everybody was three it was called black Sunday. Oh, yes. With Boris Karloff. Lax and right. I remember that one called black Christmas or something like that. There was black Christmas with that was Bob Clark who went on to direct Christmas story of all. But they black Christmas. There was a killer. That was terrorizing sorority sisters who all lived in the same house, and she was calling them from inside the house. That's that's creepy. And but there was also. Yeah, it's it's a very creepy Selm, really well-made structured horror film, John Saxon is amazing and it, and it's the template for a lot of those kind of movies from the seventies. And like I said that guy went on to make quirky. You went on to make a Christmas story a lot a lot of other films in different genres, but somebody will somebody's movies. Mr Lobo are are creepy. They're not pure horror, but they're creepy. There was one with the bow bridges. I believe in his his wife went into a fast food place or like like quick shop in never came back out. He couldn't find her. And apparently a truck driver had kidnapped her. And I was just really well done movie. And instead that sounds that sounds familiar and they buried they ended up burying him. Because the you know, the truck drivers do you wanna know what happened to your wife? Do you really want to know? And they knocked him out. It was called the vanishing. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. I've heard of that. But actually seen that Keith. Was both bridges or Keith or solid Sutherland. They think they were both on Keith. Yeah. It was good stuff. But Mr Lobo we're out of time. But we gotta get you back again, my friend. Jeff bridges was in that movie, the vanishing Mr Lobo with us up next..

Mr Lobo Stanley Kubrick Keith Han Frank Sinatra Jeff bridges Houston Boris Karloff Texas Robert John Saxon Don Roberts George Love Cooper Bob Clark Dan
"stanley kubrick" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"stanley kubrick" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"There's no question that Kubrick's work lends itself to a vast array of interpretation. That's the thing about interpretations of works of art interpretations are not necessarily mutually exclusive resolutely. And ultimately it could be argued that all works of art belong to the audience, perceiving them Nunes of the meaning, right? Because once the artist is dead, then they have no real say, yeah, which is a very controversial point. I used to hate it when my professors pointed that out. Out, especially if you're an artist, they'd just wants to allow your stuff to speak for itself and you don't want to be talking to press all the time. I don't wanna have to go through every little frame and say, this is what this means. I'm teaching you. I'm telling you how to read my films and you're not doing it, get out of my sight. I'm going back to the UK rights and the intensely symbolic nature of the stories. Kubrick specifically tells arguably communicate to the audience on a semi or subconscious level accessing those primal archetypes cited by people like call younger Fraser, the author of the golden bow or Joseph Campbell. And again, that Cormac McCarthy article, I probably already posted it on, here's where it gets crazy. But we're posting again by golly by gum, it's worth it in the case of the shining and the moon landing theory. The interpretations do honestly seem pretty subjective, but fascinating and compelling problem is some inaccuracies poke holes in the case as for the idea of a secret cabal functioning behind the scenes, pulling the strings of industries, religions, and governments across the world. Well, the entertainment industry certainly does have a version of that. They are called producers. Oh. Oh, bird. All EU producers out there in this is one thing that just wanted to speak to Casey as well about this in general. There is a frenetic pace that's inherent in the filmmaking process where I don't know if any of you out there have had the experience of being on a set of any kind of either for student film a school project, maybe maybe you've worked on a big production before, but if so, you know that there are major changes that occur to everything from the script to the set dressing to the camera angle that that's going to be used in the lens and everything in between. It happens in real time when you have a director with a with a vision who is seeing something that isn't necessarily written down. Right? Yeah, yeah. I mean, and again, the reason that Kubrick needed eight eighteen months to shoot eyes wide shut, which if you watch the final film, it's kind of baffling how it could take so long to shoot it because it's a lot of like simple interiors and a couple of people in a room talking, but it is because exactly that that he wanted to be able to try things this way. Do a scene here do a scene there. You know, change the location, changed the lighting. They're even actors that dropped out because they couldn't keep doing the movie. So some stuff had to be reshot in that way. So I mean, he he very much like looked at. He prepared his films meticulously, but he still they were like very much kind of living documents that he was making when when it came time to shoot them. And if you want to just to see an example of this, there's a great clip on YouTube or you can see behind the scenes shining footage where you can see cubic actually making these decisions about how to get the shot with with. With Jack Nicholson standing at the door during talking to his wife and this really low angle shot that he's just kind of messing around as they're hanging around, trying to figure out how to frame the thing Sally gets down below and goes, oh yeah, yeah, let's try this one. Yeah, he's got the director z. finer lays down. He's just like, let's do it from here. Yeah, I mean in that kind of thing occurs in film making all the time. And sometimes when you think about someone like Stanley Kubrick making these films, that every moment is planned out in a notebook somewhere in a grim or that he's got here on my plans. It probably isn't the way it worked out unless it's Alfred Hitchcock and then he always said, you know, and make my movies before ever comes on, and we should also, we should also note that Alfred Hitchcock was a monster off screen. To his to his talent, at least..

