38 Burst results for "Stanford"

Fresh update on "stanford" discussed on Joel Riley

Joel Riley

00:53 sec | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "stanford" discussed on Joel Riley

"Jordan. I hope you don't mind but for the audience, I'm going to go through it here. Businessman military veteran attorney from Los Angeles five years in the Marine Corps is an infantry officer. Two combat tours overseas law degree from Yale Stanford Graduate School of Business, Princeton University. Currently you're based in New York. And you invest in entrepreneurial efforts to grow. The American middle class is part of Schmid futures. If you would Jordan, just give me the thumb there. What do you What do you do? What's the The emphasis. What's the idea behind Schmid Futures George? It's great to meet you. And luckily your listeners can't can't see me blushing race. There's no reason you got a great resume. People should know, dude. Thank you. Thank you. Yes. So futures is ah, small company. I was started by the former CEO of Google, Eric Schmidt, and our mission is to.

Schmid Futures George Jordan. Schmid Yale Stanford Graduate School Eric Schmidt Marine Corps Los Angeles New York Officer Attorney CEO Princeton University Google
Small Steps Towards Productivity at Home with Sid Garza-Hillman

No Meat Athlete Radio

05:50 min | 4 d ago

Small Steps Towards Productivity at Home with Sid Garza-Hillman

"Everyone welcome to radio. This is Doug Hey and today I'm joined by my good good buddy who is so nice to talk to you sit Garza Helmet said welcome back to the podcast. Doug Nice to be here and thank you for having me on. It. was that was that was that to professional? No wonder. Out He's like, I don't want to be around that kind of anyway. Thank you so much for for for serious is always good to talk to you. Yeah same to you and. Say That anyone who is a longtime listener of the pod or follower up athlete knows exactly who you are. But you know who is said Garza Hohmann who who are you, and why should people pay any attention to what you have to say? Why don't know about the second question but the first question is that I'm. Well. Nutritionists running coach Author of two books and another one that I just finished. It's not out yet. PODCAST Vlogger I direct an ultra marathon. And I run a wellness center at at the Stanford in a nutritionist there and. father husband. That's that pretty much sums it all up. Yeah. You know our other things. That's a lot I do a lot of stuff which is i. think partly of what we're GonNa talk about today, but we'll see where that goes. Yeah I I was so disappointed in this year, we also come back out for the race would have been my. Third Time coming for the senior Costa Fifty K. which is. Without a doubt, my favorite ultra-marathon off there ever is Martin was or will be. I. Guess I can't say that definitively about I, I, can I mean there will never be a better race video It's such a cool race rents along the coast of the Mendocino coast like Northern California cliffs just absolutely stunningly beautiful and then through the redwoods and along this big river out of there, it's such a cool that and. But of course, like everything else it was canceled this year and I was sorry to Miss Miss that option is here. Yeah, I was I was a late hold out like we were getting the news about you know. Groups of fifty sounds like okay. I can do that because all space my runners out Mr groups of twenty five probably can do that. You know, and then finally it was a group of ten and I was like okay and I had to pull the plug and it was really. I took it way harder than thought it would take it. I was very bombed Tanaka the race and. It's come for some reason. The last couple of weeks I think I'm trying to nail down next year's date and everybody who signed up to have a free. You know they have a free entry into next. You basically postponed the race a year essentially, but I'm like drinking coffee out of my Mendocino Coast Fifty K. last few days I've been wearing the hat like. Just around surrounding myself with all things Mendocino. Miss you so much. You know it's It's such a fun. It's like the it's such a thing I look forward to every year and to not have it this year amongst every amidst everything else was just really a bummer. Yeah what what do you think was the most? Disappointing part about if you just about the about the race by cancelling. Yeah. Just because I love the it's such as you know for anybody who's run it they know but I keep the number on purpose. You know have quite a big wait list actually but I, keep the number very tight at one hundred fifty. Because it's really intimate fun and it's become would have been in its fifth year, but there's a lot of returners. So it becomes this thing where it's almost familial. You out there there's traditions that are being built now around the race 'cause it's now it's not in its first year now in its would have been in its fifth and so it's it's a new race but you can sort of see the establishment of traditions in and just seeing people again for the you know that one time per year and it's just it's just I greet everybody when they come. Across the finish line because I keep the numbers manageable and it's just it's just this fun. Fully positive no negative day and even people who drop I've never had a negative person. They always come back and I go I. Miss a stupid thing. You know they get a beer and they walk over to the beach you know like it just so it's all good and I've knock on Wood I've never had. A bad experience around. So it's just it's just a fun thing for me to do. It is a good addition to altering community. Thank you for putting that on. Yeah, my pleasure. All. Right. So we'RE NOT GONNA be talking about the racer. We're not even going to be talking about today we're talking about a productivity and kind of staying focused in the age of that I. Know I have I've worked from home for a long time and you've partially worked from home for a while and so I'm used to this whole working from home thing. But I'm hearing increasingly more from people who from friends and family and stuff who are getting growing increasingly frustrated with the work from home experience and. They're having they're having trouble with productivity. You're having focused missing You know their friends at work and their colleagues and and so even though we're wet like five months into this whole thing and most people are still working from home. We. Thought it'd be good to talk about productivity and to talk about. You know just kind of waste to stay focused and and be efficient but we're doing it in the framework of small steps because you're like the small stuff guy, you might be the og small sips guy. I don't know what are small steps. I'm pretty I'm pretty Oh, Jeez most. Well, my small steps are from most other small steps. So I'm there are people out there talking about micro steps, break everything into two minutes my specific approaches to train people how to set their own well. I'll put this way a small step for me as an is the mindset it's what you view something as small step. So it's not a fixed amount of time in the world. It's just for you if it's a small

Garza Hohmann Doug Nice Doug Hey Mendocino Stanford Northern California Tanaka Martin Wood
Fresh update on "stanford" discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

00:41 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "stanford" discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

"Said, all those sports in all those scholarships get financed by football football, whatever the PIE is, it's not an equal hundred percent this year because they're gonNA, lose a ton of fans because a lot of these schools won't even allow fans in who knows how many games were going to get college athletics never looked the same like a lot of these sports will not exist. And the argument that you often see about the endowment, I, think what people struggle with is the Dowman is not there for college athletics. It's just not now, I, don't pretend to be president of Stanford University understand like how you can allocate it, but it's not just as black and white is we got ten billion of an endowment. I can use you know I need five million right now to float for the women's soccer team and the wrestling program in the baseball program. Pretty sure that's not in the bylaws doesn't work like that I know it's easy to tweet out. That's not the way the real world works. You know so I think this whole situation could get really really ugly in two, thousand and twenty, one and two, thousand and twenty two, which will promote change which I'm pretty sure that the name image and likeness which these players have been fighting for, which should be allowed to do. You should be able to sell your name. If you want to go to a car dealership and sign autographs, go do it. WHO gives a shit? Here's another thing. These old stiffs don't understand. They think that like the bank is GonNa cut. Trevor Lawrence A. A, check you. WHO's GONNA pay Trevor. Lawrence. Like youtube twitter instagram like random companies targeting young people. Who Do you think Trevor Lawrence following his fifty year old men. Now it's twenty year olds. These departments are terrified to lose their cash cows, car dealerships, banks, financial institutions. Those people are not going to go to the kids. You're going to give the kid money, trevor? Lawrence Hey man. We'll give you fifty fifty rev split on youtube channel does huge numbers because you're the starting quarterback for Ohio State. You're just field Trevor Lawrence for Clemson. A lot of these old people don't understand the. This is not nineteen ninety-seven. I. Literally Make Money and make a really good living from my home. Office talking into a mic and then I press a button. I, send it in. It goes out on Collins Feed, and now on my podcast, it gets over like one point five million listens a month that wasn't even possible ten years ago. You could argue five years ago. That would have been tough. The game has changed and I think the way we think like who knows maybe these guys start a podcast or making a ton of money, they can't do that right now. But it's very very easy I. These people have this jaded view of how these kids are GonNa make money. It's it's going to be technologically driven. which doesn't really impact the athletic. Department's budget or the NC Double A. and Listen I. Think Mark Amer it's a cloud I. Think most of these presence, the university I've nothing in common with any of them. I. It's like I'm pro the football coach and what he wants because he's the revenue generator. It's like I'm pro the player of college. Football Program. They are the breadwinner for the entire university..

Trevor Lawrence Trevor Lawrence A. Football Trevor Youtube Lawrence Stanford University Baseball President Trump Mark Amer Collins Feed Ohio State Clemson
Pac-12 player group threatens to opt out, makes list of demands on injustice, safety

Morning Edition

03:03 min | 4 d ago

Pac-12 player group threatens to opt out, makes list of demands on injustice, safety

"A very different group of students thinking about what it means to show up. These our student athletes college football player specifically in the Pac 12 conference Think Cal Stanford the student athletes are unhappy with how their universities have handled the pandemic and are threatening to opt out of the upcoming season. They've written a letter to the conference about this. The players say the conference has also failed to meet the moment on a range of social justice issues and circulated a list of demands on social media with the hashtag. We are united The commissioner of the Pac 12 agreed to meet with the players. Kevin Stark with cake science has been covering this story, Kevin What are the players saying so the players are concerned they're concerned about getting the Corona virus about transmitting it to their friends and family, their teammates. They say League officials are failing to meet calls for improving safety measures. Yeah, And the other thing that they're saying is that they feel exploited for the economic gain of the schools. You know, it's no secret that college football, especially at the level of Pac 12 major source of revenue and prestige in excitement for universities, But college athletes are amateurs, and they don't make any money. Right. So what are they asking the league to do right now? They're asking for more transparency around covert cases on their teams. They want a better understanding of the risk of playing for themselves, but also for everybody that they associate with. And they're also and this is sort of the biggest thing there asking that universities distribute half of the revenue that's generated by each sport to the athletes, so this would be a giant transformation of the way. The college sports works on Beyond that, you know, they have to sign coronavirus liability waivers. They don't want to have to do that. They want extended health insurance benefits already. They get insurance beyond when they're at school. But they want that to go for a little bit longer. They want to work with the league to address some of these social justice issues that they feel like are hindering this quality within the league. You've spoken with a number of public health experts do they think it's safe to play college football, So they think it could potentially be safe to play the game. You know, with really aggressive testing with all of these protective measures, you know, you could actually have a face covering on the front of helmets. This sort of thing, you know, making sure that the weight rooms and other facilities have really good circulation. But they acknowledge that there really is a lot of other risks that are involved. We don't have a good understanding of the long term impacts of covert 19. You know, of course, attacks the lungs, but it also has been shown to attack other organs. Also, they are unsure that all universities and colleges will have the resource is to put in that kind of aggressive testing regime that you would need to do. This safely, and they're saying without that, that it's just really not worth the risk, especially because you think about a lot of these athletes want to go pro. This is their livelihood, and it's their future and their health and the's long term impacts need to be better understood. So what

Football League Kevin Stark Cal Stanford Commissioner Kevin What
Fresh update on "stanford" discussed on BiggerPockets Business Podcast

BiggerPockets Business Podcast

00:45 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "stanford" discussed on BiggerPockets Business Podcast

"Thank you. Okay caused. So here is. We paid three a three B. so I guess it's technically for. So many things. Ready things to keep track of right now. Don't tell everybody. Okay. So this is just a fun one and I don't care if this was in your home life in your professional life for one of Your Business says for your kids. Wherever what is something Walker that you have splurged on along the way that was totally worth it. When I in two thousand and two when I started. I bought a desk from like pottery barn or something like that and not kidding. The top is right here in the corner office. The. First Week I owned it I tore like it's like know fabricated would or whatever was like I? Don't know what you put on top of this like what's the? It's like looks like wood but like it's like. Laminated. Veneer Salton Slam in it yeah. Laminate I tore it right where the mouse goes so like Like every time I move the mouse I would go. Or whatever and it was in scraped my finger and so it's one of these where last year. From, two hundred to you. So last year. I lived with that. Right. Air My office in I bought a live edge walnut table just totally like. I mean this thing every morning I come in and I rub it and it's like so beautiful it takes my breath away and it was so worth it but it just it reminds me that you know I spend my life at my desk I spent my life. I. Spend my life you know working and the thing is like I just needed to make in. So it's it's aesthetically pleasing it's rich and feel like I put my time in. So I totally splurged on this amazing dusk. That is a great splurge and I wish we had a visual of that because I suspect it goes beautifully with your artwork that we're talking about earlier in your whole office decor. That's fantastic. Oh. Let me. Read. Visual for anybody. Lobby. Alerts A. Listen only people jealous now. Asked. US Ok. Before you get into the more part, we did fail to ask you a question that we ask all of our guests during the the main part and I do and ask now that we're talking about like how much time you spend at your desk what's next? Do you have more books coming more businesses? What's what's next for? For Walker Double Yup so I, do sort of three things, right? So number one is in no particular order number one right number. Two, I broke her online deals number three, run the acquisition lab in the acquisition lab is brand new. You know it's it's we kicked off in. January. People they kept saying like you help people signed by businesses and it was like, no, I can't do that. It's nuts I can't charge enough to that I told you don't hire by side adviser they're having their money I tell you what to do in the Book and but they want coaching the one education and They want they want place to go to break down like no one really GonNa buy this can you talk about it for a minute and that's what it's for and so the thing is we've run four cohorts. We've averaged from our members four point seven out five star reviews, which is not good enough. So I just cancelled I'd just turned off on new entrance for the last two months. So sixty days with all of our overhead paying out of pocket or completely redoing. All of the curriculum and so the concept is providing. So entrepreneurship through acquisition is the number one MBA class number one MBA elective at every single school in which it's taught but it's only taught at eleven schools, and by then billed as a textbook at thirty percent of those schools and I'm talking it's Stanford Harvard University of Chicago northwestern yet it's like the best schools in the world right and so what I'm doing is I'm providing sort of an et a classic experience. In the acquisition lab to anyone who wants to sign up, but it's vetted it's if you've got money and you WANNA pay income in that doesn't mean you can get. You have to at least have access to one hundred thousand dollars and we go through you know a little screening and so by doing that work in small cohorts and we're building a really strong of people who are working together to help each other in business. That's snacks. That's awesome. I love that and everybody check out our show notes. We'll have more information about the acquisition lab and where you can find out more about it now. Let's jump into. I sky don't skip the more part. You've talked a little bit about what you're doing where we can find out more about the acquisition lab. But tell our listeners where they can connect with.

