18 Burst results for "Stanley Coren"

"stanley coren" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

08:22 min | 8 months ago

"stanley coren" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"They had to kind of manufacture something that would allow the dog to use its locomotion to constantly turn this bit So basically, it was a hollow wheel just like a hamster wheel. With, an axle connected to it and that would. Turn the chain or strings attached to the spirit and keep rotating at a steady pace as the dog would run. Just like a hamster wheel, the spit would turn and. They were able to locate the device away from the actual spit to keep the dogs from from getting too hot which you gotta wonder why they didn't figure that out for the kids maybe that would have kept him from passing out constantly seems like they gave the dogs a lot more. Attention and care than they did these children. Yeah. Yeah. And maybe if and being optimistic, I could say that it's a lesson learned from their first time out the gate with this abusive practice but maybe like many people they just. Liked dogs more than they like humans. SORTA like the Nazis and horses, right right. Like the Nazis in horses the dogs had a number of uses but they also had almost link workers rights. I'm not sure how to say it. They had Sundays off and and they also you know when they were done with kitchen duty they were given a another job they were trained to sit on their owner's feet to keep them warm in manor houses and castles which are famously drafty I'm sorry I'm not trying to harp on this too much but it's crazy. They gave the dog Sunday's off and the children were. Round the clock year round I mean I. Only assume it wasn't something that we came across what days did the kids get off didn't seem like they did really bizarre and interesting So let's talk a little bit more about the actual breed we talked about a name that was given to what was it been Kanus Vert vertiginous. Yeah exactly this was. Much like dachshunds with their short legs and long kind of slender bodies. Were bred for a particular type of hunting initially in in Germany. That's true. The British dog breeders were looking for specific vacations had to be dog that was small enough to fit in a wheel Irish Wolf Hound wouldn't fit the bill. You know they had to be super strong. They had to be energetic and they couldn't be dummies because you had to be able to train them to do some specific things and they definitely didn't want them to talk back like those Pesky animal appliances in the flintstones or have hands like those pesky children that so. According to the Kennel Club in London. The. First mention of them occurs in fifteen, seventy, six in the first book on dogs ever written is the book. Of. English dogs by John Chaos he said that they so diligently look to their business that no drudge nor scully can do the feet more cunningly drudge and scullions being names for kitchen staff at the time. And we say it's other Latin name yet. The Vernet Aperture Kerr. What's that mean? It's just essentially like kitchen dog or cooking dog. If I'm not mistaken I love the idea of Kerr. That's sort of a term of abuse in old timey one like you Kerr, you've villainous Kerr which I guess is a dog I didn't really realize that until looking into the research for this episode But yeah, I mean it is a good example I was talking about dachshunds being bred specifically for hunting. It was for hunting specific types of small game like. Which I thought we would do for You ben and other types of rodents and smaller things they wanted to be lower to the ground. So they could like we wiggling to some of the smaller spaces that those creatures would go and it's a the the spit dog. According to this book. The English dogs by John. Chaos was a really good example of breeding an animal for a specific purpose and to be honest they have a little bit of a spotty history. We've been very nice to the kitchen staff. These dogs were well known in Contemporary Society. people wrote about them. Shakespeare has a dog mentioned in the comedy of errors and the hard truth of it is that these dogs did not have a good life, right? Like, yes they didn't work on Sundays but the kitchen staff usually got Sundays off. Yes. They got to hang out with their owner and keep their feet warm and that's you know a gives us all the all the cute fuzzy feels. But we have to remember that these were not ornamental pets these dogs with a function and they were treated pretty roughly. Yeah and it wasn't until the animal cruelty groups like the ASPCA or making society for prevention of Cruelty to animals. started kind of taking notice of you know animal rights. The idea of animal rights was not a thing like it was really like animals were here for us and we would do with as we as we pleased But this gentleman Stephen L. Zaghawa Hausky with the ASPCA talks about the history of these spit dogs and says the they were so low on the social order that nobody took. Account. Of them which kind of leaves the history a little bit open ended, and then they're actually is if I'm not mistaken a taxidermied turned spit dog on display at the Abergavenny Museum in Wales, the dog's name is whiskey by the way and this animal is described by Stanley. Coren wrote a book called pawprints on history as having a very similar body shape to Basset Hound with the head of a pit bull. So we're sort of using our imaginations here and thinking about what these dogs might have looked like I. Think we're both on the same page and picturing a Dachshund type situation a Basset Hound has also similarly kind of longer. With with. Stumped legs, but it does seem to be a breed. We wouldn't really see these days and you know it's interesting how breeds kind of fall in and out of favor, and if you don't keep breeding them, then they're gonNA eventually like you get die out and obviously there are hundreds and hundreds of breeds of dogs throughout the world bread for very specific reasons, and here's few examples from this cool medium article that. We read turns bit dogs, the original rotisserie machines for example, Jack Russell terriers were bred to hunt rats and border collies were bred for herding sheep and Greyhounds were sleek and quick. So they can hunt Hares and then Alsatians were guard dogs. So they were all these very specifically bred characteristics turn spit dogs really really did have a rough life I mean they were denied the most basic necessities that. You think of in terms of like a dog dogs overheat really quickly they need a lot of water to stay hydrated and to be healthy, and apparently these spit turn dogs would work in teams where they would there be like one working and run its little heart out on the wheel, and then when that one overheated essentially it would be replaced by another dog and they would trade every couple of. Hours and even though they did try to locate the wheel farther away from the spit than it would have been with the early examples with the kids turning it. So close to the actual spit because it was just a chain that was directly on it it still was very, very hot and a lot of his dry heat would hit the dogs and they weren't getting water so they would really kind of..

Kerr ASPCA Germany Abergavenny Museum Kennel Club Alsatians John Chaos Stephen L. Zaghawa Hausky London Coren Shakespeare scully Contemporary Society. Wales Stanley
"stanley coren" Discussed on Dog Tales

Dog Tales

02:44 min | 11 months ago

"stanley coren" Discussed on Dog Tales

"But, if joe fees place in therapeutic, history is noteworthy, perhaps even more so is the effect. She and her fairy associates had on Sigmund Freud himself. Remember, Freud's relationship with dogs didn't begin until his twilight is before that Freud's colleagues often described him as blank-faced. He was a man who plumbed the psyches of others, but was a bit removed himself. But Joe fee wolf learn nook and Loon York to seem to anoc something in him. And as Freud grappled with his failing health toward the end of his life, he yearned to explain why they'd had such an effect on him. Dogs provide defection without ambivalence, the simplicity of a life free from the almost unbearable conflicts of civilization. It was a psychiatrist description of a connection. Any dog new would recognize. Unconditional love. Thanks for listening to dog tales for more information about Freud, his dogs. We found the article. Freud scientists his dogs by Oriole Grissom Kofsky, and how therapy dogs almost never came to exist by Dr Stanley Coren especially helpful to our research. Every dog has his day and all day is Mondays will back then with a new episode you can find more episodes of dog tails, and all other parkas originals for free on spotify not only does spotify already have all of favorite music, but now spotify making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals like Doug Tales for free from your phone, desktop or speaker. To string tails on spotify just open the APP and type dog tales in the search bar. Several of you have asked how to help us. If you enjoy the show, the best way to help us is to leave a five star review and don't forget to follow us on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network. Join US next week for another good story about good dog. Dough tells was created by Max Cutler and is a podcast studios original. It is executive produced by Max Cutler sound design by Trent. With production assistance by ranch bureau, Carly, madden and Aaron Lawson. This episode of Dog was written by Matt Flanagan with writing assistance by Maggie Admire. I'm I'm murden..

Sigmund Freud Max Cutler Dr Stanley Coren spotify Joe fee Oriole Grissom Kofsky US Doug Tales Loon York Matt Flanagan Maggie Admire executive facebook madden Aaron Lawson Dough Instagram
Can Animals Predict Natural Disasters?

BrainStuff

03:47 min | 1 year ago

Can Animals Predict Natural Disasters?

"Sager. Have you heard about help? Het sometimes go missing just before an earthquake hits or how about in two thousand and four when a soon Nami hit Southeast Asia and killed more than two hundred thousand people but almost no wild animals. And did you know that dogs? Elephants antelopes bats. And even flamingos fled the scene before the wave. Hit even flamingos. Many people assume it's because animals are more attuned to their environment than we are others like the United States Geological Survey Gency say there's no connection between animal behavior and natural disasters. But if there were wouldn't it weren't a closer look think of the impact. It would have if we knew. Animals could predict dangerous natural events now the majority of researchers looking into this art claiming animals have a sixth sense or anything supernatural going on what they do think is that animals make greater use of their senses than we do using these. They react to environmental signals. That we stupid humans. Just don't notice of course different species have varying sensitivity to these fluctuations and most evidence is anecdotal but if animals are aware of natural disasters. Here's how they know. When troubles a-coming most likely animals can hear sounds that we can't especially the infrasonic low pitched vibrations made by earthquakes. Storms volcanoes avalanches and oceans in some studies. Researchers found that these sounds usually lower than twenty hertz make humans uneasy and even nauseous so with their greater spectrum of hearing. It makes sense that animals would perceive these before us as unsettling. If you heard a deep rumbling sound coming at you from a wide angle what would you do to hang out and make sandwiches or would you run for your life? One study that supports infrasonic. Hearing theory happened when Stanley Coren was studying whether dogs suffered from seasonal affective disorder. One day many of his one hundred ninety three tests. Dogs suddenly flipped out. Coren could not figure what was going on until a day later when he noticed that an earthquake struck nearby at a six point eight on the Richter scale after reviewing the results corn found that fourteen of the animals had hearing impairments and these were the dogs that didn't become anxious before the earthquakes looking further. He noticed that dogs with floppy ears were less likely to be agitated than those with perky open ears so it looks like the strength of their sense of hearing was what a tuned the dogs to the earthquakes low tones. Another theory is that through. Their sense of touch. Animals can feel vibrations through the ground or sense shifts. In air or water pressure hurricanes are known to decrease such

Stanley Coren Southeast Asia United States Geological Surve Sager.
"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

