23 Burst results for "Stang"

"stang" Discussed on House of Carbs

House of Carbs

03:14 min | 4 months ago

"stang" Discussed on House of Carbs

"Be from some weird part of France had never heard of or. I don't know Michigan or literally like West. Virginia there's all like weird places and it's experimental experimentalist ended the day savers kind funky and it might be from a place that like. Your Life. That's interesting I didn't know that they made wine in Georgia country. Whatever it is but they have been for thousands of years. My translation is in the book. Natural ones are basically muppets. Super colorful pretty weird mostly lovable. Okay sounds like I just need to keep experimenting and find. Keep keep working honestly. That's the thing that I I'm with you on the natural. I think there's a few that I like but most of them. I don't really want to drink like cloudy wine. Like I don't WanNa chew it. You know and there are some wines that I love that. I think the thing that I always felt that was. We'll talk we're going to get into tonight. Which in our in class but like the thing that I always found so strange about the natural wine thing so dogmatic right. It's like well you only. I only drink natural line but the the reality of it is some of the. I guess you call more traditional alliance. They're made by dynamically. There made natural. They're made in a in a very sort of you know honest in low intervention way. But they're just not for whatever reason like put into the natural wine category probably because they don't have like a purple ball on the label. And whatever so. I think that's the thing that I always found so tricky about it as like there is for some reason. There's like this dividing line that has to be drawn in the sand around while I only drink natural wine because it doesn't give me hangovers. Or because you know. There's all these reasons that are dubious to say the very least but sure if you find great you do not have to be so black and white about. I'm on the natural line side or on the I guess you know traditional That makes me feel much better. It's like basically the same as you know. I don't like Cabernet franc I prefer Bordeaux or something like that. It's just a preference thing right. You're making me feel better for some reason when you say that. There's not like thousands of people that will fight you on the Internet and tell you eighty you know what I mean like the natural wine is. There's this like there's such a strange Polarized audience around it. That it is perfectly okay for you to say you don't like Cabernet wrong but you start saying you don't like natural. What like watch. What happens when this when this podcast. You're going to get all these people being like. I can't believe this as I did. Start this off by saying all the things that I don't like about natural wine so we'll see you made me feel better about it so I think that's the right way to end our chat today. Chris Stang grant Iran old. The book is how to drink wine. The easiest way to learn what you like. You can check out their wind school. How to drink wine at the infatuation dot com slash wine right fellas. It was a pleasure. I'm going to drink some wine tonight. Thank you we are to. Let's do it together..

Cabernet Virginia France Michigan Georgia Chris Stang Iran
"stang" Discussed on House of Carbs

House of Carbs

01:57 min | 4 months ago

"stang" Discussed on House of Carbs

"Were all living in. We're looking for opportunities to be of some public service to you and recognition of the Times. Where we all have a little bit more time on our hands allegedly but definitely a little more time for some introspection an exploration of personal growth as we Sort of entered this period. I know I was thinking about. What are the things I'M GONNA LEARN ABOUT? What can catch up on my reading my viewing one of the things that could be on your list should be on your list. How to drink wine? There's been a lot of wine drinking in my life over the last couple months. I can assure you on today's show. We have an old friend of ours. Chris Stang you know him from the infatuation and the GATT sees a food information media titan. He's been on a bunch of times. He an award-winning Somalia. Grant Reynolds got together and wrote up. A book called how to drink wine the easiest way to learn what you like and grant is and award award-winning Somalia in New York City. He is the owner of a wine retail shop called parcel. He's a partner restaurants in New York City like Charlie Bird and Paths Quality Jones and legacy records. Those guys collaborated on this book. They're also collaborating on a weekly school series. How to drink wine school so we thought it'd be great to have them on here about sort of what they've been doing in this Stay at home moment both with in the wine world but also with the restaurants and the industries. They're focused on so let's get in that belly with our Boyce. Tanger Grant Reynolds Taste tastebuds on the line actually on the zoom you got a couple.

Grant Reynolds Somalia New York City Chris Stang GATT Boyce Charlie Bird Jones
Postpartum in a Pandemic

Bodies

06:25 min | 5 months ago

Postpartum in a Pandemic

"So I want to start with your pregnancy I'm wondering given your knowledge and your profession as a Dula when you're pregnant with soula. What were some of the things that you're doing to advocate for yourself and prepare for the postpartum time. I think that I was concerned about possibly getting postpartum depression just because I do have a history of depression and I had to get off of my antidepressant when I was pregnant. Because it wasn't safe for the baby and I was just looking for whatever type of body type therapy alternatives that I could find so acupuncture was really helpful for that and then I also Was in therapy with two different therapists by felt like I worked really hard and my pregnancy to ensure that I had the mental health support that I felt like I needed And Not a part of that was going on a second part of that. Was Me heavily planning the postpartum time in order to prevent not that you can prevent postpartum depression but in my brain in order to prevent it from happening? I'm heavy planner and I'm like if I plan everything and organize everything and get support that I need and I'm not like isolated by myself in those early weeks than you know things are GonNa go better and so Yeah I was and so am very concerned about mental health in this postpartum time. And what else did you know about postpartum mood and anxiety disorders going in? I feel like people a little bit like no about postpartum depression but I feel like the broader public doesn't necessarily have all the knowledge about the different ways that that can look. Well I think one thing too is definitely left out of the discussion is postpartum anxiety. I everybody instantly goes for depression. But a lot of people have postpartum anxiety and it presents and like so many different ways that there's not even like one like by the rule book they can look because everybody's anxiety shows up differently and I feel like postpartum anxiety is harder to pinpoint because as a new parent. You're already so anxious. A lot of the things that it says like the book say about postpartum anxiety about like watching the baby when the Baby Sleeps. And like you think the telling bad. It's going to happen to the baby and all that like that's just being a new parent in general so it's really hard to lockdown when that becomes more excessive so feeling that goes under diagnosed and Under reported a lot and a lot of people don't get support around because people don't know what's normal and what's not so. I felt lake as much information as I knew about postpartum depression. I was not prepared for postpartum anxiety as much as I should have been and I feel like that has been what has like cut more into play then. The depression Yeah so and I know you had your own Dula. Ns what were some of the things that Dula was helping you do My postpartum duly came to my baby shower and basically pasta out a notebook to everybody so that they could sign up for jobs for postpartum and at first. I didn't WanNa do it because I just felt like. I didn't WanNa like ask my friends that bluntly to be like hey can you? Guys take my trout and dishes but Actually had several friends after the baby shower. That were like that was so cool that year. Postpartum Dula did that. And they're like I always wanNA like support friends. That have a baby but I never know what to do. I also like this idea of asking people to show up in this time because this is not meant to be done alone and even for people who are single and are people who choose to be single parents or whatever like it's you're never supposed to like parent alone. They're supposed to be a community aspect to all of this. Yeah definitely definitely and so you know you come home from the hospital. It's an February beginning of March. Were still a couple of weeks away from the CDC announcing that there's a pandemic and so what was that first week at home like the first week was like everything that I have planned with my Dulas. It was Me being fed and people bringing me drinks and you know. Stang over to help with the baby and my postpartum do alike. Massaging my body. Because I was so swollen from the birth and it felt amazing that basically like I pulled off Lake. It actually worked. They actually showed up and I'm really grateful for that. Everybody was kind of like on a schedule of like who could do what when and who do overnight and stuff and it was really nice for like a week and a half to have that and to have them coming over in helping me get a break and Just like Lebanon us and everything and then this corona Situation hit and yet kind of all went out the window. She felt prepared to be a single mom. But not like this after about a week of being homeless soula. The governor of New York City put a stay at home order in place and all the people that were supposed to show up. Couldn't come anymore. We're stuck in isolation and that's not something. I would really wish on anybody that was in the immediate stages of postpartum or really just in parenthood in general It sucks. I don't even know how to describe it because it's like the exact opposite of what is needed during this time So many people were ready and willing to show up. It is nice that we have that support system and that when this is over we will still have that to rely on people. Were jumping on soon. Calls like nonstop and like doing like zoom hang outs and all these like zoom events. And I'm just like where was this energy before when you know we were all so busy with our lives constantly and so I like do like that. We've been told to slow down and like forced to talk to each other. I do hope that after this whole thing is over or whatever life looks like when it's over. I hope that like people continue to show up with the same energy and like really show up for each other

Depression Dula Actually New York City CDC Lake Stang Lebanon
A Second Chance at Life: Getting Sober at Age 24

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

09:02 min | 6 months ago

A Second Chance at Life: Getting Sober at Age 24

"Hello and welcome to. Let's talk a series of podcast produced by the Hazel and Betty Ford Foundation on the issues. That matter to us the issues that we no matter to you to substance use prevention research treatment of Addiction Recovery Management Advocacy and education. I'm your host oil moyers and today we have a story of hope brought to us by Holly S. Welcome Holly Thank you. Thanks for being here again. I'm so struck by the fact that as a young person in recovery. You've been so willing to stand up and speak out. You were on the stage at Hazelton BETTY FORD IN CENTER CITY MINNESOTA. When we had the drugs are there yet. You shared your story that they had that feel free to be up on that stage really awesome. I spent fifty six days. He's old and as a patient three times a day. I was sitting. And you know in the seats looking up the stage and so to be on the other side of that And even having the confidence to speak in front of a group of people as astounding. My my teachers would be proud. Come a long way so you tell us just a little bit about your your addiction journey. The first time you used you remember. Yeah I do I was fourteen. Bonfire my brother was four years or is four years older than me And so he had friends in his grade that were siblings of kids in my grade and so We went to von fire a night and drink and it tasted horrible. But it made me feel calm. Addy is and I was like okay. I hear often that this this is what I needed. That's it was. I kept drinking more looking for what you found it right. Exactly and and I never wanted to find that thought. I would have a problem with alcohol because my dad was suffered from substance use disorder. So that wasn't in my plan. So you knew a little bit of history you drank. It felt good even though it tasted lousy and alcohol was the drug that you continue to use correct. Yeah it was Up until I was twenty four years old in college I did use adderall and violence is prescribed that and and abused that after you know few months of having it And then it just any any mind altering substance it was you know zero to one hundred all the time. I didn't have turned off button. And then the day came when new. You couldn't do this anymore. Tell us about that day. Yeah so I actually when I was probably twenty one I knew I mean I had always had a bad gut feeling like my drinking is not normal. It's not that I would drink every single day but it was every single time. Major anchor would block out When someone told me they didn't lack cal. I was genuinely surprised like well it. That's not what you do and you drink And that was scary. Own and the waking up and not remembering But when I started drinking every day and when I started drinking by myself and when I started using it as a coping mechanism fats and I was like okay. This isn't right And that was around. Twenty twenty one to twenty four years old Brit just progressively about so much worse towards totally isolating and just drinking by myself in my room and Stang fire and just before you had your bottom. You had a family tragedy. Yeah so My Dad died from the disease of alcoholism and fat was a long time coming. I mean I grew up watching him drink as a you know as a young kid and and I didn't know what that silver and way read can was but I knew that the more that piled up next to his recliner the more he wasn't going to be my dad. You know he damore beer. He drank or whatever So that was a scary thing as a kid for my brother and I And then after my parents got a divorce when I was in fifth grade just progressively got worse and then it's really hard to ought somebody's slowly and then quickly wither away And a degree the loss of my dad twice The first time when alcoholism totally consumed him where the disease totally consumed to him and then once again when he was actually gone And I honestly think the first time was worse Because the staff that I loved so much wasn't the same and so for me when he passed away. I I was even deeper and might action right like you think that'd be a wake up call And it was to some extent but I did. I had no idea how to cope with and what to do and so I just kept drinking four more months for former months. Yeah said enough. Yeah and then I. I'm GonNa die can get help. And I started really experiencing the physical withdrawals you know not being able to go. X. Amount of hours without the shaking sweating meant I just. I watched my dad for so many years and to be experiencing that myself I was like I don't want to live that way. And My dad dying gave me a second chance at life because that brought me to his old buddy Ford and and that helped me get through sober living and IOP And counseling financially at. That's what money did for me and what that was Was that that you found recovery November for twenty seventeen. So here we come up on. It'll be soon two years in fall. Two Thousand Nineteen Been What's been the toughest part of your last two year journey and recovery? You know. I think it's really figuring out myself and figuring out my feelings and boundaries to to actually sit with discomfort isn't easy you know it takes a while to get to get used to and I would feel a little bit out of control of you know I'm like how am I supposed to handle this and And by just sitting with it I've and reaching out to peers and the sober community and I found that okay this shall pass and I can. I can do it Shortly you will be graduating from college yet. Your degree is in community health education. Where does that come from? What do you want to do with that Yeah so I. At first I wanted to do nursing. I wanted to go on for nursing and actually working IGNATIEVA I. I loved my nurse so much and I was. I WANNA be her but I am really looking forward to exploring the advocacy piece And that's a lot of what community? Health Education is health promotion intervention disease prevention in the arena of addiction. Yeah absolutely yeah So I'm I'm really excited about it. And your internship has been working in a sober for an organization that promotes sober living. Saint Paul's living and it's it's more of a structured sober living. But it's yeah but it's all about finding life in recovery life beyond treatment and and finding meaningful relationships and sober friends. Because that's that's hard. I I believe for me. Had I gone home to South Dakota? It would have been hard because in Saint Paul the twin cities. There's five hundred six hundred meetings a week. I mean recovery. People there are so many young Pe- ray. Yeah and it's I feel normal.