Walker Salton Slam Stanford Harvard University Of
US to Pay Over $1 Billion for 100 Million Doses of J&J's Potential COVID-19 Vaccine

KNX In Depth with Charles Feldman and Mike Simpson

03:08 min | 5 d ago

US to Pay Over $1 Billion for 100 Million Doses of J&J's Potential COVID-19 Vaccine

"It's good to be in the cove ID vaccine business, apparently Moderna, the pharmaceutical company rushing to develop a vaccination against covert 19 already taking pre orders and doses. Johnson and Johnson also working feverishly on a vaccine just sold 100 million doses of something that hasn't been developed as yet to the U. S government for well over $1 billion. Dr. J. Bhattacharya directs the program on medical outcomes at the center on the On Demographic on Demographic Economics of Health and Aging at Stanford Medical School. One of the things I've learned doctors, you guys gotta get shorter titles. That's one of things I've learned in the past few months, so it does seem odd for a lot of people. Ah, maybe it isn't. But it does seem odd that a product that hasn't yet really been proven to do anything. Ah, value that is, is being sold, apparently at great value to some of these companies. Is that odd or my just thinking the wrong way? No, it's in something unprecedented. And it is part of Ah policy actually, such as the United States government many, many governments around the world that made That they made a bet. They've said that if the vaccine does turn out to be effective, we wanted to be immediately available. At scale to everyone who you know, sort of everyone who was at risk from cover, which is basically everybody, so in order to avoid the delays, that would happen if you wait To see the doctor is going to work then then you ramp up manufactory months of delay. The decision's made again by the U. S government, but also by the government to basically make that investment now, even before we know what the facts, whether it actually gonna work or or or or or, you know, have detailed information about it. What's that? If it does work, we're ready to go. It doesn't work. We'll have lost that. We've lost a lot of money. I guess the wager is it's waiting would end up costing more than just trying to produce all this right now. So if you do hit on something, you have it ready. The prices you see, the money is being spent taxpayer dollars modern cases, is it The right cost. I mean, of course, that you hindsight will know for sure if the vaccine turns out to work out on actually application safe and then yes, it will avoid a lot of really uncomfortable discussions about who should get the vaccine first, you know, inequality, vaccine distribution. All those issues would be ramped up to 11 if you if you did, if we have different waited and the vaccine works, and then we have a massive fight in a sense now, But in the sense we're making. We're paying the taxpayer dollars real. It's real money. In order to say, Let's avoid that fight down the line if it works. In retrospect, it comes out It doesn't work. Then we'll look back and say, Gosh, Was it a good investment? It's an unprecedented unprecedented policy. But it's one that I think many countries around the world making just just because of the scale of the epidemic and the potential benefit from the From about scene if it does

U. S Johnson Moderna Stanford Medical School Dr. J. Bhattacharya United States
The Antidote to Burnout With Leah Weiss

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:02 min | 6 d ago

The Antidote to Burnout With Leah Weiss

"At a time when work has become more challenging than ever we're GonNa Explore One myth and one revelation the myth. which many of us myself included have consciously or subconsciously incorporated into our lives is that we need to grind ourselves into dust through fo- quote unquote productivity in order to achieve professional success. The revelation is that the more effective and cleaner burning fuel here is the potentially sappy notion of finding your purpose. My guest is Leah Weiss who has impressive bona fide as on both the professional and contemporary of fronts of the professional tip. She teaches compassionate leadership at Stanford Graduate School of business, and she wrote a book called how we work on the contemporary of Front. She's done for one hundred day retreats and one six month retreat all in the betton tradition. I. Believe this conversation was recorded pre pandemic, but it is deeply relevant nonetheless toward the end of the conversation, you're going to hear her drop an expression that has been rattling around in my head for months. So here we go with Leo's. Nice to meet you. It's lovely to meet you read your book on my bed Stanford while I've been reading through it. Lots of good stuff in there. Thanks so much. I've been exciting your book for years but really students always say it's a favorite because it's so much more relatable than most presentations of mindfulness. My child's College Fund. Thanks you. So, how did you get interested in I understand it started when you were fifteen or something like that yeah. I grew up not far from here in Jersey and the school that I attended. We had this amazing English teacher who taught meditation as part of his jam at this pre school. So my older siblings had done it, and then when I got to the point in high school where I could learn to I jumped right in and it really just landed it was it was really on point with challenges of having at the time like. So the high school I went to was very kind of. Call it. Somewhat conservative traditional would probably be term. It would prefer there was a young Republicans club that had the vast majority of of my class in I was like a very. I pushed back on a lot of roles I was in detention the day I. got into Stanford for example for like protesting some kind of policies. It's a school that sense spin in the news for consistently not delving into abuse that was going on there. So I was really struggling then environment making sense of things and being much more kind of. Politically progressive and just feeling weird you know as adolescent to so. When I first learned meditation and I started reading specifically Tibetan Buddhism. He had assigned a book in a course I was taking with him called literature of the enlightenment, and it just really landed the section about how we sanitize illness and death in this culture and just the struggle to find meaning when you're. An adolescent, all kind of fit together and got me really interested in just damn. Diving in the meditation it sounds to me just from looking at your book that you didn't actually start doing it in earnest until you're twenty is meditation that is I was very inconsistent in high school like I'd have periods of time where do it when I was in one of his classes or go week and then not do it for a while detentions Gupta. Meditate it was it created some good open real estate in my schedule ahead it frequently. So it would have been a good opportunity if I used it consistently that way. We're kind of impacted. It have in your twenties when you started doing it in earnest and what flavor were you doing so I had initially been exposed to baton Buddhism and that was when a sought out my first retreat in my twenty s that was specifically what I saw it out. Semi early practice wasn't as much sitting and doing breath focus as. Very early on learning about the Tibetan preliminary practices, which include hundred thousand prostration prosecutions and a lot of visualizations a lot of chanting not the content of what I teach now at the business school clearly. But for me those practices really fit and you actually there were the preliminary practices that you get before you get the kind of more nature of mind meditation instructions and that tradition. So by the time I got those I was really All in and? Excited for ready for that and then practice a

Stanford Graduate School Of Bu Stanford Leah Weiss Baton Buddhism LEO Jersey College Fund
When Covid Subsided, Israel Reopened Its Schools. It Didn’t Go Well.

The Takeaway

13:57 min | 6 d ago

When Covid Subsided, Israel Reopened Its Schools. It Didn’t Go Well.

"Since its debut and twenty seventeen, the Chinese APP tick tock has become one of the fastest growing social media tools with more than eight hundred, million active users. The APP lets users make short videos that are often shared across the Internet, but Tiktok isn't all fun games for months. Now, a lot of the attention about the APP has been focused on the national security concerns and the collection of user data, and as a result, the platform has been banned in India, by multiple branches of the US military and by Wells Fargo employees most recently however, president trump took aim at tiktok himself by threatening to ban the APP. We're looking at Tiktok we may be banning TIKTOK. We may be doing some other things, a couple of options, but a lot of things are happening. So we'll see what happens but we are looking at a lot of alternatives with respected dictum. Those remarks were before reports surfaced that Microsoft was pursuing a deal to buy TIKTOK in a press conference at the White House yesterday president trump claimed Microsoft or any other company would have to wait until September fifteen to acquire the APP and would be expected to give a percentage of the profit from the sale to the US Treasury. Joining me now is Graham Webster editor of digit China Project at Stanford University's Cyber Policy Center and a fellow at New America Graham thanks for being with us. Thanks for having me. And Cowan Rosenblatt is a youth and Internet cultural reporter for NBC, News. Dot Com callen thanks for being with us as well. Glad to, be here. Cowen who is the average tiktok user? The average tick tock user really is is a dynamic question because there is a huge range of different people who are using the APP but I'd say the most common person you're gonNA find is someone who is either at the tail end of high school or College who is definitely a solidly in generation the Gen Z. and he was using me APP mostly for fun to do dance challenges trends an engaged with communities that serve to their world. Graham. All of that sounds pretty basic I mean it doesn't sound like there's anything to be concerned about so far what type of data does tiktok collect from its users Graham? We'll TIKTOK is like a lot of social media companies these days It's using an AI driven or machine learning driven algorithm to figure out which content to to individual users. So to get this accomplished, they pay attention to obviously whatever you post that also you know what posts on your feed you look at how long you look at them where your device location is They also tried to track individual users like many apps do by looking at things like screen size and operating system and of course, they have a fair amount of information about your social graph, your your connections to friends and other people that you follow. And so what were some of the concerns around the data collection that way Graham given that it feels like there's a lot of, as you mentioned, other social media platforms and advertisers and the like that are tracking everything that we do already. Why? Why is Tiktok being highlighted here and banned in some of the institutions that we mentioned at the top Well, the basic reason is that tick tock is owned by a Chinese company named Bite Dance and they're a fairly new social media company. They had a breakout a few years ago in China with an APP called junior Tokyo that that is a you know an algorithm, IQ news feed and this is China's first big breakout internationally in terms of social media APPS and really getting take-up in in many different countries around the world not just the United States. So there's A concern that data collected by Tick Tock could end up in the hands of the Chinese company or the Chinese government and wild tick. Tock says that it stores all US user data in the US or in Singapore we don't really have a good way as a society right now to check that type of thing and to make sure that companies commit you when they commit to you know storing data and the Safeway making sure that they're actually doing that. Doesn't sound like we have a lot of that in the United States either though Graham. I mean, we have constant security breaches left and right Right. Well, the United States doesn't have a central data governance or data security or privacy Regulatory System the most prominent example of one globally as Europe, which has the general data protection regulation called the GDP are, and that governs things like when an apper services going to collect your personal information they have to gain certain types of consent and follow certain types of rules and there's also kind of limits the. Idea that if you collect data for a certain reason that you got consent for you shouldn't be able to use it for other reasons and that type of governance is just not that prominent in the US partially because the big US social media companies are not especially keen to have their practices heavily regulated they. They find GDP are in Europe to be burdensome and You know get in the way of making money. Kalland back in June president trump organized a rally in Tulsa Oklahoma and rumor has it that tiktok users promoted buying tickets for the event and didn't show up so that the event would be empty. What do we know about how that rubbed of the administration? So, what we know is it seemed to sort of frustrate the administration. Now, there's no evidence that the Tiktok users and K pop stands who are fans of Korean pop music that they had any impact on turnout. We are going through a global pandemic. There are a lot of factors going on right now. So it is really hard to know sort of what that impact was. But what we do know is it likely inflated expectations for turnout. The administration was planning to have a second rally after the main rally in Tulsa. which they then had to cancel, and so we think that it really messed with them. It was a it was a real genuine troll on the part of these tic TAC users against the president, and it really seemed to rub him the wrong way and there are lots of Tiktok users young first time voters who are telling me that when trump said, he wanted to ban this APP that was a retaliation for what they did the stunt they pulled the prank they pulled in Tulsa most what they think is happening. That's what they think is happening why there is no evidence that that's the president's line of thinking but that's what these eighteen to twenty two year olds are telling me that that's their beliefs. Cowan, we talked about The you know whether or not talk users actually had any effect on the trump rally in Tulsa back in June but more more directly here wondering if you're seeing any more political movement on the APP, whether it's a pro trump or pro biden or anti-trump anti, Biden has it started to move away from dance and song and move towards more political leaning so far. It can do both things at once actually. So there are still the dance trends. There are massive accounts that are just enjoying music on the APP but we see a lot of politics on Tiktok now maybe more than ever some young people are telling me they feel that because their home in quarantine and because politics ramping up nationally as we get closer to this election that they're seeing more and more politics in their feet, and what we're seeing is a not so much pro by content, but a lot of anti-trump content and I WANNA be clear. There is Republican Todd Democrat tiktok liberal Tick Tock conservative Tiktok. But what it appears to be is a lot of generation. Z.. Has a anti-trump sentiment and that does not mean they heavy pro biden sentiment. But things that we see our young people say, Hey, on this day, everyone go to president, trump's campaign store and put these products in your cart. But don't check out because allegedly that messes with their inventory or everyone on this day go to president trump's twitter account and report account, and let's see we can get a taken down. So we're still seeing these sort of organized movements sort of Troll, the president and a lot of discussion of politics but whether or not that is in in favor of vice, President Biden or in favor of president trump is sort of yet to be seen. Graham LE. Let's talk a little bit. But I mean, it sounds like tiktok users are for the most part having fun on the site sort of trying to do the things that Collina's talking about here but. On a more serious note, the trump administration has been trying to ban the APP. They're citing national security concerns, concerns over censorship by the Chinese government. Valid are any of those concerns really given what you know about China US politics Well I think it's you have to separate them out So the the concern about censorship I think is legitimate there was there was an example a little while ago where it looked like some of the censorship that they would do in China restricting conversations about things the Communist Party doesn't like discussed had bled over into the international product Now, Tiktok said that they were addressing that wasn't intended again, we don't really. Have a good way in the United States to check up on that and to kind of make sure that speech isn't being censored one way or the other the national security issue I think requires a lot more imagination Now, you know as was mentioned, the the military has has told service members to not use the APP and I think that makes a good amount a sense you know if if you're concerned about an APP Having links to a potential adversary There's all sorts of possibilities of ways that it could be exploited even just using location data of of service members or people who work in sensitive facilities. But if you don't work in sensitive facilities, if you're just sort of going around and and and doing the fun things and engaging in some of the political discourse that Cowan was mentioning you know there's not. A real big national security issue there a I will say that some people think that collecting the full aggregate totality of US Tiktok users could be used later in a analysis to try to do something, but it's really imaginative at this point whereas I think the censorship concerns a real and could be checked on and data privacy concerns are real but should be able to be checked on as well. What about the fact that we we just heard from Ian Bremmer, the president of the Eurasia Group in the previous segment talking about how the United States is viewed internationally in terms of our response to the corona virus. But I did ask in also about his thoughts on what this Tiktok dust up between president trump and China what seemed to Be Rooted in and he said, you know this is also part of trump's sort of relationship with how he views China and Chinese technology he's gone after while way he's gone you know talked a lot about five G. technologies. So do you see that I mean? Do you see that as a pattern in how the president views technologies specifically that's coming out of China. Yeah I think the you know the trump administration's been. Pursuing a campaign of you know escalating what could be a new type of Cold War approach to China and a lot of it is wrapped up in technology and and I think the focus on Tiktok really makes the most sense. If you consider it a distraction from two things I is a distraction from actual problems with China you know the the trump administration got this phase one trade deal which didn't really get to the deep issues of subsidy and market access and intellectual property protection. And, on the other hand, it's distracting from the fact that a lot of these security concerns should apply across many apps. Why just tick Tock you know you're talking about including American made apps like facebook and twitter. Yeah I mean the concerns are different when the parent company is in China but there are really unaccountable data collection methods going on across ad networks and data brokers are building profiles of Americans and people in other countries that can be purchased just with money and you know it's not only add companies that by this data governments can get it to. Callan, as we sort of touched on this earlier. But of course, we I, say this all the time we're heading into one of the most consequential presedential elections in my lifetime at least social media is constantly changing is tiktok going to be a thing and twenty twenty and November, or is it going to be eclipse with something else or it'll change the? Will it change the election? Calvin what are your thoughts on that? I don't see Tiktok going away anytime soon, as long as the president allows it to operate in the United States I think we're gonNA see more is eight organizing on the APP among young people and I think we're GONNA see. TIKTOK. As long as Microsoft buys it or another company comes in to allow it to operate in the US I think it's going to stick around for a long time. I mean the president did Callan has also asked that Microsoft give money to the Treasury. If it makes this sale, we is anybody else interested in buying tiktok or is it just Microsoft right now? I don't think anyone else has come out as far as I'm aware and said that they are interested in purchasing Tik. Tok I think Microsoft even just recently confirmed that they were interested in this conversation, but it appears a deal needs to be made by September fifteenth. So if someone's going to buy it, it has to happen soon. Well you heard it here I guess I callan Rosenblatt is a youth internet culture reporter for NBC News Dot Com and Graham Webster is the editor of the digit China Project at the Stanford? University Cyber Policy Center and he's also a fellow

President Trump Tiktok United States Donald Trump Graham China President Biden Microsoft Tulsa Graham Webster Callan Rosenblatt NBC Us Treasury Chinese Government Stanford University Cowan
DNA & EOs with Dr. Lindsey Elmore