Stanley Kubrick Alfred Hitchcock director Cormac McCarthy Nunes UK z. finer YouTube Joseph Campbell Jack Nicholson EU Fraser Casey Sally eight eighteen months
"stanley kubrick" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"stanley kubrick" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"We're back. So there's a conspiracy of play here that we, we mentioned at the very top of the show, but we didn't really dig into Staley Kubrick in the aluminum body, aka eyes, wide shots. The last film he made or almost finished making right depending on your interpretation and one that really freaked a lot of people out. Yeah, I think largely because it's the only film to feature Nicole Kidman wiping her bum. Oh yeah. Well it, yeah, that was the original title. Only film is wiping her bum Il film featuring Nicole Kidman wiping her bum, well, it's a there'll. Yes. Nicole wiping her boom aside. There are a lot of things that have been brought up before that perhaps this movie had to do with the first one that I read had to do with Scientology and whether or not this whole film was kind of a jab at the. This is not me speaking. This is other people speaking. The Colt like similarities or the Colt leg things that Scientology has within it. Tom Cruise is in well, that's the well again, like also Vivian Kubrick we've talked about is now a scientologist. Yes. And the people online will report that this is Stanley Kubrick fighting against it as like you've taken my daughter, you know, very upset. I making this whole movie, exposing you. However, she did not join Scientology until after the, at least at the very, very tail end of production on this film. So the timelines little tough. Yeah. If he, if you're talking about a man writing a film and then coming up with the shot. For and all of this is it doesn't lineup, but having the coal in Tom as the lead character's interesting connection there, perhaps perhaps we're you telling us off air that there's this idea of Kubrick making eyes wide shut, just put them through the ringer. Well, I mean, that's been reported by several articles. I don't case Illinois if you've heard anything about this, but there is there's there's one scene in eyes wide shut. That feels a little bit weirdly out of place. It's where Tom Cruise is kind of walking the streets of, you know, the the back lot version of New York that they built in England at night by himself, and he passes these kinda like frat guys and they don't get out of his way and they kind of bumped into the kind of like start yelling, kind of homophobic stuff. Adam. And there has been some suggestion that that scene was in there almost as Kubrick's potential commentary on Tom, you know, there's been rumors for years about sure about Tom Cruise, so you. Just just not even so much Kubrick falling down on one side of the other of that whole thing. But just kind of, I don't know prodding Tom Cruise and like the control of his image and all that kind of stuff, but isn't also isn't Kubrick very well known for pudding all actors through the ringer. Yeah. Do all on the shining. Yes. Well, and also Scott, nine Cruthers you place in in the shining tells a story about having to do some wine, a dialogue like Hello or something like one hundred times and finally kind of crying out and exasperation Mr. Kubrick what do you want? And you know, couvert just saying, I'm just waiting to get it right, or you know, just just keep trying. Yes. Those London, but it goes, it goes much much deeper than that. There's there's a, there's an article in Vanity Fair that discusses specifically how Kubrick pushed the relationship of Nicole Kidman and Tom Cruise onset and offset there was this fairly very short sex scene between Nicole Kidman's character, and some other men and Kubrick barred, Tom Cruise in being on set, and they shot it for like six days in. It's this tiny little sex scene. It Tom Cruise was not allowed to be told anything about what was happening again, this is his wife, right? And that's a, that's one of those like things that almost I can see him as a director trying to unsettle both of them on purpose right test their marriage because in the movie they're married. Yeah. And then he's testing their actual marriage, and he would have them sit down and do a sensually therapy with Stanley with the three of them together in a room and talk about their actual marital problem. Uh-huh. And then work that into the movie, the joke about the the bum wiping thing earlier, not to keep harping on that, but that sort of fed into that too idea that he made them kinda behave.

