8 Burst results for "Stanislav Petrov"

"stanislav petrov" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

03:01 min | 5 months ago

"stanislav petrov" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"But my point is that with the nuclear weapons thing, there have been at least I think it's 12 or 11 near misses of just stupid things. Like there was moonrise over Norway and it made weird reflections of some glaciers in the mountains, which set off, I think, the alarms of norad, norad radar, and that put them on highlight nearly ready to shoot. And it was only because the head of the Russian military happened to be at the UN and New York at the time that they go like, well, wait a second. Why would they fire now when their guy is there? And it was only that lucky happenstance, which doesn't happen very often where they didn't then escalate it into firing. And there's a bunch of these different ones. Stanislav Petrov, like saved the person who should be the most famous person on earth because he's probably on expectations saved the most human lives of anyone, like billions of people by ignoring Russian orders to fire because he felt in his gut that actually this was a false alarm and it turned out to be very hard thing to do. And there's so many of those scenarios that I can't help but wonder at this point that we aren't having this kind of selection effect thing going on because you look back and you're like, jeez, that's a lot of near misses, but of course we don't know the actual probabilities that they would have lent each one would have ended up in nuclear war. Maybe they were not that likely, but still, the point is, it's a very dark, stupid game that we're playing. And it is an absolute moral imperative if you ask me to get as many people thinking about ways to make this very precarious because we're in a Nash equilibrium, but it's not like we're in the bottom of a pit. If you would map it topographically, it's not like a stable ball at the bottom of a thing. We're not in equilibrium because of that. We're on the top of a hill with a ball balanced on top and just at any little nudge could send it flying down and nuclear war pops off and hell fire and bad times. On the positive side, life on earth will probably still continue. And another intelligence civilization might still pop up. Maybe. It would pick your X risk. Depends on the express. A nuclear war show, that's one of the perhaps less bad ones. Green goo through synthetic biology very bad. We'll turn destroy all organic matter through, it's basically like a biological paper lit maximizer, also bad. Or AI type mass extinction thing as well would also be better. They're listening. There's a robot right behind you. Okay, wait. So let me ask you about this from a game theory perspective. Do you think we're living in a simulation? Do you think we're living inside a video game created by somebody else? Well, I think, well, so what was the second part of the question? Do I think we're living in a simulation? And a simulation that is observed by somebody for purpose of entertainment. So like a video game, are we because it's like Phil helmuth type of situation, right? There's a creepy level of like, this is kind of fun and interesting.

Stanislav Petrov Norway UN New York Phil helmuth
"stanislav petrov" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:05 min | 10 months ago