The Essential Oil Revolution

06:30 min | Last week

DNA & EOs with Dr. Lindsey Elmore

"All Right folks, I'm here with Dr Lindsay Elmore. One of my favorite human beings on this planet, she's a speaker author, brand strategist podcast host am world renown wellness expert, she translates. Science into understandable stories and travels the world educating audiences about natural wellness Lindsey. Welcome back to the show. Thanks for back. Absolutely thanks for having me back. It's an honour. Well, you're one of my favorite guests becoming a recurring us which I love so I'm glad that you're here today and I'm super excited to talk about this particular topic of DNA and what our DNA can tell us about essential oils, and we've actually had a number of guests on the show before to to cover this topic. But I feel like you're gonNA just sort. Sort of put the icing on top of everything and make it click in people's minds because that's what you're best at just breaking down complicated things and making them simple. So this is part of your thirty podcasts in thirty days. Tell us a little bit more about that. Well I recently started a podcast called the Lindsay elmore show, and I, some of my guests have been have been educating me on how you can. Can Get your podcast out there. If you go on a podcast tour and a few months ago, I was at an event called pod Max and one of the speakers was a writer for four herbs and she had written an article about how she accomplished doing thirty podcasts in thirty days, and I just thought, wow, that sounds really hard and I decided why not give it a try and book as many as you. You can get the word out there and really share all the different facets you know. I. Love Essential Oil. So I'm excited to be here to talk to your audience, but we're also looking at podcast that encompass all of the entrepreneurship that I do the Vegan cooking yoga. Even my new little cat. We've applied to some to some broadcast to talk about you know my first couple of weeks having a kitten and so. A great way I, don't know. So it's a great way to meet New People and to share topics that I care about right. Well, I, love how the podcast world is. So multifaceted in that way, like we are human beings, we are complex creatures and we are both passionate, right. So have been able to find. There's a podcast there for everything. So whatever little passion or hobby or? Or thing that's like in your heart that you want express share with the world. There's a show out there to do just that for people who are hungry for that information, which is one of the reasons I just love podcast. Absolutely. I. Completely agree there. We have come across some crazy crazy podcast and we even applied to one and there was only about the health benefits of olives. Like was like, how do you have a podcast only about that? But there is legitimate podcast for anyone and everyone. That's hilarious. I'M GONNA have to add that into my book that I'm writing about podcast. Dina's is just an example how niche you can make these things. So. Let's dive into the Science DNA. Tell us what gives us like the kindergarten version of what is DNA, and what can you tell us about our bodies. So DNA is basically A. For your body, every single person has DNA and there are building blocks of DNA called base pairs, and we each have about three point two, billion base pairs of DNA, and what we have is these base pairs make called genes. So there's a sequence of the base pairs that make gene the gene in codes, a part of your body bit either contributes to the structure of your body. So you can have a gene that helps to encode for tissues or four bones or for tea. Or you can have genes that encode for the function of your body, and so this could be perhaps an enzyme or it could be a spleen soul that is destined to help clean your blood cells. So DNA it's a blueprint, it's built of base pairs that make up jeans, and then genes encode the structure and function of our bodies. Okay. So with that basis of information there how why, and what, why do? Do essential oils differ in their benefit based on different DNA types like I used to think that all essential oils just kinda did the same thing to everyone and then I started using essential oils in seen how center oils did different things in different people's bodies and I'm like Oh. Why is that his dad because of our DNA? Well, it could be because of your DNA. So within your, DNA, we have. Have things, called snips and the snips Stanford single nuclear tied Holly. MORPHISM 's this is a really fancy term that basically means mutations. We are all mutants because we don't all have matching. DNA. That's what makes us human? That's what makes us beautiful in diverse. So mutation has a bad connotation to it, but really, and truly all mutation is is where they're within those base pairs that are building your DNA there. there. Is a change with one of those base pairs and that is called a single nucleotides polymorphism. So when we look at the population as a whole, we can identify what is the most common nuclear tied sequence within our DNA. This tells us at every single point within the DNA, what is considered the normal trait? Some people have different nucleotides. That's where those snips comment those single nucleotide polymorphisms. So these abnormals. Tides lead to our genetic mutations. Some of them are benign. So some of them don't make any difference. You know you and I could have two different SNIPS and our bodies still functions

Dr Lindsay Elmore Lindsay Elmore Brand Strategist Morphism Writer Dina Holly
Computer mouse co-inventor William English dies at 91

This Week in Tech

01:07 min | Last week

Computer mouse co-inventor William English dies at 91

"I think I should probably mentioned before we wrap up the passing of Bill English. he was ninety one years old. You may not know the name, but he built the first computer mouse stuggling Bart his colleague at the Stanford Research Institute Sri came up with the idea. Angle Burt was a fellow engineer they made. The mouse he helped put on the demo the what was it called the demo to end. All Demos. Where we saw for the first time, a mouse graphical user interface windows. Doug Engelberg I had the pleasure of interviewing at on the screen savers twenty years ago passed away in twenty thirteen. He brought that original mouse, which is just a big wooden box with rollers and stuff But very cool. So the mother of all Demos, which is December ninth nine, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, eight. Where we for the first time, saw the computing that we would all be using eventually. Bill English one of the creators. passed away at the age of ninety one

Doug Engelberg Angle Burt Bill English Stanford Research Institute Sr Bart Engineer
Researchers Use Artificial Intelligence To Study Elephant Calls

All Things Considered

01:51 min | Last week

Researchers Use Artificial Intelligence To Study Elephant Calls

"Which is a problem If you study them, we basically have no idea what they're doing, how they're using the landscape all of those kinds of things. Peter Rag is the behavioral Ecologist at Cornell University. And he says one way to solve the problem is to eavesdrop on the elephants instead. Leads Cornell's elephants were listening project, which uses an array of microphones in the rainforests of Central Africa to record the rumbling and trumpeting of elephants. They pick up other sounds too, like the chest beats of guerillas. By now, he estimates they have gathered a 1,000,000 hours of tape. And he says, analyzing that much tape is a beast. Very, very slow, very tedious. Jonathan Jones, Selman agrees. He volunteered on the project as a teenager, hand picking elephant calls. He thought there had to be a better way. So he and fellow Stanford grad Nikita Demir trained artificial intelligence to do the job. Instead, Here's Gom Selman, we feed these models, hundreds of examples of both audio clips with and without elephant calls, and then these deep learning models of basically the overtime. Able TTO learn specific features that the people training these models don't fully know ourselves. They'll present the model next week at a virtual meeting of the Ecological Society of America. Other Wreg hasn't yet tried the new algorithm. He says. It seems faster and more accurate than earlier. Aye, aye attempts, which gives him and other scientists a better chance to decode the mysteries of elephants rumbles. This is their language. If we can start understanding that better, we know Maur. What's going on in the forest where we can't see anything because to keep an eye on the forest you got to keep in here.

Cornell Peter Rag Wreg Gom Selman Selman Cornell University Maur Ecological Society Of America Central Africa Nikita Demir Jonathan Jones Stanford
Researchers Use Artificial Intelligence To Study Elephant Calls

All Things Considered

01:51 min | Last week

Researchers Use Artificial Intelligence To Study Elephant Calls

"Elephants True to the name spend their lives hidden in the rainforest, which is a problem If you study them, we basically have no idea what they're doing, how they're using the landscape all of those kinds of things. Peter Reggae is the behavioral Ecologist at Cornell University. And he says one way to solve the problem is to eavesdrop on the elephants instead. Greg leads Cornell's Elephant Listening project, which uses an array of microphones in the rainforests of Central Africa to record the rumbling and trumpeting of elephants. They pick up other sounds too, like the chest beats of guerillas. By now, he estimates they've gathered a 1,000,000 hours of tape. And he says, analyzing that much tape is a beast. Very, very slow, very tedious. Jonathan Jones, Selman agrees. He volunteered on the project as a teenager, hand picking elephant calls. He thought there had to be a better way. So he and fellow Stanford grad Nikita Dimier trained artificial intelligence to do the job. Instead, Here's Gom Selman, we feed these models, hundreds of examples of both audio clips with and without elephant calls, and then these deep learning models are basically the overtime. Able TTO learn specific features that the people training these models don't fully know ourselves. They'll present the model next week at a virtual meeting of the Ecological Society of America. Other Wreg hasn't yet tried the new algorithm, he says. It seems faster and more accurate than earlier. Aye, aye attempts, which gives him and other scientists a better chance to decode the mysteries of elephants rumbles. This is their language. If we can start understanding that better. We know Maur. What's going on in the forest where we can't see anything because to keep an eye on the forest, you got to keep an ear on it, too.

Cornell Peter Reggae Gom Selman Wreg Selman Cornell University Maur Ecological Society Of America Central Africa Jonathan Jones Greg Nikita Dimier Stanford
How to Get Sleep in Anxious Times With  Dr. Donn Posner

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:45 min | 2 weeks ago

How to Get Sleep in Anxious Times With Dr. Donn Posner

"Don't know about you guys, but my sleep has suffered at times quite badly during the last few months. Today's guest really got me thinking about this issue in a whole new way I. he normalizes the sleep problems. Many of us are having. If you're sleeping poorly right now, he says don't freak out. It's natural and normal. Second he has a whole bunch of tips for how to deal with insomnia. Some of which I had never heard before, and I'm already starting to operationalize my own life. His name is Don. Posner he's one of the leaders in the field of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. Titles are founder and president of sleep, well, consultants and Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. Not only did done patiently answer all of my questions, but we also played him. Some listener voicemails from you guys. One last thing to say before we dive in here, you'll notice over the course of this week. That are episodes this week. Have a theme which we're calling primordial needs today. We're doing sleep. Wednesday it's sex, so it's fun week here on the show. Stay tuned for all of that I. IT sleep and on near here we go. Great to meet you and thanks for doing this. I appreciate it sure thing good to be here. You gave a talk recently. That got some attention. deservedly. We'll get now more attention now that we're putting you on the show about acute insomnia. Can you tell us what that means and why? You're worried about it right now especially. Let me clarify a couple of things. Let me maybe work backward. The best way to define acute insomnia is to define chronic or long term insomnia, which we in the field called insomnia disorder. And the way we define that is that a person is having trouble initiating sleep to begin with. Or they wake up in the middle of the night and can't get back to sleep. Or they wake up sort of at the end of their night and never get back to sleep, right? And so those are really three flavors of insomnia if you will beginning middle and end. We like to say chocolate, Vanilla Strawberry, and then there's neopolitan which is a mixed bag right so that's insomnia. If that is happening and we say what's problem with to sleep or staying asleep, it's if you take longer than thirty minutes to get to sleep on average if you are awake for some combination of thirty minutes in the middle of the night, or you wake more than thirty minutes earlier than your desired time. If that's happening three or more nights a week for longer than three months. And you have associated daytime symptoms, that's insomnia disorder and I want to underscore that last piece which is. Really, a twenty four hour disorder. It has to have impact on your day. For us to say that this is really an insomnia disorder problem. You have to have something like fatigue sleepiness. Concentration problems, performance, problems and so forth. So chronic insomnia is those symptoms more than three months. So now going back to your question about acute insomnia, acute insomnia is all of that. Less than three months when I give talks, and when I asked the audience how people here have ever had a bad night's sleep I know I'm going to get a laugh and one hundred percent of the hands go up. We've all had that experience. And all of that is normal nothing to concern ourselves about it, and we don't even talk about anything as diagnostic as acute insomnia until we get to at least three days. But then anywhere between three days and three months is considered acute insomnia, and that means that you're having those problems either initiating or maintaining sleep. And you may or may not have daytime symptoms yet. And it's usually due to some stressor, and we say anything from the Bio psychosocial spectrum. I now say to my trainees. You could probably open the dictionary. Put your finger down on a word and find something that causes insomnia. Whether. It's an illness physical pain a change in your environment, a psychological stress like stress at work tax time those sorts of things and I also hasten to add that. The Valence of that does not have to be negative. Right change is stressful so getting married and getting a new bed partner in your bed. Can Change Your sleep patterns. Having a child. Is a precipitate for an acute insomnia until you can get that kind of straightened away. The thought process is absolutely very much that that's a normal reaction distress. Maybe even a good one because. If we go back evolution narrowly speaking. Sleep is a dangerous activity. Right if you're asleep, you're vulnerable. It must be important for that reason because every species, does it. And so, it must provide very important function, but it's dangerous, so we always say that sleep is deferred when the lion walks into the mouth of the cave. and. Therefore, we could say that acute insomnia is adaptive. If, you understand so even now in our culture. It's adaptive in the sense that you're making changes. You're trying to deal with. Whatever's coming down the pike. But we always expect that. If you then adapt appropriately or the problem itself goes away, or you get on some medication or the stressor itself remits then we expect the acute insomnia to remit, and so all of that we consider to be normal, and it is for a smaller subset, but yet epidemic numbers that sort of gravitate into this chronic insomnia realm, which is where people like myself and my colleagues come in terms of helping people to treat that.

Insomnia Adjunct Clinical Associate Pro Founder And President DON Psychological Stress Posner Stanford University School Of Partner
Toxic Stress

PODSHIP EARTH

06:04 min | 2 weeks ago

Toxic Stress

"Just as we saw light at the end of the covid tunnel, we now find ourselves back in the darkness. The psychological impacts of this pandemic being felt acutely. We live in fear of losing a loved one to the virus, a friend being killed by the police because of the color of their skin. Parents and kids exhausted of being cooped up together. Certainly told school will be online this fall millions who have lost their jobs a terrified by having to choose between buying food or paying the rent. Essential workers as stressed by the lack of effective protective equipment. The list of legitimate to worry about has grown nearly endless. Stress takes many forms and manifesto, myriad of symptoms at its was stress can elicit a toxic shock to our system that changes who we are at the very fundamental level. During covid acts of abuse neglect in household dysfunction are all on the rides while the stay at home orders help stem the tide of the pandemic. There's a mounting evidence that lead to violence in the home, becoming more severe and frequent. When we think of environmental factors that contribute to health problems like asthma, the impacts of stress from abused neglected dysfunction are often overlooked in the last decade understanding of both adverse childhood, experiences and toxic stress as adults has evolved. In large part, this is due to the work of Dr Nadine. Bug Harris an award-winning physician, researcher and advocate dedicated to changing the way society responds to Childhood Trauma. Doctor Doug Harris was appointed as California's first ever surgeon general by Governor Gavin Newsom in January twenty nine team. As California in general Nadine has had a bold goal to reduce adverse childhood experiences also known by the acronym ace or aces by half in one generation Dr Buck. Harris's career has been dedicated to serving vulnerable communities and combating the root causes of health disparities. After completing residency at Stanford she founded a clinic in one of San Francisco's most undeserved communities, Bayview hunters point it was Ed's. That Buck Harris observed that despite the implementation of National Best Practices for Immunizations Asthma. Obesity treatment and other preventive health measures a patient's still faced outsized risks for poor health, development and behavioral outcomes. In Two thousand eleven, she founded the Center Youth Wellness and subsequently grew the organization to be a national leader in the effort to advance pediatric medicine raise public awareness and transform the way society responds to children exposed to adverse childhood experiences and toxic stress. Dr Bernard Harris Is Talk. How Childhood Trauma Effects Health across the lifetime has been viewed more than six million times have book. The deepest will healing the long term effects of childhood adversity was called indispensable by the. New York Times I stopped by asking. What is like to be surgeon general during the time of Kobe? It's a little crazy. Yeah, it's a new role within government. It also feels really important. Because in this moment I think a lot of people are recognizing the importance of public health, and it's coming to a new level of awareness for a lot of people and so i. think that creates a lot of opportunities that I'm really grateful for. We will say this, but we kind of take our health for granted. Nadine we. We we go about our lives and this has been such a shock to the system. That is nearly all that we think about now for a lot of us. We're not just in this moment of covert nineteen, which is has been this incredible health crisis, but it's also showing all the cracks in our safety. Net it showing how much there are so many people who can't live without paycheck at. At showing how many folks are on the front lines it showing how dependent we are on healthcare, it's also showing how mental health is a huge issues, the stress of the pandemic and it's also showing up in the racial disparities right when we look and see that black and Brown folks are dying at a higher rate like there's a pandemic that comes across our country across the globe and yet. Yet in the United, states what see is that black and Brown people are dying at a substantially greater rate than others when I see the racial disparities around Kovin I feel outraged every day and I think about my kids and everything that I'm working for to ensure that they live in a state and in a country where they simply have equal opportunity right now. I'm not asking for a leg. Asking for any kind of you know anything special, and simply asking for equal opportunity for my children to be healthy, and well for my children to have their God given right to grow up and make themselves whatever it is that they will make of themselves, and so from that standpoint, it's been terribly challenging time if I'm speaking honestly because you know, we're all working around the clock, fighting Covid, and then we also have to be fighting all these other pieces fighting racial discrimination structural inequalities, all of these different pieces and for me, the fight has never felt more important and it. It feels like we're right on the front

Dr Nadine Doctor Doug Harris Covid Tunnel Dr Bernard Harris Buck Harris California Covid Governor Gavin Newsom New York Times Stanford Obesity Asthma Dr Buck San Francisco United Researcher Center Youth Wellness Kobe ED
Desk Shields Are Part Of Salem, NH Schools’ Reopening Plan, Boston