Betty Ford Betty Ford Foundation Moyers Twenty Twenty Holly S. Hazel Hazelton South Dakota Adderall Addy Center City Minnesota Saint Paul Ford
Remembering Christian Laettner's Famous Buzzer-Beater

The Bill Simmons Podcast

05:04 min | 6 months ago

Remembering Christian Laettner's Famous Buzzer-Beater

"Friends from Pearl Jam taping this Sunday afternoon. We don't need to take this on Sunday night anymore. Because there's no sports it's all it's all vintage sports. I've actually been preparing for this moment. My whole life. Old Games ran. Russillo is here as he is every Sunday. This was the part of the schedule. And we'll be talking about March madness thoughts where the last couple of weeks of the NBA would were going. Would-be worried about Mvp conversations and things like that. Now now I wanNA talk about The later shot. 'cause I watched that with my son yesterday. He had never seen he didn't know is going to happen. He was amazed. I got to relive it. Threw Him Russillo. Yeah that was Was An all time. I mean that that seriously in the moment you're like this is a kind of game that I'm going to think about the rest of my life. I mean not every day Certainly but late nurses dominance is a college player and then seeing younger people watch that game now and not like Lakers mom and you go. You guys have no idea you have you have no you think you know but you don't you know what I what struck me watching that game. I thought Leitner was going to be a really incredible pro because he was so good in college. But then you watch him and you think about the translate him as I go. He's got slow feet was really hard for him to like. Put The ball down. Every shot was almost like a miracle shot by hamlet on balance. Fling shots These turnaround fifteen footers. I think nowadays he would have been an awesome stretch five. I think he would have been shooting eight threes. A game in everything he did would have been different but I am. I was mad at myself. Twenty eight years ago that I thought later was going to be such good proud. Who else knew who knows what else happened. When we went to the wrong team. He had some personal issues etc. You know what the great lesson about Labor is is that he was. You'll know better than I want to get anything where I get this. Kinda thing wrong. But was he one of the first guys like tested positive for. We'd like in that era. Right or was rumored or something. There is always always rumors. He talked about that thirty for thirty. We did that. You know he definitely Off The court might have had a couple issues but a everything. I love watching these games and just getting upset about some of the issues are making 'cause like Grant Hill. Just first of all. He was a soft mark coming off the bench which seemed inconceivable but It seemed like he could have gone by anybody. He wanted to Kentucky team at all times and yet they're like all right spread out for Hurley. This is much better option. Hurley's got this. Maybe she go to grant hale the guy who guy who's going to be a first team all NBA guy in five years. Yeah later was suspended. Some Games there. I Don history but I just wanted to double check it because I remember later on and that was you know when I started talking to guys in front offices in I would be leading up to the draft and I was like you know. How can you figure some of the stuff out because what you learn is that no one really figures it out? But when you're outside of the world you think everybody has this magic. Is that that none of us can understand? It's really not that and something to gm told me that was really really smart and again it was the very beginning of me talking to these guys when we were talking about backgrounds personalities and try to figure things out and he goes look he was plenty of guys that are from terrible areas. Have a terrible family set up and have bad guys around left and right. And they're the best teammates they practice hard. They care they never get any trouble and then you look at somebody like Leitner. Who's like the poster boy? He's one of the best college basketball players in history. Not just guys that we saw was that dominant. He was incredible. And it's like here. He is Duke. Looks like he's a gap model and the whole deal and it was like well. Yeah you know now no one cares about any of this stuff but I just always thought that was really really interesting to kind of talk about lake nurse transition to the pros because he was. It's hard to imagine. He wasn't better because he still was a decent player like he still had a decent career but he was at all incredibly dominating at Duke You thought there's there's no way this isn't going to be a special pro. Plus we had familiarity with them. Because we're able to you know. Watch him and watch that Duke team evolve and even like they were shown Cherokee parks on the bench and acid. Like I remember. They recruited him. He was like the number one guy in deal he was going to be. It was going to go from ferry to Leitner to Cherokee parks. And you know you watch him on the bench and guys like Thomas Thomas Hale who added thought of in forever you know we just watched all those games back then and and something changed with College. Probably Fifteen sixteen years ago when you know. Maybe they will. Maybe it was less time. I know everybody's talked about all the possible reasons for it but it just met more back then like I remember where I watched that game and who I was with. You know an and there's been Great College Basketball Games especially this year late. They were shown. Today they're shown Carolina Villanova two thousand sixteen. That was an awesome game. That was really fun. But it. There was a weightiness to especially that ninety two seasons. Because you had the The fab five and It just every I remember everything about that seasons it was fun to relive it. I thought. Cps did a good job the way they showed it see. It felt like a real game. They didn't try to cut ahead. They would go to commercial and they would only show one ad so they could go right back so it stayed in the flow. But they didn't try to edit it. They didn't cut free throws so it kind of felt like being a time machine right. Yeah that when I've gone back in watch the NBA stuff You sit there and like the thing that jumps out especially working on the side of it now like I would. They're all these things that I would never think about is just a kid home watching these games and now that you work in it not that you and I have extensive background calling games but you just you look at it so differently You know when you mentioned the college basketball thing though it is. It's a simple answer. You can't have a brand where you're changing the brand every single time like. Imagine if you had this hit. Tv show with all these characters that people invested in and he said. Oh by the way we're never bringing these characters back for season two where he's GonNa bring all new characters and it just. It's hard it's really simple answer. But the turnover. Who used to get weird when guys would leave after their sophomore years but like what like what that. Guy. I think. He's doing now granted. It's wrong I think I should be able to go straight out of high school but there's just you know we like things to be easy as fans and really as consumers in any story like really it's how do you get people to jump into the next part of the story and college. Hoops like how many people can name. Who's on Baylor? You know for the season started. I stopped everything to watch Baylor. Kansas and it was a really fun game. This year was like nine. Am Tip out here. But I know that those kind of Duke Games or that Saint. John's Georgetown stuff for Sarah to that big Monday like I would watch that instead of the NBA growing up and now. It's absurd to think I would ever do that. I saw. I noticed watching that thinking about that team and even Kentucky and they were talking about how they were on probation for two years and the guys stuck around. Patino saying they really have anywhere else to go the other. Yeah they had all these seniors that were there but one of the things. I loved about college back then. Was it married high school in the sense I. The new guy shows up. And he's the freshman. He's gotTA prove himself. But then you got the older kids that have been there for a while and you know. The Duke was like the perfect example of. They're they're really like a high school team. Cherokee parks was the young freshman. Grant Hill was a sophomore. Who is going to take it over when Leitner leaves and and that dynamic that just eventually was gone. You Watch that game and you're thinking Mashburn Ingrain. Hiller are sophomores Mashburn. Just unbelievable there. Eight hundred twenty eight ten just looks like a classic stretch for now he he would have been I think a multiple our NBA Guy. There's no reason he should've even stayed at Kentucky for two years he should have gotten into the NBA as fast as you possibly could. We didn't realize that back then. Yeah I got to know Mashburn when he was at he. Spn One of my favorite living in Bristol stories. Is he and I go into Walmart to buy an extra controller and I didn't know it was going to pay for it because I didn't want to assume anything and I was like. Yeah 'cause I had the playstations hooked up in my hotel room and we were just bored out of their minds so it's me Jamal Mashburn at Walmart and I asked him about that team. And I always when asked about different coaches that these guys played for. I was always really interested. In which coaches told you to stay or told you to go because they're guys that are really selfish about it but then there's other ways you know now it's it's out of control like no one. Stang but back then I was like well. What would say to you he goes? I'm not letting you come back. You're too good like you're too good. You have to get out of here and I know you know Ripa Tinos. Rep's is taking pretty big hits over the last couple of years but that was something that I was always really impressed with that. He just looked at like I was like. Did you want us? He's Kinda wanted to stay because mashes whole thing was like. He's a New York City guy and his mother wouldn't let him go to a school in New York City. He was telling me about some of the recruiting stuff like Saint. John's back then still would've thought they were getting Jamal Mashburn. And he's like my mother was like you're not you're not playing ball in the city. And then he goes on a Kentucky after Kentucky went through that that brutal stretch. And you know that's that's the game if you're thinking of one loss that you've had in your Phantom Bill. I'm trying to think maybe it's two thousand. Ten Celtics Lakers the one. That's things the most I don't know if it's game six eighty six in the mets. But that doesn't feel as bad since they've won four titles but if you're a Kentucky fan like that's the kind of that stuff comes up every day it's like Bucky Dent in the eighties for Red Sox fan just sitting at a bar. Mfn Bucky Dent on because later shot. Well the Kentucky did end up winning. I think it's probably worse for Mashburn Jerk Kentucky Fan. You had to tidal teams later in the decade. Because like Ben and I were watching. We went right from yesterday. We were watching that Kentucky game and then the Major League Baseball Network were showing the playoff game in seventy eight Yankees Red Sox and we watched the last like probably two and a half innings and I was explaining to him how the playoffs worked back. Then it was a gay. You played the whole season. It was two division champs in each league. They tied so we had to have a playoff game. And he was like Whoa. How did they decide? Who had it as like? I don't remember. I just remember like everybody from Boston to stay home that day. And we're watching it. He had no idea it was going to happen. And a living through the the remmy hits that shot to Pinella. Panella can't see any just jabs his jabs his mid out. I'm getting mad at George Scott all over again. I think he was my least favorite. Red Sox player just swing for the fences. Every time never never touched a ball early on that he was early. It was at the head of it. Yeah Jangle That was such an agonizing loss and they've won four world series since and it still really hurts Agata Sad. I don't feel any better from it. Yeah I I grew up hearing about it because you know that's where our our gap comes into play. Were still too young to but it was one of the first things like eighty two as my first sox game against brewers and I I just remember like the Bucky Dent thing like it was four years later and people still in them. I remember that we again emceeing. So if the way your brain store stuff early when there's nothing else in there so they allies kids we can always go back and remember anything. Because there's no distractions of real life. But I remember being upset after the fact years later. Just my father telling me that they blew the fourteen game lead and you just go. How is that possible? Like how? How could they have low like how they had the best team? And all these different things and again that stuff used a matter a lot more And Eighty six at all comes up again eight years later so we've seen over the last few days in especially ESPN and then Nba TV and emo but others channels. They're

NBA Kentucky Jamal Mashburn Leitner Bucky Dent Red Sox Basketball Thomas Thomas Hale Russillo Lakers John MVP Hurley Walmart George Scott Cherokee Baylor Grant Hill New York City Bristol
Your Coronavirus Questions Answered!

Healthcare Triage Podcast

11:07 min | 6 months ago

Your Coronavirus Questions Answered!