"stanislav petrov" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Lot of the time Civil rights movement for example Getting a lot more attention at this time period than the nuclear arms race But by the late 70s the Soviet stockpiles had gotten quite large So you start to see a ramping up of nuclear concerns putting more missiles in Western Europe debates over whether you should make new types of weapons like the neutron bomb and Reagan comes to power on the argument of we fallen behind the Soviets these evil empires they can't be worked with that works for him in terms of elections but it also drives the fears way way way way up In 1983 there was the Soviet nuclear false alarm incident Other than the Cuban missile crisis I think most scholars would put 83 as the closest we came to some sort of nuclear war which I don't think most people realize But the war scare of 83 is a lot of things So one of them is a Soviet false alarm when the Soviet early warning system says there's missiles in coming The person Manning this computer station is stanislav Petrov he basically says I don't think this is real And he doesn't pass it up the training command Which is treason Well the American systems had false alarms also during this time period At some point in the 70s I found a note from kissing her that said that they were having one false alarm a week at one point It's unbelievable right So the Soviet systems are probably not better made than ours And so people did use their judgment but yeah in 1983 the Soviets are very worried that the United States could attack them first And so not passing it up the chain is him really putting a lot on the line Either it's a false alarm or they're all going to be dead Is it really his job to make that choice It's not clear So other things that are going on in 83 the United States is doing things that are deliberately provocative like routinely entering Soviet airspace with military planes to see what their response would be How quick could they get defenses up and running How quick do they ping them on the radar So any plane that was going to come in that we're going to think it was an American plane and go after it And this is what led to them shooting down Korean airliner zero zero 7 in 1983 which was a horrible accident but they thought it was one of these American planes that was trying to probe them and mess with them Wow When it comes to what the public feels you said in the AP piece that it's difficult to measure the public's degree of fear over time because polls use different methodologies or pose questions in different ways I'm relying here on a lot of insight I've got from one of my colleagues who's a political psychologist named Kristin Carl Are you really getting a representative sample Are you talking to enough people And then the way you pose the question matters So if I give you a question where I say how worried are you about Russia using nuclear weapons Are you a little worried very worried I worry every day You'll be thinking about oh how do I feel about this That's different than if I go to you and say what are you worried about You might say I don't know climate change the inflation crime the subway whatever This is one of the tricky things If you ask people of today about nuclear weapons in a structured way they'll often give you a response that it's on their list of things But if you ask them in an unstructured way if you just say what are you worried about The typically doesn't come up as much which just as a contrast in 1983 they did a unstructured poll where they basically asked people what are you worried about In 1983 25% of Americans were worried about nuclear war and they didn't need to be prompt about it So that's a pretty good indication of one out of four people rank it higher than crime the economy whatever That's a really high level of anxiety You created new map which is a website that shows how much destruction different types of nuclear bombs could cause in any city in the world The site has seen like 20 times its normal traffic in the past month why did you create it So I may nuke my ten years ago and I made it because it's really hard to wrap your head around nuclear weapons We've all seen the movies where the nuke goes off and the screen fades to white and that's sort of the end of the movie right And a lot of people that's sort of how they envision a nuclear weapon it would just kill everything all at once The end And one thing there's a lot of different types of nuclear weapons right There's a real big difference between the weapon dropped on Hiroshima the weapons made in the 1950s and the weapons used today So nukemap is a website that I made because being able to see that kind of damage superimposed on places I know makes a big difference to get back to this conversation about fears I think there's a really big difference between a sort of abstract impersonal fear and a much more personalized custom fear So if your idea of nuclear bomb going off is the screen fades to white the movie says the end and the credits start rolling You end up not taking that seriously as something that's likely to happen You put that in the part of your brain you put your awareness of your own inevitable death And actual nuclear weapon going off would not destroy everything If a Hiroshima size bomb again not a big bomb went off in Manhattan You're talking about 400,000 people dead 400,000 people is an unimaginable amount of dead people But it's also not that many out of the people who live in the greater New York metro area I'd still have a lot of survivors And in some ways that's worse You don't necessarily see yourself as being instantly dead in that situation You see yourself as one of the people who might have to clean up the mess and deal with the grief It's actually more powerful to show people that these weapons are massively powerful but not infinitely powerful In some ways and we've done research that backs this up this causes people to take them more seriously as a human problem and not just part of the universe you can't deal with Alex thank you very much Well thank you so much I really enjoyed being here Alex wellerstein is a historian of science and teaches at the Stevens institute of technology.

stanislav Petrov Kristin Carl Western Europe United States Reagan AP Russia Manhattan New York Alex wellerstein Alex Stevens institute of technolog
"stanislav petrov" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