Stanley Kubrick Tom Cruise Nicole Kidman Scientology Illinois director London Adam Vanity Fair New York Scott England six days
"stanley kubrick" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"stanley kubrick" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"My name's knoll been divorced for a couple of years Brown. Yes. Congratulations met. Been married, nine years Frederick. They called me Ben. Our super producer, Paul one take deck in his away on adventures, but we are joined with our super producer Casey peg rim who you may recognize from several other shows here at how stuff works bay guys. Thanks for having me in today. Thanks for coming on the show. Casey. Most importantly, if you're listening to this, that means you are you you are here in that makes this stuff. They don't want you to know and really as math ninth anniversary. Yeah, that's true. Actually, yeah, it, yeah. Now, while you're listening, but while we are listening to ourselves, unless this episode somehow comes out on the same day, we record it, which usually doesn't happen in less quick peek behind this curtain. We got something wrong. But yes, massive, congratulations met. A lot of people may not know that you in case you have worked together extensively in the past in the film world, right? That's right. We owned company together for a while there. He shot my wedding. We made numerous projects together. Yeah, shout out to Brad elephant. Oh, dear. Oh, no. Now people will know what to search on. There might be some stuff on Google. I think the website is no no longer up. He shot up your wedding and you guys are still did, but it was it was like celebratory style in the air. It was like a wedding. It was. I think it was a Bank heist now wedding. Yeah. So always wanted one of those. And how cinematic would that be? Speaking of. Amazing. Segues guys, finally getting to an episode that a lot of you have asked us about in the past. I mean, for years, we're all film buffs here at the studio and like many of you. We spend a lot of time kicking around theories. In discussing the implications various works as well as they are greater influences on leader films and filmmakers. Today we are diving into one of the most well known conspiracies in the world of cinema and to do this Justice. We have to begin with a single man. His name is Stanley Kubrick old. STAN. The man Kubrick was born on July the twenty sixth of the year nineteen and twenty eight in the Bronx because there have been in the Bronx. Yes, I've never been there. I often away we went to the Bronx once. Right? Yeah, we aren't brief briefly there on that that that went to the hidden buildings. Yeah, yes. Yeah, that's not a secret anymore. Yeah. His dad was a physician and his mother, a housewife, and he was a bad bad boy. Yeah, he's who is who is in tortuously bad at school in elementary school, he had about as minneap sciences as he did a attendance days. It was an outcast. Once he got to high school, he later claimed I never learned anything at school, and I never read a book for pleasure. Until I was nineteen. But when he did, he caught the bug and originally he wanted to either play baseball or beer writer. Imagine how different the world would be. If we were talking about Stanley Kubrick, the third baseman, the third baseman, right? And he did have one shining aspect or moment in high school. It wasn't all rainy gray days and sad songs on the radio. He turned out to be a promising photographer, which I think happens with a lot of people later, go onto become directors, right?.

Stanley Kubrick Casey peg Bronx Brad elephant Paul Brown producer Frederick Google baseball writer nine years
"stanley kubrick" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

Show Me the Meaning!