"We're going to dedicate at least this show if not a few shows to answering your questions. About Ron vires. Tiffany is going to be asking a question. She's sitting right over there. But not near me. Because we are actually acknowledging social distancing at this point so she's got to be what twelve feet fifteen feet away from me? I think south. That's the safest so she's answering your question asking your questions. I should say I'm answering your questions here. We go okay. So let's start with one of the most asked questions. What is the deal with insights? Should we avoid things? Like Ibuprofen for now just to be safe. So a lot of the concern about ends proof has to do with some studies that looked only viruses in the respiratory tract in general no non specifically with covert and some of those studies did show perhaps some associations that there might be some you know getting a little bit worse or having some side effects if you had a respiratory virus and took Ibuprofen. The best. I've seen was randomized controlled trial to give people basically Cnn medicine or I've appropriate or something like an aide or nothing or some combination and it found incredibly minimal differences. Tiny really tiny and so. I don't even know how much this is. This is old news. I mean this study is like a couple years old. It's not new. It is not cova specific and so everyone's concerned about this just seems a little more than we need right now. Okay so what's being said on twitter is the ICU. Physicians are saying that they've noticed a trend that people are worse off when they have been on. End said so again. I don't know that these are actually informal studies and that we actually know you're going to hear anecdotal reports but of course it's the anecdotal reports. That are GONNA make the most noise. I have not yet seen any conclusive data to push in that direction. So the rest of the questions. I've just tried to group. So this first group is going to be questions about social distancing and quarantine so this first one. Can you do things outside in suburban areas like? Walk your dog basketball with your family as long as you stay away from other people and then what about playing on an outdoor golf course. If there aren't a lot of people in your away from others going outside great. There's no reason to stay in the house. This is not like floating around the air but you WANNA follow the same rules with other people that you would follow him. The House like walking with the neighborhood friend who Stang more than six feet away is fine. Like don't get in the zone where they could call on you. Then you should be fine Playing basketball with the same people like your family that you are otherwise in the house with otherwise likely fine now playing basketball with people that are not part of your social isolation group is not okay really because then that's just like hanging out with them. That's what we're trying to avoid so being outside if you're following social dissing rules are is great being outside and close with people who otherwise close to his great but don't be outside with people you otherwise wouldn't be close to because that's just as dangerous being inside with them so. I think that also answers. The question. People wanted to know if kids could play together outside so if they are your kids from the same house yes with neighbors probably easy to say nobody should ever see anybody That's very difficult to hold down. So there's a couple of ways you could theoretically go about doing this. One is If you have a couple of families and you guys commit that like these are the families that are only seeing each other. You've socially isolated yourself and just a slightly larger group and they truly commit to that. That's pretty much okay. Secondly if you can agree to the same rules that I just said it's fine so we've told our our youngest daughter. She can have like one friend that she's designated over but they have to play by the same rules more than six feet away washing of hands. No sharing anything you know. They can play together like a video game or something but no making videos and foreign around. You gotTA respect those distances if kids can do that on play dates and they're old enough great if you're talking about small kids then again if you set up with like one or two families and say like Dr. Kids are just going to socialize with each other and nobody else and the families are not doing everything else. And You keep the group contained. Then that's probably so it's like that also addresses this question on. Should you refrain from having people over to your house? Same roles I'd say would apply if you like can identify one. We have sort of two families that we would consider. Perhaps let's say would you? Let's say two families that are best friends so it's just three families that if we say we're only doing our three families and nobody else probably okay the same way. I also said like I have a neighbor across the street as a friend of mine. I imagine You know he came over and wanted to sit and chat inside over there and I sat over here and we follow the same rules and good handwashing this really minimal risk there so you have to be smart about it but you want to keep to a minimum. I mean you really do. The part of this is Trying to keep social distance and of course if we go to serious quarantine in lockdown you should probably stop even that but we're not there quite yet okay and still keep all of this to groups. Wet less than ten. There's oh well I mean the president is CDC said. No group should be getting together larger than ten. I think that that's still too large. I mean it's just I would say like you know if you're getting together in a group of ten people unless you're committing to sit six feet apart a pretty large room and so I don't know how we're actually pulling that off now with our family. Read around the kitchen table. But that's because we're agreeing that's our social circle and if you live in a family of ten fine keep the ten people in House. Nobody's saying household but you probably shouldn't be inviting a random ten people over to your house at any time. That's not serving the purposes. It's very unlikely you're following the rules and keeping at least six feet apart from anybody else. How do you practice appropriate social distancing in places like grocery stores and pharmacies that you sometimes really need to go to so clearly of course you know all the usual rules apply in Washington Washington washing? Don't touch your face. Coffey elbow. Don't go if you're sick. Stay away from sick people. It's also better to go on off hours when fewer people are going to be there. It's better to avoid it when there's huge lines as much as possible. Keep your distance from other people. You know it's no we could spend in light stand in line like six feet apart. You know making sure. We're not sneezing or coughing on each other. I'm certainly the second Jordan. Wash your hands you know again and again and again when you unload the groceries wash your hands you know just constantly constantly constantly get used to making you short. You are clean and you've taken whatever might have gone off certainly before you touch your face certainly before you eat. Is it okay to volunteer places? Like food banks if you have no symptoms and use a mask. This is where I would talk to the Food Bank and find out there policy but again they're going to want to restrict it to his people as possible the whole goals. We don't want lots and lots of people coming into contact with each other so if they said we have a core of volunteers and these people are agreeing to go up and back to the Food Bank and not do anything. That would be ideal. Should we cancel all on critical doctor? Appointments in March may be an April on. This person. Said it feels like I should but I don't want to leave issues unresolved for potentially. I'm laughing at this question. Because I get asked this question about should I cancel ex by friends family and acquaintances all the time? And every single time my responses it's going to be cancelled anyway I think it's very unlikely that a lot of these optional appointments over the next few weeks certainly are going to stay in place. Be It a dental visit. A non emergent doctor visit A nail visit a haircut. Were heading towards probably much more strict isolation which case they get canceled. The trip matters yet. We probably should cancel them Because because they're just exposing us in ways that we probably don't need to next question should soon healthcare workers coming back from spring break allowed to continue work clinical rotations. Many are even after having traveled. I mean our medical school. Just shut down all third year rotations for medical school. And we're waiting to hear what they're doing on fourth year rotations. I think that's GonNa stop no matter. What because again. I think we're headed towards you. Know really only essential personnel should be exposed. And so I think this is one of those theoretical questions that people are asking. Now I think in a week will be moot. How can families of healthcare workers support their family working in healthcare? Well still helping contain the virus? So how do they keep their kids neighbors etc? Save when someone in the home is a doctor nurse. Paramedic getting lots of exposure enroll like. I've seen extremes on twitter. Were were doctors who know they're being exposed or like moving into the garage to protect your family which is just. I can't believe this is where we are But you know we. I think we're living in a world where I mean. Look as much as you can in a house practice good hygiene. Wash your hands. Stay away from people. Don't share stuff. My kids are all in high school. You know my oldest is in his room most of the time and so it's like it's not as hard pressed social isolation if you have if you have small children. It's much more difficult almost impossible. Let's own almost impossible But but doctors who were seriously being exposed need to take much care as possible to keep their family safe but it's going to be very hard. Should we bring parents home from CARE? Facilities Assuming no one in the homesick and then related to that. Should I get my elderly parents to my house from another state before things get worse if you're committing to true isolation liqu you're not GonNa Leave Your House and you can drive and get your parents so that you know they're not going to an airport. I guess it's theoretically possible that you could safely get them to you and then all commit to not leaving the house but you almost have to have the same rules that were advising the elderly at that point like it would be dangerous for you to go to the supermarket and then come home be near your elderly. Pats. You'd almost have to shutdown. That's been hard to do If they're in a nursing home or long term care facility I'd talk to the Nursing Home I don't know what safer to be honest whether to bring them home or not. Sometimes it's impossible. You just can't provide the care that they need which is why they were in a facility to begin with and of course once they're exposed. I'm not sure how much good it does to bring them out. So these are the kinds of incredibly hard. No good answer questions. That people are going to ask that are worth discussing. But I would do that. You your doctor or your parents doctor and the healthcare facility where they are. Is it safer to have your food delivered or to order food for pickup great question so I I suppose it depends on? How the pickup goes. Here's the thing there's there's not as there's really not much of an for transferring food as long as people are taking usual precautions and of course if you get delivery. They put the package down. Walk away you could open the door. Never be exposed to human being taken back to Washington to get to go no exposure. That's possible with pickup. But it's also possible you walk into pick up in their six other people wind to pick up the exact same moment and those are the kinds of exposures. Were trying to avoid okay and I feel like might be important to mention here that we should tip the people low. What I forget. You're only asked me a safety issue generous to everyone as humanly possible right now. We have canceled the people that help us clean the house. We're still paying them. And I say that. Not to Brag not too but it's like as much as you can help all the people that you can Because they are utterly dependent on a lot of the income. That is coming into completely. Cut IT OFF. Believe the most vulnerable vulnerable of us at

Social Isolation Twitter Ibuprofen CNN Respiratory Tract Basketball Ron Vires Tiffany Golf END President Trump Washington Washington Washington Coffey Stang
"stang" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

11:25 min | 10 months ago

"stang" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"And I produced. Nice try from curbed a podcast about utopia a place that is perfect and does not exist hosted by avery. truffle me. The season starts in Jamestown with the first permanent English settlement in North America. An ends in the fictional her land a world with no men in sight. Nice is try has been recommended as a must-listen by the New York Times The New Yorker esquire vulture time and more apple podcasts. Even named it one of the atop podcast of two thousand nineteen but don't just take their word for it check it out for yourself. The entire season is available. Now find out more and binge it on Apple podcast asked spotify or your favorite podcast APP. recode media Peter Kafka. That's me live on tape from New York City at Vox media headquarters talking to Chris. Dang Co founder and CEO of confederation. Either is it infatuation. It's the infatuation. Congratulations thank you. It used to be immaculate infatuation. Dead Ninety nine syllables we We got rid of one of those words pretty quickly just to make things easier just made a good name change I think many many people listen to this. PODCAST will have heard of the infatuation. Haven't what's the one sentence description of the infatuation I mean at its core of a restaurant discovery platform But we do things a little different than some other people that also provide that service. And that's really the the bread and butter of it is that we make really situational restaurant recommendations the nation's so I'm Gonna I'm GonNa do the one version online restaurant reviews better at this than I am. Let's let's less sexy but it's good. What you guys do is good good? There are a bunch of places that do this. Yeah well that's why that extra sort of context is always necessary. Right is because I used to hear for a long time. We're building this. Why does the world need more restaurant reviews? And that's understandable right. There's a lot of that in this world and there has been for a very long time and as you know digital world evolved along game yelp and plenty of other places that people you can get this kind of content but we really believe that we were building and providing something different and that context. Is that situational part. meaning that you know we really want to make sure that People are passionate about dining and interested in becoming knowledgeable about dining can understand how that's going to fit into their lives. So who are you GONNA be with. What's the VIBE that you're looking for with those people will part of town you need? CBS and then what's the best restaurant that sort of fits into all of those parameters. See Plug this in Works well in your browser on your phone you can say I'm on a date going going out with mom and dad. Whatever it is you really slick website reviews a pre short? Tell you what to order. It's Kinda written for an every person. Yep absolutely it's a good product. Thank you. I'm really happy to hear that you agree. You guys have been around for how long so we started in two thousand and nine but it was really a side hustle. My business partner Andrew and I were in the music business us and we actually started then immaculate infatuation almost as a way to just get our friends to stop texting us because we were just you guys you guys. Are The restaurant guys. Yeah you know the music business nighttime sports here out all the time going to shows and inevitably you have dinner before you go to the shows and he and I are both really passionate about restaurants so so it It just became one of those things that we were quickly the most knowledgeable to people in our group of friends and also throughout that process. We realized that really just felt like there was an opportunity to serve. You know a group of people who would maybe fairly recently become introduced to dining as a passion with the resource that they could relate to people who have some spending money. Yeah we would always say young professionals in a major city I mean we were only New York until we went full time at the business in twenty fourteen in by design. We knew that the two of US couldn't we wrote. The two of us are at every single restaurant review up until two thousand fourteen basically So we knew we needed to keep it very contained until after we. I WANNA get into how you built it but I just want us at the stage again in case people don't know what you are you're in New York you'd a bunch of other cities You bought the GATT. We did A couple years ago MM close the deal on March twenty twenty. Just relaunched it. We can talk about that as they used to be. Sort of the one restaurant review resource that used especially in New York. Yeah if you moved to New York Ark in nineteen ninety-seven like I did you walk around that thing in your backpack We can talk about that. And then just in terms of the overall scope of the business. You guys raised thirty million bucks from underclothes. Jeffrey Katzenberg's median tech Finance or Financing Slash Holding Company twenty eighteen dot closed in At the end of Twenty eight August of two thousand eighteen and overall size How many folks are using the site using visiting your? You know we read together between all of the You know audiences combine about four or five million people a month. Okay so are you throwing in like facebook and yeah I mean that's okay. We deliver a modestly sized business. Right now look I think we have lots of room to grow. We reach a lot of people especially in a demographic of young professional in a major city. And you've got good mindshare this year because there's lots of restaurant people who know about you and I'd heard about you guys forever in full disclosure. We work next door to the people who work at eater they'll roll employed at vox media and for a while my perception of you guys without ever looking at the site was this is bro e or Friday or somehow dumbed down. Maybe some people at eater look down their nose. Sure you you probably have encountered this multiple times but by the way if you go to the site it's pretty straightforward. We love when people underestimate us. Yeah but yeah it's it's not it's you're not I don't want to offend the the the fine people who work in consume barstool. You're not the Barstool of food reviews. We would certainly not describe ourselves as that yet. You're super earnest and serious and this is good food we like it. We think you would like to order this to honor that like our whole thing is just really trying to get to a place in which we feel like the contents ants relatable and useful. And so you know there's lots of things right like people would always say. Oh you millennial audience and that was true in his true largely because of the way that we built using things things like social media. But we don't write in me speak and for as you know much as we'd heard this sort of thing. Our audience has always been very very much more female leaning than it is male. That's changes we've scaled but We just always felt like the content isn't written for a certain gender. It's not written for a certain person. It's not written for certain certain demographic it's just meant to be as reliable and useful as possible and really that just means being conversational. So here's the big question I have for you guys. If you guys were came to me in twenty twenty fourteen or two thousand fifteen and said we're doing this thing it's going to be mobile first and it's going to be a really slick product that it's built for this money audience. I said Oh i. I understand why you're doing that. I understand why you're launching it. I bet you get funding. People seem to be into this kind of thing now but it's twenty. Nineteen sentiment in general is not good about media companies I'm SORTA surprised you guys could raise money in two thousand eighteen and they're definitely down on the product that you have right now which is primarily free ad-supported Internet media. Is this going to remain that Kinda company if you guys figured out a way to make that free ad supported reported media business work that the rest of us haven't figured out. Well I mean. I think we've figured some things out And I think we're continuing to figure things I think that's the space. All of us live in right now. I think when you go back to that idea of can't surprise. We raise money surprised that you know even that we've gotten as far as we have. I think the thing that's always been true for us and you can go all the way back to the very beginning was that you know. Certainly there are many ways to look sceptically on a restaurant review website or whatever you WANNA call it but the thing that really you can't deny has been true since day one is that the the brand and the content has connected with people and we've just been able year over year to build a bigger and bigger and bigger audience of people who really care about it and they really relate eight to and they feel connected to it and that's when we go in if I were going to pitch you on you know investing in the business or you know launching podcast together or something. I would just say to you that I think we we have some really valuable Things that are hard to build which is a brand Credibility and trust and which is a real community that day a take our advice and they go to restaurants when we tell them we liked the restaurants they come to our food festivals and pay good money to be there they engage with us across all of our platforms with a texting platform that we are constantly engaging with people on You know so. That's always been the thing that's helped us take the next step even a an uncertain world of concentre media or attack or whatever you know bucket you WANNA put us into and that's still very true. It actually relates exactly why we bought the GATT. which is that? That's a brand that you know has has been built over forty years right and it's at its own bumpy ride in the last. Let's call it decade or so but brands and A strong relationship between Lina Brandon a community. It's that's really hard to just get and it's hard to build and you know one of the most important ingredients in that recipe has time and so we feel like you know as we continue to get bigger and we've matured and we've grown. We've all just felt like as long as we can keep that part you know intact and as long long as we don't mess up the brand break the trust we have between the brand and the community we can figure all the rest out And that's been that's really been what our business has become. Yes we are in ad-supported brand part we do really great brand partnerships with great companies who want to interact with our audience and that's been a really good business for us and it. It looks a little bit different than it might for a vox at scale. And even you know a company like Barstool or you know. I think everybody's learning that you kind of have to customize your model towards your your exact recipe of platform and you know where your audience lives and how you engage with them and it's worked really well for us. I think it puts us in a position right now as we really start start to scale in our growth is increasing year over year as a percentage not you know not decreasing or plateauing so it just gives us a lot of confidence that regardless of what's happening around us as long as we keep brandon community intact we can figure the rest out and the other thing that's a little counter. Intuitive to with your approach is is sort of a conventional media business right now as you guys are expanding city by city which makes perfect sense as a consumer right. I'm going to Philadelphia for Christmas. Where am I going to eat I'm GonNa look you guys up. It's really hard to make local work basically because again if it's ad-supported people don't generally ad buyers don't want to buy a small audience Philadelphia. They WANNA buy a bigger reach. How are you guys solving that? Well I approaching it. We've actually found that While that's certainly true that you know advertisers want broad reach. We've actually found that having the ability to who provide combinations of market distribution actually has worked really well for us because in a Lotta situations if you're gonNA launch a new car you know if you're a car you uh-huh car company Automotive Company launching a new car or the new edition of the Toyota Camry or whatever it is mostly the marketers. Yes they'll have their national plan and that's GONNA be big media India's purchases and all the things you see car companies. Doing they advertise a new vehicle. But there's also always going to be an element of demographic driven marketing plan while they'll say hey for this car we really think that Atlanta in Houston and Washington. DC You're going to be important markets for us so we actually have the ability to do both Were clearly not going to give people the targeting that they're gonna get going to Google or facebook or one of the big tech companies.