WBZ Afternoon News

00:49 sec | 2 weeks ago

Desk Shields Are Part Of Salem, NH Schools’ Reopening Plan, Boston

"Says it's got a plan when it comes to schools and Salem. Deaths of Children and teachers are being surrounded by a clear shield. The kind you see in a supermarket checkout now, says Assistant Superintendent for Business operations Debbie Pain. She says. The same deal is happening in the lunch room with Touchless payment systems. Every kid in Stanford, we'll get five cloth masks, and if a family is still uncomfortable, remote learning is an option with a three sided shield on their death or table. If there at a table some rooms student Senate tables instead of the individual student desks, and the teacher will also have a shield to be behind when students or staff are behind those shields. They are able to remove their masks. Otherwise, students and staff would be expected to wear their masks in the hallways when they get up from their seats when they're moving around the class Karen Regal W B Z Boston's News radio over Main Bates College

Debbie Pain Assistant Superintendent For B Karen Regal Touchless Main Bates College Salem Stanford Senate Boston
Floodgate and tEQuitable

Zero to IPO

04:39 min | 2 weeks ago

Floodgate and tEQuitable

"Welcome back to another episode of Zeroed IPO and we have to awesome guesses. Good Morning Lisa Good Morning. And how are you today? The morning? Good Morning. Doing great can't complain. We're going to have a very lively conversation about a wide range of things that I think will be applicable to our audience. Let me, introduce our first guest today and Morocco who is a pioneering tech investor at floodgate, and among many accomplishments, has a PhD in math modeling from Stanford where she also teaches entrepreneurship, and I think it's going to have a lot of insight to share with all of us today about what it means to start and run a company particularly in difficult times. I. Certainly Hope so I've started adventure in two thousand one, and then again in two thousand eight, so I do have some memory and recollection of hard times. Our other guests is Lisa Globe term. Who is the founder and CEO of technical and we're GONNA. Learn a lot more about equitable today, but Lisa has a fascinating and varied career. Leading up to the founding of technical, you were the chief digital officer for the Department of Education. You've worked at a bunch of big companies. You've worked at government, which is the biggest company of them all? You were the chief digital officer at bt. Networks You're also one of the senior management team for the launch of Hulu so when you started this company. You had a lot of experience navigating corporate environments, and so, why don't we just dive in and talk about how that experience informed the founding of equitable and why you did what you did? I've been fortunate enough over the course of my career to work on some pretty transformative technologies, so whether it was shockwave, which was the first time the web. whether it was helping with the launch of Hulu. It's been a hell of a journey in terms of making change, but it was really at the White House where I came to understand that we really could harness technology to solve what had been previously thought of as intractable problems right? I want to focus on making improvements right here on our home planet to solve the issues for the under served the underrepresented in the underestimate it, so that was kind of how it all came to be well. Let's get into the details of it. Tell us what testable is. How did it fit this this desire on your part, yeah? Equitable is really about using technology to make workplaces more equitable, and our mission is to create work culture that works for everyone and in order to do that. We've created this platform that that is independent third party and help people address issues of bias discrimination harassment in the workplace. But more generally kind of helps folks with in a personal conflict workplace misconduct, those kinds of things, so we do two things one is we provide a sounding board for employees where they can when they're feeling uncomfortable in the workplace and they can come and explore their options. Get Advice, and basically figure out what their next steps are in how to move forward, and then on the flip side. People are using the platform. We actually gather data that we anonymous and we aggregate, and we use that to identify systemic issues within organizations culture. We create a report for the management team with actionable recommendations so for us again. It's really important. Important that we work on both sides equation where we are empowering and supporting employees, but we are also helping companies identify issues and address them before they even escalates were trying to create this virtuous cycle again getting to the systemic issues. A lot of what you have done with tech quibble is create something that was needed, but that maybe people didn't know they needed, and certainly now they may not even know that the solution is out there for them. which I think will resonate for a lot of our audience members who are creating something to solve a problem that most people as you said at the beginning is intractable or people think that. If it was easy to do. Somebody would have done it right. I think that's it so for me. The thing that's been again really gratifying is that. We're just kind of talking to folks. People like you're the first vendor I have ever spoken with. That is solving a problem that I have today. I know exactly what this problem is, but I didn't know like. Where have you been all? My Life I didn't know a solution like this existed once. I've talked to somebody for five minutes. It's like Oh my God I totally. Totally, get it like this makes perfect sense to me, but I gotta get that five minutes because they don't even know that assertion might exist. That's actually one of my big questions for you all, which is what are some of the factors that go into when you're creating a new market? And how do you? How do you get people to even be aware of that situation?

Hulu Lisa Good Officer Zeroed Ipo Lisa Globe Founder And Ceo Lisa BT Morocco White House Harassment Floodgate Department Of Education Stanford
Former Kansas State president Jon Wefald on college football amid pandemic

The Paul Finebaum Show

05:40 min | 2 weeks ago

Former Kansas State president Jon Wefald on college football amid pandemic

"Dr John We follow the former president at at Kansas state. Thanks for spending a few more minutes with a doctor. I wanted to ask you you mentioned. Where the college presidents are, but but some have pushed back and said while it wall. It is a dangerous decision to green light at cancelling. It might be even worse when you consider the financial risk You've sat in those chairs. You sat these NCWA committee meetings. You've been part of negotiations. What's at risk for college athletic departments and colleges themselves? Paul I'm already there because there's not going GonNa be a college football season this year, so I mean. Look at the the big ten's already canceled. But forty two games the the PAC twelve is canceled like thirty six. So and in the presence are are are in charge of the entire university. So you know when I hear Ross talking. I understand completely. He's got every scenario looked at. But, even if everything's perfect there and you get a multitude of students getting the covid nineteen, the president's are going to call the season off, but here's the deal I'm already. Looking at the consequences, and and they are bleak. the University of Minnesota did A. Long Study and was in the Minneapolis Tribune. Let's say they're athlete budgets one hundred, twenty three. And if there's no football season for Minnesota and the big ten. Their athletic budget, just kind of in half and say for. Let's say the sixty five power five schools. Paul. There's no football this year. Their athletes budgets are close to cut in half, and in some cases more in some cases less. But will you saw Stanford I mean Look Stanford is one of the richest universities one of the best universities in the world, and they've already cancelled eleven, so called Olympic Spring Sports and. You're going to see other schools in the power five conferences eliminating. Those sports left and right here in the near future, because they won't be able to afford like at the University of Minnesota if they go from one hundred, twenty, three, million and that budget's cut in half. They're GONNA have to start eliminating sport, so it's going to be devastating. Who wants to eliminate sports? But here you've got this great school. Stanford that's already eliminated eleven, and that's just the tip of the iceberg. And so for Kansas, state. Let's say our budget is like eighty five million well, it would go down to thirty eight to forty million, so we would have to cut sports to. So the consequences of the limited, he's coaches and telling teams We just can't afford anymore and their moms and dads are furious. No it's GonNa be very painful. And Athletic Departments Are Really important all of our schools and. And you know if you lose half your budget because of this pandemic call covid nineteen. Oh i. tell you what it is. It is GONNA be so devastating Paul I hate to think about it because you know once that college football season half the budget for most of these half-baked departments. It's gone into the night. Actually, we feel. Let me go back. Something I I know you've answered it and I don't mean to be repetitive, but. Okay, but we talked to people and you've. You've addressed one or two of the interviews and. I'm struggling because there's such a disconnect I'm talking to people every day. I had commissioner on from another conference earlier and they're optimistic. Glass half full and all this, and then you're. You're not even. You're not even taking a breath and just saying there's not going to be college football. The same thing you seven months ago and I'm I'm trying to figure out you know. If what you say is true. Why are they saying with? They're saying. Well. I suppose you could call wishful thinking. I'm a quintessential. I'd be doing the same thing Paul was. president or Director today. So I I, would all the I mean I'd be doing exactly what you're saying. They're saying. If you're not sure you don't think they really believe it. Well I. Don't think they've really looked at it. Seriously I don't think I think. Really. Underestimating is enemy called Cova nineteen. It's everywhere in in some cases in America is on the uptick, and it's had an increase that you know a lot of places are. Kind of dangerous to go. But you know I see. Here's the deal this covert nineteen. Let's say here. We have sixty five universities. In, hundreds of athletes and coaches that wanted to do a perfect job and start the season on September fifth and go through twelve games, and so forth in the problem is. They're not in control. This is an enemy. That's everywhere. Kind of little communist, running all over the place from China. And so they could just wake up one day and find out that three hundred fifty students at Kansas state have developed covid nineteen.

Paul Olympic Spring Sports Football President Trump Stanford Kansas State University Of Minnesota Dr John Ncwa Minnesota PAC Minneapolis Tribune Kansas China Ross Cova Limited Commissioner America
Notre Dame AD Jack Swarbrick reportedly wants 2020 season delayed

ESPN Radio

00:41 sec | 2 weeks ago

Notre Dame AD Jack Swarbrick reportedly wants 2020 season delayed

"Time top administrators and one of the big time college football schools from around the country has championed the start of delaying the college football seats that it comes from Notre Dame athletic director Jack Swarbrick in an interview with ESPN. Heather didn't your college football insider? He says that he'd like to schedule the start a little later that he doesn't see a full 12 games scheduled being a possibility. He thinks it's more between 8 to 10 games now. Part of this is also Notre Dame has lost three opponents for the year. The Big 10 of the pact all conference and I was earlier this month they were moving to a conference on Ly scheduled, So that means Notre Dame does lose USC, Stanford and a game against Wisconsin, which was supposed to be played at Lambeau

Jack Swarbrick Football LY Espn Heather Director Wisconsin USC Stanford
Doctors And Dentists Still Flooding U.S. With Opioid Prescriptions

Up First

03:45 min | 3 weeks ago

Doctors And Dentists Still Flooding U.S. With Opioid Prescriptions

"New NPR investigation shows that doctors are still over prescribing opioids emphasis on still. It's been years since we have been referring to. As an epidemic hundreds of thousands of people are dead of overdoses, families. Family's destroyed. Children have been removed from their homes. Addicts are struggling to recover and still. Why would doctors be doing this? Our addiction correspondent Brian Man has been looking at publicly available data. Hey, Brian Good morning. You've been on this story for years and at a certain point, it just looks reckless. How could doctors still be over prescribing opioids? Yeah, it seems remarkable. What a lot! Lot of experts tell NPR's for all their dangers. opioids are still kind of hard wired into the American healthcare system. A lot of people for example have insurance that will pay for opioids, but not alternative pain treatments, also a lot of doctors were trained during the opioid boom, and they still see these medications as a quick convenient solution to patient pain. Here's Dr Jonathan Chen. He's a physician in California. Who Studies prescribing patterns if you look worldwide? We're like five percent of the population, but we consume eighty percent of the world's prescription opioids. It's not just a handful of doctors. Doing kind of all arts become a culture that this is normal so normal end deadly twenty the latest year. We have good records. Noel forty people were still dying every day from prescription opioid overdoses. Millions more saw their lives shattered by addiction. There are now tighter regulations in a lot of states. The healthcare industry gotten a ton of trouble. There were lawsuits. Billions of dollars were paid out or will be paid out. Are you saying that none of that worked? But what NPR found is prescribing has come down from the really crazy high levels. We saw during the peak of the OPIOID boom, but critics and people who studied this say progress has been slow and also really uneven. Here's Gary Guy. He tracks prescribing patterns for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is still three times. The amount of opioids being prescribed as there was in nineteen. Nineteen ninety nine and there's also substantial variation across the country. The experts we talked to said that last part is really troubling. It turns out. OPIOID prescriptions have come down a lot in some parts of the country. That's a big success story, but we found other areas of the US especially rural areas and parts of the south where the prescribing boom is still going full tilt enough prescriptions being written in those communities every year for every man, woman and child to get a bottle of pills. Are there differences within the healthcare industry like are certain types of doctors over prescribing while others are not. This is really interesting, so with the CDC. Found is a lot of healthcare. Workers Ignore Federal Safety guidelines that's across the industry, often giving these medications for twisted ankles and lower back pain that could be treated with tylenol or an ice pack, but studies also show yes, that there are sort of opioid. With in health, care, surgeons for example are giving out. Millions of VEX has pills every year, a new study from the University of Pittsburgh found dentists have actually increased the number of powerful opioids. They give out what that means is a lot of these pills going out into communities that can be diverted and misused. Here's Keith Humphreys. He Studies opioid prescribing at Stanford University you have this incredible reservoir pills, but doesn't exist in other countries, so it's it's remarkable. This continues and that we put this much potentially deadly drug out on the street every year, but that's situation we're in, and that's obviously super dangerous for those communities.

NPR Dr Jonathan Chen Gary Guy CDC Keith Humphreys Brian Man Brian Good Family United States VEX Stanford University Noel University Of Pittsburgh California
Cory Schlesinger On Isometric Training

Just Fly Performance Podcast

05:30 min | 3 weeks ago

Cory Schlesinger On Isometric Training

"Welcome to another episode of the show. I know you've probably if you've been following this show, you've probably caught a couple of McEwen as that I've put on and decided, it's time to not just do them myself. Because I enjoy answering questions, but in addition to have to kind of check and make sure I'm not double or triple covering old question. I just thought it'd be more fun to get more minds involved in this segment of the show and I always enjoy whether it be an episode with three people or four, generally speaking the more the more people in the conversation. It's always a good thing and. And also I just love talking to Corey. So I wanted to get him involved on the the QNA. Here just a quick back onto for those you guys who aren't too familiar with corey his work. He is the head, strength and conditioning coach for the Phoenix Suns. He's spent the last or the previous three years as the head of basketball athletic performance for Stanford University. He was involved at a couple a D. One schools before that he's also trained pro athletes Olympians, and it's just overall as a coach in his overall a coach who? Is incredibly creative, but also is incredibly practical and athletes centered in the way that he views train. The training of the athlete core is a guy who not only has a great mind for the strength element things, but also played basketball in the college level and is continually. Looking at a wider more zoomed out view of what what training athletes means in context of becoming a better player. So for the show we took you guys as questions on social media, a lot of them were directed towards US specifically core issues on athlete autonomy in his training system, but also some great questions on isometrics foot training. Combining strength with sports, skill, training and more This was a really fun show and I will say definitely the questions are probably a little bit more geared towards cores neck of the woods, which is awesome. I mean honestly I I would just as well consider this a second interview with Corey just as much as a Q. A.. It's just fun to answer these questions alongside him so for episode to eleven. Let's get onto this QNA with myself and Corey slesinger. I. We got a special QNA today. I was sick of just doing myself and some super excited. Have Corey here so welcome to the Q. and Corey. Hey glad to be able. All right well, so let's get rolling. Thanks Irwin. Who who pop questions I? Think we just ask for my instagram this time instead some different mediums. Usually, that's where most of them come from anyway, so ause kick it off. Acceleration Randy Petersen thanks for the question he asked about the utility of ground-based strength, tumbling, crawling ruling, wrestling with pro athletes, and so maybe this could be framed to like a college versus pro, or as he worked through the levels What do you think about that one corey in in different populations. You know it's it's interesting because everyone, no matter what if you're professionalize your amateur? They all fit on a spectrum of their own developments, so like taking a. Broad like. Tumbling good for professional athletes, yes, if they're lacking certain things and the same of amateurs. Yes, if they're lacking certain things, but we gotta look at it more so in my opinion is you gotta? Just do it needs Alice. And where that athlete is currently, you know it's not this cutoff point where all of a sudden they're professionals. They don't need to do XYZ or there. Is there an amateur, so they have to do x Y and Z. You have beautifully gifted genetic athletes who don't eat a lot of art work to be hundred percent hottest, and so then you skip a lot of those steps, or you have more strategies in place to keep them. Them playing or keep them doing the things that make them awesome on the court or on the field, and then you have some that are like well. They're grinders are the ones that constantly need that training stimulus or that controlled stimulus to help them develop or stay more robust than those athletes in the woods yet? Maybe they do any more quote, unquote, ground-based work, or they need more skill acquisition, not from a skill perspective on the court, but just from a human perspective, and that's where for me. It's everybody across the board on your child won't do your DNS in stages, or you're an elite level athlete, who seven foot tall and do a backflip duck. All of them need some form or fashion of. Tools that will allow them to get in and out of scenarios via falling which everyone in some point we'll go through or you know being ground-based and being able to stay able is and being able to express that or not only express forces, but also be able to hush this to be able to sustain them to be able to of our accepts them into. Be Able to redirect them, and that's where I think there's a question that was presented earlier. The France Bosh you. How does this influence? I guess some of these things. Just self organizing and that's what I think. Tumbling willing comes into the equation as Yom. You're just giving them exposures them. How to self organize in areas that might not be. Normative values are a plane basketball on a hardwood surface which requires as a ton of stiffness. How about we actually teach them how to fall and get more compliance so they can keep receiving