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"stanley kubrick" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

"And maybe the idea of the holiness of the room is feeding into that resentment. The Jack already elicits with. He can't really hold down a job. He's kinda outta work. He used to teach just to make ends meet, but he wasn't proud of it. He didn't love. It wasn't like a passion. It was something that he did just to get by. But really he's a struggling writer. And so he doesn't have the thing that he. Wants. He doesn't have the fulfillment of his desire, so he's not content. So there is an interesting class element that Kubrick is exploring here too. Going back to second going, you talk you praising Jack Nicholson's performance. If you I, there's some funny inside into that. If you watch a Stanley Kubrick's daughters like short documentary about the making of the shining called the making it a shining, think once you go watch it and you see Jack Nicolson the back because this was like a crazy over delayed. Shoot that went on and on and on, and they kind of were like, you know, art became reality because they were kind of going crazy in the hotel. And you see Jack Nicholson just sitting there like being like I get a new script every day and just I get to the sad and it's a different script. So I just throw the things away in the morning. I just don't even read them anymore. You know, he's a sitting there and then he just pumping himself up with an axe like you can tell. He's just kind of like, I guess, for making some weird, scary movie and I'm going to go act crazy. And then Stanley Kubrick edited together to this weird mail. Some thing that I think is in that documentary Ryan, you can tell me that the little boy Danny. With the actor's name is, but it's Danny something daily Lord, any Lloyd that he didn't know that he was in a horror film that he thought he was just in like, oh, tell family drama, which when I watched the film, I'm like, but he's holding a knife and he's getting scared by these. Ghosts, how did he get that performance out of him if it wasn't a horror film, but what is that covered at all. I don't believe so. I mean, he's in the, he's in the same way more trivia. Now I've seen Danny Lloyd in person and that's exactly what he had to say. Oh, that's amazing. Cool, cool. Well, there we are like, what? Man? Because the performance so young kids. Awesome. I was just going to take a moment to give a hand for Shelley Duvall in this movie. I mean, wow, I have Shelly watching this and I was thinking to myself. Is there something important that Danny the actors characters name is Danny that Jack, the actor's name is Jack, but that Shelley, the actor's name is not Shelly is there's something important about that that it's supposed to focus our attention on her character as Winifred or as Wendy room to thirty seven to. I don't know. I mean, is the names in the book. Are they consistent? Oh, I think they are. I think, yeah. Then I probably wouldn't think too much into well anyway, point plus the hell. Laura Nassar to other names. He's like, are you a winning or you like? I can't remember what the ready? Yeah, she says no, no, I'm a. I'm a Wendy. It's like, oh, okay. I think they could probably speak to more what Austin was talking about earlier with, like, you know, her just being the whatever, like his comeback or what? What does the word he's sperm receptacles learn Bank firm Bank, my bad book. What is the difference? There is something really interesting the different..