07:06 min | 1 year ago

"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Animal party on live radio with me jab well and my guests doctor Stanley Coren professor Sam Corran one of his books intelligence of dogs is one of my favorites and it has tests in there and it breaks all the dogs and it talks about different kinds of intelligence in different kinds of dog breeds and so the doctor card I wanted to tell you a little anecdote here we have these three dogs that come together so fee avalanche and will and will visit shepherd cross so fee I'm trying to get this right which is which because we always call them together but when is a bear knees great Pyrenees I'm gonna get it when is the great Pyrenees Max that's so be an avalanche is an American Eskimo dog and so fee she's a huge long like a dog very well behaved we don't really put a lot of discipline honor she's terrific but she often leaps over tall fences and then to leap back again she never gets off the property she just goes from one dog play area to another little bit a mischief no big deal well recently we saw her lie on top of one of these very very tall gates and just lay there intentionally I'm serious it was totally intentional so that her body avalanche the Eskimo cross could walk up her like a bridge and go over the gate with her and then the two of them ran off an played in in the area they're not supposed to be and yet they're little I had leaving the shepherd behind and I just thought oh my gosh that's just so cooperative and and it shows so much about their breezes shepherd of course didn't follow didn't join in wouldn't jump over anything if you paid him sat there Bargate I thought I better tell stand about this so I also saw on TV that there was a dog who pulled another dog out of traffic and saved it last week on the news and I wanted to ask you how common is this this dog's working together like this well actually I wrote a couple of chapters about that sort of thing in one my books it's actually much more common than you might think dogs are social critters and sort of keeping to go back to wolf analogy to sort of keeping that pack intact it is very important to them and so they do try to render assistance to one another sometimes it's deliberate sometimes it's accidental but you could also manipulated so let me tell you one of my favorite stories there is a golden retriever which had been trained to be a seeing eye dog and you know worked until she was about eight nine years old and then you know that's about the time when they start thinking about retiring the dog and so the dog was retired and it turned out that within about three or four months of retirement she went blind so now you have this line seeing eye dog great and what the owner of the dog this is so the person who adopted the talk after she retired Goldie's owner took another dog they have another goal to retrieve her in the house and they put a huge battle on her like a jingle bells and that'll well the young dog to serve as the guide dog so yeah line took and follow the battle yeah exactly and that's exactly the way it worked and until she a she survived until she was eleven and for those last two or three years of her life she followed the bell she had her own assistants spoke and it worked out well with this it really looked to me as I was looking out the window and I saw this dog sort of positioning herself and I thought to myself she's not jumping over it what is she doing what is she doing and then I saw the other ones like climb number of that this is just like when you see those army movies where the short recruit and the tall recruit the tall recruit reaches back over the wall and pulls the short recruit over team work no class yeah so okay so I've got some other topics we had some questions when I told people you were coming on the show I had a lady contact me who has an artistic child and she had a very specific question that I know you can handle I told her a little bit like get the autistic child to feed the dog walk the dog be important to the dog but her question is why do some dogs why do dogs like some people and really not bond with other people and the follow up to that is how can she help her dogs to like her autistic child more well part of this is going to have to do with breed as their Jack Russells in this case little Jack Russells are middle aged and elderly I don't know yes it certainly you're hoping for no no careers or not not the most affectionate dogs of the world I mean you know I had a terrier who I dearly loved and I wrote a book about you know of gradually that was a book about the the thirteen year war is that my wife had for this character no terriers are not necessarily the most affectionate dogs there are things associated with the canine personality for example do you know where the name spaniel comes from well with the little that little Spain is probably what it means just looking at well we we normally name dogs after either the people who created them like the Jack Russell terrier proportion John Russell or the country plates which airport and the spaniels come from Espanol so I think so that would be the suggestion then that that they came from Spain but none of the spaniels were developed in Spain so why did they get the name spaniels and the reason was that when these breeds of dogs were being developed the focal or was that the best lovers in the world okay that right so you had all these Kissy face dogs and regardless of the truth of the matter they must be associated with specs so that's how they get they got to be spent so a dog like that it's much easier to to get bonded for but if you're dealing with a trying to establish a bond with the dog probably the best trick to use is the is the trick that you use for sort of taming wild animals and that is to hand feed the dog so so you don't just give a bowl on the floor for free one one cable at a time and and it's even better if you can get the dog could do something like sit tour come forward a step or two words that's all I don't think that's gonna be a problem for those Jack Russells they like to yeah that's right and so that so that's the trick you know you have to feed them one table at a time and after a couple of weeks there will be a very strong bond between the child to the dog okay well I'm glad we asked you that we have to go to break we'll be back very shortly to.

"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Radio with me jab well and my guests doctor Stanley Coren professor Sam Corin one of his books intelligence of dogs is one of my favorites and it has tests in there and it breaks all the dogs and it talks about different kinds of intelligence and different kinds of dog breeds and so the doctor card I wanted to tell you a little anecdote here we have these three dogs that come together so fee avalanche and will and well this is separate cross so fee I'm trying to get this right which is which because we always call them together but when is a bear knees great Pyrenees I'm gonna get it when is the great Pyrenees Max that's so feet and avalanches an American Eskimo dog and Sophie she's a huge long like a dog very well behaved we don't really put a lot of discipline honor she's terrific but she often leaps over tall fences eventually back again she never gets off the property she just goes from one dog play area to another little bit a mischief no big deal well recently we saw her lie on top of one of these very very tall gates and just lay there intentionally I'm serious it was totally intentional so that her body avalanche the Eskimo cross could walk up her like a bridge and go over the gate with her and then the two of them ran off an played in in the area they're not supposed to be and yet they're little I had leaving the shepherd behind and I just thought oh my gosh that's just so cooperative and and it shows so much about their breezes shepherd of course didn't follow didn't join in wouldn't jump over anything if you pay them sat there barking I thought I better tell stand about this so I also saw on TV that there was a dog who pulled another dog out of traffic and saved it last week on the news and I wanted to ask you how common is this this dog's working together like this well actually I wrote a couple of chapters about that sort of thing in one of my book it's actually much more common than you might think dogs are social critters and you should be keeping to go back to wolf analogy to sort of keeping that pack intact it is very important to them and so they do try to render assistance to one another sometimes it's deliberate sometimes it's accidental but you could also manipulated so let me tell you one of my favorite stories there is a golden retriever which had been trained to be a seeing eye dog and you know worked until she was about eight nine years old and then you know that's about the time when they start thinking about retiring the dog and so the dog was retired and it turned out that within about three or four months of retirement she went blind so now you have this line seeing eye dog great and what the owner of the dog this is so the person who adopted the talk after she retired Goldie's owner took another dog they had another golden retriever in the house and they put a huge bell on her like a jingle bells and that'll well the young dog to serve as the guide dog so yeah a line cook and follow the battle yeah exactly and that's exactly the way it worked and until she a she survived until she was eleven and for those last two or three years of her life she followed the bell she had her own assistance coke and it worked out well with this it really looked to me as I was looking out the window and I saw this dog sort of positioning herself and I thought to myself she's not jumping over it what is she doing what is she doing and then I saw the other one like climb number of that this is just like when you see those army movies where the short recruit and the tall recruit the tall recruit reaches back over the wall and pulls the short recruit over team work no class yeah so okay so I've got some other topics we had some questions when I told people you were coming on the show I had a lady contact me who has an autistic child and she had a very specific question that I know you can handle I told her a little bit like get the autistic child to feed the dog walk the dog be important to the dog but her question is why do some dogs why do dogs like some people and really not bond with other people and a follow up to that is how can she help her dogs to like her autistic child more well part of this is going to have to do with breed as their Jack Russells in this case little Jack Russells are middle aged and elderly I don't know yeah it's certainly you're hoping for no no careers or not not the most affectionate dogs of the world I mean you know I had a terrier who I dearly loved and I wrote a book about a you know a fracture the that was a book about the the thirteen year war is that my wife had for this character no terriers are not necessarily the most affectionate dogs there are things associated with the canine personality for example do you know where the name spaniel comes from well with the little that little Spain is probably what it means just looking at well we we normally name dogs after either the people who created them like the Jack Russell terrier proportion John Russell or the country plates which the report and the spaniels come from Espanol so okay so that would be the suggestion then that that they came from Spain but none of the spaniels were developed in Spain so why did they get the name spaniels and the reason was that when these breeds of dogs were being developed the focal or was that the best lovers in the world so you that's right so you had all these Kissy face dogs and regardless of the truth of the matter they must be associated with specs so that's how they get they got to be spent so a dog like that it's much easier to to get bonding for but if you're dealing with a trying to establish a bond with the dog probably the best trick to use is the is the trick that you use for sort of taming wild animals and that is to hand feed the dog so so you don't just give a bowl on the floor for free one one cable at a time and and it's even better if you can get the dog to do something like sit tour come forward a step or two it that's all I don't think that's gonna be a problem for those Jack Russells they like to yeah that's right and so that so that's the trick you know you have to feed them one cable at a time and after a couple of weeks there will be a very strong bond between the child to the dog okay well I'm glad we asked you that we have to go to break we'll.

Sam Corin Stanley Coren professor eight nine years thirteen year four months three years
"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