07:56 min | 10 months ago

"stanislav petrov" Discussed on On The Media

"In the middle of a crisis, and yet these things still happen. And if you look at the Cuban missile crisis itself, now that we can hear the tapes, we know that there was a huge rush to escalation and only one man in the room one man was opposed to it, and that was president Kennedy. It's actually even more horrifying now that we have more information about the Soviet side of this. So for example, one of the biggest pushes during the Cuban missile crisis from people like Curtis Lemay. He was the head of strategic air command. Lemay was saying, we should just invade the island. They don't have nukes there now. We'll just take it over. That'll be that. We now know that they actually had nukes on the island. Hundreds of nuclear weapons, including tactical nuclear weapons, which would have been used to repel an invasion. And amazingly, the Americans just didn't know that. I got a chance to ask the CIA photo interpreter who was the one who gave this intelligence and said there are no nukes on the island yet. And I said to him, how did you get this wrong? And he said, well, the way we do it is we look at pictures from what a nuclear bunker looks like in the Soviet Union, and we know that those ones have nukes in them when they have fences and guards around them. And we saw they had bunkers in Cuba, but they didn't have fences and guards around them. So we figured they must be empty. And it turned out they weren't. Then a lull in the mid to late 60s, even though weapons are being stockpiled. You have this period that we call detente. The U.S. and the Soviet Union get a little chummy or the U.S. and China get chummy or at the same time, there's many more weapons being built. They're getting more sophisticated, but public attention to the weapons is generally lower. Some of that's because the nuclear test thing that had been going on is now underground. And so you move on to other things. And to be sure, the 60s were a turbulent decade, even without thinking about nuclear weapon, which this is somewhat relevant to our present time. It's not like when nuclear anxieties are low, everybody's sitting around and saying, what a great world we live in, we're concentrating on other things. A lot of the time. Civil rights movement, for example. Getting a lot more attention at this time period than the nuclear arms race. But by the late 70s, the Soviet stockpiles had gotten quite large. So you start to see a ramping up of nuclear concerns, putting more missiles in Western Europe, debates over whether you should make new types of weapons like the neutron bomb and Reagan comes to power on the argument of we fallen behind the Soviets. These evil empires, they can't be worked with, that works for him in terms of elections, but it also drives the fears way, way, way, way up. In 1983, there was the Soviet nuclear false alarm incident. Other than the Cuban missile crisis, I think most scholars would put 83 as the closest we came to some sort of nuclear war, which I don't think most people realize. But the war scare of 83 is a lot of things. So one of them is a Soviet false alarm when the Soviet early warning system says there's missiles incoming. The person Manning this computer station is stanislav Petrov, he basically says, I don't think this is real. And he doesn't pass it up the chain of command. Which is treason. Well, the American systems had false alarms also during this time period. At some point in the 70s, I found a note from Kissinger that said that they were having one false alarm a week at one point. It's unbelievable, right? So the Soviet systems are probably not better made than ours. And so people did use their judgment, but yeah, in 1983, the Soviets are very worried that the United States could attack them first. And so not passing it up the chain is him really putting a lot on the line. Either it's a false alarm or they're all going to be dead. Is it really his job to make that choice? It's not clear. So other things that are going on in 83. The United States is doing things that are deliberately provocative, like routinely entering Soviet airspace with military planes to see what their response would be. How quick could they get defenses up and running? How quick do they ping them on the radar? So any plane that was going to come in that we're going to think it was an American plane and go after it. And this is what led to them shooting down Korean airliner zero zero 7 in 1983, which was a horrible accident, but they thought it was one of these American planes that was trying to probe them and mess with them. Wow. When it comes to what the public feels, you said in the AP piece that it's difficult to measure the public's degree of fear over time because polls use different methodologies or oppose questions in different ways. I'm relying here on a lot of insight I've got from one of my colleagues who's a political psychologist named Kristin Carl. Are you really getting a representative sample? Are you talking to enough people? And then the way you pose the question matters. So if I give you a question where I say, how worried are you about Russia using nuclear weapons? Are you a little worried, very worried? I worry every day. You'll be thinking about, oh, how do I feel about this? That's different than if I go to you and say, what are you worried about? You might say, I don't know, climate change, the inflation, crime, the subway, whatever. This is one of the tricky things. If you ask people up today about nuclear weapons in a structured way, they'll often give you a response that it's on their list of things. But if you ask them in an unstructured way, if you just say, what are you worried about? The typically doesn't come up as much, which, just as a contrast, in 1983, they did an unstructured poll where they basically asked people, what are you worried about? In 1983, 25% of Americans were worried about nuclear war and they didn't need to be prompt about it. So that's a pretty good indication of one out of four people rank it higher than crime, the economy, whatever. That's a really high level of anxiety. You created nuke map, which is a website that shows how much destruction different types of nuclear bombs could cause in any city in the world. The site has seen like 20 times its normal traffic in the past month, why did you create it? So I may not map ten years ago, and I made it because it's really hard to wrap your head around nuclear weapons. We've all seen the movies where the nuke goes off and the screen fades to white, and that's sort of the end of the movie, right? And a lot of people, that's sort of how they envision a nuclear weapon. Oh, it would just kill everything all at once. The end. And one thing there's a lot of different types of nuclear weapons, right? There's a real big difference between the weapon dropped on Hiroshima, the weapons made in the 1950s and the weapons used today. So nuke map is a website that I made because being able to see that kind of damage superimposed on places I know makes a big difference. To get back to this conversation about fears, I think there's a really big difference between a sort of abstract, impersonal fear, and a much more personalized custom fear. So if your idea of nuclear bomb going off is the screen fades to white, the movie says the end and the credits start rolling. You end up not taking that seriously as something that's likely to happen. You put that in the part of your brain, you put your awareness of your own inevitable death. And actual nuclear weapon going off would not destroy everything. If a Hiroshima size bomb, again, not a big bomb, went off in Manhattan. You're talking about 400,000 people dead. 400,000 people is an unimaginable amount of dead people. But it's also not that many out of the people who live in the greater New York metro area. You'd still have a lot of survivors. And in some ways, that's worse. You don't necessarily see yourself as being instantly dead in that situation. You see yourself as one of the people who might have to clean up the mess and deal with the grief. It's actually more powerful to show people that these weapons are massively powerful, but not infinitely powerful. In some ways and we've done research that backs this up, this causes people to take them more seriously as a human problem and not just part of the universe you can't deal with. Alex, thank you very much. Thank you so much. I really enjoyed being here. Alex wellerstein is a historian.