Corey Slesinger Basketball QNA Mcewen Phoenix Suns Instagram Randy Petersen D. One Stanford University United States Irwin France Alice
Becoming a Coder

Command Line Heroes

04:30 min | Last month

Becoming a Coder

"Use spent the last few years fully immersed in the world of coders. You've interviewed over two hundred developers as admins, architects, engineers and programmers for your buck. Yeah I spoke to boy on awful lot of software developers all over the ecosystem. Great you the perfect co-pilot, so glad you could join me be here. Let's start with the most traditional path to becoming a coder going to college to get a computer science degree. I think for what I do as a product manager, it's important to have that technical foundation and glad I did it through a computer science program because I feel like I. Don't understand like. How do I program something to do this? But I also understand like what goes on under the hood. That was venom rot single. She graduated from Stanford University in two thousand sixteen with a computer science degree. She says her education set her up for product manager positions at facebook, Google and other companies. Clive. Voters out there, get CS degrees. If you look at the stack overflow survey, so that's the big gum coating site, and they do a fantastic survey of tens of thousands of their users every year. And their data suggests that about sixty percent of the coders that are on stack overflow that are professional. They have some sort of formal computer, training or something close to it like electrical engineering and and the numbers may be a little higher than that, but let's just say you know two-thirds, so it is still most common route far and away for becoming a coder. Is Go and get a computer, science, degree or something related to it. Is that because s degrees are lucrative. Yes, they are They are what an economist would call a costly signal right? You know they indicate that. Hey, I'm someone who's willing to spend a lot of time learning this stuff so you know I'd be a good person to hire. If you're developer, you're having to constantly learn all the time. New Frameworks new languages new environments. So, so some of the reasons employers would tell me that they like getting people from computer. Science degrees is because those people just spent four years doing nothing, but learning and they're going to need to keep on learning. When you get an undergraduate degree, you're learning, but you're also learning the theoretical math. You're also learning about algorithms, and you're learning about networking and computer systems, and I think all of those just give you very solid foundations so that if you were? Were like you know switch industries or not like? It would just be a lot easier for the Stanford degree helped with being taken seriously honest. You just confidence like that's a big part of it to dealing with imposter syndrome, and then also like People WanNa. Talk to you, even applying to jobs after like you just it's just a lot easier. Because of this big network you have do cs degrees make them better performers than those who come into the industry traditionally. That is a really a really great question. It's a hard one to answer. Because I got completely different answers from different employers I. had some people tell me that? Yeah CS people are just more confident and more self assured and can hit the ground running, then sell trained people bootcamp people, and then I heard exactly the opposite right like I heard you know for example, give it cult. He runs river, which is like a is becoming the dominant e commerce site for selling musical equipment, fantastically growing profitable firm and he's like. You know. I used to say I only wanted CS grads, but they just didn't have all the sort of life skills that you want to be a productive team member and more and more. He stood at hiring bootcamp. People self train, people people who. Are Musicians learned on the side. You also hear praise for the non computer. Science, people I think from a certain class of investor or even old school coder there in the fifties or sixties, and they taught themselves using like a like a commodore sixty four back in the eighties when they see someone who came along and said Yeah I. Just is in job in hospitality and I hate it. I learned. Learned a ton of stuff on Youtube and Code Academy. They're like yeah, I want that person. It is very by model. Shall we say there is a class player? Is? That is really rigorous about only during CS, and there's a whole of the class at actually sometimes regarded as a real mark of pride to be self taught or a scrappy person who change their career and went to a boot camp.

Stanford University Product Manager Developer Clive Youtube Facebook Google Code Academy
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

11:15 min | 8 months ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Are still really young. So you know you have choices in those moments and again I love having a good team around me you that will not be cowed that we always go back to our values. What are your values? What are the things? Is that you as a human being value for me. It's love it's grace. It's compassion its integrity and so when I focus on my values that always helps me know what to do next. And I I feel good about coming mean through those moments without hopefully parodying the vitriol and name colleen that this president does yes but to be very clear an unapologetic about the values that I hold and that I believe the vast majority of my residents hold.

colleen
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

13:23 min | 8 months ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Giving me the chance to myself. When is Michael Tubs The mayor of Stockton California much like Mayor Chef Stockton is who I am. A big part of Hoya royal was born and raised. Its home. I spent four years here and my master's and bachelor's and soon as I could while complete my senior year I went back on the Stockton Radford City Council for for four years I've been married for the last half. I think much like Oakland. The things that I love best about stock north things are how I live my life. So Stockton's doctors resilient city. It's a working class. City is a city on. That's used to people are expecting big things. From surprise people is to see that leads from the heart is it's a CSI afraid to fight to see that understands. That seems like ours are really kind of where the rubber meets the road row in terms of our values of social justice or inclusion and equity arm and then I think personally nothing much like the mayor of great appreciation for the work. You all do. Is that growing up. I was often the beneficiary services. Group like yours provide my among them as a teenager. My father incarcerates so when we have conversations about poverty or mass incarceration or gun violence. Those aren't things I've learned about that Stanford or say yes Stanford. Because of the things I lived I came to Stanford they learn about structures and policies the road that policy and programs can have and changing those. So that's what motivates my work. That's what makes me up every morning as mayor and more importantly I'm soon to be a father in six weeks and.

Mayor Chef Stockton Stockton Radford City Council Stanford Stockton California Hoya Michael Tubs Oakland
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

09:56 min | 1 year ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"You. I'm thinking of Sarah Corbett. Yeah. You explain it by the main, okay? So we're massive fans of woman named Sarah Corbett who is a craft avast. And which we for when we first heard about his where I work we were a bit skeptical, but she was working to she had been invited by an organization to try to change board's perspective on whether they should pay a living wage or not. And so in about this work. She said, of course, you know, what we wanted to do is make Rudolph and throw them at the invasive angry, but we quickly recognized that that wouldn't make a difference. So what they did. Instead. That they looked at each of the board members who they were hoping to get on board with this idea and became obsessive in learning everything they could about what they cared about. And then they went to the store the that the board was the advisory group for and they what handkerchiefs from that store to demonstrate that they were customers, and they created a custom embroidered handkerchief for each of these board members as and wrapped it beautifully as this beautiful gift. And they wrote a note with that said you have an incredible amount of power. You have an influential job and an important one. We are your customers, and we love your employees. And we want you to pay them a living wage, we ask this humbly as your customers who care about the people who work in your stores, and she did this was such love. Of all the board members continue to carry the hacker Chaves they met with them over a series of months and actually did agree to raise the minimum wage that they were paying their employees. And I think what is inspiring to me about that story is that she approached it with incredible love and humility and ask them to be a better version of themselves rather than calling them out for not being the best version of themselves. So I think anytime we're trying to get somebody to do something that they're not doing. We have to show them. How this is going to help them be the person that they hope to be. I told you she sells it way better than I do. Hi, I'm from Los Angeles. And we. Over the last couple of years have done a big public campaign around homelessness and really quick shout out. One of the things that was really has been helpful for us is that there is the storytelling sort of curriculum that folks who live in supportive housing Goto. And then they are there to talk to the board of supervisors or fill in the blank stakeholder. And it's been it's been good. We successfully put together this campaign to put together a quarter sales tax generates about three hundred thirty five million dollars a year as well. As a a sister piece of legislation at the city level to make a thousand new sport of housing units per year. So that was really great. But now we can't say any projects and one of the things that are researchers are telling us is that some of the messaging that we use to get legislation passed is like backfiring because have certain images in their mind. When these support of how? Housing sites are gonna come to their. Their neighborhoods. And so you you mentioned in your definition that it's like this word of transcendence. I love it. If you had any more like thoughts about how to like, we did focus we focus on like, we should not have folks. Leaping on our streets. And we got a short term win. That's really really important. But it feels like it's not getting us over the finish line. So do you have other questions that you should be asking? When you start to develop that strategy. I think the reason that we want your strategic communications plan to live on the back of an envelope. Is that you have to constantly right it, and so the communications plan that you had worked for the system in which we're working, which was policy changed. Now, you're working in a new system, which has culture change. And so you need to answer the questions differently. And so I think it's really important when you go through these questions that you've versed as answering question number one that you really think about which system we're working in who is influential or a decision maker within that system. And what are we going to do to get them on board? So I think that that communication strategy solve that challenge. Now, you need to go through the process again. Hi, my name is Diane I work with the youth ally into and. You might have just answered that question for me. But. We work with young people and. Working with specific issues that. Regarding public school safety community safety and one of the issues that has been coming up, especially I mean nationally as you mentioned with parkland is the issues of law enforcement on school campuses. And what that means to young person for being really truly safe and that interaction when we've had issues with law enforcement and the families have come come to us. We've spoken with young people and they've shared those stories. The immediate responses while that was in one particular instance, that's not how it happens all the time or we'll have administrators rushed to the defense of the law enforcement. We've had police chief say. Well, it's those kids it's those families. So every time we try to bring up a story. It seems to get shot down with rationalization or well, how presenting it well enough and one of the context contextual factors of our community. That is probably important is that we live in a suburban community rural suburban community that means low housing costs. And so we fifty percent of our population at any given time probably has. It has a lot of law enforcement that lives there retired law enforcement and law enforcement that lives there. So it's been a very difficult thing for us to figure out how to craft the narrative or the communication strategy that doesn't say what's those kids? It's not an issue all the time. And so that doesn't get shot down. So I just want to help think through that strategy of the culture shift or the communication strategy. What is it that we need to think about differently and have the young people share differently in order to get that across? Yeah. I would go back to the process and really figure out what it is. It's like you're not completely while you understand us. Use your clear that you we all want there to be zero shootings in school. And we never wanna lose another child. But I think in terms of answering the first question, you've got more work to do to think about what is the system that's in place that you're really trying to change. And what are some of the things that are going to make a difference there? So I would be trust the process there. But it's interesting to me because I'm hearing you describe the psychological phenomenon that we talked about which was when we see people who are not in the in group, we ascribe to them the most extreme perspective. So it seems like maybe some contact theory would be really helpful here as well and really getting people in the same room. Yeah. I also think that it would do us some service to take some time to study the worldviews identities values of your target community that you're trying to influence. We recently worked with organization and they're trying to persuade mothers in Appalachia to think differently about higher education for their daughters. And we used a lot of the academic research around worldview in values and identity to sort of evaluate where do they fall on that continuum? Do you have an individualistic worldview or an egalitarian world? Do what are the underlying values of those five that we mentioned, and we found that they have a mix of individualistic worldview, pull yourself up by your bootstrap, but very strong communal worldview, and they have a fear that if you say higher education that means my daughter's going to think she's better than the community, and she's not gonna come back, and they don't. I want them to leave the community because they have such strong ties. So now that they have that insight about what's happening on unconscious. The gut intuition that shaping their judgments they can think about stories they can tell that override those assumptions, but also resonate with them. So they're connected to how they see the world what they value, but they also assure them that those perceptions and perceptions of harm are unfounded. Thank you. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating social change. Please. Visit our website at dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Sarah Corbett Stanford University Rudolph Los Angeles Chaves Twitter Facebook Eric ni Diane I Appalachia three hundred thirty five mill fifty percent
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Situations. There's another question here. Hi. So there's so much to unpack from everything that you said and connecting to a lot of what we heard yesterday as well. First of all disabilities. You were spot on left completely invisible. A lot of the time yesterday. We heard some gentlemen, speak about funding for mental health another area that is almost completely invisible. And I do believe that it's because makes us nervous. It makes us uncomfortable. It talked a lot about that. In terms of the communication strategy yesterday. What kind of information were willing to receive in what turns us away? So I really appreciate that. And would love to know more about how to identify and and connect with disabled populations because in my community. I will tell you. They are invisible. I don't see disabled people on a regular basis in my world. But certainly they're they're twenty percent. I absolutely believe that that is true. And so I would like to know more about that. And then the other thing in terms of how we deal with intersection -ality the last keynote yesterday talked about the strategy of dividing and conquering, and I think sometimes we are almost enemies in that sense. It's our issue. That's most important. And so you talked about some efforts that you made to diversify the crowd, and you talked about board. It's so my question is I feel like one of the things that we all have to challenge. Ourselves to do is to make ourselves Volna Rable. So if you're invited to be on a board, if your first response is my just checking off a box. Well, maybe it's okay to check that box off because we need to be vulnerable. And so I wonder how you feel about that. Like if you were to take the risk if we were all to just take the risk to be vulnerable and try to educate and build release. Ships as we go does is it necessary for the relationship to be built first. Because then I feel like we're just continuing to be stuck where we are in. Now. It's really good. I just think that for for myself. There are some groups. That's like, yes, I would love to be on your board. I can. And I know what I want to add myself. But if I don't know that organization, I don't have a relationship if if someone asked me to be on a health service board, and I'm an arts person. I would have no clue why they would ask me. So yes, we do need to be vulnerable and say, yes, and I have done that where I felt if I didn't do it who else would. So I cannot complain when something happens and the oh look at them. They just did something that they should have known not to do. So I know that's my responsibility. Either one of you should of question for you. Well, that that is a really good question. Where are you located? Dayton, ohio. There are disabled people in Dayton. I probably have some Facebook prince. But I think starting with just Google, you know, we're so lucky that we have that resource because, you know, Google disability organisations, Dayton, Ohio and see what you can come up with. You know, I'm professionally interrupted able still even though I'm retired Judy and access stance dot org, and I'm also always really happy to try to connect people with resources or answer questions. But I think he'd just have to start with the research part. And I think ticking boxes is fine. But if you you know, you go and you find the disabled person to be on your board. But you're not doing anything that really engages them or their community or reflects them, then it's not going to be successful. And I think that's where we have to really take responsibility. You know as organizations to get. Training on race to get training on disability to you know, break down our own our own 'isms. You know? And and that's something that I wish I had done more of when I was at access, but I also understand that we're all like, you know, forty hour weeks or a joke. You know, let's just say sixty. So I know that we're all really overburdened. But you know, and that you know, you've got to be prepared to make the investment of time. And I want to thank all three of you for your incredible generosity and your experience and your your time here. Thank you for the full trajectory of your work. And for everything you've done to make our field, and our our lives actually, much more better by your efforts. So I appreciate you taking the time to talk with all of us, and thank you so much. Thank you everyone for being a. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating for social change. Please visit our website at SSI dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Volna Rable Dayton Facebook ohio Stanford University Google Twitter Eric ni Judy twenty percent forty hour
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric ni. Managing editor of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI are dot org. What practices made the arts more or less impulsive? At our two thousand eighteen nonprofit management is to conference leaders from the San Francisco Bay area art world discussed how they run their organizations and shape the performances to be more diverse and welcoming to all panelists Tim Seelig artistic director of the San Francisco game ends chorus says that's the next big shift. If we are to survive to go under the community knocked down those norms and be something that is accessible leak was joined by non Tara San manager of cultural strategies with race forward. Judith Smith, founder and director of access dance company and Sherry young executive director and founder of the African American Shakespeare Company. We're delighted to be here. And I'm certainly just thrilled to be joined by my illustrious co-panelists over here. I'm your moderator for the day. I'm going to take a just a quick second to introduce myself for more fully. And then we'll actually have everyone say a bit about their work. So you have a sense of who you are. And what we do and what we've done and also just a note that more full bios are are certainly near program, and you can take a look. So my name is Nancy says, and I'm the manager of cultural strategies at race forward the center for racial Justice innovation I'm recovering arts administrator and artists and a large portion of my work is running innovation labs for racial equity in the arts. I currently do. So in New York City where we have sixty different arts organizations of all types, everything for museums to theaters to small community based groups going through. Offensive racial equity boot counts, and my job also involves organizing in the arts and culture sector in the nonprofit arts and culture sector for increased racial equity and really delighted to be here to have a pretty expensive conversation about diversity inclusion and equity the arts, and I wondered actually Tim if you would introduce yourself, and then Sherry and Judith a little bit as well. Sure. The artistic director of the San Francisco gay men's chorus, and as a that, I am a cat herder of the gays and. So it's a challenge I actually have two hundred seventy five gays that get together every Monday night, and that is about a thousand opinions on any given topic. So I find myself as both conductor and coordinator, I've been the executive director and the chief operating officer. I've been conducting gay choirs for thirty one years, and it's been a joy, and and also rocky road in many ways. And I know you're excited to hear about the rocks. That's it. My name is Sherry young. I'm the founder and executive director of the African American Shakespeare Company, we were just voted the best life gator in San Francisco for two thousand eighteen thank you. I started the company when I was about five years old. So. We do Shakespeare in a different cultural vein that connects to a diverse community specifically, the African American community has always been my targeted goal, and we kind of branched out into doing American classics, which includes not only August Wilson and George wolf, but Tennessee Williams, and I don't know some others, but we do that. And we're now opening up for colored girls with into sake. Sean gay tomorrow night in San Francisco. So if you are in town, please drop by but we only have about thirty tickets left, literally. And we look forward to our twenty fifth anniversary coming up next season. Thank you. My name is Judah Smith, and I am the founder and director America. I'm also a recovering arts administrator. I just retired in February. I started the company when I was ten. Seriously. It was thirty one years ago. Access started. Listen group of us. They got together really with the idea of just saying what would happen when you brought people with and without disabilities together to explore movement. What we didn't realize that there was a whole really important, social and political implication that what we were doing right away access started alongside artistic program engagement work teaching because people would come say where do I go do this? And we had nowhere else to send them. We also realize that because it's virtually impossible then and still today for disabled dancers to get training that we were going to have to train dancers, and alongside that advocacy became a really important part. So access mission. As I exited was to change the face of dance and disability through artistry, engagement, and advocacy. And I'm thrilled to say that the company is continuing they replaced me with two people an executive director and artistic director, and you can find out more about access on the website, a D A N C E dot org.