07:40 min | 2 years ago

"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Doctor STAN corn, the professor back on the show when I saw on the news, like probably many of you did Lee. Terrifically funny footage of a person trying to get on a plane with a peacock and another person trying to get on the plane with the squirrel each one claiming that this is going to come them. Well, it's their PTSD pet. And you know if I was on that plane having a pet squirrel on the plane with me, would not, call me neither would a peacock. I know what they sound like. And I very likely do I don't think they'd be pooping and litterbox is, so I wanna ask Dr Cohen, what is all this about these exile, eighty assistance animals and where should the line be John. Dr card, welcome to the show, by the way. Secret Besser Dr corn. He's been on my show. Many times is professor of psychology is written many bestselling books on Doug's, too. So I love to put these weird psychology questions to them. So if you've ever wondered why dogs or cats or animals do what they do. This is the kind of show for you. We're going to talk about the psychology behind us humans and the animals. And so the first question is about these people who wanna get these odd animals on the plane, what's going on there? Well, I'll tell you, you know, they're down to be in the news sometime soon. Somebody who wants to get on the plane with a bowl carrying their emotional support goldfish. You have to understand that there's lots and lots of data, which suggests that when you interact with a familiar and friendly animal and most of the research has been done on dogs. And if you're interacting with that animal impending, it, there's a whole bunch of changes which occur in your body, your heart rate goes down your blood pressure. Goes down your muscles. Relax, you breathe more regularly, and there's even evidence that their harmonious changes so you get oxytocin, which is a hormone associated pain? That makes us pregnant mothers have an easier time delivering. I know that one will also associated with the fiction, so nice when you're caressing, somebody, the tocine flows more and the corticosteroids stress hormones go down. So there are good things associated with this. The data says that the largest fix our gotten interacting with dogs, you get a lesser effect with cats. I have no idea what effect you get with squirrels or. What about faked ons? Like those fake Asian made simulated animals that they seem to be passing around old, folks homes, and I find disturbing. I don't know why I find it disturbing because sometimes the patient doesn't seem to know it's not a real dog. I don't know what it is that bothers me about that. But is that the same as a dog the fake? Awful lot of the effect has to touch, so you know, feeling that for and the warmth is really important, but equally important is the fact that there is an emotional responsiveness, you get this reciprocity. So you talked to the dog and the dog responds with particular behavior steel, and that kind of social support. There's all sorts of psychological evidence shows that we manage stress awful lot better when we've got emotional support. Even just somebody sitting, you know, near us, but it has to be alive. Okay, I'm could fake it. It can't be like a simulated cat that purrs or a dog wags its tail. And that's how I actually there's been some research to which, you know, there was one thing, which used Renault looked like a, like a large rat to me, which was a ferry thing, which actually had a vibrator inside. So it did per. Yeah. And kids seem to like it better than than one which doesn't care, but it had no affect on the stress rate reactions of the adult. So, so think an airline is justified in saying, like dogs, only or dogs and cats only or like what would a would ahead like trying to think on chubby openminded. Okay, the these rejections were done in states, and there is a versus with Disabilities Act, and it says that licensed therapy dogs or service dogs like for the blind and deaf must be taken on. But the big problem is a whole lot of people are using this, as an excuse to bring anything they want on. So, you know, they bring their pet whatever it is on. And none of these things have been certified, none of these things have been specially trained and I think that unless they've been trained and certif-. They should not be on. You know, between even though I mean I read puppies, than I sell puppies and last year, I had a litter of nine standard poodles where three went to service and their siblings that didn't go to service are very similar. But once they're trained and certified these dogs that we know is, so they're so predictable in so guaranteed to behave in a certain way in public whereas their siblings. Well, maybe they'll have a mischievous day, naughty day and make on the carpet men accident or do something inappropriate. I mean, even though the same potential almost it's the training that goes into the makes them able to pass in society, and I don't get that. That's right. And, you know, the fact that we draw comfort, I mean, you know, draw comfort from my old, empty headed little cavalier, king. Charles spaniel and, you know, he's, he's his skills are, are really quite limited. I mean you know, I had the person who trained the top obedience stall in. In the us, and Canada word Faulkner, try to train him to retrieve an could get word of dog loan hunt. I think that's from a movie, right? I mean, not that there are some issues that they just won't they look at you like, well, why did you throw it? If you want it, I'm not getting that. Dan board. Finally looked at me and says you wanna dogs at retrieves? He says, get a retriever, so I could get another retriever. So my, that's what my puppy but anyway. Break right now. So we're going to pause there. We're gonna come back before we go to break. I want to welcome all us. But affi- listeners that's disturb people on their cell phones. People out and about are able to listen to us just with a click on Spotify. So we got access to millions of new listeners, and most of them are, are pretty young. So we've got a whole new young listening audience, people who would have to pay to take your classes if they wanted to listen to the wisdom of doctor professor Stanley Coren, who we've got on air today, so we're going to go to break, and we're gonna come back and we're gonna take a little turn. We're going to stop talking about PTSD and I'm gonna tell you about an amazing little Sewri that happened here these, these three dogs, and what they did, and how they work together. I love it. When dogs work together. So stay tuned. Everybody animal party will be.

professor PTSD Dr Cohen STAN corn professor of psychology Spotify us Stanley Coren oxytocin Lee Renault Doug Charles Dan board Faulkner
"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Live. Okay. Cut Rosso champ fake it. It can't be like a simulated cat that purrs or a dog wags its tail. That's how I actually there's been some research, which, you know, there was one thing which used under. No looked like a like a large rat to me, which was a ferry thing, which actually had a vibrator inside. So it did per. Yeah. Kids seem to like it better than than one which doesn't per, but it had no effect on the stress rate reactions of the adult. So, so you think an airline is justified in saying, like dogs, only or dogs and cats only or like what would a would ahead. Can they like trying to think autism? Chubby openminded. Okay. The these rejections were done in states, and there is a persons with Disabilities Act, and it says that licensed therapy dogs or service dogs like for the blind and deaf must be taken on. But the big problem is a whole lot of people are using this, as an excuse to bring anything they want one. So, you know, they bring their pet whatever it is on. And none of these things have been certified in one of these things have been specially trained and I think that unless they've been trained and certified, they should not be on. That, you know, difference between even though I mean I breed puppies and I sell puppies and last year, I had a litter of nine standard poodles where three went to service and I mean, their siblings that didn't go to service are very similar. But once they're trained in certified these dogs that we know is so are so predictable in so guaranteed to behave in a certain way in public whereas their siblings. Well, maybe they'll have a mischievous day, naughty day and make on the carpet men accident or do something inappropriate. I mean, even though the same potential almost it's the training that goes into the makes them able to pass in society, and I don't get that. That's right. And, you know, the fact that we draw comfort, I mean, you know, I draw comfort from my old, empty headed little cavalier king. Charles spaniel and, you know, he's his his skills are, are really quite limited. I mean, you know, I had the person who trained the top obese. Radiant stall in the us, and Canada word Faulkner, you know, try to train him to retrieve and I gave could get word of dog loan hunt. I think that's a co from a movie, right? No, no. I mean, not catch that dog is that there are some shoot well, that they just won't. They look at you like, well, why did you throw it? If you want it, I'm not getting that. And word finally looked at me and says you wanna dogs at retrieves? He said, get a retriever, so I could get another retriever. So my, that's what my populist, but anyway, we have to go to break right now. So we're going to pause there. We're gonna come back before we go to break. I want to welcome all this. But if I listening that's disturbing people on their cell phones. People out and about are able to listen to us just with a click on Spotify. So we just got access to millions of new listeners, and most of them are, are pretty young. So we've got a whole new young listening audience, people who would have to pay to take your classes if they wanted to listen to the wisdom of doctor professor Stanley Coren, who we've got on air today, so we're going to go to break, and we're gonna come back and we're gonna take a little turn. We're going to stop talking about PTSD and I'm gonna tell you about an amazing little story that happened here these, these three dogs, and what.

Stanley Coren Spotify us professor Charles Faulkner
"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

07:44 min | 2 years ago

"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"On pet. Life radio with me dad will and I decided to invite doctor STAN corn the professor back on the show when I saw on the news like probably many of you did Lee. Terrifically funny footage of a person trying to get on a plane with a peacock and another person trying to get on the plane with the squirrel each one claiming that this is going to come them while it's there PTSD pet, and you know, if I was on that plane having a pet squirrel on the plane with me would not call me. Neither would a peacock. I know what they sound like, and I very likely do I don't think they'd be pooping in litterbox is. So I want to ask Dr Cohen, what is all this about these exile assistance animals, and where should the line be John Dr card? Welcome to the show, by the way for talking with secret Besser, Dr corn he's been on my show. Many times is professor of psychology. He's written many bestselling books on dogs too. So I love to put these weird psychology questions to them. So if you've ever wondered why dogs or cats or animals do what they do? This is the kind of show for you. We're going to talk about the psychology behind us. Humans and the animals, and so the first question is about these people who wanna get these odd animals on the plane. What's going on there? Well, I'll tell you. There's bound to be in the news sometime soon somebody who wants to get on the plane with a bowl carrying their emotional support goldfish. Yeah. You have to understand that there's lots and lots of data which suggests that when you interact with a familiar and friendly animal and most of the research has been done on dogs, and if you're interacting with that animal, petting it. There's a whole bunch of changes which occur in your body. Your heart rate goes down. Your blood pressure goes down your muscles. Relax, you breathe more regularly. And there's even evidence that they're harmonium changes. So you get actually koshen, which is a hormone associated pain that that makes us pregnant mothers have had easier time delivering I know that one will also associated with affection so nice when you're caressing somebody at the medicine of flows, a more and the corticosteroids stress hormones, go down. So there are good things associated with. This. The data says that the largest fix our gotten by interacting with dogs. You get a lesser affect with cats. I have no idea. What effect you get with squirrels or? What about fake dogs like those fake Asian made simulated animals that they seem to be passing around old folks homes, and I find disturbing. I don't know why I find it disturbing baby. Because sometimes the patient doesn't seem to know. It's not a real dog. I don't know what it is. That bothers me about that. But is that the same as a dog the fake? Okay. An awful lot of the effect has to do with touch. So you know, feeling that for and the warmth is really important, but equally important is the fact that there is an emotional responsive. This you get this reciprocity. So you talked to the dog and the dog response with particular behavior steel, and that kind of social support there's all sorts of psychological evidence, which shows that we manage stress an awful lot better when we've got emotional support. Even just somebody sitting ghetto near us, but it has to be alive. Okay. So make it it kept like a simulated cap that purse or a dog wags at sale. That's how I actually there's been some research, which, you know, there was one thing which used looked like a like a large wreck to me, which was a ferry thing which actually had a vibrator inside. So it did per. Yeah. Kids seem to like it better than than one which doesn't pair. But it had no effect on the stress rate reactions of the adults. So so do you think an airline is justified in saying like dogs only or dogs and cats only or like what what a what a head like trying to think autism chubby openminded? Okay. These rejections were done in the states, and there is a persons with disabilities. Act. And it says that licensed therapy dogs or service dogs like for the blind and deaf must be taken on. But the big problem is a whole lot of people are using this as an excuse to bring anything they want one. So, you know, they bring their pet whatever it is fun. And none of these things have been certified. None of these things have been specially trained, and I think that unless they've been trained and certified they should not be on. That you know difference between even though I mean, I breed puppies and I sell puppies. And last year, I had a litter of nine standard poodles where three went to service and in their siblings. That didn't go to service are very similar. But once they're trained and certified these dogs that we know is so they are so predictable in so guaranteed to behave in a certain way in public, whereas their siblings. Well, maybe they'll have a mischievous day a naughty day and make on the carpet men accident or do something inappropriate. I mean, even though the same potential almost it's the training that goes into the makes them able to pass in society. And I don't get that. That's right. And you know, the fact that we draw comfort. I mean, you know, I draw comfort from my old empty headed little cavalier. King Charles spaniel. And you know, he's he's his skills are really quite limited. I mean, you know, I had the person who trained the top OB. Didi installed in the US and Canada ward. Faulkner trying to train him to retrieve and get a good kid. Word of dog loan hunt. I think that's a co from a movie, right? I mean that. That dog is there are some that. They just won't they look at you like, well, why did you throw it? If you want it. I'm not getting that. Won't do it. Dan board finally looked at me and said you wanna dogs at retrieves? He says get a retriever. So I could get another retriever. So my that's what my up, but anyway, we have to break right now. So we're going to pause there. We're gonna come back before we go to break though. I want to welcome all this fought affi- listeners. That's just terrific people on their cell phones, people out and about are able to listen to us just with a click on Spotify. So we just got access to millions of new listeners and most of them are are pretty young. So we've got a whole new young listening audience people who would have to pay to take your classes if they wanted to listen to the wisdom of doctor professor Stanley Coren who we've got on air today. So we're going to go to break, and we're gonna come back, and we're gonna take a little turn. We're going to stop talking about PTSD, and I'm gonna tell you about an amazing little story that happened here. These these three dogs and what they did. And how they work together. I love it when dogs were together. So stay tuned. Everybody animal party will be.