vox media New York facebook apple Lina Brandon New York City New York Times Philadelphia North America Jamestown avery. New York Ark US Jeffrey Katzenberg Peter Kafka Co founder spotify Chris
"stang" Discussed on House of Carbs

House of Carbs

12:37 min | 10 months ago

"stang" Discussed on House of Carbs

"I'll share with you just how I have it organized now because I'm interested sort of vision. Wise how you this might sort of play out so I think of was again as SMART Yelp like elephants. I don't I don't know whether or not y'all Babar. has any interest in advertise. Trust me of House House of cards but YELP is terrible. I find it utterly useless. It's a it is a lowest common denominator information and it's mainly filled with gripes So the I never look at Yelp for any information as as when it comes to me being food curious in in a new city or even my own city I I find the information they impart so if you if you have designs on buying Yelp I'm sorry for saying all these bad things about it but it's not I don't i. I have designs on replacing them. And so it's all good. Oh great terrific because There's a guy you know has a standard. It has a reputation it has credibility it is as the original crowd sourcing. Those those quotes That that have been in the books and now online Have the ring of truth Innis. I believe that they they're not Made Up. I don't think that that Tim Nina were sitting in their apartment in in wherever they live in the city. You know crafting these things out of whole cloth themselves elves and and the infatuation has to me as I've gotten to know it. It's a deeper dive and has kind of editorial voice that that speaks a kind of a language it imparts information. That's different from crowd sourcing. It has more taking it. It is more to me than than the way that I receive it as a consumer of it like You know I'm a I'M NOT I. I wouldn't call myself a serious food person but I'm more than just a an amateur. I mean you have a podcast about it so I would probably tell you. It's pretty theory food person. I don't take it that seriously the way I'll say I didn't say that a lot. Actually we say that a lot around around the four. The walls are company. Obviously this all the time that you don't you don't have to be serious about through to take it seriously. They're supposed to be fun and it's supposed to be like you know people who who are passionate on dining do it because it's something that gives them pleasure and gets them away from the things in life that suck so I should be so serious right right. You're right on the wanting with that I'll steal. That might become the new tag for the show because he has a great description types of information will remain as is relevant to me going forward. So I'll just be excited to see how you guys you sort of navigate this and think about the marriage as it really gets going in two thousand twenty and onward you know what kinds of information make sense and and and how it works but rail. They're pretty complimentary. I think thank you. Yeah I look you. You summed it up perfectly and what you said about you know the way that the the content comes across what the purpose for that continent exactly the way that we talk about about it internally and that's again why we I would agree that we think it's very complimentary. I think what it all comes down to. And you know this goes back to the rating system and all those other things that you know it all comes down to trust and credibility and authenticity and people have to believe that you know your intentions are correct. That you've done the homework and that your Acting responsibly and that you're not there just to take a shot at a restaurant if you're gonNA write something that is an entirely positive and that You know it's why it's important important. We on the infatuation side really communicate to people that we pay for all of our own meals. It'd be dying anonymously and That all Kinda goes back to. I think you know what's happened over time with the Internet is just that it's hard to know who to trust especially when everybody has a voice so when the opportunity for you know to purchase the guy came along it was really driven by that which is just that you know trustworthy. Brands are really really hard to build. And one of the most important Ingredients in the recipe of you know building a brand is time and so you know you pointed out. Also that the you know the infatuation ten years old so we just feel like one of the most important asset asset that we have. It's really hard for someone. Just come along and you know take away from us or copy or steal is just that trust and credibility inside of both the brand so It's an easy thing to screw up. And that's what we all we have to talk about and make sure we're really smart about as we build and grow and expand and scale that we can't lose that relationship of trust and credibility with With the audience and the element of authenticity and credibility has to remain intact with the brands but Once you have that there's a lot you can do To make sure that you're serving people with high quality information so we're still going to learn a lot as we go along and and figure out you know especially as we think about where you might see both ratings and and in the same place that might be a window sticker or it might be On each you know respected digital product. We we need to be smart about how that information is presented. But we're pretty confident that people understand that. I think you can look to rotten tomatoes as an example of Where that's done really well? We'll show you a critic score and a community score and people can make decisions based on that information so something that I think helps Both endeavors is like the third source of information that I actually Do rely on which is going to the newspaper in that place that location and finding the restaurant critic And and you know taking on what they've looked at over you know. You can quickly by way the Internet now You know take a look at what My Bill Addison and and Patricia. I'm going to mess up her last name. ESCORTS DAGGA IN IN L. A. are looking at and eating and I can look in DC. Tom Seats Emma. I`Ma avid consumer of his stuff in Austin Texas. My Man Matthew Repeat Pete Wells in New York right like all those folks are living in those places and eating What those places have to offer so those are also vital information sources that provide a standard against which to measure the ratings that are emanating from places like the infatuation and and Yeah Zagat? and Ah like do you. Guys have a view as to how those relationships between the various information sources what's like the best kind of a quotient there. I think everybody's different everybody. You know some people might you know instead of using those local local writers and newspaper critics. They might use you know people they know on instagram. Who Live in those places that feel are very credible? There's so many places you can go find nine information and there's so many people who Who are doing this stuff? The right way who are passionate about food and want to help people discover ever things in their city and they're passionate about their city and I think you know there's A. I think everybody has a little bit of a different mix in terms of the way they go about approaching a new city right so for me for example When I like went to Copenhagen for the first time I definitely you know research stuff I could find online but then I asked him friends and then I? You made a list of the restaurants that I wanted to go to and I went and followed those restaurants on instagram because I wanted a little bit of visual on what the place looks like. And what the kind of food look like. And that's just happens to be my approach. But I think everybody's a little bit different. I think you know look we. We should all want support any local media that exist anywhere because it's vital resource whether it's in food writing or sports writing or whatever. It is something that needs to to exist so we're always very happy to Even though we compete with those platforms very often I think they should be there and You know we've we've actually. An example of this has been really but fun and informative and useful and valuable to us as we've got really good relationships with a a lot of the critics in London. WHO's still matter a lot because they just have different media market so a lot of big newspapers still a really really really important and And it's only helped us to you know. Be a part of that community. It's not like we have to go in there and say we're GONNA put all these people out of business because we it's just ridiculous I think that and also the the more people there are out there helping provide this kind of information. It's it's good for everyone. It's good for the restaurant. That's good for the communities and so on and so forth so it's just an interesting time though because I don't think there's I really don't think that nowadays you can say that well. This is the one way that everybody discovers a restaurant or this is the one way that everybody consume assume there news or this is the one way that everybody You know approaches belonging to a community. It's everybody's different so it's hard to be really prescriptive and say like like this is the this is the. This is the way that you're gonNA reach people and you're gonNA have a hundred percent of the market share of restaurants discovery. That's not gonNA happen. Yeah right it. It is Because I I haven't even we haven't talked about some of the more traditional media magazine media folks the bone apetite the food and wine's thrill list is out there with with reviews Who has a wire just came out I can't remember the guy's name He. He did his best restaurants. Jeff Gordon or near Jeff Gordon Air exactly And he was very kind of DC. So I'm I'm GonNa get him on the pot. I WanNa talk to him about his experience here but your the point is is right that like you know what's out there is kind of especially food world tons of resources and each individual person will customize based on Trusted trusted resources. Like I've Al- I've looked at this thing before and it has not steered me wrong and it's a way validate the decision making 'cause you know for for lots of taste. Buds hungry homeys out there. The act of going out and eating is something that you mentioned before still still you know. It's it's a passion move. You're looking for food as a as a way of of like you know getting yourself out of the ordinary grind And food food food when you go to a restaurant not just sustenance. You want the the entire experience it went. All five of your your senses tickled so I I didn't expect that we were gonNA spend half hour going through kind of the machinery but it's it's fascinating and I'm glad that we did you know sort of hood don't don't don't put me on here unless you ready for me to talk a lot. 'cause I it it is Kinda fascinating area because of the moment that we're in in terms of the information and the resources that are out there and what we're talking about is taking an old media resource but beloved one at least to me a book that S. and part part of what made the Burgundy Bible and I can say it. I'm not worried about offending any religious. Folks they are Ardi no heathen actually said a while ago. The best thing can happen if we get banned from religious bookstores isn't a great story. That's a great point. You're right Burger Story. Yeah you're right. The Burgundy Bible still is organized in an impeccable way. And you know having that trusted resource resource sort of back in in in one's hands To us is. Is You know a a welcome return. So I I hope And I'm still able to. I'm still able to go EAT NEW YORK with with some frequency but You know for other folks in other parts of the country. Ah maybe maybe the Burgi Bible will show up on their bookstores again in their locale. I I I want to cover a couple things. We we have the benefit of looking back at at two thousand nineteen. We talked about the ten year anniversary of the infatuation dot com huge congrats. I hope nobody can remember because it was too much alcohol consumed. We were too busy. We actually didn't Andrew. My business partner was very upset that we didn't throw a party but we'll do new something someday. It's too late you you already season ally tonight. We'll put the knight. This December is just a month. It's holiday party season..