San Francisco African American Shakespeare C executive director director founder and director founder and executive director Sherry young San Francisco Bay Tim Seelig Judith Smith administrator Tara San Eric ni Stanford Managing editor African American community New York City director America Judah Smith Nancy
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

06:49 min | 1 year ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Most people go to work for a foundation as as as PM mentioned, you know, people kind of like us who came from the outside born with the name gates or buffet, right? And they go there to try and do good and do. Well, the argument about how bad things are from my community. Is not as powerful as this is the vision we have for serving our power. This is what we want to see. I mean, especially since you election of November twenty sixteen. We're really knowledgeable. What would we don't like? But what what's what's the shared vision of narrative for promoting forward? I mean, if you know, Cheryl, I wonder probably a conversation or bottle of wine, but if how many fellows, you support now, we've got a global community of over eight hundred and so if you went to if you went to ten thousand what would be different. To what research the foundation research the program officer, you're engaging. Those are real live. Human beings are not green green. Shape accounts. Find out what that foundation is looking for in terms of defining success kind of build a relationship from that. And then you can teach him something to where you're in there. So I just I just I just want to. You know, maybe again, maybe I've been in for three too long. Maybe what I'm saying. Now tells me it's time for me to go. But most Sunday Sion's wanna do well and want to do the right thing. Well, and to sort of want to be accountable for it. And so you just have to sort of show up like that. And I can't I can't walk into a boardroom status that you said, and that turns into a grand strategy or grant program got to be sort of a positive vision or outcome of something that we can assert and just wanna 'cause we hear a lot of that you should fund our community because we're only getting point zero one five percent of all foundation of lengthy funny. Well agree with that. And yeah that sucks, but I'm not giving you a grant. Because you told me that I'm just want to be honest and candid about that. And that I think we need to assert the positive shared vision of missing Linda this. This is why I love the young people. They're much more naturally sort of intersectional and bridge builders, then then certainly my generation, right? They'll go to a black lives matter of into on Saturday and LGBT event on Monday and metoo event on Thursday, and they're down with all of right? And we saw it after the shooting and parkland right member before minute, it was just a bunch of white kids talking about it and young people, wait a minute. What about us and by the time to March on Washington showed up do- young people of color at the podium. I don't know how that happened. But it wasn't because we gave them a grant. There's something I want to interrogate in their doctor Ross grow, and then we have to because. Got to get in a fight with a pregnant woman. We strong. I'd agree with you. No. I mean, just like in because in the spirit of listening as someone who also was on the non-profit side for a long time. This idea that we're supposed to research every opportunity and then research like the personality. Oh, she's Philipino. She's pregnant maybe I'll bring up that. I have kids that kind of stuff. It sounds again like the onus is on the applicant who has less time in his looking for money. So I want to say, yes. And like I do believe that a positive vision for what we wanted to chief. That's not just resistance is really powerful. And I also want to say what is the accountability? And responsibility of our of our sector to both stop operating in a silo way ourselves. So we have no idea like what other people fund or why right? We don't fund collaboratively most of the time we have all these super individualistic processes. So I think both of the vision you just put forth, I think that that vision that demand or that request can be made of Flint as well. Like, I think we can operate more as a collaborative ecosystem and less like how many foundations exist? Now. It's way more than two thousand hours and Plum, k sixty thousand individual mountains castles on top that people have to figure out how to get to the top of. And then ask their, you know, ask their ask. I think that there's a different a different constellation with which if we operated collaboratively in differently, and I just wanna say one hopeful thing because I I've level some critique of my sector, which is. I started this job for years ago with the mandate from our great partners to get other funders to behave better. Right. Act right medicine or something. I was I was pretty skeptical, but you know, over time, and because actually the Trump election has lit a fire under the feet of many of our friends who maybe didn't feel like they had to do anything differently. I think there's been like a migration towards asking about what edible practice looks like in real in real life like embodied, practices and approaches, and we went from like, a, you know, this tiny little you've never heard of us the Whitman institute. Now, you know, this tiny little foundation the bay area to there's eight or nine foundations that of all different scales and sizes that have signed up to not just model these practices, but advocate for them, widely invasive FRA sleep our sector, so that's just one of the many initiatives influence that actually does exist. That is pretty parallel values aligned with the conversation. We've been having this remote. So while we can be very critical of both the nonprofit sector and the philanthropic sector. I really wanna. To say that I feel more hopeful than I thought I would feel for years into this job of like try to change Flannery. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating social change. Please. Visit our website at dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Stanford University program officer Washington Twitter Cheryl Sion Facebook Eric ni Flannery Linda Ross Flint Plum Whitman institute zero one five percent two thousand hours
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric ni editor and chief of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI dot org. Research shows that wind talented social innovators lack invisible capital the so-called, right pedigree, right passport, right skin, color, right gender. They may fail to get the attention and vestment they need to succeed. How can leaders in philanthropy improve access to capital? What tools can help nonprofit leaders overcome these barriers and get the support they need at her two thousand eighteen nonprofit management institute conference social entrepreneur author and Stanford University lecturer Kathleen Kelly, Janice lead, a panel discussion with echoing green president Cheryl Dorsey Whitman institute, co executive director Pia in Fonte and Californian dominancy EEO Robert Ross as we heard from a lot of the questions throughout the day. It's impossible to have a conversation about diversity equity and inclusion without interrogating. Some of the invisible barriers that prevent capital from getting into the hands of so many people who are fighting on social Justice issues on the frontlines. I I became really passionate about this issue myself as doing research where my book social startup success of elible on Amazon. And so for the book, I went out and interviewed hundreds of organizations. They're leaders are staff their boards to try and understand how organizations scale, and as I was writing at my interviews and writing them for the book, I realized that so many of these stories sounded very similar that someone would graduate from and Ivy league university they would get capital from someone who took a chance on them. They looked a certain way talk to certain language had a certain pitch deck. And it occurred to me that although talent and good ideas can come from anywhere that we have a funding system that preferences, things like social innovation and certain degrees often at the expense of so many community based leaders or people with lived experience or people who are connected to the communities that they are serving and arguably a much better position to solve so many of the issues that we care about. So I became really curious well who got left off of the pages of social startup success. What are we leaving on the table because they never get funded, and I started to research this question of invisible barriers to capital and learned that divers leaders are significantly underrepresented in the social sector today. Well, thirty percent. Of the population is black or Latin necks only ten percent of organizations are led by black black and Latin x individuals. We also know that diverse leaders are under invested and the social sector today. Just four percent of grants and contributions, go to diverse led organizations and forty one percent of leaders of color struggled to find access to funding. Sources I think that that number is probably very low. There's also new research from digital undivided that talks about the challenges of being a black female leader lack women led organizations and companies raised just thirty six thousand dollars angel funding versus a three million dollar national average. They have statistically received only zero point zero zero six percent of venture funding, which I think we can only infer that similar disparities exist, and the nonprofit sector if you look at who is distributing the capital the picture becomes very clear. Eighty five percent of foundation. Trustees are white ninety four percent of foundation presidents or weight and seventy six percent of foundation stuff are wait. And then we also we think about despair this invisible barriers. To capitol have to talk about the wealth gap and this country to set an important barrier for represented leaders. The average white household has a total worth one hundred sixteen thousand dollars. While the Jeff can American household is just eleven thousand and this is problematic. When organizations are so often relying on friends and family for Sabe capital. I learned yesterday that the seed capital is sixty billion dollars annually in this country. And if you want to access that capital, you have to have family and friends who have money to get. Divers meters were to be capitalized at levels commensurate with their presentation the sector, we would need twenty two billion dollars in additional grant funding. So that's where we are. Flan therapy is reinforcing many of the very forms of inequality that we are all working so hard to solve. I'm really excited to talk about new approaches today with our incredible panelists who are addressing these and many issues in their work as funders, and I wanna start by giving them an opportunity to introduce themselves. And then we'll dive a little bit more into teasing out some of these challenges and barriers that exist, and then we'll talk a little bit more on a positive note as well. Cheryl, even a certain sure, thanks Kathleen. Hi, everybody. My name is Cheryl Dorsey. I'm president of echoing green echoing green is a leading angel investor. In emerging social entrepreneurs we provide a startup capital and wraparound support to amazing social entrepreneurs

Cheryl Dorsey Kathleen Kelly president Stanford Eric ni Amazon Stanford University Fonte editor Ivy league university Whitman institute Sabe Pia Robert Ross executive director lecturer Jeff Janice lead one hundred sixteen thousand d
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

09:52 min | 1 year ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Where culture plays out a little differently. So whole truly because I work with means stream organizations chamber of commerce community foundations the powerbrokers community that culturally I have to look a certain way in dress a certain way in order to be heard in that room at the same time. I'm being brought in because there is a disconnect between their work and what they're trying to achieve in their greater region. And so it's an interesting kind of dynamic to have to show up as one of my friends would say suited in booted. So that you can hear the words that I'm saying at the same time the words that I'm saying are going to make you uncomfortable because it requires to do work that you're not. Already doing or else? You would not bring me in the room. And so the cultural thing is like way bigger than like, you said just a simple, pedigree or school or things like that. But it is are you creating an environment that allows people to have those type of conversations that get you to better place at the same time being aware of the cultural identifiers that you're putting out there that folks like me have to recognize in order to be able to have. My message heard something that's a good point that culture is more broad than to say like organizational, and when you're working in communities having lived in New Orleans for a number of years, which was a big adjustment from Chicago. It's like community takes on different manifestations in means different things from ward to ward neighborhood to neighborhood. I guess my final question is. I recently read broadened the Angelo's book white for Jilin. Why why people have a hard time talking about racism and having grown up in New Hampshire? Like, I'm I'm surrounded by whiteness. I'm you know, I was like one of two kids and elements school it was black. So that being said the way that she lays out the book, she talks about how we have this false idea about like racism and racist just being like, independent individual actors like bad people, but not thinking about the overall structure, and like the history of our country founded on white supremacy, etc. Etc. That really is like in the air, we breathe. And so I'm wondering given that there is the like the personal work like adding onto your point like the individuals that you're going to have those conversations with need to do some soul-searching and really like interrogate their assumptions their ideas their values etcetera before they can necessarily maybe engaged with what you're recommending as far as them changing. So there's like this personal level of change that needs to have. Open. And then there's an interpersonal dynamic because you know, we're in community with people, but then institutionally and organisationally there's another structure, and then there's like the the medicine doctors. And so recognizing the complexity I guess of like how to affect change and really make D I not just like a bumper sticker, which I feel like it has become in the last five years like everyone's talking about yet. There's a whole lot of sizzle. But not a lot of state with the concept. And so my question for you is what like across those four areas whether personal or interpersonal structural institutional like where do you think the first domino? Is that people could like consider if they want to start making more actionable in real? That was loaded. It was very loaded like big old baked potato with sour. He's all on there. I don't know. There is a one domino. So I don't expect when I enter into community to do the work that I do for people to have done the interpersonal work or the inner work. It's great when I start using talking about systemic racism and policies like redlining and the GI Bill and all of that where there's a foundational understanding. That's great. But that's not my expectation. I brought into communities because they do not wanna Ferguson. That's why broaden I'm not brought in because there's been a mass of Piff une- by the powerbrokers that this is a necessary transformative moment in order for their city to have resiliency. Those are really cute words. But the reality is no one wants to be a ticker. Tape on CNN saying their streets are on fire because another black man has been shot. And so for me, I want all of those dominoes to fall. But I don't know if we're going to get there. And so my work is to hit it wherever I can and hope that there's so much somebody else on this day j- or who who's been on this day or in this room, that's working on the other Domino's at the same time because all are needed. But I think it's a it's a little I don't know. I'm just not that idealistic to believe that all of those Domino's can happen at the same time. My initial thought to your question Mckee was leadership. Like, I wholeheartedly believe. And if you want to see change, it has to start with the leader pick, your nexus of what that is is is that the organization is at the person is a department is a something bigger than that. But it has to start with the leadership and the leadership has to decide what's important to him or her and authentically in the in the context of d I really what's important. Like, do you believe diversity is important because at least a better outcomes? Okay start there. Right. That's a value. If you don't believe what you are spouses it will come through. It will fall short it. Oh, hit a wall. Pick your pick your metaphor. Right. It won't go far. But it starts with the leadership's asking a team the individual what's important to me with important to us. And how are we going to? Carry that out that I think is the first step in the start of that. And then similar to crystals point it is really about deciding where you want to star and thinking about the organization's assessment or again, whatever that unit is like what can I what can I take on? What are we willing to take on? Where do I think the organization is? So do you want to tackle representation? Okay. Go for it. Maybe you don't wanna start with representation because you want to start with the culture of equity and inclusiveness. Like, let's not bring more folks into our stuff. Right because she'll just send them right out the door. It'll be a revolving door maybe work on both of those because you have capacity as an organization to change the same thing at the individual level. Do you have relationships with people that you're willing to go deeper and take risk and go farther? Once you get to that. What do I value is this really important to me? And where do I want to start? I used to teach training program called personally fishing at Kraft Foods, and what always say when you have this really big task. They set us the salami approach. Right. You never eat the whole salami at one time you actually slice off pieces of it. So when I think about this domino. It really is thinking about where you it's a whole lot of work that we have to do that we are trying to achieve socially if you think about where those couple of things I want to slice off. And then eventually will be ready to go back and. Slice additional pieces. I just wanna just second everything that you will said. And I the one thing I'll say is that she crystals point I watching to Dr king as a quote or how to quote, it's since been like, I don't need a man to love me. I just need him not to Lynch me. And so I kind of take philosophy which I'm not as interested in sort of getting into whether you believe in you don't believe, and I do think that behavior comes first then belief this idea of like, I need you to really believe in. It's like some of the organizations with the longest versity statements and inclusion statements and this and that and the beautiful color Benneton ads on their big like they're actually engaged in some of the most Rick systemic practices along so many different dimensions. Like, that's actually where your commitment shows up in terms of actual systems so much more interested into your point just taking one system at a time and saying, okay, what are the str? Pictures we can put in place here that will allow us to achieve a different result as opposed to focusing on the inter- the personal belief systems. I I think that actually comes after people have certain seats have seen certain results. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social nation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating for social change. Please visit our website at dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Domino New Hampshire Angelo New Orleans Stanford University CNN Stanford social nation review Twitter Chicago Kraft Foods Facebook Eric ni Jilin Lynch Dr king Ferguson Mckee five years
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