PTSD professor professor of psychology Dr Cohen STAN corn Besser Spotify Stanley Coren Lee King Charles Faulkner US Didi Dan board Canada
"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

07:34 min | 2 years ago

"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"I decided to invite doctor STAN corn the professor back on the show when I saw on the news like probably many of you did Lee. Terrifically funny footage of a person trying to get on a plane with a peacock and another person trying to get on the plane with the squirrel each one claiming that this is going to calm them. Well, let's their PTSD pet. And you know, if I was on that plane having a pet squirrel on the plane with me would not con me. Neither would a peacock. I know what they sound like, and I very likely do I don't think they'd be pooping in litter boxes. So I wanna ask Dr Cohen, what is all this about these anxiety assistance animals, and where should the line be John? Dr Cohen, welcome to the show, by the way. Secret Besser, Dr corn he's been on my show. Many times is professor of psychology and has written many bestselling books on dogs too. So I love to put these weird psychology questions to them. So if you've ever wondered why dogs or cats or animals do what they do? This is the kind of show for you. We're going to talk about the psychology behind us humans and the animals, and so the first question is about these people who wanna get these odd animals on the plane. What's going on there? Well, I'll tell you. Down to be in the news sometime soon somebody who wants to get on the plane with a bowl caring their emotional support goldfish. Yeah. You have to understand that there's lots and lots of data which suggests that when you interact with a familiar and friendly animal and most of the research has been done on dogs, and if you're interacting with that animal, petting it. There's a whole bunch of changes which occur in your body. Your heart rate goes down. Your blood pressure goes down your muscles. Relax, you breathe more regularly. And there's even evidence that there are modal changes. So you get oxytocin, which is a hormone associated pain that makes us pregnant mothers have an easier time delivering I know that one. Yes. Well, it's also associated with affection so nice when you're caressing somebody at the medicine flows. A more and the corticosteroids the stress hormones go down. So there are good things associated with. This. The data says that the largest effects are gotten by interacting with dogs. You get a lesser effect with cats. I have no idea. What effect you get with squirrels or? What about fake dogs like those fake Asian made simulated animals that they seem to be passing around old folks homes, and I find disturbing. I don't know why I find it disturbing baby. Because sometimes the patient doesn't seem to know. It's not a real dog. What it is. That bothers me about that. But is that the same as a dog the Facebook? Awful lot of the effect has to do with touch. So you know, feeling that for and the warmth is really important, but equally important is the fact that there is an emotional responsiveness. You get this reciprocity. So you touch the dog and the dog response with particular behavior steel, and that kind of social support there's all sorts of psychological evidence, which shows that we manage stress an awful lot better when we've got emotional support. Even just somebody's sitting near us, but it has to be alive. Okay. I'm cut fake it. It can't be like a simulated cat that purse or a dog wags its tail and that's how I actually there's been some research, which, you know, there was one thing which used it looked like a like a large rat to me, which was a ferry thing which actually had a vibrator inside. So it did per. Yeah. Kids seem to like it better than than one which doesn't per. But it had no effect on the stress rate reactions of the adults. So so do you think an airline is justified in saying like dogs only or dogs and cats only or like, what would a would ahead? Like, I'm trying to think on chubby openminded. Okay. The these rejections were done in states. And there is a person with Disabilities Act. And it says that licensed therapy dogs or service dogs like for the blind and deaf must be taken on. But the big problem is a whole lot of people are using this as an excuse to bring anything they want on. So you know, they bring their pet whatever it is on. And none of these things have been certified, and none of these things have been specially trained, and I think that unless they've been trained and certified they should not be on. Know difference between even though I mean, I breed puppies and I sell puppies. And last year, I had a litter of nine standard poodles where three went to service and their siblings. That didn't go to service are very similar. But once they're trained and certified these dogs that we know so they're so predictable in so guaranteed to behave in a certain way in public, whereas their siblings. Well, maybe they'll have a mischievous day a naughty day and make on the carpet men accident or do something inappropriate. I mean, even though the the same potential almost it's the training that goes into the makes them able to pass in society. And I don't get that. That's right. And you know, the fact that we draw comfort. I mean, you know, I draw comfort from my old empty headed little cavalier. King Charles spaniel. And you know, he's he's his skills are really quite limited. I mean, you know, I had the person who trained the top obese. Audience stalled in the us and Canada word Faulkner tried to train him to retrieve and I could. Dog loan hunt. I think that's the movie right now. I mean that that there are some that they just won't they look at you like, well, why did you throw it? If you want it. I'm not getting that. And word finally looked at me and says you wanna dogs at retrieves. He says get a retriever. So I could get another retriever. So my that's what my puppy. But anyway, we have to go to break right now. So we're going to pause there. We're gonna come back before we go to break. I want to welcome all this butterfly listeners. That's just terrific people on their cell phones, people out and about are able to listen to us just with a click on Spotify. So we just got access to millions of new listeners and most of them are are pretty young. So we've got a whole new young listening audience people who would have to pay to take your classes if they wanted to listen to the wishes of doctor professor Stanley Coren who we've got on air today. So we're going to go to break, and we're gonna come back, and we're going to take a little turn. We're going to stop talking about PTSD, and I'm gonna tell you about an amazing little story that happened here. These these three dogs and what.

PTSD Dr Cohen professor professor of psychology STAN corn Besser Facebook Spotify Stanley Coren oxytocin Lee John King Charles us Faulkner Canada
"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

07:37 min | 2 years ago

"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Wealth. And I decided to invite doctor STAN corn the professor back on the show when I saw the news like probably many of you did Lee. Terrifically funny footage of a person trying to get on a plane with a peacock and another person trying to get on the plane with the squirrel each one claiming that this is going to calm them. Well, let's their PTSD pet. And you know, if I was on that plane having a pet squirrel on the plane with me would not call me. Neither would a peacock. I know what they sound like, and I very likely day. I don't think they'd be pooping in litter boxes. So I wanna ask Dr Cohen, what is all this about these anxiety assistance animals, and where should the line be John? Dr Carin welcome to the show signs away for a secret Besser, Dr Cora, and he's been on my show. Many times is a professor of psychology and has written many bestselling books on Doug's too. So I love to put these weird psychology questions to if you've ever wondered why dogs or cats or animals do what they do. This is the kind of show for you. We're gonna talk about the psychology behind us. Humans and the animals, and so the first question is about these people who wanna get these odd animals on the plane what's going on there? Well, I'll tell you. Is down to be in the news sometime soon somebody who wants to get on the plane with a bowl carrying their emotional support goldfish. Yeah. You have to understand that there's lots and lots of data which suggests that when you interact with a familiar and friendly animal and most of the research has been done on dogs, and if you're interacting with that animal, petting it. There's a whole bunch of changes which occur in your body. Your heart rate goes down. Your blood pressure goes down your muscles. Relax, you breeze more regularly. And there's even evidence that there are modal changes. So you get oxytocin, which is a hormone associated pain. That makes us pregnant mothers have an easier time delivering I know that one. Yes will also associated with affection so nice when you're caressing somebody at the chosen flows, a more and the corticosteroids the stress hormones, go down. So there are good things associated with this. Data says that the largest effects are gotten by interacting with dogs. You get a lesser effect with cats. I have no idea. What effect you get with squirrels or? What about fake dots? Like those fake Asian made simulated animals that they seem to be passing around old folks homes, and I find disturbing. I don't know why I find it disturbing baby. Because sometimes the patient doesn't seem to know. It's not a real dog. I don't know what it is. That bothers me about that. But is that the same as a dog fake? An awful lot of the effect has to touch. So you know, feeling that for and the works is really important, but equally important is the fact that there is an emotional responsiveness. You get this reciprocity. So you touch the dog and the dog response with particular behavior steel, and that kind of social support there's all sorts of psychological evidence, which shows that we manage stress an awful lot better when we've got emotional support. Even just somebody's sitting near us, but it has to be alive. Okay. So fake it. It can't eat like a simulated cat that purse or a dog wags its tail. That's how I actually there's been some research to which you know, there is one thing which used it looked like a like a large rat to me, which was a ferry sing which actually had a vibrator inside. So it did per se. Yeah. Kids seem to like it better than than one which doesn't pair. But it had no effect on the stress rate. Reactions of the adults. So. So do you think an airline is justified in saying like dogs, only or dogs and cats only or like what what a what a hedge? Like, I'm trying to think chubby minded, okay. The these rejections were done in states and there is a versus with disabilities. Act. And it says that licensed therapy dogs or service dogs like for the blind and deaf must be taken on. But the big problem is a whole lot of people are using this as an excuse to bring anything they want on show. You know, they bring their pet whatever it is on. And none of these things have been certified, and none of these things have been specially trained, and I think that unless they've been trained and certified they should not be on. You know difference between even though I mean, I read puppies and I sell puppies. And last year, I had a litter of nine standard poodles where three went to service, and I mean, their siblings that didn't go to service are very similar. But once they're trained and certified these dogs that we know is so they're so predictable in so guaranteed to behave in a certain way in public, whereas their siblings. Well, maybe they'll have a mischievous day a naughty day and make on the carpet men accident or do something inappropriate. I mean, even though the the same potential almost it's the training that goes into the makes them able to pass in society. And I don't get that. That's right. And you know, the fact that we draw comfort. I mean, you know, I draw comfort from my old empty headed little cavalier. King Charles spaniel. And you know, he's he's his skills are really quite limited. I mean, you know, I had the person who trained the top. Obedience stall in the us and Canada word Faulkner. Try to train him to retrieve and could kit. Dog won't hunt. I think that's from the movie, right? Which is. There are some. They just won't. They look at you like, well, why did you throw it? If you want it. I'm not getting that. Dad finally looked at me and says you wanna dogs at retrieves? He says get a retriever. So I could get enough of retriever. So my that's what my puppy. But anyway, we have to go to break right now. So we're gonna pause there. We're gonna come back before we go to break though. I want to welcome all this butterfly listeners. That's just terrific people on their cell phones, people out and about are able to listen to us just with a click on Spotify. So we just got access to millions of new listeners and most of them are are pretty young. So we've got a whole new young listening audience people who would have to pay to take your classes if they wanted to listen to the wishes of doctor professor Stanley Coren who we've got on air today. So we're going to go to break, and we're gonna come back, and we're gonna take a little turn. We're going to stop talking about PTSD, and I'm gonna tell you about an amazing little Sewri that happened here. These these three dogs and what they did. And how they.