U.S. Soviet Union Curtis Lemay stanislav Petrov Lemay president Kennedy Kristin Carl CIA Cuba Western Europe Kissinger Reagan China AP Russia Hiroshima Manhattan New York Alex
"stanislav petrov" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"stanislav petrov" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"In the end. He was neither rewarded or punished. Incident was a major embarrassment for the soviet establishment which had created the satellite system. The satellites detected a missile launch by looking for the heat signature which comes from the rocket. That's why to this day. Americans and russians notify each other before rocket is launched. What they believe happened on september twenty six. Nineteen eighty-three is that the soviet satellites detected the light of the sun reflecting off the clouds at just the right angle that was why the satellites detected a launch but the ground base radar. Didn't americans estimate that if the soviets were to have launched there might have been between eighty to a hundred and eighty million deaths just on the american side. The americans of course would have responded in kind killing an additional fifty to one hundred ten million more people the story of stanislav petrov and what happened on september twenty six. Nineteen eighty-three wasn't released to the public for over ten years it wasn't until the soviet union claps that knowledge of that day became public as it turns out. This wasn't the first or last time that a nuclear close call like this has happened in nineteen sixty two during the cuban missile crisis. A soviet submarine was being hit with depth charges and thought that war had already started. They were going to fire a nuclear torpedo at an american ship but that action required three senior officers on board to be an agreement. One officer vasili arkhipov descended and the nuclear torpedo was never launched on january twenty. Fifth nineteen ninety-five the soviets picked up another launch. Which was taken all the way up to russian president. Boris yeltsin he declined to launch and it turns out it was an american slash norwegian research rocket which was just not announced. As for stanislav petrov. He was quietly reassigned after the incident later left the military and had a nervous breakdown after the collapse of the soviet union. He was eventually growing his own food to survive. When the story of the events of nineteen eighty-three finally became public. Petroff was finally given the recognition. He deserved he was given several modest cash prizes by peace groups from around the world which helped his financial situation immensely stanislav petrov passed away in two thousand seventeen at the age of seventy seven when he died he had the distinction having perhaps saved more lives in an immediate and direct fashion than any other person in human history. You associate producers have everything everywhere daily. Are peter bennett. And thor thomsen. If you'd like to support the show please join the list of patrons over at patriotair dot com and also remember if you leave a review or send me a question you too can have it. Read on the show.