Jack Nicholson Danny Lloyd writer Stanley Kubrick Laura Nassar Shelley Duvall Danny Bank firm Bank Shelly Austin Ryan Winifred Wendy
"stanley kubrick" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"stanley kubrick" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"The late filmmaker stanley kubrick may have one more surprise for his fens a previously unseen script by mr kubrick has come to light more than sixty years after it was written kubrick the novelists calder willingham adopted burning secret from nineteen thirteen novel some say the project never made it to the screen because of its risk as subject matter the script was thought to have been lost forever and there was nathan abrams hens nathan abrams is a film studies professor at bangor university and that's where we reached professor how did you come to find the script after all these years well i just published my book stanley kubrick york jewish intellectual and trump reached out to me and also to show me a couple of scripts and this this person is the son of a full mcnabb rates a stunning kubrick and the script came into his possession because his father was going going to be off to work on the film and how did you feel the first time you had it in your hands oh this is testing it's i mean this has been commended that he was working on it back in nineteen fifty six but no one ever knew if it's completed it and what's the script was in and now we've got full fool droff and tells us up what do you have that it is the real deal and not something that someone who's an overzealous fan just made up you know question every document look i mean i'm in the all kind of every day and they're scribblings on the kubrick manuscripts house i know someone go in before being scruple trevi this stunning coup but we have thought don't could face but we try and get it with with the other information that we have to say it's you know the who's on the cover of the script you know all this extra information the other thing is this is a over one hundred page script this this take lots of publication to produce something this extensive i think what what tell us what the story is burning secret bunning secrets in vela by stephens vibe which was published in nineteen thirteen it's about the swamp byron holiday results who's spies an attractive jewish woman who's married and when she rejects his advances he decides the best routes host to befriend young some and stanley's taken the cuddle of the story and translates into a contemporary american idiom in mid fifties nineteen fifties america if they including you noted that this was a jewish woman including making them nonjewish yeah so so another way that this fits kubrick's working pots and is that the jewishness at the seoul texts that he adopted as is a race and we can see this certainly in his previous film the killing and we sit and all of his films off to that puffing thousand a month whether on the shining where they went to the jewish characters do you know what his motivation would be doing that easy for self hatred identically the mall complex is fuzzy doesn't economic motivation in mid fifties america he carly calculates the people didn't wanna watch jews on screen remember the parrot of the hollywood moguls putting jews on the screen but not as jews you know the dog la so tiny kind of and others where they've changed their names the deeper on stymied has an ambivalent relationship with jewish identity because you know what he didn't his films if you jewishness out explicit and then reinserted it under the surface those you can read the codes and we can see that and that's why i'll came my but multiple times i'm that was three things like costing decisions and of little factors many other things that relationships was shop how well firstly like shots thinks of him taking a stream jewish nova nevada of unissons since then secondly the seams of marriage fidelity at altri enough triangle as well which we'll see him the lisa we'll say that family try and go in the shining animal complex one environment and you know some of the.

stanley kubrick sixty years
“Lost” Stanley Kubrick Screenplay ‘Burning Secret’ Discovered By College Professor

As It Happens from CBC Radio

04:39 min | 2 years ago

“Lost” Stanley Kubrick Screenplay ‘Burning Secret’ Discovered By College Professor

"The late filmmaker stanley kubrick may have one more surprise for his fens a previously unseen script by mr kubrick has come to light more than sixty years after it was written kubrick the novelists calder willingham adopted burning secret from nineteen thirteen novel some say the project never made it to the screen because of its risk as subject matter the script was thought to have been lost forever and there was nathan abrams hens nathan abrams is a film studies professor at bangor university and that's where we reached professor how did you come to find the script after all these years well i just published my book stanley kubrick york jewish intellectual and trump reached out to me and also to show me a couple of scripts and this this person is the son of a full mcnabb rates a stunning kubrick and the script came into his possession because his father was going going to be off to work on the film and how did you feel the first time you had it in your hands oh this is testing it's i mean this has been commended that he was working on it back in nineteen fifty six but no one ever knew if it's completed it and what's the script was in and now we've got full fool droff and tells us up what do you have that it is the real deal and not something that someone who's an overzealous fan just made up you know question every document look i mean i'm in the all kind of every day and they're scribblings on the kubrick manuscripts house i know someone go in before being scruple trevi this stunning coup but we have thought don't could face but we try and get it with with the other information that we have to say it's you know the who's on the cover of the script you know all this extra information the other thing is this is a over one hundred page script this this take lots of publication to produce something this extensive i think what what tell us what the story is burning secret bunning secrets in vela by stephens vibe which was published in nineteen thirteen it's about the swamp byron holiday results who's spies an attractive jewish woman who's married and when she rejects his advances he decides the best routes host to befriend young some and stanley's taken the cuddle of the story and translates into a contemporary american idiom in mid fifties nineteen fifties america if they including you noted that this was a jewish woman including making them nonjewish yeah so so another way that this fits kubrick's working pots and is that the jewishness at the seoul texts that he adopted as is a race and we can see this certainly in his previous film the killing and we sit and all of his films off to that puffing thousand a month whether on the shining where they went to the jewish characters do you know what his motivation would be doing that easy for self hatred identically the mall complex is fuzzy doesn't economic motivation in mid fifties america he carly calculates the people didn't wanna watch jews on screen remember the parrot of the hollywood moguls putting jews on the screen but not as jews you know the dog la so tiny kind of and others where they've changed their names the deeper on stymied has an ambivalent relationship with jewish identity because you know what he didn't his films if you jewishness out explicit and then reinserted it under the surface those you can read the codes and we can see that and that's why i'll came my but multiple times i'm that was three things like costing decisions and of little factors many other things that relationships was shop how well firstly like shots thinks of him taking a stream jewish nova nevada of unissons since then secondly the seams of marriage fidelity at altri enough triangle as well which we'll see him the lisa we'll say that family try and go in the shining animal complex one environment and you know some of the.