PTSD professor professor of psychology Dr Carin Dr Cohen STAN corn Spotify Stanley Coren oxytocin Doug Lee John Dr Cora Besser King Charles us Canada
"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

07:06 min | 2 years ago

"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"You're listening to animal party on satellite radio with me, and my guest, Dr Stanley Coren professor San Cohen, one of his books intelligence of dogs is one of my favorites. And it has tests in there, and it ranks all the dogs, and it talks about different kinds of intelligence and different kinds of dog breeds. So Dr car I wanted to tell you a little anecdote here we have these three dogs that come together. So fi avalanche and wolf and wolf is a shepherd cross. Sophie, I'm trying to get this, right? Which is which because we always call them together. But one is a great Pyrenees. I'm going to get it. When is a great Pyrenees mix. That's Sophie, an avalanche is an American eskimo dog. And so she's a huge long legged dog very well behaved. We really put a lot of discipline honor. She's terrific, but she often leaps over tall fences. And then she'll leap back again. She never gets off the property. She just goes from one dog play area to another little bit. Mischief. No big deal. Well, recently, we saw her lie on top of one of these very very tall gates and just lay. There intentionally. I'm serious. It was totally intentional. So that her buddy avalanche. The eskimo cross could walk up her like a bridge and go over the gate with her then the two of them ran off and played in the area. And they're not supposed to be in yet. They're little ahead leaving the shepherd behind and I just thought oh my gosh. That's just so cool operative, and and it shows so much about their breeds the shepherd, of course, didn't follow didn't join in wouldn't jump over anything if you paid him that they're barking, and I thought, oh, I better tell STAN about this. So I also saw on TV that there was a dog who pulled another dog out of traffic and saved it last week on the news. And I wanted to ask you how common is this this dogs working together like this? Well, actually, I wrote a couple of chapters about that sort of thing in one of my books. It's actual. Much more common than you might think dogs are social critters and should've keeping to go back to wolf analogy to sort of keeping the pack intact is very important to them. And so they do try to render assistance to one another. Sometimes it's deliberate. Sometimes it's accidental, but you can also manipulate it. So let me tell you one of my favorite stories. There is a golden retriever which had been trained to be a seeing eye dog and worked until she was about eight nine years old. And then that's about the time when they start thinking about retiring the dog, and so the dog was retired. And it turned out that within about three or four months of retirement. She went blind. So now, you have this blind seeing eye dog, right? And what the owner of the dog. This is the person who adopted the dog after she retired goldies owner took. Another dog. They had another golden retriever in the house, and they put a huge bell on her like jingle bell and that allowed the young dog to serve as the guide dog. So yeah. You're blind talk and follow the best. Exactly. And that's exactly the way it worked. And until she she survived until she was eleven and for those last two or three years of her life. She followed the bell. She had her own assistant stalk and it worked well with this. It really looked to me as I was looking out the window, and I saw this dog sort of positioning herself. And I thought to myself she's not jumping over at. What is she doing? What is she doing? And then I saw the other one climb over. This is just like when you see those army movies where the short recruit and the tall recruit the tall recruit reaches back over the wall pulls the short recruit over that's teamwork. No. Yeah. So okay. So I've got some other topics. We had some questions when I told people you were coming on the show. I had a lady contact me who has an autistic child, and she had a very specific question that I know you can handle I told her a little bit like get the autistic child to feed the dog walk the dog and be important to the dog. But her question is why do some dogs why did dogs like some people and really not bond with other people and a follow up to that is how can she help her dogs to like her autism child more? Well, part of this is going to have to do with breed as their Jack Russells in this case little Jack Russells middle aged and elderly. You're shaking your head. No. Yeah. Were hoping for no terriers are not not the most affectionate dogs in the world. I mean, you know, I had a terrier who I dearly loved, and I wrote a book about of Guinot actually, there was a book about the the thirteen year war that my wife had with this cairn terrier, no terriers are not necessarily the most affectionate dogs. There are things associated with the canine personality, for example, do you know where the name spaniel comes from? Big little fat little Spain is probably what it means. Just looking at. Well, we normally name dogs after either the people who created them like the Jack Russell terrier from parson John Russell or the country place, which the report and the spaniels come from Espanol. So so that would be the suggestion that that they came from Spain. But none of the spaniels were developed in Spain. So why did they get the name spaniels? And the reason was that when these breeds of dogs were being developed the folklore was that the best lovers in the world. Hey. Oh, okay. That's right said so you had all these kissy-faced dogs, and regardless of the truth of the matter they must be associated with. So that's how they got to be spaniel. So a dog like that it's much easier to to get bonding for, but if you're dealing with a trying to establish a bond with a dog, probably the best trick to us is is the trick that you use for sort of taming wild animals, and that is to hand feed the dog. So you don't just give a bowl on the floor for free. One Kibble at a time. And and it's even better if you can get the dog to do something like sit come forward a step or two. That's what I don't think. That's going to be a problem for those Jack Russells they liked, you know, that's right. And so that that's the trick. You know, you have to feed them one Kibble at a time. And after a couple of weeks, there will be a very strong bond between the child and the dog. Okay. Well, I'm glad we asked you that we have to go to break. We'll be.

Jack Russells Sophie Spain Dr Stanley Coren John Russell professor San Cohen STAN Guinot eight nine years thirteen year four months three years
"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

07:35 min | 2 years ago

"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"And I decided to invite doctor STAN corn the professor back on the show when I saw on the news like probably many of you did Lee. Terrifically funny footage of a person trying to get on a plane with a peacock and another person trying to get on the plane with the squirrel each one claiming that this is going to calm them. Well, it's their PTSD pet. And you know, if I was on that plane having a pet squirrel on the plane with me would not call me. Neither would a peacock. I know what they sound like, and I very likely, I don't think they'd be pooping litter boxes. So I wanna ask Dr Cohen, what is all this about these anxiety assistance animals, and where should the line be John Dr card? Welcome to the show, by the way for talking with secret Besser, Dr corn he's been on my show. Many times is professor of psychology is written many bestselling books on Doug's too. So I love to put these weird psychology questions to him. If you've ever wondered why dogs or cats are animals do what they do. This is the kind of show for you. We're going to talk about the psychology behind us. Humans and the animals, and so the first question is about these people who wanna get these odd animals on the plane what's going on there? Well, I'll tell you, you know. They're down to be in the news sometime soon somebody who wants to get on the plane with a bowl carrying their emotional support goldfish. Yeah. You have to understand that there's lots and lots of data which suggests that when you interact with a familiar and friendly animal and most of the research has been done on dogs, and if you're interacting with that animal, petting it. There's a whole bunch of changes which occur in your body. Your heart rate goes down. Your blood pressure goes down your muscles. Relax, you breathe more regularly. And there's even evidence that there are modal changes. So you get oxytocin, which is a hormone associated pain. That makes us pregnant mothers have an easier time delivering I know that one. Yes. Well, it's also associated with the faction so nice when you're caressing somebody the flows, a more and the corticosteroids the stress hormones, go down. So there are good things associated with this. The data says that the largest effects are gotten by interacting with dogs. You get a lesser effect with cats. I have no idea. What effect you get with squirrels or? What about fake dogs like those fake Asian made simulated animals that they seem to be passing around old folks homes, and I find disturbing. I don't know why I find it disturbing because sometimes the patient doesn't seem to know. It's not a real dog. I don't know what it is. That bothers me about that. But is that the same as a dog the fake? An awful lot of the effect has to do with touch. So you know, feeling that for and the warmth is really important, but equally important is the fact that there is an emotional responsiveness. You've get this reciprocity. So you touch the dog and the dog response with particular behaviors to you, and that kind of social support there's all sorts of psychological evidence, which shows that we manage stress an awful lot better when we've got emotional support. Even just somebody's sitting near us, but it has to be alive. Okay. I'm cut fake it. It can't be like a simulated cat that purse or dog wags its tail. That's how I actually there's been some research, which, you know, there was one thing which used it looked like a like a large rat to me, which was a ferry thing which actually had a vibrator inside. So it did per. Yeah. Kids seem to like it better than than one which doesn't pair. But it had no effect on the stress rate reactions of the adults. So so do you think an airline is justified in saying like dogs only or dogs and cats only or like, what would a would ahead? Okay. Like, I'm trying to think on chubby openminded. Okay. The these rejections were done in the states, and there is a persons with disabilities. Act. And it says that licensed therapy dogs or service dogs like for the blind and deaf must be taken on. But the big problem is a whole lot of people are using this as an excuse to bring anything they want on show. You know, they bring their pet whatever it is on. And none of these things have been certified in one of these things have been specially trained, and I think that unless they've been trained and certified they should not be on. You know difference between even though I breed puppies, and I sell puppies. And last year, I had a litter of nine standard poodles where three went to service and their siblings. That didn't go to service are very similar. But once they're trained and certified these dogs that we know is so they're so predictable in so guaranteed to behave in a certain way in public, whereas their siblings. Well, maybe they'll have a mischievous day a naughty day and make on the carpet men accident or do something inappropriate. I mean, even though the same potential almost it's the training that goes into the makes them able to pass in society. And I don't get that. That's right. And you know, the fact that we draw comfort. I mean, I draw comfort from my old empty headed little cavalier. King Charles spaniel. And you know, he's he's his skills. Are are really quite limited. I mean, you know, I had the person who trained the top OB. Dog in the us and Canada word Faulkner try to train him to retrieve and could get word of dog won't hunt. I think that's a co from a movie, right? Catch that dog is that there are some that. They just won't they look at you like, well, why did you throw it? If you want it. I'm not getting that. Won't do it. Dan board finally looked at me and says you wanna dogs at retrieves. He said get a retriever. So I could get another retriever. So my that's what my puppy. But anyway, we have to go to break right now. So we're going to pause there. We're gonna come back before we go to break though. I want to welcome all this listeners. That's just terrific people on their cell phones, people out and about are able to listen to us just with a click on Spotify. So we just got access to millions of new listeners and most of them are are pretty young. So we've got a whole new young listening audience people who would have to pay to take your classes if they wanted to listen to the wisdom of doctor professor Stanley Coren who we've got on air today. So we're going to go to break, and we're gonna come back, and we're gonna take a little turn. We're going to stop talking about PTSD, and I'm gonna tell you about an amazing little story that happened here. These these three dogs and what they did..