YELP Yelp House House Jeff Gordon Babar. Burgi Bible Tim Nina Texas New York Tom Seats Emma NEW YORK Pete Wells Copenhagen Austin Bill Addison London Patricia
"stang" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"stang" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Do you stay relevant as an organization despite Mike Constant change so certainly for us. It's again listening to customers listening to patients listening doctors nurses but for me I have the privilege the working with a private equity firm some student partners who understand tech enabled healthcare services company and they have the purview of the marketplace and where it's moving in healthcare and I have that additional voice to advise us and say look. We have to make sure this part of the program is more robust. Should we be adding more and investing more in this this particular area so I think you know certainly the way to stay. Relevant is to make sure that your program is meeting. The evolving needs of the marketplace and you do that by listening listening to your customers to families doctors nurses and certainly to advise that you have and so again it's it's really taking all those voices into make sure you're moving in the right direction great great message and how about the one area that drives everything at progeny health so I certainly think your employees employees that your greatest strength the talent that you have working every single day in the company is the strength of Your Business and so we try and and do all we can to empower employees to recognize and reward them and to make sure we continue to develop programs to mentor them to be their best self to help them move moving along their career paths so really we are very focused every year on making sure that we are providing great work environment for employees because their greatest asset. What's your favorite book that recommended the listeners so too and I thought about this a lot. When I was beginning the company it's hard it's hard to sit in a basement and think of create something that doesn't even exist and so I read a book at the time that's an older book and it's called the power positive thinking by Norman Vincent. It's appeal the nuggets in that book of it. Literally takes a mustard seed of faith in what you're doing and belief in what you're you're doing to change change an environmental problem. You're trying to solve to change the world ultimately but for me the the nuggets of inspiration that book walk really helped me in the beginning of the company so I found that very inspiration and I still have it at my nightstand today and the second thing I recent book that loves it's a historical called leadership leadership turbulent times by Chris Goodwin and she looks at four presidents and what they did during very significant times in the history of the United Change a united stakes in their leadership to change the outcomes of this country and it's a fascinating read they talk about Lincoln the to Roosevelt's and Lyndon Johnson fantastic read that shows shows you the skills of leadership during difficult times and how they were able to change whether it's policies are other things in this country to move us forward so fascinating dating reap wow sounds too great recommendations folks you know where to go for the shouts and links to the books a full transcript the discussion go to outcomes rocket that health in the search bar type in progeny health and you'll find it all their wow this has been so interesting saying. I mean social determinants of health takes village using tech to improve outcomes such a great time with the L. A. If you can't just just leave us with the closing thought and then the best place the listeners could continue the conversation and you know I think my closing thought with the insolvent thank you so much for inviting me to be on your program. It's it's a privilege college really to talk to you today. Thank you so much I would leave your listeners with whether you're on the hospital side the payer side or your families certainly to be open to to innovative approaches to solving complex problems in healthcare sometimes. If you are Healthman our hospital you're going to have a young company. Come to you with a great idea but they may not be too season. Give them a chance. I have innovative companies coming to me at progeny triangular. Thank you innovation a chance and it works for the early adopters of the proxy program. I wouldn't be here today so you know my pitches really there's lots entrepreneurship out there and innovation at companies that have the ability to contract with people. If they've got a great idea give him a chance because they may be the change at the marketplace needs drive drive complex patients to better comes at great message and if the Listeners WanNa continue the conversation. Where.

nuggets Norman Vincent Mike Constant Chris Goodwin Healthman Lyndon Johnson Lincoln Roosevelt
"stang" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

11:32 min | 1 year ago

"stang" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Progeny Health's comprehensive specialty focused utilization management and in case management solution is is a rare example of the healthcare innovation that has delivered irrefutable value to infants and their families providers and payers alike debate. The company has manage is over sixty thousand Nikki cases in over fourteen hundred hospitals in all fifty states. It's proven ineffective and we're going to talk about the solution here today. More importantly how we take care of this community of patients so without further ado I want to open up the microphones to Ellie to spend some time with us. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you saw happy to be here. Thanks for inviting me absolutely now. Did I leave anything out in the intro that you wanted to fill in the blanks with no I think you you covered it all so thank you so much for doing that absolutely so so dr staying tell us what got you into healthcare to begin with so. I I thought about that a lot and and you know at a very young age fourteen I realized loves science loved Biology Allergy and and started volunteering at a hospital as a candy striper and that's really which started my interest in health care and worked there uh not only on the patient in the emergency room actually allowed me down into the Er and I loved how you could help people during their greatest time of need need and and help heal them and so that really started my interest at the age of fourteen in healthcare and from there just worked really hard as a student through Collagen origin and med school to realize that so you you got into the healthcare profession you serve as a frontline physician for many years and then you made the shift you got in the industry to us a little bit more about that and wine yeah you know it's it's it's one of those stories of I trained in Philadelphia on did my residency at Saint Chris Hospital for children and had the opportunity to point graduation to help found a private practice with a dear friend of mine and so we we're in practice for six or seven years loved what I was doing in private practice but had the opportunity to interview in a managed care plan and so oh really loved what I was doing had no interest they called three times in a friend said just go check it out so long story short became very interested during that interview process in how you could affect the health of populations and so left member practice went into managed Medicaid and in a very short period of time. I was there about five five years. I saw a very broken system so this is back in two thousand and was working in managed care and thought you know what I'm forty years old. I see an opportunity to make a difference in a really high risk population at the time care coordination care management didn't exist social determinants were being addressed and I saw that will program so needed in the marketplace and so quit my job sat in a basement and founded a company and you know no money no mentors no nothing vision in my head of what could be and here we are sixteen years later with just incredibly talented people in the company helping me move the mission forward that the mazing that's amazing Elliot. You know you you get plaud- your your courage for for for doing that for seeing the the opportunity in that broken yes in so gosh. It's been over a decade now. You guys are making some big big traction here. If you had to summarize is what the hot topic that needs to be front and Center for the leaders listening to this podcast today. What would you say it is so you know I think today and and over for sixteen years a healthcare has evolved I think hospitals providers health plans are doing a better job at working together. because managing patients takes village and there needs during the inpatient setting are a lot and we have incredible talent in this country certainly in the Nick You managing patients degree health outcomes but upon discharge the setting that they're discharged into matters their ability to interact and connect with the health system is really important and when there's barriers in place that ultimately affects health outcomes and so I think the messages we all need take very holistic. Look at the patient. It's not just the clinical diagnosis it's how does that diagnosis affect their life and outside of their medical teams. Are they getting what they need to continue the good work. Clinical teams have done to keep them healthy. They're able to maintain that in the outpatient setting so you know my big drive. Service Company is how do we take a comprehensive look at patients and give them what they need and help them access to the system so they they can lead their best life. I love it. Yeah you know and I think it's it's it's critical that we think about what what Dr Stang is highlighting here for us the social she'll determine its and especially in the in the Nikki population I mean I know I probably shouldn't say especially because every everybody matters what look at the end of the day these kids can't take care of themselves so you know I you know I think it's great that your your your your foot foot high focusing the social determinants discussion to the nick you that's where it becomes actionable and maybe you can dive into some of the tech enabled old things that you guys are doing to drive outcomes couple examples. Maybe happy to do that and so we have a platform in the company called baby tracks ax and over sixteen years you learn a lot and we've taken our database with massive amounts of information and John Regression Shin models and built into our platform intelligence so we've got today about one hundred and twenty five plus fulltime. Nikki clinicians and then another over one hundred police doing other various very important jobs in the company. We've got a very large. It team but where we are today is we can output clinical diagnosis diagnoses and clinical attribute to the patient into our system and we know their risk of readmission and we know when to reach out in the course of a hospitalization hospitalizations to be very proactive working with the hospitals so that when the babies are clinically ready and ask direct questions that the babies the parents are educated. Whatever needs in the home at supports are in place so that when the baby is ready to go home they go home and then there's that safety net post discharge but our platform has really allowed Valdas to be very interacted with hospitals to know when to ask patients and families the right questions how to educate them and then certainly to know upon discharge which patients are most likely to be a readmitted and Kinda double down that education of families and increase supports each so that those babies lead certainly a healthy first year of life and beyond so it's really knowing who to reach out to WHO's most at risk when the ultimately improves the health outcomes and really add tremendous value we now just an example is when we provide case management is a company and we've always done this the first things we asked families are about food clothing shelter and seeing if there's any domestic risk in a family and and if we assigned for example food insecurity our case managers while they have apparent on sonar typing in their address one one one mainstream Detroit and up in front of my case as manager POPs validated from the pantries resources in their neighborhood and we warm transfer them to that resource live while they're on the phone to solve those problems that that's how you solve problems to move people to better health outcomes. We've learned over time years ago. We would hang the phone up do some research and call them back and sometimes you never connect with them again. I really need to solve problems actually people on the phone and when you get those pillars of their life aligned then you move them to well child checks immunizations nations in education to drive even better health outcomes for the family but if you have hungry children at a table they're not gonna hear you about well. Child checks immunizations musicians because they have to solve what's in Toronto and so that's really where it takes a village and there are tremendous resources in every community in this country willing and able to help people. We just have to connect those dots so that's really technology helps us solve that that's incredible work and I just got goosebumps when you're telling that story story elion in just I thought about a I volunteered a couple months ago at a school as part of a volunteer project where it was in Tampa Campau Florida and it was a you know a an urban neighborhood and we were working with their food program they basically they are telling us that they have a ninety percent graduation rate compared to sixty percent because they're able to give these kids food once a week like to take home a drive bag and no wetback and it's just like wow granted you know when you look at the data one in eight. Americans has food insecurity agree and so you walk down your street I and somebody's having a challenge in so many of these things are solvable and I think every small company like If we all do our part we saw this. This is very solvable and there are lots of people focused on solving this issue. it's critical. It's critical to life. It's critical to education education and it certainly critical to health outcomes. If you don't have good nutrition you can't heal body and so it's it's really just one of the ways that it takes a lot. August to approach supporting family to lead to better health outcomes love it so that Christine tell us about an example of how you guys have created in results by doing things differently so yeah great question Saul and you know when I founded the company in two thousand and three as a doctor. There were adversary relationships between health lands and hospitals. managed care was well underway but people weren't working together as teams and so what I saw. Is You know if you have conversations proactively with hospitals upfront so so what we do today is. We have a team of three. We've got neonatologist pediatricians. We've got nick you nurses talking to hospitals about care plans and we have case managers talking to families about the baby education ended up poops discharge plan and so we basically have a team of three working directly with hospitals and so the system when I entered it was very fragmented and I I would say adversarial adversarial and our model is very collaborative. We are a majority of clinicians on this end. I'm doctor so I know the challenges oranges and and how stressful it is in an environment to take your really sick kids. So how do we reach out understand care plans and make sure parents are educated so they can make decisions visions to remove any inefficiencies in the system quickly and when babies are medically wreck. Ready is their equipment in the home..