stanislav petrov vasili arkhipov soviet union Petroff Boris yeltsin peter bennett thor thomsen
"stanislav petrov" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"stanislav petrov" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"In nineteen ninety-three. The cold war was near tight. The number of nuclear warheads on earth was at an all time high. The soviet union and the united states were both on high alert and each could launch a full scale attack in a matter of minutes. The president of the united states was ronald. Reagan was a staunch cold warrior and the leader of the soviet union was a former kgb. Chief named yuri andropov in september things were especially tents on september. First the soviets had shot down a passenger aircraft korean airlines flight 007 which had straight oversaw calling island in the soviet union. Two hundred sixty nine people on board were killed in the attack. Moreover information leaked after the end of the cold war indicated that the soviet union was preparing for an eventual for strike by the united states. They initiated a program called operation ryan in nineteen eighty-one which was organized by then kgb chief and now soviet leader yuri andro pov. This was the situation that the world was in when the events of the story took place on september twenty. Sixth one thousand nine hundred eighty three stanislav petrov was born in nineteen thirty nine in vladivostok is father flew fighter aircraft in world war two and stanislaw followed in his father's footsteps by joining the soviet air force. He graduated from the kiev higher engineering radio. Technical college in nineteen seventy two and was assigned to the newly created soviet early warning system..

soviet union yuri andropov united states yuri andro pov ronald Reagan stanislav petrov kgb ryan vladivostok soviet air force stanislaw kiev
"stanislav petrov" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

No Such Thing As A Fish

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"stanislav petrov" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

"There was a plane and it had a mid flight situation where all the pilots had to jump out of plane. Evacuate ejector seat out of it and the plane. Actually crumbled in the air and to nuclear bombs dropped from it over north carolina and they should have gone off basically but they found one of the bombs hanging from parachute off a tree and they looked at today and basically for respond to go off for things needed to be activated on it. So it's a four tier system. Three those had been activated in the process of going down but the fourth didn't go off some for some reason it's my as none of them should have gone offshore day and yet somehow three of these extreme safety triggers had just gone. We're ready to go. That's why you have four. I guess but if it went off each of them had two hundred and fifty three times the power that the little boy bomb had that was dropped over here ashim. Can you imagine just one thing to go off is mind boggling. We had one in britain as well in the fifties anyway. in lakenheath base in suffolk. That was a plane crashed into a nuclear weapon storage facility. It was a miracle. The bombs didn't explode but if they had we probably would have lost cambridge wasn't and he's looking happy great loss one. The us officials said it's possible that parts of eastern england would have become a desert and we only found out about this way way later when we looked back the reports said that there was a mass panic when they realized this happened. And when the fire services we're going towards lakenheath all they saw was a combi of americans. Just leg i cars full of people just panicking and people getting taxes. And just say. Take me anywhere away from here as quickly as you can. Well what did you take on that taxi. Right a cabdriver. Say what you're out of my zone. Actually i might. Surcharge is just unbelievable. Nothing ever happened my lucky to so many hookups in nine hundred. Ninety three though. Was this other one which was when in the soviet union there was a computer malfunction which meant the guy on duty stanislav petrov basically received information that the us was launching a missile strike on the at that very moment and he was under very strict orders that he should tell us through periods and they would launch a retaliatory nuclear strike and so the siren go off and garlic strike strike strike and said this is actually one hundred percent reliable information. We've got a second sorry in third fourth or fifth went off and he for some reason decided not to tell superiors for you know. I think something's going wrong here. And he said the only reason he kinda thought that was because the system was to cernan how he's still had to pass twenty or twenty nine security levels to be totally sure that there was a strike and he was like. I'm not even sure it would do that if there was a strike so he didn't report it twenty minutes when by nothing happened so i thought okay. It was computer cock-up but he was the only civilian persons russell to the best episode of frazier. Could take you by.

ashim lakenheath north carolina stanislav petrov suffolk britain cambridge england us soviet union cernan russell frazier
"stanislav petrov" Discussed on Pop Culture Affidavit