Stanley Kubrick Sixty Years
"stanley kubrick" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"stanley kubrick" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Two six eight five five you want to get in on the action we'll take some calls a little later this hour but i this is a fascinating new development and potentially a new tool in the armenteros him of crimefighters headline brain stimulation decreases intent to commit assault and this reminds me a little bit of a nineteen seventyone movie that i grew up with it was when i was a teenager stanley kubrick's nineteen seventyone movie clockwork orange starring malcolm mcdowell maybe old enough to remember that or have you seen it on tm classics now nearly fifty years later the same principle seems to have been demonstrated if you recall in the clockwork orange movie malcolm mcdowell and his band of drugs who are basically a bunch of violent hooligans they commit something called ultra violence while beating people to a pulp they sing singing in the rain it's like a perfectly orchestrated violence he is then apprehended and he undergoes behave mater modification which is depicted as something exceedingly cruel kind of a pavlovian conditioning where during or watching scenes of violence he's subjected to electric shocks he's turned into a docile lamb you only problem is when they release him he's a refuse reformed beaten to a pulp because he he can't fight back he's completely lost his aggression and in a less overt way in a more subtle way it turns out that stimulating the prefrontal cortex with an electrical stimulation can reduce a person's intention to commit a violent act by more than fifty percent so this is not like you know jack nicholson or another movie one flew over the kuka's ness it's not like you're getting involuntary shock therapy were you you know grit your teeth and smoke comes out of your ears it's a very.

assault stanley kubrick malcolm mcdowell jack nicholson fifty percent fifty years
Trump commends crew, passengers on Southwest Flight 1380 for "tremendous bravery"

24 Hour News

02:04 min | 2 years ago

Trump commends crew, passengers on Southwest Flight 1380 for "tremendous bravery"

"Being held without bail that's all county cops looking for clues about a man found stabbed to death in hempstead police received a call to warner and pennsylvania avenues where they found the victim at around four thirty tuesday morning no details about this guy released other than he was pronounced dead at the hospital in east meadow short time later president trump hailing the actions of those aboard the flight from laguardia made an emergency landing after an engine explosion last month i'm honored to have the heroic crew and passengers of southwest lady thirteen eighty at the white house today the flight was heading from new york to dallas but made an emergency landing in philadelphia in an oval office meeting the president credited captain tabby joe schultz for saving lives noting she was a groundbreaking navy fighter pilot drew from years of training and safety the land plane the president says the true and passengers all showed great character and bravery he mourned the death of jennifer reardon who died of injuries suffered after sheba's partially sucked out a window throws saga megani you've probably seen his movies and now there's a brand new view through the eyes of a famous director in the exhibit entitled through a different lens you can see how stanley kubrick's cinematic genius evolved so he was a seventeen year old kid from the bronx you were still at william howard taft high school when he started working for look magazine and he worked covering the new york city streets that's whitney don houser director of the museum of the city of new york which is showing these iconic black and white city scenes from the forties and fifties this is a boy a shoeshine boy where he followed the shoeshine boy around for a day exhibit also includes the photo essays that were published in look magazine juliet papa ten ten wins on fifth avenue wins news time went away facebook looking to introduce a feature for people who are looking for love the company had nnounced the new dating feature at its annual developers conference f eight facebook ceo mark zuckerberg said users will not be matched with people they already know want to be clear that we have designed this with privacy and safety in.