PTSD professor professor of psychology Dr Cohen STAN corn Besser Spotify Stanley Coren oxytocin Doug Lee King Charles us Dan board Faulkner Canada
"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

07:01 min | 2 years ago

"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Dabble, and my guest, Dr Stanley Coren professor San Cohen one of his books intelligence of dogs is one of my favorites. And it has tests in there, and it rakes all the dogs, and it talks about different kinds of intelligence and different kinds of dog breeds. It's a doctor car I wanted to tell you a little anecdote here we have these three dogs that come together. So fi avalanche and wolf and wolf is shepherd. Cross. Sophie, I'm trying to get this, right? Which is which because we always call them together. But when is a great Pyrenees, I'm going to get it. When is a great Pyrenees mix. That's sofi. An avalanche is an American eskimo dog. And Sophie, she's a huge long legged dog very well behaved. We don't really put a lot of discipline honor. She's terrific, but she often leaps over tall fences. And then she'll leap back again. She never gets off the property. She just goes from one area to another little bit of mischief. No big deal. Well, recently, we saw her lie on top of one of these very very tall gates and just lay. There intentionally. I'm serious. It was totally intentional. So that her buddy avalanche. The eskimo cross could walk up her like a bridge and go over the gate with her and then the two of them ran off and played in the area. And they're not supposed to be in yet. They're little ahead leaving the shepherd behind and I just thought oh my gosh. That's just so cooperative. And and it shows so much about their breeds the shepherd, of course, didn't follow didn't join in wouldn't jump over anything. If you paid him sat there barking, and I thought, oh, I better tell us about this. So I also saw on TV that there was a dog who pulled another dog out of traffic and saved it last week on the news. And I wanted to ask you how common is this this dogs working together like this? Well, actually, I wrote a couple of chapters about that sort of thing in one of my books. It's actually much. More common than you might think dogs are social critters and should of keeping to go back to wolf analogy to sort of keeping the pack intact is very important to them. And so they do try to render assistance to one another. Sometimes it's deliberate. Sometimes it's accidental, but you can also manipulate it. So let me tell you one of my favorite stories. There is a golden retriever which had been trained to be a seeing eye dog and worked until she was about eight nine years old. And then that's about the time when they start thinking about retiring the dog, and so the dog was retired. And it turned out that within about three or four months of retirement. She went blind. So now you have this blind seeing eye dog and what the owner of the dog. This is the person who adopted the dog after she retired goldies owner took another. Dog. They had another golden retriever in the house, and they put a huge bell on her like jingle bell and that allowed the young dog to serve as the guide dog. So yeah. Blind dog and follow the best. Exactly. And that's exactly the way it worked. And until she she survived until she was eleven and for those last two or three years of her life. She followed the bell. She had her own assistant stalk and it worked out well with this. It really looked to me as I was looking out the window, and I saw this dog sort of positioning herself. And I thought to myself she's not jumping over at. What is she doing? What is she doing? And then I saw the other one like climb up. This is just like when you see those army movies where the short recruit and the tall recruit the tall recruit reaches back over the wall and pulls the short recruit over that's teamwork. No. Yeah. So okay. So I've got some other topics. We had some questions when I told people you were coming on the show. I had a lady contact me who has not Istiqlal, and she had a very specific question that I know you can handle I told her a little bit like get the autistic child to feed the dog walk the dog and be important to the dog. But her question is why do some dogs why did dogs like some people and really not bond with other people and a follow up to that is how can she help her dogs to like her autistic child more? Well, part of this is going to have to do with breed Jack Russells in this case little Jack Russells middle aged and elderly shaking your head. No. Yeah. You're hoping for no terriers are not not the most affectionate dogs in the world. I mean, you know, I had a terrier who I dearly loved, and I wrote a book about of Genoa. Br actually there was a book about the the thirteen year war is it my wife had this territory. No terriers are not necessarily the most affectionate dogs. There are things associated with the canine personality, for example, do you know where the name spaniel comes from? I big little fat little Spain is probably what it means. Just looking at. Well, we normally named dogs after either the people who created them like Jack Russells terrier parson, John Russell or the country place, which they were born and the spaniels come from Espanol, so fate. So that would be the suggestion that that they came from Spain. But none of the spaniels were developed in Spain. So why did they get the name spaniels? And the reason was that when these breeds of dogs were being developed the folklore was that the best lovers in the world. Okay. That's right said so you had all these kissy-faced dogs, and regardless of the truth of the matter they must be associated with. So that's how they got to be spaniels. So a dog like that it's much easier to to get bonding for, but if you're dealing with a trying to establish a bond with a dog, probably the best trick to us is is the trick that you use for sort of taming wild animals, and that is to hand feed the dog. No, you don't just give a bowl on the floor for free. One Kibble at a time. And and it's even better if you can get the dog to do something like or come forward a step or two if that's what I don't think that's going to be a problem for those Jack Russells, they liked know. That's right. And so that that's the trick. You know, you have to feed them one Kibble at a time. And after a couple of weeks, there will be a very strong bond between the child and the dog. Okay. Well, I'm glad we asked you that we have to go to break..

Jack Russells Sophie Spain Dr Stanley Coren professor San Cohen Genoa Istiqlal John Russell eight nine years thirteen year four months three years
"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

07:26 min | 2 years ago

"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Terrifically funny footage of a person trying to get on a plane with a peacock and another person trying to get on the plane with the squirrel each one claiming that this is going to calm them. Well, it's their PTSD pet. And you know, if I was on that plane having a pet squirrel on the plane with me would not call me. Neither would a peacock. I know what they sound like, and I very likely I don't think they'd be pooping in litter boxes. So I wanna ask Dr Cohen, what is all this about these anxiety assistance animals, and where should the line be John? Dr corn welcome to the show, by the way for talking with you secret Besser, Dr corn he's been on my show. Many times is professor of psychology and has written many bestselling books on Doug's too. So I love to put these weird psychology questions to them. So if you've ever wondered why dogs or cats or animals do what they do? This is the kind of show for you. We're gonna talk about the psychology behind us. Humans and the animals, and so the first question is about these people who wanna get these odd animals on the plane. What's going on there? Well, I'll tell you. Down to be in the news sometime soon somebody who wants to get on the plane with a bowl carrying their emotional support goldfish. Yeah. You have to understand that there's lots and lots of data which suggests that when you interact with a familiar and friendly animal and most of the research has been done on dogs, and if you're interacting with that animal, petting it. There's a whole bunch of changes which occur in your body. Your heart rate goes down. Your blood pressure goes down your muscles. Relax, you breeze more regularly, and there's even evidence that their hormonal changes. So you get oxytocin, which is a hormone associated pain that that makes us pregnant mothers have an easier time delivering I know that one is also associated with affection so nice when you're caressing somebody at the medicine flows. A more and the corticosteroids stress hormones go down. So there are good things associated with. This. The data says that the largest fix are gotten by interacting with dogs. You get a lesser effect with cats. I have no idea. What effect you get with squirrels or? What about fake dogs like those fake Asian made simulated animals that they seem to be passing around old folks homes, and I find disturbing. I don't know why I find it disturbing baby. Because sometimes the patient doesn't seem to know. It's not a real dog. I don't know what it is. That bothers me about that. But is that the same as a dog the Facebook? Awful lot of the effect has to do with touch. So you know, feeling that for and the warmth is really important, but equally important is the fact that there is an emotional response. This you get this reciprocity. So you talked the dog and the dog response with particular behavior steel, and that kind of social support there's all sorts of psychological evidence, which shows that we manage stress an awful lot better when we've got emotional support. Even just somebody's sitting near us, but it has to be alive. Okay. So fake it. It can't be like a simulated cat that purse or a dog wags its tail. That's how I actually there's been some research, which, you know, there was one thing which used it looked like a like a large rat to me, which was a ferry thing which actually had a vibrator inside. So it did per. Yeah. Kids seem to like it better than than one which doesn't per. But it had no effect on the stress rate reactions of the adults. So so do you think an airline is justified in saying like dogs only or dogs and cats only or like what the would ahead? Okay. Like, I'm trying to think of this chubby openminded. Okay. The these rejections were done in the states and there is a versus with disabilities. Act. And it says that licensed therapy dogs or service dogs like for the blind and deaf must be taken on. But the big problem is a whole lot of people are using this as an excuse to bring anything they want on. So you know, they bring their pet whatever it is on. And none of these things have been certified. None of these things have been specially trained, and I think that unless they've been trained and certified they should not be on. Difference between even though I mean, I read puppies, and I sell puppies. And last year, I had a litter of nine standard poodles where three went to service and their siblings. That didn't go to service are very similar. But once they're trained and certified these dogs that we know you so they're so predictable in so guaranteed to behave in a certain way in public, whereas their siblings. Well, maybe they'll have a mischievous day a naughty day and make on the carpet men accident or do something inappropriate. I mean, even though the the same potential almost it's the training that goes into the makes them able to pass in society. And I don't get that. That's right. And you know, the fact that we draw comfort. I mean, you know, I draw comfort from my old empty headed little cavalier. King Charles spaniel. And you know, he's he's his skills are really quite limited. I mean, you know, I had the person who trained the top. Obedience dog in the us and Canada word Faulkner, you know, try to train him to retrieve and I could. Dog loan hugged. I think that's a from a movie, right? Catch that dog that there are some. She won't fetch. They just won't. They look at you like, well, why did you throw it? If you want it. I'm not getting that. Won't do it. Dan board finally looked at me and said you wanna dogs at retrieves? He says get a retriever. So I could get another retriever. So my that's what my puppy. But anyway, we have to go to break right now. So we're going to pause there. We're gonna come back before we go to break though. I want to welcome all this butterfly listeners. That's just terrific people on their cell phones, people out and about are able to listen to us just with a click on Spotify. So we just got access to millions of new listeners and most of them are are pretty young. So we've got a whole new young listening audience people who would have to pay to take your classes if they wanted to listen to the wisdom of doctor professor Stanley Coren who we've got on air today. So we're going to go to break, and we're gonna come back, and we're going to take a little turn. We're going to stop talking about PTSD, and I'm gonna tell you about an amazing little Sewri that happened here. These these three dogs and what they did. And how they work together..