Nikki Progeny Health private practice Ellie Service Company nick Dr Stang Toronto John Regression Shin Saint Chris Hospital Philadelphia Saul Tampa Campau Florida Valdas Medicaid Christine Detroit sixteen years
"stang" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"stang" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"A walk scored four runs, and they have to go ahead right at first when nobody out here in the seventh Jahn heavies Solarte day is the hitter. Against castio four two four the score. The pitch is high in tight to solarte's at ninety seven. Ball one. It is our lucky seven dinning if a giant hits a home run here in the seven Jerry Stang of lower lake wins, a VIP stay and play package at the grand Sierra resort and casino in Reno. L A grou- ball third could be too far as the second one throat a first time double play. Wow. So day. After problem off the base it immediately ended the double play. To outs nobody on you can enter it can be our dot com slash contests. Good luck. Jerry Stang of lower lake in our lucky seventh inning VIP stay played package at the grants year resort and casino. Here's a ball at a dirt lower lake. If you go north from calistoga. South of clear lake. That's where lower lake is. Place. I'm sure me I've been around it. I'm not sure I've ever actually been in lower lake to go to Kevin pillar. After this half in exempt innings stretch sponsored by dignity health. Hello, human kindness. Four here in seven power fouls. This pitch back to the vac stop. He had a good rip at a fast ball. But.

lower lake Jerry Stang Kevin pillar solarte Reno calistoga
"stang" Discussed on Wichita Life Podcast

Wichita Life Podcast

10:31 min | 1 year ago

"stang" Discussed on Wichita Life Podcast

"A business this strategist helping entrepreneurs in the Wichita area. She is the founder of the HIVE which is a co working space and a community with a focus on women enjoy my conversation with Andrea driest. Stay right. I'm here with Andrea staying. How're you doing today. Good how are you. I'm doing well. Thanks for having me absolutely Can you just tell the listeners a little bit about yourself. Well I was born and raised in Wichita and I am the founder of the hive. It's a women focused co working in communities face awesome very cool so how were which did you grow up in. I grew up in Al Past Goddard into aviation community out there cool awesome so just to get into the high of a little bit is so what is the height I guess can you go into that a little bit so we're essentially a space offer support for small business owners community for professionals channels. We like to say that we give permission to women to be seen to be known it's a space for leaders to connect and empower one another and help them succeed faster during their careers and lives awesome so is this your first. I don't know quote startup. What what's your background in that Gosh well. I come from a long line of entrepreneurs. If you know my maiden name you know that I'm the granddaughter of Don Hatton of Dot hat and Chevrolet Eighth my parents also own a used car dealership in so I come from a long Gaunter preneurs third generation entrepreneur that I know of. I'm sure there were more but essentially I've always kind of had a business up my sleeve. When I was little Oh my brother and I had a pet detective business and the neighbor even paid us to find her cat caller which later I found out she was hiding for us. I in high school I I did photography senior photography might for my friends and that turned into a business doing wedding photographer my ex husband and I did elopement he would marry them and and I would do the photography so I've had a few different businesses. I also did freelance writing on the side. I've always said the best way to keep the gaps out of of your resume is to own your own business. Even if it's a side hustle and you always have something to put on your resume. That's really cool. It's really cool so that obviously had a big influence being the granddaughter of John. Hadn't had a pretty cool so the hi. How did you get the idea for the high of what was the final straw that broke the camel's back to get the start or did you always want to or well. I had had I'd love. I'd love the ideas co working spaces. I lived in Dallas. List in Austin and Lexington Kentucky had seen a few different ones and had really enjoyed concepts but I always had a young daughter in daycare was very expensive expensive in other cities that we lived and so moving back to Wichita daycare wasn't as much of a problem I was able to send her to fulltime daycare and so when I went fulltime freelance glance on my own I knew I was gonNA feel isolated and so I went to work at a local co working space and I was really happy that they had brought the concept of Wichita and we're innovating meeting in that but I just flat out say with my marketing background. I wasn't their target market. it was a predominantly men in the tech industry and the space was just it was is just not inspiring to me and so I was part of a group called lean an and kind of based on the concept of the book by Sheryl Sandberg Zero Facebook facebook and Lena Leinen circles pops up all around the country to help inspire women professionals to help them get past that gender wage gap to advocate for themselves else to be assertive without being overly aggressive things like that in business so I brought the idea to them. I kind of had that iconic onic statement that most entrepreneurs make which is wouldn't it be great if and mine was wouldn't it be great if there was a space that was more women focused okay that had you know really inspiring decor that was nice and bright and beautiful and that you felt comfortable bringing clients to that looked professional and we also had more of a community element to it so the community membership was kind of then formed as part of that idea you know there's other big spaces around the the country some that are women exclusive where women focused. We're not willing exclusive. We do have men that are members but these other cities were doing really cool. Things and I just knew that we had the capacity could do it here in Wichita very cool very cool and just take a quick step back so co working space I've kind of heard of them. I've never really worked in them but I guess where does that idea come from it's usually they like most things started on the east coast and the West Coast there were a lot of jobs that were transitioning to remote people could work from on their laptops anywhere in the world and so everybody at first is like Oh yes they can work from home and my pj than it sounds really wonderful and then you get home and there's dishes and laundry and kids in dogs and all the distractions and a lot of people can think into depression and they're just not as focused they miss having those water cooler conversations they miss having co workers and so that's when the concept of Co working came about you know you pay a monthly membership and you can come to a space and work from there being around other people who are also working from home only working from your space now and that's kind of what the initial start of it was is women. Who are you know have the flexible work schedules it really has grown to be more even women who have brick and mortars so one of our members is stacy were Latin from the hoppy nome so she owns a brick and mortar business is the thriving business off Douglas but she can't get work done there. She can't get computer worked on their You know everybody's wanting to collaborate with her and Oliver Employees are asking in her questions and the customers are wanting to socialize with her and so this is kind of her safe haven shh don't tell anybody but that's where you can find stacy but she also runs a podcast here sealing breakers and with Rene Dot flair and so it's been fun Avenue even further women who have brick and mortar is to have memberships here. One of the questions I was going to ask is it. A lot of freelance started people or pretty good balance between that and brick and mortar. Oh my gosh we have members in literally every different industry I mccosh. We've got interior designers. We've got a lot of coaches. We've got a few people that own boutiques around town apricot lane mocks either either both members campion. Patty we have. Let's see we have a plumber. We have a lot of service industry businesses but there are some that are product-based we are. We are a direct sales friendly face. Not a lot of entrepreneurial spaces are but because we are women unfocused we realized that's part of a woman's journey sometimes and they the the women who are members who are in direct sales. They own their own business. A lot of them have their own name to it. That's it's two separate from the direct sales so we're not we're not afraid of that and we're all about empowering women in whatever it is that they want to be a leader in so about fifty percent of our members members aren't even entrepreneurs. They actually work at other companies around town everything from w she tech. Martin Pringle has a corporate membership with us where they have all twelve of their female attorneys as HIVE members interest bank has a corporate membership with us and a lot of people around town their employers pay for their memberships to be a community member because you're actually getting they're getting value. They're getting content content. They can come back and then apply in a marketing role at company or you know we do lunch and learns ranging from business tips and finances to digital digital marketing everything from instagram to facebook to YouTube all of that as well as you know personal style tips in we keep it finding engaging the hive actually we stand for a lot of people don't know this it stands for healthy inspired valued and empowered and so all of our content falls into you one of those values as well. That's not listed for them. That's cool and it's I think it's really good idea for the corporate. I mean they're gonNA get a lot more benefit than probably whatever they're paying for the membership. Um just collaborating with a lot of other like minded women in just people in general I mean people go to all the different networking groups in town because they want to a lot of businesses work with entrepreneurs. You know they say okay as an entrepreneur. You need your lawyer. Your accounting your banker. there these key partnerships initiative in relationships that you need to build and these you know they're going to these networking groups to meet entrepreneurs and so this is a space where there's you know in in the world of business. There's a lot of get togethers four entrepreneurs and there's a lot of get togethers for professionals but there's not a lot of organizations combining. The two that we really do that we combine really any woman who is a leader or wants to be a leader is welcome here. Most powerful has really cool so do you do a lot of the people in town already know about you. You're do you do any advertising to try to get members. Most of it happened by word of mouth. you know what they say is behind. Every successful successful woman is a tribe of other successful women who have her back now. We like to turn tribe into hive but really it's been my hive that that talks about me and occasionally. I'll even see people who I haven't even met saying. Have you checked out the hive and I'm like well. I need to meet you because you're promoting me and I don't even know yet. I think most people I meet eight nowadays who were involved in business and entrepreneurial word world in Wichita. I put my hand out. I say hi I'm Andrea staying and they say Andrew Guessing from the hive. I know who you are. I know what the high of is so. A lot of people have the surface knowledge of it right now. A lot of people still think well. I don't need that. I don't need a space to work from or you know. I don't have time to come to every one of your events. that's not really the whole of what we do so really it is having over now over one hundred hundred seventy women leaders who have your back and so one of the most powerful uses of the network. I've seen is layup from the Greater Wichita Partnership. She joined the high when they were building their new website and she literally sourced almost all of her models for the video and photography from our hive membership. I bet she would pop in there and say hey. I'm needing a model for tomorrow to pretend like they're looking at an apartment in Wichita and we'll take pictures video and oh you got somebody from the high. you know everybody's like. Oh you need sucked so and so so and so can do it for you. I'm looking for a real estate agent to show that people house that kind of thing or maybe maybe you're saying hey..

Wichita Andrea driest founder facebook Greater Wichita Partnership HIVE Al Past Goddard Sheryl Sandberg Dallas stacy Martin Pringle West Coast Don Hatton Eighth John Patty Lena Leinen Lexington Kentucky instagram
"stang" Discussed on Thoth-Hermes Podcast

Thoth-Hermes Podcast

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"stang" Discussed on Thoth-Hermes Podcast

"It? Stang is pretty much for staff. It's reminiscent of the world tree. You can even look at it. Like, it's a very primitive form of pitchfork similar broom being bro. More the bedroom. Being a broom that is you know, it's a tool a household toll on this. So I mean, we use the staying to unite the world's directed tree to to bring the above in the blow together. So yeah, it's pretty pretty pretty simple explanation, at least my explanations. Very simple. Now, good things are simple. One of the chapters. I think it's one of the law even the lost chapter of two east, quote the crew could pass right? We you kind of start with it. If I remember well when you enter rookie boatswain's, well, Dan, you bring it back into loss Chipper, and you say something about the crew could pass being the balance between the right and left handed pass a funny. Well, and I was fascinated by that definition because there is not one of my favorite questions is balanced between right and left hand. How much it is necessary or? Is it necessary? Whatever right. So what what's your take? And maybe you can say more about this that crooked possibly being that balance. How you see that Mississippi of the bounds of what it is. Having having too much of any type of personality core is not good. So if you're either too good or too bad, you go into directions where it's impossible to live stream and any type of extremism. So when people get into being light workers, and that's all they do. And they never acknowledged any type of shadow that person may have or any type of darkness that may be in their spirit. I feel it does the entirety of of the field as a disservice to the entirety of human because there's multiple faces to every person. So with once practice, there's an I I don't know who originally said this. But it's something that gets bandied around all the time in the pagan community in which craft Muniz about a wit a witch who cannot harm cannot heal. Right. And I think that says in a very succinct manner. The essence of that type of thing you need to know how to be able to do both which craft doesn't have an inherent morality assigned to it. It's a tool when you look at it historically, Ryan when you look at century, they get the whole harmed on thing that right? The throw around which doesn't even doesn't apply to garner in practice necessarily. Because even then you also have to talk about how which craft like the basis of the word in the and the. The original meanings of it was only malefic magic in a which was something negative to be called. Which is I'm sure something that was what was going on. Then what it's now. Twenty nineteen in words, change of all, and they still mean things, but they changed. So which now means something different. But it doesn't have an assigned good nor evil to it. It's nature. It's it's as a moral as a river or amoral as a gun. It's just it's a it's a tool knowing how to use it doesn't mean that you're automatically doing something. Good or bad. So the crooked path is essentially the gist of that type of thing it's the journey that the witch goes on one of the things that I learned in voodoo is the phrase working with both pans. So you're working with your left hand in your right hand. And the crooked path is also like that like you go back and forth. It's not that you're necessarily finding the line in between. It's not your your literally meandering your way in between these two walls, and creating off of them when you get too far over the line, you know, and it's it's important to be like that. You can't go all the way in one direction you'll fall apart. And you know, in another sense, there's no straight roads in life. Now, you will meander, and when we look at the trip life, for example, in the Kabbalah, you have the pillar immersing the pillar sever to you have the black the white the in the flow when you travel up the tree of life. If you're not just going strip center, you go from left harangue exact back and forth back and forth. That is it path. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. No. I think this is a permanent truce in all spin into a work because as you said Tarata, and that's one of the main errors of certain, I wouldn't even call them today shin certain practices. They owned the except one site being wonder yetter. But yeah, see that one side and necessarily that continent go well. In the way. Absolutely. But I find it very interesting that you explain it with the crooked path and also. It's like a parenthesis around the whole book because you start with at and you end with it. That's why I find it fascinating and very much like about the book. And that's also part that I park wisdom crooked, plus you immediately gift the reader practice. You know, it's it's it's not it's not a book where you start with twenty pages of or twenty eight two hundred pages off theory, and why we are all here and read that book, and then in the end you're out to do to meditations. It's it's right from the beginning it gifts you something to do entry experience into practice. Then I find I find it. Very interesting approach was that I'm sure that was intention to to to is it for you a book that people should use for practice for how

Stang Mississippi Muniz Dan Tarata Ryan
"stang" Discussed on About to Review

About to Review

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"stang" Discussed on About to Review

"And then for inquiries around. Development. Jenner Tiffany productions. Excellent. Well, thank you so much Ivan sitting with David Abu Safi who has is a man of many hats. So thank you for taking the time to sit down. All my pleasure. That's great to put a face to interesting logo. Thank you. Jennifer, Nicole Stang from the film, the Whistler is sitting with me right now. Welcome to the show. Thank you. Thanks for having me. So your film was super creepy and made me feel uncomfortable. Great. So it worked Toby vowed your film. So the Whistler is about a teenager named Lindsey who falls asleep while babysitting her younger sister and wakes up to find her little sister gone. And it's kind of like the pied piper kind of idea and theme rather so are evil entity. Is this kind of puritan? Sort of ghost from the past that kind of kidnaps these children, and yeah, we have a little twist at the end. So I won't reveal that. But that's that's basically what it's about. Yeah. So it I mean because it kind of takes the as it is starting, you know, the older sister like not want to babysit, but whatever, you know, type of angle of an as it progresses. I mean, it has solid jump scares. Thank you. Great. And you talked about that, you know in the in the QNA. Yes. The ability to earn a jump scare is I think really important, and so, you know, agreed. And that was kind of one of the I would say exercises in this short. You know, I wanted to show that it's a bit of a slow burn for ten minute short because I wanted to say, hey, let's try to make these scares work and to make scares all about timing and intimidation, and so you only have ten or so minutes to do that. So, you know, it's it's kind of a challenge, and that was one of the really fun things to do especially in post because you're working with the music trying to build you know, that kind of. Almost subconscious rumble that you feel rather than here. And you're trying to create kind of a spooky atmosphere, and but you want to build it. Right. So how you do that? And it's all in the editing..