Juliet Papa CEO Whitney Don Houser Stanley Kubrick East Meadow Pennsylvania Hempstead Mark Zuckerberg Facebook Laguardia William Howard Taft High Schoo Bronx Director Jennifer Reardon Joe Schultz President Trump Philadelphia Dallas
"stanley kubrick" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

I Think You're Interesting

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"stanley kubrick" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

"The temp tracks alex north persuaded stanley kubrick that he could do it replace the temp tracks with material that would be similar in mood or spirit or what have you but he was competing against some of the masterworks of the canon yeah you know the to strauss's ligeti etc he did record a score he almost had a nervous breakdown doing it because of all the pressure in fact he was in a stretcher he was in a hospital bed on wheels it was rolled into the recording sessions because he had muscle spasms in his back from all the pressure he recorded a score that you know a lot of people say it was really very good kubrick in like it you know he didn't inform north that he didn't use any of it north came to the premier in new york and was completely shocked to see and humiliated that not one piece of his music had been used so the temp tracks were what stayed in do you know if any of those any of that compose music survived is it in a vault somewhere it was re released or it was released i should say it was not released it was released for the first time a few years ago i forget the label but it is out there if you google alex north two thousand and one score you will find you know you'll find a way to get it now we keep talking sort of about the time line and i kinda wanna clarify like clark and kubrick's are kind of talking about the movie look like in sixty four right on the heels of dr strangelove which was kubrick's previous fell and then it's not released until april of sixty eight we're peer in the fiftieth anniversary of it that seems like a it was longer than they were expecting it was it was definitely longer there than they were expecting and part of the reason is the visual effects took a lot longer than they at i naively thought they would.

stanley kubrick muscle spasms new york clark dr strangelove alex north strauss google
Kentucky gov. apologizes for comments linking teacher protests to child abuse

24 Hour News

02:26 min | 2 years ago

Kentucky gov. apologizes for comments linking teacher protests to child abuse

"Former first lady barbara bush is in failing health and won't seek any additional medical treatment texas democratic congresswoman sheila jacksonlee wishing her a speedy recovery best wishes to mrs barbara bush a texan and beloved here and we wish her the very best express out best wishes and concern for her family the ninety two year old former first lady has decided not to seek a dish personal medical treatments and will instead focus on comfort care kentucky governor matt bevin issuing an apology via twitter for his incendiary comments from friday in whissy he suggested the state teachers walkout at left children alone at home exposed to drugs and sexual abuse i'm sorry for those of you every single one of you that has been hurt by things that i've said let's work together we need to work together frankly we're all in this boat the commonwealth of kentucky together our children our grandchildren their futures depend upon this bevan's comments came shortly after republican lawmakers voted to override as vetoes of an operating budget which included increased spending for public education with the help of an accompanying tax increase arly army a golden globe nominated actor and former marines drill instructor who gained famous gunnery sergeant hartman in stanley kubrick's full metal jacket has died herath by restarting harley army here army whose nickname was the guney died on sunday morning from complications of pneumonia math the age of seventy four the news was announced via his official twitter account by his longtime manager well the countdown for the closure along i six ninety six is set to begin the prep work for the big reconstruction projects set to get underway today as the crews will be out setting up signs and temporary signals and dots courtney fouls is the assistant construction engineer on the project this project was actually pulled forward due to the condition and the roads so they're really they identified a need that really we needed to get out and do this project sooners so they pulled everything together and we pull the ladder resources to get the accelerate the design in mccone county eastbound i six ninety six will remain open from i seventy five out to i ninety four but the westbound lanes will be closed from ninety four to seventy five for the entire project in oakland county freeway will remain open weekdays.