09:48 min | 1 year ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric. Knee managing editor of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI dot org. And I'm Mike publisher of Stanford social innovation review. This podcast is part of our power of feedback series produced for SSI are with the support of the William and flora Hewlett foundation. It might be an exaggeration to say that Paul John is a citizen of the world. I often and different parts little bit them fiddle Teela, but a seal Columbia Ecuador, my father used to travel very much. Okay. Maybe Paul is just a citizen of the part of the world between Guatemala and tear. Del Fuego except that are traveling father. Who was an engineer was born in Mexico and Paula currently lives in Texas. She enjoyed the travelling as a child she learned Spanish as well as Portuguese than English. But at twenty two during a visit to family friends in Houston polo began to think that the only way to achieve independence from her father was to get married, and I said to him the first person who pass I wanna marry. I mean, that's what I say. And they he say you will. Not do that. And I say, yes, I will. And I did it. I I should it did the marriage lasted twenty five years and in the fullness of time Paula had a son and a daughter. She took advantage of the opportunity to become a different sort of parent from the ones she'd known high believe, I'm more flexible. I listen to my kids I like to laugh with them because my father, he really it was not a talk in. He was just a person who say do these do these these. Because Paul and not only laughed with her children. But listen to them and paid attention to how they were responding to her. She could use their feedback to inform her parody unhappily in the fullness of time Paulo began having some physical problems, including arthritis serious enough to keep her off her feet. She learned that she could get some assistance with their medical expenses in Harris County, Texas where she was living. If she applied for a card, which gave her access to the healthcare system. It was called a gold card. Eventually Paula her that she could get help with the form she needed to fill out at a piffling community health outreach services echoes for short Paul is first visit to echoes was about as frustrating as it could have been the FBI wait the full Bod while about four hours, maybe more when they're closed they find I find out that I cannot do not thin. I don't get the paperwork. I don't got nothing. Right. So I. Got frustrated I wing home died to cry so much because I was in pain, and I didn't know what to do more visits resulted in more frustration the staff at echoes was perhaps almost as frustrated as the clients were. Fortunately, they decided to ask people like Paula, John how they could better serve their needs. Like it. When you come to give you paper, and that paper, they ask you how we can do better what we do wrong. And you know, they don't ask for you to put your name scientists like that. So you feel free to say, well, what you feel you know, fuller wrote that she felt members of the echoes staff should be more friendly. First of all, I believe, you know, he's the more important things is going to say Hello that's very important because when you come to a place the matter what place it is. Anyone? You are welcome. I believed you know, that open door polo also wondered if the process of applying for health care could be streamlined and made more consistent. So that clients weren't constantly getting different advice from different people. She wrote that the office felt cramped could they arrange it. So that people had more space than perhaps more privacy. Cathy, more the executive director at echoes was listening, and she and her colleagues began responding to the suggestions of people like Bala, some of the things she actually said to you were some of the things we focused on the most one of them was creating order here is how she put it. But the truth is we became more organized in our morning routine, which then trickled down to the clients every morning, we do what we call the morning meeting with clients and that morning, meaning informs clients as to what they can expect that day. It's also a welcoming meeting is you'll remember pallet talked about putting a smile on our faces and being more, frankly, more customer service oriented, and that's part of that morning meeting of the welcoming of of everyone thanking them for their patients telling them where they can go for questions, and and directing them to who they to me, frankly in case they have complaints. These were all keys of what Palo shared with us customer service. More order and not making people wait as long within the limitations of the space available Kathy more enter colleagues who are known as navigators have tried to address conditions that might have seemed impossible to improve. When Paula enter fellow clients mentioned the well first of all the privacy part. She's right on target. It about. And so we've tried to make some privacy by putting up those dividers in the waiting area. So the navigators have a private place, but the navigators are still next to another navigator so Powis, right? We need more space. So that we can space people out or get people offices. But we don't were not able to do that yet. It's hard dream. Okay. Echoes is not exactly a dream. Come true. But the organization has seen an helped nearly three times as many people this year as it saw in twenty seventeen and Kathy more feels that responding to the suggestions of clients. Like, Paula, John is at least partly responsible for that Paula. Thanks kathy's. Right. Because every time I come here. This my say Hello. You know, like, I'm part of the family. You know, when you come to edges, you know, United's change it when you come United strange that treats you like family, you become family when you come over and over you become a family. So yes, I believe so the mission of a Pitney community health outreach services is to help people access health, educational and social services bureaucracy language issues the difficulty many of the clients face in just getting to the office all these challenges can be frustrating. But by asking their clients how they can improve delivery of their services and by listening to their responses echoes has built a better system. The proof is in the way, those served have told their friends and neighbors about how well it is gone echoes. And that the people there will listen to suggestions. And sometimes those suggestions have come in for. Normally as complaints, Kathy. More recalls have clients used to all get the same bag of groceries. It included five cans of salmon or five cans of tuna or five cans of chicken. I remember one day someone came and said, I don't like chicken. I really like salmon can't I have salmon. So it was feedback. But it wasn't necessarily on this survey. Okay. But it was clear feedback clear enough. So that the folks packing, the groceries got clued into the fact that they were dealing with individuals with food preferences and the preferences of some of those individuals led to an expansion of the pantry there was feedback from our clients and volunteers to by the way who wanted to have a food fair here at echoes where we could provide fresh fruit. So on the first Saturday of the month. We have this mood fair. The food truck comes we have things like corn dairy. We've had meat. All sorts of fruits and vegetables, and we hand out almost fifty to sixty pounds of two two hundred families on a Saturday morning all because somebody or perhaps several somebody's wondered if all that good stuff might be added to the menu more evidence that if you're in the business of trying to help people it's a good idea to ask those people what they need. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for podcasts articles and other content about innovating for social change. Please visit our website at 'Society dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Paula Paul John Kathy William and flora Hewlett foun Eric ni Stanford Texas Stanford University Del Fuego Columbia Ecuador managing editor publisher Guatemala Twitter Harris County Houston Paulo Pitney Facebook
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric ni. Managing editor of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI dot org. And I'm might Voss publisher of Stanford social innovation review. This podcast is part of our power of feedback series produced for SSI are with the support of the William and flora Hewlett foundation. Levels essay and Oland Artie visa victory. LS? revels thirty eight from Oakland, California. He's been out of prison since may twenty seventeen he spent almost all of the previous fifteen years, incarcerated and California. Arizona and Mississippi he did not commit crimes in all three states. Never know what the administration's thinking at the time, but I will say they don't want you to become too comfortable in one spot. And so a gospel twenty years at one prison, we're going to allow you to speak five six years here. Time to move on Shannon, characterizes his younger self as an angry man, some of the anger perhaps resulted from his apprehension and conviction. The first time for causing quote, great bodily injury the second for second degree robbery though. He was moved from prison to prison state to state, Shannon, manage to remake himself he earned three assoc-. Hits degrees and learned enough about computers to graduate from student status and become a teaching assistant while still incarcerated in that role. He began learning about how important it was for a teacher to consult with his or her students regarding the best ways to learn. My teacher always always asked us for what we could do to make this program better took suggestions. And we'll make a whole new program in a prison that might sound like a subversive idea ask the inmates. You're trying to help for suggestions about how to help them more effectively. Shannon was fortunate to have an instructor who saw the benefits of including his students in the process of designing and reforming the curriculum. Shannon himself was encouraged to identify the most challenging parts of the computer courses and design ways to help the inmates less students having trouble a lot of other mates that I was dealing with wherever senior population. And so they kind of didn't really know. Stable was going on. And so I was able to say, hey, let's break it down into much simpler time, and so they were really appreciate that Shannon, became increasingly convinced that feedback from the folks he was helping had multiple benefits and having learned how well cooperative partnership can work in. The course he was helping to teach while he was incarcerated Shannon brought that approach home. I was released made two thousand seventeen where their particular obstacles that you faced when you return to Oakland. I started doing my job research. I started doing all myself. I had a couple of us. But every time I got into an interview we got to a certain question, and there was always a temperature trying and I assume that question is to you have a criminal record. Correct. Shannon sought help at the center for employment opportunity. He told the counselors there. He'd take anything they had he just wanted to be able to support himself and as he put it. Not be a hindrance on others. So the CEO the center for point opportunities found me a job in San Francisco. I community housing partnership, which is a nonprofit organization in which I still work to this day. So I started off as genuine too much to the job. I received a text from CEO, and they asked me a couple of general questions Channa knew from experience that inmates often came out of prison with expired driver's licenses. You wanna help them he thought show them how to get a new license? So they can drive to the job. You're going to help them find at the time. Shannon. Didn't immediately realize how powerful that particular bit of feedback would be I didn't know that. It was a big deal there. I did find that out to one of the workers by the name of Nate called me one day and wanted to speak with regards to the feedback. He explained to me how quick six words turn into this big thing he said that he couldn't keep them on the shelf. It was like every time a new class came in all the handbooks and practice tests relieving, maybe somebody at the center should have thought of providing help to clients who'd require a licensed. But the fact that the suggestion came from somebody who knew firsthand what the centers clients needed emphasizes that power of feedback. The lesson wasn't lost on Shannon rebels. It allowed me to be I witness at the actual power of it for my little suggested to where it's at now. Shannon has advanced from janitor resident service counselor for community housing partnership building and San Francisco with fifty residents who are transitioning from homelessness to independence. He says he's leveled up and he carries with him the lessons about feedback that he began learning as a teachers assistant when he was still incarcerated and so often quoted reading listening and ex my residents that I worked for to provide me feed that what do you guys like to do or what can I do improve the program for you? And I came up with the flyer that I gave. And just told them. Hey, take two to three minutes. Jot down a few suggestions, and I'm going to incorporate your suggestions to better overall program for you guys one of the benefits of that process was ice cream Sundays on Sundays. Another one was better grooming at the suggestion of one of the residents, Shannon found barber who'd come by their place set a generator and provide outdoor haircuts. I was staying for the fact that they finally had someone listening to their ideas and equipment money what they want Shannon has built the process of seeking feedback and implementing the resident suggestions into the routine of his job, he hosts regular meetings dedicated to collecting those suggestions, and then he brings them up stairs. And I'm able to open up with my supervisor and manager. Like, hey, this is what I did. This is what my residents are asking for this is what I can do right now according to policies, but I would like to be able to do more. So kind of wakes up to upper management. It's a good thing. That's happening to my position. It's a good thing. That's happening to the positions of everybody involved and part of the explanation for this. Good thing is that Shannon RAV for victory. E LS has continued to seek feedback from the people he's helping and to provide it to the people supervising him. The theory is simple. Don't assume, you know, what's best for people. Even if you've been in the position, they're in give them the opportunity to let you know how to help them and trust their suggestions. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating for social change. Please visit our website at SSI dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Shannon RAV William and flora Hewlett foun Eric ni Oakland California Stanford San Francisco Oland Artie Stanford University Managing editor publisher robbery teaching assistant Arizona CEO E LS Twitter Stable Mississippi Nate
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

13:05 min | 1 year ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric ni. Managing editor of Stanford. Social innovation view which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI are dot org. The non-profit color change was formed after Hurricane Katrina use online resources in the fight for the rights of black communities in America since then color of change has grown into the nation's largest online, racial Justice organization with more than one point four million. Members were shod Robinson, president of color of change spoke at our two thousand eighteen nonprofit management institute conference about the nature of political and cultural power and the importance of continually assessing the nonprofit sector's efforts to bring about change Robinson says we have to continue to challenge and ask ourselves. What are we winning? How are we doing? It is fantastic to be with you are I want to start off with a story about social movements. It was two thousand and ten and I was the senior director of programs and advocacy at glad the game lesbian alliance. You can Steph ommission as they were known at the time and glad I oversaw all of the organizations programmatic work from the work in Hollywood to shift perceptions about LGBT people to the work in the news industry to challenging what types of words and terminology the AP style guide would allow so much of that work so much of that work around advancing LGBT equality, particularly the culture change were is oftentimes talked about as a model, and we oftentimes hear these conversations and the nonprofit space about models. Something was disrupted for me back in two thousand and ten when I was asked by the State Department to take on a contract and go to Serbia and to work with LGBT activists who were at the time trying to. Have a pride celebration. There was a whole lot of political context behind the scenes around the e EU in the United States wanting Serbia to be part of the EU, and that they needed to prove that folks could have freedom of assembly, whether they be ethnic minorities women LGBT folks in part of this pride celebration was proving that that folks could sort of gather and celebrate in the face of attacks and violence, and that the government would protect in allow for freedom of assembly, and I decided I'd never been to Serbia, and my mom was like why are you going to Serbia? This doesn't make any sense. Like just because someone asked you to go someplace. But you know, it was like a trip, and so I went and I packed up. And did as much studying as I could about Serbia. I was not an expert, but I wasn't expert on the context of LGBT advocacy changed. So I packed all the information about how we were engaging in the media how we were training spokespeople. How we were dealing with issues of religious acidy, and culture, and and and went off to Serbia and that night after got there and took a nap and went and met with some a set of activists, and I sat down, and I could see that they were instantly disappointed when I walked in the door. And I wasn't sure why they were disappointed at first. I wasn't like I was like is it because I'm black is it because I'm laid if I missed some sort of like interaction and they were disappointed by my age. But I I started talking about the work that we were doing at glad and I also. Talked about some of the work that our colleague organizations were doing at the time in LGBT movement in about ten fifteen minutes in after they lab me to politely, so talk, they stopped me. And they said this is all interesting, but we weren't really interested in stories of the LGBT movement. We've been reading stories about Ella Baker and buyer rust in and we're actually very interested in the black civil rights movement as a model for how we do our work. We're interested in whether or not we have enough buses or enough bathrooms. We're interested if we have the right sort of political and cultural ask that's what we've been studying and that is. What we would like to know more about. My understanding of that is academic. It is based off of stories and lots of conversation with people I've gotten to know through my work. But it was certainly not a personal journey is someone that was born in the late seventies. I say all that to say that how we model what we think about models. What we think about advocacy, not just here in the United States. But around the world is incredibly complicated. But as we've grown, this nonprofit infrastructure in our country as we've grown philanthropic, infrastructure and our country. I think we have to continue to challenge ask ourselves about. What are we winning? What are we advancing are the structures that we've set up truly allowing us to translate the hopes aspirations and dreams of the people that we serve into the real world change that they actually deserve. Or are we setting? Institutions for perpetuity. Are we setting up institutions because we don't believe we can win. Are we setting up structures in needs that rely on themselves over and over again metrics over and over again, hiring new staff over and over again, growing our institutions for the sake of growing over and over again, these are complicated questions, and I'm not here to answer them for you. I just believe that these are the questions we have to be asking ourselves when the folks were marching and Selma. When the folks were sitting in at lunch counters, they weren't thinking about the ten year strategic plan of their organizations, and whether or not they're going to have funding for the next capital campaign. They were thinking about how do we make Justice real for the people that are that we actually serve the how do we in a very concrete way advance the idea that democracy should work for all of us. And so I wanted to start off with that story because as I go through and talk about some of the work. We're doing at color of change. What does it mean to grow a twenty first century civil rights organization rooted in not trying to be a model based off of something else? But thinking about innovation very, clearly I love palm trees, and if you can kind of tell from my accent. I I'm a New Yorker, and I love central park and just because I love palm trees, and there's a lot of trees in central park. Does not mean that a palm tree will grow and central park. And so even as I talk about some of our work. I am not trying to say that it is a direct model that you can overlay on every other problem or every other community with all of these problems in all these challenges. We have to be thinking about both technical and adaptive measures to be able to innovate and move our agenda. About thirteen years ago right around this time in the aftermath of flood Hurricane Katrina. That was caused by bad decision makers that turned into a life altering disaster. By those same bad decision makers color of change with founded how many people remember those images of black people on their roofs begging for the government to do something and literally left to die. For so many of us Katrina illustrated things that we already knew about geographic segregation generational poverty. The impacts of so many ways that we've underinvested in education and systems like Justice and quality. But at the heart of Katrina. No one was nervous about disappointing. Black people government corporations media were not nervous government was attacking maligning and in criminalising, those who are most vulnerable corporations where fleecing and figuring out how they could carve up the Gulf Gulf Coast and media was telling a story that literally talked about people who had built the city of New Orleans as descendants of slaves as refugees because no one was nervous. And in those moments while I fundamentally love research, and we do research color of change a research report that illustrates all the facts in the figures alone that has all the data points that we had to the people is not going to solve a problem. Like that often times what we do in the courtrooms. Won't solve that problem. If we have an issue of power because we don't have what it takes to actually implement even if we win. Our friends out here in the valley might be able to create incredible technology that in those moments do not actually change the fact that folks are not nervous research in law and technology are all important, and I'm not undermining that, but we can't research our way or legal our way or or code our way or even nonprofit executive direct our way out of problems like that. And so a color of change we have built that infrastructure in the beginning of our time it color of change. We were really just a response vehicle through online technology and really taking a lot of cues from organizations that were using emails and using petitions, and in that moment, we were giving people the ability to make a collective voice together. Every single day were hit with all sorts of information from the radio to the television to the newspaper. And the internet and that information can inspire activate make us annoyed upset, but if we don't do something in that moment, we oftentimes go back to doing what we were doing before. And so it color of change in these early days, we were responsible fighting for voting rights for Katrina survivors, who have been displaced making sure they could vote channeling energy and frustrations of everyday people whether they were in Seattle or Kalamazoo or Austin or Miami and giving people a collective way to engage. So that while people were watching what was happening or watching challenging situations. They weren't just giving to the Red Cross, but they were also working for systemic change as well. And while we were doing that we recognize that we had to do more. And so we started to build what we thought about was countable accountability vehicle not just sort of building the energy over that time to channel those voices. But starting to think more strategically about who are targets recognizing that some of the stuff that we were dealing with with part of the larger culture, and if we were going to challenge, folks like Glenn Beck, and Lou Dobbs and an advocate and push against what they were doing on the air. Air. Maybe direct target was in a media company that could care less about black, folks. But maybe it was the corporations that were sponsoring those shows, and maybe we could develop a strategy by using the internet, recognizing the models that came before us around holding institutions accountable in leveraging buying power, but leveraging the new technology and the new tools to think differently about how we could supercharge that. So we had a strategy of respond and then building that energy. And then over time we started to think very clearly about what does it mean to actually move that energy to systemic change? So that we're not just in response mode or build mode, but we're finding those systemic pivots along the way. So we're responding to moments and we're building energy. And then we're finding those pivots where we can translate that energy translate that power to actually start shifting laws or longer term practices. Maybe not just getting someone fired but changing. Standards and practices. Maybe not getting someone to apologize but changing systems of how how things work inside of places of power. And that was really part of how we start to think about developing a twenty first century model that could be leveraged to create real change that could be leveraged to create Justice right now color of change is a movement of one point four million black