Jenner Tiffany David Abu Safi Nicole Stang Toby Lindsey Ivan Jennifer ten minute
Kanye West to appear on Joe Rogan Experience podcast

podnews

02:51 min | 1 year ago

Kanye West to appear on Joe Rogan Experience podcast

"This podcast is going to have a new guest soon. The Joe Rogan experience. Kanye west said that he's spoken with Joe Rogan and a podcast is coming soon. The musician had been complaining that the media. Didn't want a serious interview about mental health issues. Now, all the Joe Rogan experience is arguably big enough. This event has the capability to get this podcast and podcasting into showbiz news reporting across the world. Music radio podcasts. The BBC has used a loophole to refuse to tell licence-fee payers. How much it spent on BBC sounds? It's UK only radio music and podcast up. That's according to the times, the corporation is normally bound by freedom of information laws but claims the app is for the purposes of journalism, art or literature, which is excluded. By the law podcast of media consultant, Eric museum thinks that twenty nine thousand nine will be the year of the DIY podcast network. What tactics work at building audiences for podcasts. He asks let's start with what doesn't work almost everything. The Begnaud collective of also made their predictions for two thousand nineteen among the predictions increase in the number of fiction podcasts produced by large companies, an alternate production houses and new tools and built in functionality. That'll make supporting creators a much easier process, poppy and have published their top podcast of two thousand eighteen according to listens in their own app. The company has also upgraded its statistics platform and has posted a set of screen shots of the new functionality. If you want to speak podcast movement, two thousand nineteen speaker submissions will open in the next seven days. The organizers advice is to start thinking and preparing now for the best chance of being selected. Meanwhile, the UK's first podcasting fan convention pod UK has announced its share jewel and guests for the event. It's in Birmingham in the West Midlands on February the second whisker have let us know that they too are in the process of attaining IAB certification. They joined simple cast vox nest and spreaker megaphone Lipson Omni studio and art nineteen blueberry and NPR or ready. Their PR x has posted a look back at their podcast garage community recording space two years after opening it Lipson would like to remind you to update the copyright date. In your lips in account. Charlie sorelle at its his podcast using a pencil. He says and apple pencil on an ipad pro and resonate RIC. Have published the top thirteen motivational podcast, which will read as soon as we can be bothered. Finally, what language is this or James set? You it's Muliaina scout then Hartron than it's could muscian as Jag Stang. If you speak that language, you'll know it's cre- the CBC reports on in its Chee podcast in the first nation language heard in northern Quebec.

Joe Rogan UK BBC Kanye West Charlie Sorelle Lipson Omni Lipson Jag Stang Birmingham Consultant Eric Museum Pod Uk West Midlands Hartron NPR James CBC Chee Apple Quebec
"stang" Discussed on Assassinations

Assassinations

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"stang" Discussed on Assassinations

"The founding of thirty five Christian farming communities now, they're eighty five communities all committed to using these sustainable farming methods that sister Dorothy developed, but it's the settlement of Esperanza where Dorothy died that is the most sacred to these farmers Esperanza became a symbol to the people that the powerful business conglomerates. Brazil weren't all powerful today as Barranca is wholly owned by subsist. Farmer residents. There's a new water wheel that delivers water to the local houses the building where Dorothy killers hid for a short time is now a school. Unfortunately, land disputes remain common in Brazil, and par is still central to many of these conflicts despite improvements in local law enforcement, many still view power as a safe haven for criminals, the pastoral land commission, the Catholic organization Dorothy helped to found says that in the decade since Dorothy murder one hundred eighteen people in the state of power have been killed over land disputes, many of these murders like Dorothy assassination are carried out on the orders of mon- Dante's powerful people who order hits on anyone who gets in their way before door these death. Prosecutors didn't even bother to charge. These Mondays knowing they'd be lucky even to convict. They're hired gunmen beat is conviction was one of. The first times in the history of paro. That Amman Dante was brought to Justice this set a powerful new precedent and since store 'this death three more Mondays have been convicted. It's hoped that this progress is only the beginning of new more equitable future for Brazilians, but in a country where one percent of the population still owns forty seven percent of the land. The struggle for equality is still overwhelming in the past decade, the United Nations Greenpeace Amnesty International and the Human Rights Watch had become strong advocates of landless people's rights and sustainable development in Brazil Dorothy is death played a key role and making Brazil a priority for these organizations by bringing to light the degree to which the Amazon had already been damaged in power and beyond. If sister Dorothy Stang were still alive today. There's a good chance. She'd still be deep in the Amazon fighting for the people and the forest in death. She's been considered for canonization as a Catholic Saint prayer cards with her picture are sold in stores every year on the enemy Serie of sister. Dorothy murder. A pilgrimage is made along the road. She walked on the morning of February twelfth two thousand five to the very spot where she was killed the place of her death is still marked with a wooden cross painted a different color every year today almost fourteen years after the killing many of the children who take part in this recreation of the sisters funeral procession never had the chance to meet Dorothy yet they attend school. She built their parents live on land. She won for them their food and water. Come from the jungle she helped to protect. They may not have known the sister. But they know why she is beloved sister Dorothy Stang life and mission are best remembered in her own words, quote, my heart screams joy, but I'm needing patience. As it can't happen overnight. How to maintain hope has been a challenge. I have to be with these people if it means my life, I want to give my life. Thanks for listening to assassinate someones will be back next Monday. With another episode, you can find more episodes of SAS emissions as well. As all.

Dorothy Stang Brazil Amazon murder Amman Dante paro Barranca mon- Dante Greenpeace Amnesty Internation United Nations forty seven percent fourteen years one percent
"stang" Discussed on Assassinations

Assassinations

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"stang" Discussed on Assassinations

"To take all the blame and free the others. So that only I would go to jail with all the blame as if I caused all of this. I told them I'm not going to do this. It didn't come to lie on the stand. Both gunmen were firm in insisting that Tato had ordered the killing after telling them about the money beat it would pay them as on bacteria's. He told the court that the way Dorothy died was not a fate. He would wish on anyone. Finally in December of two thousand five a jury found rife Ron and quota WALDO guilty of murder rife, Ron dust Nevis. Solace was sentenced to twenty eight years in prison. Clothes aldo. Carlos busty STA was sentenced to seventeen years was definitely a win. But for Justice to be fully served. The men who ordered sister Dorothy murder would also have to be convicted it was comparatively easy to convince a jury to convict two gunmen who confessed in open courts, but coming trials would be orders of magnitude more difficult. Coming up. We'll look at Tato and beat us trials and see if Justice will be served now back to the story. In December of two thousand five hired gunmen ri- fron and Clodoaldo were convicted for the murder of sister Dorothy Stang, but it wasn't over yet. The men who ordered the murder Tato Beata and Reginald oh still hadn't been brought to Justice Chato was next to be tried. Prosecutors strategy was to convict the smallest players I and work their way up to the largest they would use earlier testimony in verdicts to bolster their later trials. Totta was the middleman between the gunman and the money men. He was the only one who could prove the conspiracy was real. But in a stunning move Tato renounced, his earlier deposition, implicating Beata and reg of Aldo in his testimony Tato took full responsibility for the murder. Prosecutors were shocked. They believed Beata and reservoir, though, must have obtained some. Mm sort of leverage over Tato perhaps using Todd family. There was a real chance now than Beata and Russia Valdo wouldn't face any consequences for their part in Dorothy murder. This prospect was terrifying to landless farmers after getting away with murder, perhaps their next act would be to raise the settlement of Esperanto and kill everyone in it to make matters worse. President Silva failed to follow through on his promises to stop land seizures in paro under international pressure. It appeared he'd made promises. He couldn't keep perhaps the president hoped that by the time. He would be expected to follow through the world would have moved onto another story. By the time taught owes trial began the military had reduced the size of its forces in the area significantly the loggers and ranchers were emboldened and reverted to their old ways. Par was slowly succumbing to its old Monica of the lawless state. It seemed Beata and reservoir though were destined to go free. But at the last minute Tato like rifles enclo- Aldo suddenly decided to drop Americo. Instead, he would be represented by public defender dolls Affonso Barbosa, perhaps Beata and Russia Valdo lost whatever leverage. They had of Tacho or perhaps the killer. Cattleman grew a conscience at the last minute. Whatever the reason after Tato changed lawyers. He changed his story to he once again, implicated Beata and Russia Valdo his wealthy bosses in may of two thousand six Tato was. Sentenced to twelve to thirty years in prison. Thanks to his testimony reservoir, though, and Beata would stand trial after all. Another year passed as prosecutors built their case against Russia. Volvo and beat up and made their way through a maze of delaying tactics by Americo international obsession with Dorothy case waned in two thousand six but protests in Brazil, continued Dorothy was formerly recognized by the Vatican as a martyr and some of the local people began praying to her as if she were a Saint, although Dorothy was dead and the president had failed to keep his promises to her people. Her work continued to bear fruit, the thirty five Christian communities, she founded all devoted to sustainable farming continued to work the land members even founded new communities carrying on her practices Dorothy paid for many children's schooling and Anna Pooh on the condition that they return to their rural communities and use their education to help their people following Dorothy death..

Tato Beata Dorothy Stang murder Beata and reservoir Tato Aldo president Russia President Silva Clodoaldo Justice Chato paro Volvo Carlos Americo international Americo Tacho Totta Anna Pooh Todd
"stang" Discussed on Assassinations

Assassinations

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"stang" Discussed on Assassinations

"Evil, assassinations now back to the story. The case of Dorothy Stang murder seemed like a microcosm of everything that was wrong with the Brazilian legal system. The lower class hitmen ri- fron and quota WALDO faced consequences while Beata the rich man who directed their actions. Had escaped Justice beauty was responsible in more ways than one beat ahead and soul Tato land that he didn't truly own. There would have been no conflict between Tato and Dorothy in the first place, the local people were pleased to see the gunmen behind bars. But they wanted to see the duplicate landowner brought to Justice not just his minions, but to do that police would have to build an airtight case against an international oligarchy who could afford the best defense attorneys in Brazil, and for now the best help they had in that effort came from right, fron and clo- Aldo themselves. Both men agreed to confess to their crimes and to implicate. Both Tato and Beata for hiring them as part of their confession rife, Ron and Clodoaldo were ordered to reenact the crime. So that the authorities might see exactly what happened to Dorothy. The killers were brought to the scene of the crime of few days after their arrests police carefully removed reference handcuffs and gave him a mock gun at the urging of police right fron played out the entire murder shot for shot a policewoman playing the role of Dorothy fell forward onto the ground. Just like Dorothy had rife Ron with tears welling in his is explained that his very first bullet had struck Dorothy in the head and killed her. A crowd gathered to watch the reenactment rife Ron could feel their anger. He was one of the most hated men in Brazil. Now, if not the world he stood over the prone policewoman and confess to how he had fired five more bullets into sister. Dorothy. As back as she lay dead as the scene. Progressed Rifaat was overcome with guilt. He told onlookers that he didn't want any of this. He told them his life would never be the same. But there was no sympathy to be found from the settlers of Esperon saw who knew rifle is just another member of beat as private army. Now that rife Ron and Clodoaldo were cooperating fully with police Tato also changed his story. He decided to admit to his role in ordering the murder in a deposition shortly after Clodoaldo arrest Totta claimed Beata offered him fifty thousand re ice the equivalent of thirteen thousand US dollars to kill the none. He confessed that after arguing with sister. Dorothy, he passed the buck both literally and figuratively to ride fron and quota. Waldo warfront continued to insist that he had only received fifty dollars while Tato kept the rest of the thirteen thousand dollars he'd received from Beata for the next month. The case stalled prosecutors prepared their case against Tato Clodoaldo and RAI fron, but the big fish Beata remained missing. Despite president Silva's big proclamations. It looked Brazil would continue. To be a place with two sets of laws one for the vast majority of the people and the other for the wealthy few like Beata. At last after weeks on the run on March twenty sixth beat a finally gave himself up to the police when asked about being conspirator in the murder Beata said, quote, there's nothing to support that I've got nothing to do with this. I was on my ranch everything I say has proof, but I'd like to see their proof beat as wife publicly called sister. Dorothy, an invader she insisted that in private sister. Dorothy was nothing like her public gentle image. This was a common thread among the wealthy landowners in opposition to the sisters work. They often claim she armed the poor farmers and encourage them to kill landowners for his defense Beata hired America. Leo, a lawyer whose main clientele were large landowners, a Brazilian Johnny Cochran figure he was prone to dramatic pronouncements and big swings of legal. Strategy. He insisted that his client was innocent going so far as to claim that Dorothy was an agent of the US government sent to start an uprising in the Amazon convincing Brazilian court that the woman of the year, an elderly nun was a secret agent would be difficult, but America was willing to try anything. In fact, he even offered to represent the other alleged conspirators all on beat as dime. Surprised rife Ron and Clodoaldo accepted Beata seemingly generous offer to pay for their legal defense. They began meeting regularly with America, of course, despite turning himself in beat ahead..