Pop Culture Affidavit

08:34 min | 1 year ago

"stanislav petrov" Discussed on Pop Culture Affidavit

"That they they went to lawrence kansas pay people fifty dollars a day to shave their heads and basically like break windows and stuff like that. The fact that steve. Good burke strangle back to joplin just makes me think brad douglas of the spider enrolls face because That's where he's from. brad died. That makes me well. You know the the this could have been the they check a lot of a and they took a huge risk with this Because it couldn't they had a lotta trouble finding sponsors and things like that nowadays sometimes with. I've seen tv movies or shows specials like this where it's sponsored by like one company in that company has paid enormous amount of money To have maybe limited commercial interruption or something like that and then they have like their product is being shown or something But for the most part yeah they got them and then they. They had to handle this way. They did they they could have been in. This could have been very cheesy and it could have been very you know compared to other movies actually little more gentle than that a couple roussel's talk about in a little in a little while but But it is still very brutal in the way it handles in it's still very straight forward and and i think it was in the viewpoint section of this when we can we can start to segue into that. I think it was carl sagan who was like who kind of the his criticism of the movie was that like. It was too mild than that. It would actually be much worse and the movie actually said that there's a thing at the end where it says this is this is a scenario is actually one of the better ones. And they're you know if you if you watch things about people are like reagan watched it and he was deeply embedded that did not stop him his administration from using this and going look our her in ways of dealing with us. It's the right way we keep doing that. This won't happen so it in turn into one of those things. Where because of course they did they turned it to their own advantage. Yeah although apparently nicholas meyer to get a letter from regan years leader saying that. It did help change his mind. Especially he's got later into the decade Well i'm also going to point out that this movie aired two months or about a month and a half after september twenty six nineteen eighty three an early warning system of the soviet union reported a launch of intercontinental intercontinental ballistic missile and this guiding stanislav petrov. It was just this officer of the soviet air defenses said out. This isn't this isn't a nuclear. And they were like they're like no no we've got launch about a launch and he kept turn like saying no. Nobody turned out to be a clinton but we came really close to all diane because of so. I'm wondering how much that played into their feelings about this film that it literally almost just happened. Yeah that's that's another. That's a good thing to think about too because this would have been already in production ready to go by the time that happened. They were going to have it. Come out being but the cuts the network wanted pushed to november this. That's a good point. 'cause you get when gorbach have finally comes to power because this is also like This is also the early nineteen eighties and between eighty eighty five between the death of brezhnev and the rise of gorbachev you have this revolving door of soviet premiers like they can't seem to stay in power because they keep dying and that is that adds to instability within the soviet union. That's where their economy. Their economy starts go under You know and then it. It'll be an eighty six. When chernobyl happened. That really does start to truly show. How bad things were in that country because you know they were very good at putting up a smokescreen and went right into win in visited russia. Only you know somebody asked them. Do you still believe these people are evil and he said now like like everybody who loves reagan wants to just focus on him being a bad acid saying the evil empire. They rarely talk about how things change does the decade war and how it became like you said clear that the soviet union was it was all Baling wire with this nice little sheen but you know got your mobile is one of those things where like. They didn't even tell those people go. Yeah and somebody recommended up to me about that. And i'm gonna have to read it because it is. I still have to watch the hbo show. But that's i guess that's another thing that you know as you get later in the decade. We get more cooperation avid and and the cooperation. That comes story. Glass notes is really out of necessity. Survival you know it's like we can't do things the old way and even then corbet. Chad had people who wanted him taking out because of what he was doing with that even though he was doing his best to ensure the country's survival he he was not interested in dissolving the soviet union he. He wanted the soviet union to survive. He just realized he couldn't do it under the system that they had they needed to meet those changes because or else they weren't going to survive. So and then there were. There were various hardliner plots to to kill him etcetera. In fact it's like one of the major plot points in the final season of the americans which is an outstanding show of any. But if anybody listening because differ seated. I highly recommended. Yeah so after this we had. Because i think we've covered this pretty well but we have a and this is really fascinating because the attention span required to sit through what essentially is about another hour to an hour and a half of Of talk on hands right. I mean like you know. We don't have the attention span for that in our culture now but it was a it was about an hour and hour and a half of viewpoint. Viewpoint was an occasional panel. Show on abc by abc news. That would cover certain issues. And things like that. Ted koppel was the narrator that point in sorry the anchor the moderator moderator moderates. He was the anchor of nightline at anchor eater. Use the anchor of nightline nightline had been on for about four years at that point and the panel was carl sagan Host of the cosmos and an astrophysicist weisel the author of nights the nights holocaust survivor human rights advocates brent scowcroft. the f- was an air force general and he was the former national security adviser under ford and then later be national security adviser under george. H w bush william buckley's junior famous conservative pundit and then robert mcnamara former secretary of defense under kennedy and johnson and henry kissinger for State is with what was that. Your thank you. And i being flipped where i was telling you. Before every year former secretary of state under nixon national security advisor as well I was being being kind of flipped before. But i was watching this in going into this. I knew that buckley was on there. I needed sagan. Been on there. But i didn't know that it was like a large panel. I literally was sitting in my classroom watching this planning period. And i had this reaction what i saw kissinger in the macnamara i was like. Oh this asshole. It's funny because all i wanted was either dylan baker or God what is that guys. He was also in.