PTSD Dr corn professor of psychology Dr Cohen Facebook Spotify Stanley Coren oxytocin Doug John Besser King Charles professor us Dan board Faulkner Canada
"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

07:03 min | 2 years ago

"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"With me, dab dabbled, and my guest, Dr Stanley Coren professor San Cohen one of his books intelligence of dogs is one of my favorites. And it has tests in their ranks all the dogs, and it talks about different kinds of intelligence and different kinds of dog breeds, Dr Carl I wanted to tell you a little anecdote here, we have these three dogs that come together. So fi avalanche and wolf and shepherd. Cross. Sophie, I'm trying to get this, right? Which is which because we always call them together. But when is a great Pyrenees, I'm going to get it. When is a great Pyrenees mix. That's Sophie and avalanches in American eskimo dog, and she's a huge long legged dog very well behaved. We don't really put a lot of discipline honor. She's terrific, but she often leaps over tall fences. And then she'll leap back again. She never gets off the property. She just goes from one dog play area to another little bit. Mischief. No big deal. Well, recently, we saw her lie on top of one of these very very tall gates and just lay. There intentionally. I'm serious. It was totally intentional. So that her buddy avalanche. The eskimo cross could walk up her like a bridge and go over the gate with her and then the two of them ran off and played in the area. And they're not supposed to be in yet. They're Lilla head leaving the shepherd behind and I just thought oh my gosh. That's just so cool operative, and and it shows so much about their breeds the shepherd, of course, didn't follow didn't join in wouldn't jump over anything if you paid him sat there barking, and I thought, oh, I better tell STAN about this. So I also saw on TV that there was a dog who pulled another dog out of traffic and saved it last week on the news. And I wanted to ask you how common is this this dogs working together like this? Well, actually, I wrote a couple of chapters about that sort of thing in one of my books. It's actually much more common than you might think dogs are social critters and should've keeping to go back to wolf analogy to sort of keeping the pack intact is very important to them. And so they do try to render assistance to one another. Sometimes it's deliberate. Sometimes it's accidental, but you can also manipulate it. So let me tell you one of my favorite stories. There is a golden retriever which had been trained to be a seeing eye dog and worked until she was about eight nine years old. And then that's about the time when they start thinking about retiring the dog, and so the dog was retired. And it turned out that within about three or four months of retirement. She went blind. So now, you have this blind seeing eye dog, right? And what the owner of the dog. This is the person who adopted the dog after she retired goldies owner took. Took another dog. They had another golden retriever in the house, and they put a huge bell on her like a jingle bell. And that allowed the young dog to serve as the guide dog. So yeah, totally blind, talk and. Follow the battle. Exactly. And that's exactly the way it worked. And until she she survived until she was eleven and for this last two or three years over life. She followed the bell. She had her own assistant stalk and it worked out well with this. It really looked to me as I was looking out the window, and I saw this dog sort of positioning herself. And I thought to myself she's not jumping over at. What is she doing? What is she doing? And then I saw the other one like this is just like when you see those army movies where the short recruit and the tall recruit the tall recruit reaches back over the wall at pulls the short recruit over site. That's teamwork. No. Well, yeah. So okay. So I've got some other topics. We had some questions when I told people you were coming on the show. I had a lady contact me who has not child, and she had a very specific question that I know you can handle I told her a little bit like get the autistic child to feed the dog walk the dog and be important to the dog. But her question is why do some dogs why do dogs like some people and really not bond with other people and a follow up to that is how can she help her dogs to like her autistic child more? Well, part of this is going to have to do with greed. Jack Russell's in this case little Jack Russells middle aged and elderly. Shaking your head. No. Yeah. A hoping for no terriers are not not the most affectionate dogs in the world. I mean, you know, I had a terrier who I dearly loved and I wrote a book about Guinot. Actually, there was a book about the the thirteen year war is it. My wife had lived cairn terrier. No terriers are not necessarily the most affectionate dogs. There are things associated with the canine personality, for example, do you know where the name spaniel comes from? Well, I would think little fat little Spain is probably what it means. Just looking at. Well, we normally named dogs after either the people who created them like the Jack Russell terrier parson, John Russell or the country place which the report and the spaniels come from Espanol so stay so that would be the suggestion that that they came from Spain. But none of the spaniels were developed in Spain. So why did they get the name spaniels? And the reason was that when these breeds of dogs were being developed the folklore was that the best lovers in the world. Okay. That's right said so you had all these kissy-faced dogs, and regardless of the truth of the matter they must be associated with. So that's how they got to be spaniel. So a dog like that it's much easier to to get bonding for, but if you're dealing with a trying to establish a bond with a dog, probably the best trick to us is is the tricks that you use for sort of taming wild animals, and that is to hand feed the dog. So you don't just give a bowl on the floor for free. One Kibble at a time. And even better if you can get the dog to do something like sit come forward a step or two if that's what I don't think that's going to be a problem for those Jack Russells they liked in. That's right. And so that that's the trick. You know, you have to feed them one at a time. And after a couple of weeks, there will be a very strong bond between the child and the gawk. Okay. Well, I'm glad we asked you that we have to go to break. We'll be back.

Jack Russell Jack Russells Spain Sophie Dr Stanley Coren Dr Carl I Lilla professor San Cohen STAN Guinot eight nine years thirteen year four months three years
"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

07:06 min | 2 years ago

"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"You're listening to animal party on satellite radio with me dab. Well, and my guest Dr Stanley Coren professor San Quran one of his books intelligence of dogs is one of my favorites. And it has tests in there, and it ranks all the dogs, and it talks about different kinds of intelligence and different kinds of dog breeds, Dr car I wanted to tell you a little anecdote here we have these three dogs that come together. So fi avalanche wolf and wolf shepherd. Cross. Sophie, I'm trying to get this, right? Which is which we always call them together. But when is a great pair knees. I'm going to get it. When is a great Pyrenees mix. That's Sophie, an avalanche is an American eskimo dog and snow fee. She's a huge long legged dog very well behaved. We don't really put a lot of discipline honor. She's terrific, but she often leaps over tall fences. And then she'll leap back again. She never gets off the property. She just goes from one dog play area to another little bit of. Mischief. No big deal. Well, recently, we saw her lie on top of one of these very very tall gates and just lay. There intentionally. I'm serious. It was totally intentional. So that her buddy avalanche. The eskimo cross could walk up her like a bridge and go over the gate with her. And then the them ran off and played in the area. And they're not supposed to be in yet. They're little ahead leaving the shepherd behind and I just thought oh my gosh. That's just so cooperative. And and it shows so much about their breeds the shepherd, of course, didn't follow didn't join in wouldn't jump over anything. If you paid him sat there barking, and I thought, oh, I better tell STAN about this. So I also saw on TV that there was a dog who pulled another dog out of traffic and saved it last week on the news. And I wanted to ask you how common is this this dogs working together like this? Well, actually, I wrote a couple of chapters about that sort of thing in one of my books. It's actually. Much more common than you might think dogs are social critters, and sort of keeping to go back to wolf analogy to sort of keeping the pack intact is very important to them. And so they do try to render sisters to one another sometimes it's liberate sometimes it's accidental, but you can also manipulate it. So let me tell you one of my favorite stories. There is a golden retriever which had been trained to be a seeing eye talk and worked until she was about eight nine years old. And then that's when they start thinking about retiring the dog, and so the dog was retired. And it turned out that within about three or four months of retirement. She went blind. So now, you have this blind seeing eye dog, right? And what the owner of the dog. This is the person who adopted the dog after she retired goldies owner took. Another dog. They had another golden retriever in the house, and they put a huge bell on her like jingle bell and that allowed the young dog to serve as the guide dog. So yeah. Telling her blind talk and follow the best. Exactly. And that's exactly the way it worked. And until she she survived until she was eleven and for this last two or three years of her life. She followed the bell. She had her own assistant stalk and it worked out well with this. It really looked to me as I was looking out the window, and I saw this dog sort of positioning herself. And I thought to myself she's not jumping over at. What is she doing? What is she doing? And then I saw the other one like climb up. This is just like when you see those army movies where the short recruit and the tall recruit the tall recruit reaches back over the wall pulls the short recruit over so that's teamwork. No. Yeah. So okay. So I've got some other topics. We had some questions when I told people you were coming on the show. I had a lady contact me who has an autistic child, and she had a very specific question that I know you can handle I told her a little bit like get the autistic child to feed the dog walk the dog and be a portent to the dog. But her question is why do some dogs why do dogs like some people and really not bond with other people and a follow up to that is how can she help her dogs to like her autistic child more? Well, part of this is going to have to do with breed Jack Russells in this case little Jack Russells middle aged and elderly. Shaking your head. No. Yeah. You were hoping for no terriers are not not the most affectionate dogs in the world. I mean, you know, I had a terrier who I dearly loved, and I wrote a book about of Guinot. Br actually there was a book about the the thirteen year war is it. My wife had this cairn terrier, no terriers are not necessarily the most affectionate dogs. There are things associated with the canine personality, for example, do you know where the name spaniel comes from? Big little spat little Spain is probably what it means. Just looking at. Well, we normally named dogs after either the people who created them like the Jack Russell terrier from partial John Russell or the country place which report and the spaniels come from Espanol. So so that would be the suggestion that that they came from Spain. But none of the spaniels were developed in Spain. So why did they get the name spaniels? And the reason was that when these breeds of dogs were being developed the folklore was that the best lovers in the world. Okay. That's right said so you had all these kissy-faced dogs, and regardless of the truth of the matter they must be associated with spec. So that's how they got to be spaniel. So a dog like that it's much easier to to get bonding for, but if you're dealing with a trying to establish a bond with a dog, probably the best trick to us is the is the trick that you use for sort of taming wild animals, and that is to hand feed the dog. So you don't just give a bowl on the floor for free. One one Kibble at a time. And even better if you can get the dog to do something like signature come forward a step or two. I don't think that's going to be a problem for those Jack Russells they liked. That's right. And so that that's the trick. You know, you have to feed them one at a time. And after a couple of weeks, there will be a very strong bond between the child and the dog. Okay. Well, I'm glad we asked you that we have to go to break. We'll.