Dorothy Stang Beata Ron Tato Clodoaldo murder Brazil Clodoaldo Dorothy America US Tato Rifaat Waldo warfront Esperon Amazon Aldo president Silva Johnny Cochran Totta Leo
"stang" Discussed on Assassinations

Assassinations

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"stang" Discussed on Assassinations

"Sister. Dorothy Stang spent more than four decades fighting for Brazil's, landless farmers and the fragile Amazonian ecosystem, although she was beloved by many her activism, put her on a collision course with the country's richest land barons who stopped at nothing to protect their wealth. Dorothy knew her life might end at any moment. She told her friends and family that she was prepared to pay the ultimate price for her activism. She only hope that if she had to die. Her death would be a catalyst for change on the morning of February twelve two thousand five a nun nelga and a local farmer's son Giraldo watched as Dorothy was gunned down just outside the farmhouse where she was staying. It was hard to leave their friend lying there in the mud, but nelga and Giraldo knew they could. Don't move the body without hampering the coming investigation, it might even put nelga and Giraldo in danger. If the gunmen were still watching fled to call for help by the time. Police arrived many hours later Dorothy face was bloated from laying in her own blood all day, one fellow sister said she was only able to recognize Dorothy by her shoes. Police retrieved Dorothy is body and drove her about thirty miles to the nearest city on Phut. Meanwhile, words spread across power that sister Dorothy was dead. Wherever Dorothy is body went from that night on it was accompanied by hordes of mourners singing and chanting in celebration of her life. The next morning on Sunday February thirteenth sister Dorothy was flown more than four hundred miles to Belem the capital of power state there. She underwent an autopsy a medical examiner removed six bullets from her body afterwards. Dorothy is remains were placed into a casket and loaded into a hearse a police vehicle led the procession while local mourners surrounded the hearse on foot at eleven PM. Dorothy body arrived at the parish church of Santa Maria Goretti in Belem the sisters of Notre Dame. Dana Moore were gathered there to receive their fellow sister with applause, the nearest Catholic Bishop Bishop Flavio J of analii of Obata tuba traveled through the night to reach sister. Dorothy, he performed a funeral mass. The first of three that day at four o'clock in the morning, then spoke to the thousands of mourners gathered outside Bishop Flavio share. Sister. Dorothy passion for social Justice, he dedicated himself to battling child prostitution, drug abuse and police corruption, and he'd already interfered.

Dorothy Dorothy Stang Dorothy face Giraldo Belem Bishop Flavio Bishop Bishop Flavio J Brazil Santa Maria Goretti prostitution Dana Moore Notre Dame Phut four decades
"stang" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"stang" Discussed on KTRH

"Sheridan spaghetti ground thrown. I wanna acquaint you with something that I don't think you know, about in that is on October third. Pope francis. Open the sonata bishops on the topic of youth, faith and vocational discernment. He was in Saint Peter's Square and Vatican City and instead of holding a traditional papal stab for Rula. He was clutching. What looked a lot like a wiccan Stang and conservative Catholics were appalled. And viewed the people's actually viewed it in fought this choice of staff is evidence that something diabolical is going onto the Vatican. Now, the pastoral staff is usually a cross or a bent cross with Jesus on it. But there's no set style of what stopped the pope decides to use you can use whatever he wants. But a staying like the pope what the pope was had in his hands on October third just seemed beholding Sadat with this fort staff and the poor. Staff for those of you. They're familiar with it. It's usually used by witches to perform rituals and spells things are forked Bajic ones. Many of these stamps have been seeing held by wizards and movies like Lord of the rings. And which is claimed that they can draw spirits up from the underworld if they use their stings, it's, you know, apparently, it's a fork staff, and it was given to the pope by two young women on August eleventh at a prayer vigil with with a lot of young people at Rome's Circus Maximus. So the women claimed fork staff was Similac of Christ dying on the cross is a defect in the wood created some pair much like seeing Mary at a piece of toast or water stain on the wall. But in the middle of the fork is a nail. And I and I want to talk to Thomas about this Thomas Sheridan with us. So here's the pope at the Senate, and he's holding what appears to be a pagan Stang or a witches Stang. And you know, we can argue that it was just a fork tap when the when the nail went through it where they put a nail through. It doesn't that represent the Fallas in the spreading of the womb. Yeah. Absolutely. That's what that represents. It said the Stang is an old English of actually used nor nor in. In origin. But a bit Dillard's tying actually comes from an old English word. And it's basically what staff is derived from it was used by druids and Seder's the Nordic druids. For you know, probably a thousand years before the church came along and used it. It was a symbol of authority. It was the it was almost like in ancient times, the just like Gandalf Lord of the rings as Tolkien betrayed came into the room like carrying a staff, he had a spiritual and a a a magical authority now if you look at all the old illustrations of the early saints. I mean, the early saints like Saint Bonnie base and Saint Patrick and all the others. They're all carrying the grit the bishop's crook, which is another version of that where it's kind of got a curl top. But that was because the early Christian missions missionaries into Europe into particularly northern the western Europe had to carry to stop the staying with them in order to assert their spiritual authority as a holy man. No one I found particularly interesting about this new one. That this. Pope Francis has is it looks it looks particularly ancient it looks particularly antiquarian and rustic unhappily is warming. If this is some kind of real style from when the church massacre in pagans in Europe. And if there's some kind of symbolic gesture in him whipping out this thing with this this, you know, Arden Fallas true. It's a it's a very strange picture. It's a very strange event. What is he up to as a very strange pope? I it's hard to say, I know I see that. And I and I saw that immediately. And I recognized it as a cult which is stable it was it was certainly something that reminded me of Gandalf in Lord of the rings or or one of the other wizards at the time holding the staying with the Nabet, but I saw the nail through to meet I thought oh my God. This is a representation of the foulest penetrating. Basically, it's about coitus. It's about. The male female divine feminine being pursed by the mail. And and what we're seeing now in as you said earlier about the witches and the rising of which is the feminine nature. Power is for some reason, politically we have this gender fight between the powers, there's even a TV show called American horror story. We're right now, the fight happening in the TV show is between witches and warlocks and whether or not a character by the name of Michael is the supreme witch or the anti Christ. It's amazing fight because the witches are fighting amongst each other as to who is about to lead. And we have the same problem now with the witches.

Pope francis Europe Arden Fallas Vatican City Thomas Sheridan Tolkien Rula Saint Patrick Sadat Rome Nordic druids Senate Dillard Mary Seder Michael thousand years
"stang" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

The Rich Eisen Show

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"stang" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

"The lead singer and guitarist of respectively of shinedown here in studio and they've got quite an active social media following say the least they released a song get up on youtube without any video it's just audio it's already gotten two million listens already right and i can also tell that they've got a very strong social media following because the band and both gentlemen tweeted out that they're gonna be on the show and all of a sudden my time line china folks so again we are here the day after july fourth and you know this is the time in the same way that when the football season's over i kind of surf in two college basketball and i think a lot of sports fans now that july fourth is done they'll start surfing into major league baseball now later on this month training camps opened up in the nfl the nba free agency period has begun to peter out a little bit there's still some big names out there on the market but the paul george stang bron james leaving boogie cousins signing with washington the shuffling between the new orleans pelicans lineup and the los angeles lakers lineup and i don't think i'm missing too much else we're still waiting on kawhi leonard there's a lot of rumors that kyrie irving is not resigning with the celtics just yet because he wants to see what the knicks look like next summer stay tuned for the newsletters today and so with that beginning to peter out a little bit it's time to really dig into what's going on a major league baseball and if you're not aware or you're somewhat aware and it's time to dig into it right now the american league is essentially settled it settled business with the yankees and the red sox battling for the right to win the al east or from what it's looking like right now even with houston and seattle having the same situation in the al west one of them's going to win the other one's gonna be the.

china seattle houston lakers los angeles new orleans washington paul george stang peter nba football yankees american league baseball knicks celtics kyrie irving nfl basketball
"stang" Discussed on WREK

WREK

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"stang" Discussed on WREK

"Oh from it's hard to believe they were attacked by an hour raise bob friends we didn't do a live show this last sunday night because i was finishing up a little movie of my own a movie that i started filming in nineteen sixty four and i just finished if it's on my youtube channel have stang anyway we're doing a rerun this week and at least it's not an hour of slack rerun it is in fact a rerun of a show i did last saturday week week with a podcast called project vest i had been on their show about three years ago and it was really fun so i did it again and it was fun and i'm just gonna run that show again the show is called project archivist if you talk that into google that'll be their show will be the first thing up yeah we have the triumphant second coming of wreck reverend ivan stang of the church of the sub genius it's been i think three years since we last had you on here and that was one of our most downloaded most loved shows it's easily up within our top five shows that we've ever done and we've continuously throughout the years had people say when is when is ivan stang coming back on a little while ago i'd say about a year and a half ago i was hanging out with a mutual friend of ours gregg bishop and we got into a big conversation about you and he's like yeah you need to get you know you need your reverence staying back on the show again so ever since then we've been trying to pull it off and figure out a way to get you on and finally at just bit the bulletin and said hey let's do this again and you obliged and now here you are so welcome back to project archivist mr stang well thank you so much price bob price roggin price logo thank you you by the way it's not it's not mr stang.

google ivan stang bob youtube three years
Career Criminal Charged In Yarmouth Police Officer Murder Held Without Bail

Howie Carr

02:01 min | 2 years ago

Career Criminal Charged In Yarmouth Police Officer Murder Held Without Bail

"Manna charged with accusing or man accused of killing a copy yesterday and the cape being held without bail today i'm jim phillips wbz sm news a man charged with killing a massachusetts police officer serving an arrest warrant has been held without bail after pleading not guilty to murder thomas latina which made a brief appearance in barnstable district court today the judge says she would appoint a lawyer for the man authorities described as a career criminal police say the twenty nine year old latina which shot yarmuth canine officer sean gannon on thursday while he and other officers were serving an arrest warrant at a home in barnstable sean gannon being remembered on the south coast after he was killed in the line of duty in barnstable yesterday gannon spent his youth in new bedford attending saint mary's all saints catholic school before graduating from bishop stang high school in dartmouth in two thousand three former class mate and friend father riley williams of saint francis xavier parish and a cushion tells w b s news he was obviously shocked upon hearing the news but he takes solace knowing that gannon had a deep rooted faith on race somebody dedicated to the higher principles of life family to his hauling of the police officer and so if something a person of faith they just think he wrote the first part of the story so well and so we just have the pen over to god right now and let him finish it up john mitchell also expressed his condolences on facebook saying sean represented the very best of new bedford and the prayers of our city a with his family and with the town of yarmouth is they are the sudden loss of this arolla young man governor charlie baker is signed into law the most extensive overhaul of massachusetts criminal procedures and decades the new law makes changes to everything from the states bail system to the use of solitary confinement and you.

John Mitchell Charlie Baker Saint Francis Xavier Parish Riley Williams Barnstable Barnstable District Massachusetts Bedford Facebook Manna Dartmouth Bishop Stang High School Saint Mary Sean Gannon Thomas Murder Officer Jim Phillips Twenty Nine Year