Texas Oakland County Mccone Courtney Official Whissy Matt Bevin Kentucky Mrs Barbara Bush Barbara Bush Engineer Harley Army Stanley Kubrick Sergeant Hartman Instructor Bevan Twitter Sheila Jacksonlee Ninety Two Year
'Full Metal Jacket' actor R. Lee Ermey dies at age 74

24 hour News

01:51 min | 2 years ago

'Full Metal Jacket' actor R. Lee Ermey dies at age 74

"His name was our lee emery you might not recognize the name was in full metal jacket but boy if you ever saw that film you'd never forget his performance temper by restarting harley army here li army was best known for his role in stanley kubrick's classic film full metal jacket in which he played the abusive marine corps drill instructor gunnery sergeant hartman it will not you will learn by the numbers i will teach you get up on your army earned a golden globe nomination for that role army was also the host of two popular tv shows on the history channel army served in the marines and was a drill instructor himself in the nineteen sixties his longtime manager bill rogan announced army had succumbed to complications from pneumonia he was seventy four i'm john stolnis w news time eight fifty two time now for traffic and transit on the twos sponsored by septa yeah we're gonna stick with seventy six schuylkill expressway eastbound and read at the gerard avenue exit down there was an accident there the accident's cleared but the flares were left out there so we still have people moving onto that right lane over to the left but it looks like a semi tractor trailer just rolled over the flares and extinguished them so traffic is a very fluid thing it changes quickly so we're going to say that eastbound schuylkill expressway is clear now at the girard avenue exit then there are some residual delays at stretch back to about half way back to the boulevard now elsewhere vine street expressway eastbound a smooth ride across the city from river to river went to get to ninety five ninety five northbound from vines should expressway up to allegany no major problems to turn that around and go southbound down through penn's landing no problems around the sports complex over the girard point bridge round the airport down to the blue route things are looking really good you go northbound on the blue route no major issues from ridley park up through swarthmore bruma upper darby dental conshohocken no major issues to report at.

Harley Army Stanley Kubrick Sergeant Hartman Instructor Army Pneumonia John Stolnis Penn Girard Point Bridge Ridley Park Swarthmore Bruma Upper Darby D Bill Rogan
"stanley kubrick" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"stanley kubrick" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Of its two founders assode ataka hotta and higher miyazaki the studio jebali moved away from production and the idea was that it was it was no longer in a produce new films so a bunch of the animators in producers formed a new studio and marion the which is flour is kind of their uh their maiden voyage their they're launched into whether this is something they can do and studio tripoli's magic is just so specific it produces on a may lake no no other studio out there with just this this amazing blend of beautiful phenomenally detail oriented so animation and these stories that are all about heart in energy that are mostly in some fashion or another kind of fables some of them very high fantasy some of them very low fantasy marion the witches flower could be a studio jebali project it's it's that close and it's an amazing thing it's almost as though when stanley kubrick died at somewhere in the back of your head you thinking is never going to be another stanley kubrick it's as though somebody came along and produce to perfect stanley kubrick movie and the sensation of realizing that something you love has continuity that it isn't dead that it's going to be an ongoing thing is part of the the spectacular filling had watching this film it's based on a mary stuart fantasy novel it's about a young girl who encounters a magical flower the gives her magical powers and that opens up for her a world of magical which and warlocks that she suddenly gains access to even though she is not really part of them maybe the slightest hint of harry potter to the entire narrative but in the manner of a studio jubilee movie it's really all about that magical expansive energy and creativity and the the personal energy at a young girl discovering the world entirely through her own spunk and bravery and courage it's a movie that i was a familiar with at all touch i have to confess until i saw you're listening notes in front of me tell me that it's a movie that's going to premier nationwide january he team thursday.

tripoli stanley kubrick harry potter marion
"stanley kubrick" Discussed on Truth Be Told

Truth Be Told

17:00 min | 4 years ago

"stanley kubrick" Discussed on Truth Be Told

Is the Illuminati Behind the Death of Stanley Kubrick?

Truth Be Told

01:45 min | 4 years ago

Is the Illuminati Behind the Death of Stanley Kubrick?