Jack Russells Sophie Spain Dr Stanley Coren wolf shepherd John Russell professor STAN Guinot eight nine years thirteen year four months three years
"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

07:33 min | 2 years ago

"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"STAN corn the professor back on the show when I saw on the news like probably many of you did Lee. Ciro physically funny footage of a person trying to get on a plane with a peacock and another person trying to get on the plane with the squirrel each one claiming that this is going to calm them while it's there PTSD pet, and you know, if I was on that plane having a pet squirrel on the plane with me would not call me. Neither would a peacock. I know what they sound like, and I very likely do I don't think they'd be pooping in litter boxes. So I wanna ask Dr Cohen, what is all this about these exiled, he assistance animals, and where should the line be John? Dr Carin welcome to the show, by the way, we're talking with secret Besser, Dr corn he's been on my show. Many times is professor of psychology is many bestselling books on dogs too. So I love to put these weird psychology questions to him. So if you've ever wondered why dogs or cats or animals do what they do? This is the kind of show for you. We're going to talk about the psychology behind us. Humans and the animals, and so the first question is about these people who wanna get these odd animals on the plane. What's going on there? Well, I'll tell you. Down to be in the news sometime soon somebody who wants to get on the plane with a bowl carrying their emotional support goldfish. Yeah. You have to understand that there's lots and lots of data which suggests that when you interact with a familiar and friendly animal and most of the research has been done on dogs, and if you're interacting with that animal, petting it. There's a whole bunch of changes which occur in your body. Your heart rate goes down. Your blood pressure goes down your muscles. Relax, you breeze more regularly. And there's even evidence that they're hormone changes. So you get oxytocin, which is a hormone associated pain. That makes us pregnant mothers have an easier time delivering I know that one. Yes will also associated with affection so nice when you're caressing somebody at the medicine flows. A more and the corticosteroids the stress hormones go down. So there are good things associated with this. Data says that the largest effects are gotten by interacting with dogs. You get a lesser effect with cats. I have no idea. What effect you get with squirrels or? What about fake dogs like those fake Asian made simulated animals that they seem to be passing around old folks homes, and I find disturbing. I don't know why I find it disturbing because sometimes the patient doesn't seem to know. It's not a real dog. I don't know what it is. That bothers me about that. But is that the same as a dog the fake? An awful lot of the effect has to do with touch. So you know, feeling that for and the warmth is really important, but equally important is the fact that there is an emotional responsiveness. You get this reciprocity. So you touch the dog and the dog response with particular behavior steel, and that kind of social support there's all sorts of psychological evidence shows that we manage stress an awful lot better when we've got emotional support. Even just somebody's sitting near us, but it has to be alive. Okay. So fake it. It can't be like a simulated cat that purrs or a dog wags his tail and that's how I actually there's been some research, which you know, there is one thing which used I dunno. It looked like a like a large rat to me, which was a ferry thing which actually had a vibrator inside. So it did for me. Yeah. Kids seem to like it better than than one which doesn't pair. But it had no effect on the stress rate reactions of the adults. So so do you think an airline is justified in saying like dogs only or dogs and cats only or like, what would ahead? Like, I'm trying to think some chubby openminded. Okay. The these rejections were done in states. And there is a persons with disabilities. Act. And it says that licensed therapy dogs or service dogs like for the blind and deaf must be taken on. But the big problem is a whole lot of people are using this as an excuse to bring anything they want on. So you know, they bring their pet whatever it is on. And none of these things have been certified and gonna these things have been specially trained, and I think that unless they've been trained and certified they should not be on. You know difference between even though I breed puppies, and I sell puppies. And last year, I had a litter of nine standard poodles where three went to service, and I mean, their siblings that didn't go to service are very similar. But once they're trained and certified these dogs that we know so they're so predictable in so guaranteed to behave in a certain way in public, whereas their siblings. Well, maybe they'll have a mischievous day naughty day and make on the carpet men accident or do something inappropriate. I mean, even though they're the same potential almost it's the training that goes into the makes them able to pass in society. And I don't get that. That's right. And you know, the fact that we draw comfort. I mean, you know, I draw comfort from my old empty headed little cavalier. King Charles spaniel. And you know, he's he's his skills. Are are really quite limited. I mean, you know, I had the person who trained the top obese. Dog in the us and Canada were Faulkner try to train him to retrieve and could kit. Word of dog won't hunt. I think that's a from a movie, right? That. That dog is that there are some that. They just won't they look at you like, well, why did you throw it? If you want it. I'm not getting that. And board finally looked at me and says you wanna dogs at retrieves. He said get a retriever. So I could get another retriever so Mike buck. That's what my puppy. But anyway, we have to go to break right now. So we're gonna pause there. We're gonna come back before we go to break though. I want to welcome all this butterfly listeners. That's just terrific people on their cell phones, people out and about are able to listen to us with a click on Spotify. So we just got access to millions of new listeners and most of them are are pretty young. So we've got a whole new young listening audience people who would have to pay to take your classes if they wanted to listen to the wishes of doctor professor Stanley Coren who we've got on air today. So we're going to go to break, and we're gonna come back, and we're going to take a little turn. We're going to stop talking about PTSD, and I'm gonna tell you about an amazing little story that happened here. These these three dogs and what they did. And.

PTSD professor professor of psychology Dr Carin STAN corn Dr Cohen Ciro Spotify Besser Stanley Coren oxytocin Lee John Mike buck King Charles us Faulkner Canada
"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

07:05 min | 2 years ago

"stanley coren" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"To animal party on satellite radio with me dab. Well, and my guest Dr Stanley Coren professor STAN Cohen one of his books intelligence of dogs is one of my favorites. And it has tests in there, and it rakes all the dogs, and it talks about different kinds of intelligence and different kinds of dog breeds. It's Dr Arnn, I wanted to tell you a little anecdote here we have these three dogs that come together. So fi avalanche and wolf and wolf is shepherd. Cross. Sophie, I'm trying to get this, right? Which is which because we always call them together. But when is a great Pyrenees, I'm going to get it. When is a great Pyrenees mix. That's sofi. An avalanche is an American eskimo dog. And so she she's a huge long legged dog very well behaved. We don't really put a lot of discipline honor. She's terrific, but she often leaps over tall fences. And then she'll leap back again. She never gets off the property. She just goes from one dog play area to another little bit of mischief. No big deal. Well, recently, we saw her lie on top of one of these very very tall gates and just lay. There intentionally. I'm serious. It was totally intentional. So that her buddy avalanche. The eskimo cross could walk up her like a bridge and go over the gate with her and then the two of them ran off and played in the area. And they're not supposed to be in yet. Lil ahead leaving the shepherd behind and I just thought oh my gosh. That's just so cooperative. And and it shows so much about their breeds the shepherd. Of course, didn't follow didn't join in wouldn't jump over anything. If you paid him sat there barking, and I thought, oh, I better tell us about this. So I also saw on TV that there was a dog who pulled another dog out of traffic and saved it last week on the news. And I wanted to ask you how common is this this dogs working together like this? Well, actually, I wrote a couple of chapters about that sort of thing in one of my books. It's actually much more common than you might think dogs are social critters and should've keeping to go back to wolf analogy to sort of keeping the pack intact is very important to them. And so they do try to render assistance to one another. Sometimes it's deliberate. Sometimes it's accidental, but you can also manipulate it. So let me tell you one of my favorite stories. There is a golden retriever which. I've been trained to be a seeing I talk and worked until she was about eight nine years old. And then you know, that's about the time when they start thinking about retiring the dog, and so the dog was retired. And it turned out that within about three or four months of retirement. She went blind. So now, you have this blind seeing eye dog, right? And what the owner of the dog. This is the person who adopted the dog after she retired goldies owner took another dog. They had another golden retriever in the house, and they put a huge bell on her like jingle bell and that allowed the young dog to serve as the guide dog. So yeah. Blind talk and follow the best. Exactly. And that's exactly the way it worked. And until she she survived until she was eleven and for this last two or three years over life. She followed the bell. She had her own assistant stalk and it worked out well with this. It really looked to me as I was looking out the window, and I saw this dog sort of positioning herself. And I thought to myself she's not jumping over at. What is she doing? What is she doing? And then I saw the other one like climb up. This is just like when you see those army movies where the short recruit and the tall recruit the tall recruit reaches back over the wall pulls the short recruit over that's teamwork. No question. Yeah. So okay. So I've got some other topics. We had some questions when I told people you were coming on the show. I had a lady contact me who has not child, and she had a very specific question that I know you can handle I told her a little bit like get the autistic child to feed the dog walk the dog, it'd be important to the dog. But her question is why do some dogs why did dogs like some people and really not bond with other people and a follow up to that is how can she help her dogs to like her autism child more? Well, part of this is going to have to do with greed, Jack Russells in this case little Jack Russells middle aged and elderly shaking your head. No. Yeah. You're hoping for terriers are not the most affectionate dogs in the world. I mean, you know, I had a terrier who ideally loved, and I wrote a book about of Genoa Br actually there was a book about the the thirteen year war is it. My wife had this cairn terrier terriers are not necessarily the most affectionate dogs. There are things associated with the canine personality, for example, do you know where the name spaniel comes from? Well, I think little little Spain is probably what it means. Just looking at we normally named dogs after either the people who created them like the Jack Russell terrier parson, John Russell or the country place, which her born and the spaniels come from Espanol, so fate. So that would be the suggestion that that they came from Spain. But none of the spaniels were developed in Spain. So why did they get the name spaniels? And the reason was that when these breeds of dogs were being developed the folklore was that the best lovers in the world. Hey. Oh, okay. That's right said so you had all these kissy-faced dogs, and regardless of the truth of the matter they must be associated with. So that's how they got to be spaniels. So a dog like that it's much easier to to get bonding for, but if you're dealing with a trying to establish a bond with a dog, probably the best trick to us is is the trick that you use for sort of taming wild animals, and that is to hand feed the dog, so. Oh, you don't just give a bowl on the floor for free. One cable at a time. And and it's even better if you can get the dog to do something like sit come forward a stepper too. If that's what I don't think that's going to be a problem for those Jack Russells they liked, you know, that's right. And so that that's the trick. You know, you have to feed them one at a time. And after a couple of weeks, there will be a very strong bond between the child and the gawk. Okay. Well, I'm glad we asked you that we have to go to break. We'll.

Jack Russells Spain Dr Stanley Coren Dr Arnn John Russell Sophie STAN Cohen professor Genoa Br eight nine years thirteen year four months three years