Ted koppel carl sagan brad douglas robert mcnamara stanislav petrov dylan baker soviet union early nineteen eighties brad two months william buckley russia george nixon buckley joplin brezhnev reagan november one
Do Not Adjust Your TV

Your Brain on Facts

04:10 min | 2 years ago

Do Not Adjust Your TV

"Their feet a lot of the time though. It's simply a matter of broadcasting a stronger signal than the station is the equipment can be sophisticated but it can also be made of scrap. Parts from things like ham radios. The motives vary widely from frustration. To it's just a prank bro. to we don't even know what heads up. There will be real clips in this episode and some of them are weird with a capital. W t f the earliest signal intrusion anywhere in the world that we know of happened back in nineteen sixty six in the soviet city of kaluga and almost triggered a nuclear war. If you know only one thing about world history in the second half of the twentieth century it would probably be the cold war decades of itchy trigger finger tension between the us and the us are one night. The regular broadcast was suddenly interrupted by a seemingly official emergency warning that nuclear war had just broken out with the united states. Many viewers took the message seriously running for cover and seeing their final prayers thankfully as what happened with stanislav petrov. Nineteen eighty-three when he correctly guessed that the early warning system was malfunctioning. When it reported incoming us bombers you can hear all about that way back in episode eleven for want of a nail government. Officials weren't quick to react a good thing to at the time. The ussr had over seven thousand nuclear weapons at their disposal. Ducted eighteen nuclear weapons tests that year alone. The us had nearly four times as many. But that's neither here nor there. It would only take fifty hiroshima sized bombs to plunge the world into nuclear winter. The soviets weren't messing around. If one official had thought another department had put out jim. It message about the us attacking. That could've been the start of a very fast extinction level event thankfully. The officials didn't panic at least not officially it would later be found that a teenager had hacked the station. His name was never released possibly because of his age and possibly to save him from retaliation from his neighbors or maybe it was a made up. Cover story tin foil hat. Nuclear war became a running theme for signal takeovers and it wasn't confined to the cold war in june of two thousand seven a show called panorama was part of the regular programming in the city of prague. In what is now czechia. The show was meant as a sort of tourist program to display calm scenic areas around the country. Like a tv travel brochure. This particular episode started off as usual with long. Lingering shots of picturesque locales around prague. Without warning the screen was bathed in a blinding flash and mushroom cloud began to climb into the sky above the city. This would be disturbing enough to see on its own but panorama was usually aired live meaning terrified viewers. At home were left. They had just witnessed a nuclear strike on their hometown. The hijacking was seamless. There had been no static or breaks in the tv signal. It was so realistic. In fact that even government officials and authorities believed the explosion was real. Luckily it doesn't take many phone calls or glances out of a window to confirm that there is not in fact a mushroom cloud rising above a blast crater in the middle of the city authorities soon turned their energy to finding the perpetrators. It would eventually be discovered that a guerrilla artistic collective called sto hoven which is known for their extravagant hoaxes and pranks were the culprits. Apparently this was a piece of performance art whether or not making hundreds of people think they're about to die.

Kaluga Stanislav Petrov United States Ussr Hiroshima Prague JIM Sto Hoven