Serbia Hurricane Katrina Katrina United States Robinson EU Stanford Eric ni Managing editor America Ella Baker State Department Steph ommission president senior director Red Cross Selma Hollywood
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

05:27 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Now too. Risha? So she can talk about color of change. And when we were coordinating about our conversation here on stage. The idea was to try now to look at a less. Dark conversation because some of the work that she has championed at color of change had enormous success. And what I hope you'll be able to tell us how you've deployed some of these digital tools and opportunities in a way that's contributed to the success. You've had so that we can have a conversation about the upside. And not just the downside. Absolutely. Thank you so much. It's always wonderful to be back at Stanford. How many folks have heard of color of change? Oh my God. Okay. I'm always shocked a little bit so color change was founded about thirteen years ago. And the aftermath of her Hurricane Katrina. We're now the largest online racial Justice organization in the country. With close to one point five million members nationwide. These are folks that take online action mostly sometimes off-line action to achieve real world change for black people. And we measure ourselves by meaningful real world change tangible. We're world change for black people. But back in two thousand five our founders van Jones who's on CNN, occasionally and James Rucker. Who's a Stanford alum were like many people in the country. Watching the television news watching the footage of Hurricane Katrina New Orleans seen black people stranded on their rooftops watching government officials Pat themselves on the back for a job. Well done. And listening to media corporations. Call black people looters as they went to go look for supply survive and what they saw in. That moment was an absence of black political power. What they saw was that. No one was nervous about disappointing. Black people. And that lack of nervousness that lack of fear. Was a direct indication of a lack of real political power. So they're pulling together some ideas, and they decided to send out an Email to about a thousand of their friends and the subject line read Connie was right Konya west had just gone on a national broadcast and said sort of impromptu that George Bush didn't care about black people. And so they sent out this Email to a thousand of their friends with the subject line Connie was right? And in the Email, they went onto a unpack all the ways in which black people had been failed by institutions in this moment. And they asked people to take a simple action by clicking on this petition. They would be joining a twenty-first-century civil rights organization that was focused on building row political power for black folks. They sent out t shirts of the people that sign them with the slogan. Conde was right on them. You can't wear them like anywhere anymore because he's only been right like one maybe two times. Since then. But you could our point they were trying to take political moments that people were engaging with those sort of water cooler talk moments giving people language to unpack the realities of the situation, and hopefully giving people something from to do in that moment. And the realization and asking folks to join color of change was that we needed to build an independent infrastructure for strategic black response. And so that's what we've been doing where a black led organization we exist in the progressive world. I think we exist in an interesting intersection in that we leverage all of the new media tools that we've talked about that create that are dangerous in some respects. And we also worked to hold those companies accountable. And I think there are a couple of examples coming up of that. But we fundamentally believe that no real political change in this country has happened in the absence of black people, and that when black people when all working class people when and so that's the framework that we that we come from an embody. We think about power and a few ways, and we think about leveraging technology NFU ways, the first two steps of model require responding and building we have to build enough pressure to we have to respond to specific moments. We have to build enough pressure to an impact specific situations. We have to build enough pressure to hold decision makers accountable and impact a wide landscape. And so a lot of the work that we've done in our early days at color of change has been around holding media more countable to black people. All of these men once had very successful television shows, they no

Hurricane Katrina Connie Conde Stanford van Jones James Rucker CNN George Bush Pat thirteen years
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric. Knee managing editor of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI dot org. The interaction between digital technology and democracy is complex offering both enormous potential and peril editor two thousand eighteen frontiers of social innovation conference robberies a Marcon, Laura Andriessen faculty co director of Stanford PACS digs into the implications. For the social sector in conversation with Kelly born a program manager at the William and flora Hewlett foundations, Madison initiative and a racial hatch. A managing director of campaigns at color of change. Good morning, everybody. It's a real pleasure to have you here at Stanford University. And I want to introduce the panel that's going to kick off the frontiers conference this year by saying just a few words at the start about how I'd like to orient your attention to something which is obvious. If you just pay attention to the news these days, and that has to do with the way that I like to think about the interaction between digital technology and democracy, or if you prefer digital technology and social innovation the framework, which I think works for me that I want to urge upon you as well is the idea that there is so much about what digital technology digital tools and digital platforms organizing by thinking first digitally offers as promise to those of us working on the frontiers of social change and innovation. There's enormous potential. That these tools and platforms. Afford us in ways that old style organizing old style change innovation were less potent less powerful at the same time, simply by pension taint attention to the news, you know, that there's also great peril in the way that digital tools and flat forms can sometimes bring about ill intentionally or unintentionally through malicious actors or through simply indifferent or unaware actors more. Generally, it's a basic truism that digital technology as a general force is having an enormous enormous impact on so much of our personal private and professional lives. So that's the frame promise and peril that I want to orient you towards the beginning panel. And we've got to fantastic people who are going to serve in discussion to orient us and precious are thinking forward a bit. I want to introduce. Kelly born Kelly is a program manager at the Hewlett foundation, and she's managing the Madison initiative there a set of investments at the Hewlett foundation that are designed to look for the ways that philanthropy can help rejuvenate and restore some of the integrity of democratic institutions. And then Secondly, a Risha hatch who is managing director at color of change and social movement organization here in California and the bay area well Kelly, why don't you come and join me here on stage. So. Here's the promise. This is remarkably just from two thousand sixteen. Collection of essays from technologists and scholars about how machines are reshaping civil society and democracy itself. And then this is the title of an article from a colleague of ours here at Stanford Nate personally presser in the law school last year in the journal democracy. We'll democracy Ken democracy survived the internet. This suggests you the the dual and manichean possibility of technology another way to think about this. This comes from Nate slides the various ways in which we want to try to think about how the internet or digital technology poses a distinctive type of threat something different from the past. There are various things that are merely differences by degree the ways in which digital technology has fragmented or disintermediated the media or informational landscape. Now, of course, that's nothing new, but technology makes all of us producers of speech and content in ways that were much more difficult in the past. The speed of information and the difficulty of correction, you all know that lie travels across the internet at light speed,

Kelly managing director managing editor Stanford Nate Stanford Hewlett foundation Stanford University Ken democracy flora Hewlett foundations program manager Stanford PACS Eric Laura Andriessen editor director Madison California
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

06:35 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Is there another question else? I mean, I've plenty of questions to to ask. But I really want to give you to the opportunity. Hi, thank you so much. My name is Ray smell Lima director of policy for a humanitarian NGO based in Somalia so conflict fragile setting. I'm really glad to some of the early definition of a in terms of replacing some things, and I think there is a at least a setting that. I am in most of my workers most of the colleagues and peers who I work with on the frontline who worked for local NGOs are dying for reasons around going into places where roller people are in. And so if there's one job I could replace it would be their job. So that it doesn't actually cost us. Their lives are young bright people. Sometimes fused future luminaries of a country. That is so needed some some some that needs so much of the leaders of these guys represent. So is there air I for some of the areas where conflict settings or happening where there's protracted crisis where there's less need of a machine that cleans your house, but really need machines that can replace a life that could be lost. Yeah. That's that's a really good question. So again, I'm more a basic science technologist, which means most of our work is a little of quite far into the future rather than current application, but in the field of robotics, and a lot of remote technology. There are people definitely looking at these great example for replacement actually make sense, right? Not disaster relief is another is another area where we want to take human lives out of harm's way. We Stanford robot is a professor who Somma Qatif beauty diver robot. Who that goes deep under the ocean where humans really shouldn't be there because it's too dangerous to to deep into the water. So this whole idea of building technology or rope. Especially robotic send. Enter technology that can insinuations work on dangers and and sit. Context that that is not good for human is there. There is research going on is a deployable today to be a perfect level. I think it's still in the basic science research. Research phase. But. No, please. Keep an eye out on. Potential application. There's also telling medicine, and it's a different case from what you're talking about. But you could see different aspect. People are thinking about these technologies. Is there a question that you? Just linking the sorry. Kelly Hutchinson from university of Melbourne Australia. There's a linking point from the previous session on the female workforce in in informal and voluble labor markets in a stray Leah we've got an aging population. We've got a caring the Caras workforce. There the underpaid workers, the female and they've got precarious employment. But when I work in Victorian government, and we were looking at the future of work and raising this question, how do we make this transition? I'm interested to understand how you know. You're much hotter on the signs day. But that value that the value of work. And the value of paying people a livable wage also connects to that basic income theme that we've seen. How do we as people working in this space, enhance what we can do and bring people along with us because as you say, it's either the distortion view of the world's gonna wind or this utopian view that this is going to solve everything and we're the practitioners and the people trying to bridge days to divides. Yes. So quick question. I I didn't catch your name. But that sentiment is so shared every time. I I traveled globally and talk to people who care about AI. And you're right. I'm I don't pretend I have the answers, especially when it comes to economics policy. I'm not an expert, but what I really want to advocate, and now was part of my New York Times op-ed is that. Governments corporations academia have a collective responsibility to start the research and studies of these policies implications impacts now what I worry about is that if we're not putting resource or put it this way, there's trillions of dollars billions of dollars going to develop technology that makes money, but there's more to that. There should be way more resource going to the studies and research about these critical policy issues human nature's and technologies that related to these issues that can help solve these issues. I really think that. Globally. We need to have more stepping-up of companies, universities and governments putting resource in the tension in this. And again, I don't pretend at all. I have unsearched to those. But banning of you do and with the right resource and dialogue and all this. We can we can crack this problem, or at least put together solutions to crack these problems, but we've got to get our act together globally together to do this. Thank you so much parties. Call for action again address to all of us. Thank you. Thank you. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating for social change. Please visit our website at SSI dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Stanford University Somalia Lima Ray Leah Twitter Somma Qatif New York Times director Facebook Eric ni Kelly Hutchinson professor AI university of Melbourne Austra
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Technologists and thought leaders in the space of diversity and inclusion and I'm happy to talk more about that. But that that Google has been collaborating with us along with other companies as well, that's where I want to have next because I know that deeply care of of making all sorta. Bringing work inclusion to attack careers. How can we think of a I as as something we leverage to? To to bring more inclusion or how can we actually make a I more female or not colorblind? Yes. So that's a great question. So a few years ago literally happened to me one day I woke up and thinking that around the world of a I we have two seemingly disconnected crisis. And I woke up thinking that there's actually a deep connection between these two crisis. So one crisis the talk of terminators coming next door is that I got knows where it's going. But but it's such a powerful technology. What if it turns evil, and you laugh about it? But plenty of people talk like that and the second highs is a crisis. I live day to day is the lack of diversity we already locked versity in stem in. CS is only worse and about four or five years ago. I woke up a realize there's a deep convection between these two prizes potentially which is really worthy people behind technology. That's really the connection. So if we believe that the technology makers and leaders are people that carry the kind of value, we care, we will have less fear about this technology becoming terminators but in order to to bringing the kind of values that we cared into the technology. We should look at the people. We who are developing this technology if that that group of people the technologist represent a narrow slice of humanity. It is a problem, and it will have a much harder time representing who we are collectively and carrying the values. We collectively care. So this is why I started talking to my colleagues, and my students about this as we know I will change the world. The real question is who is going to change. I and with that realization we wanted to experiment a new way of of bringing an education to students high-schoolers because we believe high school is the age where students are thinking for the first time who am I? And what do I mean to the world and world concretely? What's my college? Major and this is the right age to capture their sense of responsibility as was their imagination. So we experimented a Stanford. Summer camp, where we opened a we we took a number of high school girls, ninth grade girls, and we put together an AI curriculum. That's human centered. We won the technology to have a mission. So give them a very rigorous technical curriculum. But their hands on research projects in the summer. Cam is deeply human centered, for example, if they're interested in a particular technology or natural language processing it's looking word documents while then we spend it as a project to look at Twitter data in natural disaster time and to predict the need for for help. If they're interested in comer technology, commit or vision, we spend it in a hospital setting and to. Doctors. Predict

Google Stanford Twitter Cam five years one day
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

09:41 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"I before I actually go to that hard. Let me ask the question. What is our to fischel about a I? So the word artificial intelligence like I said is coined by professor John McCarthy, and that was to. To really. Trying to understand a very fundamental question for the early pioneers in computer science, which is can machines think can we build intelligent machines, and humans are very good at introspection than looking at ourselves where we think about building machines that are intelligent. We never totally think about who are intelligent beings in the universe and ourselves are intelligent beings. So would night came to stem for virtually professor Jomar because they passed the way. So I never had a chance to ask him in person. Why did you call this field artificial intelligence, but I would have imagined that intelligence is a term for human and even some animals and in order to differentiate that the machine tellers from biological intelligence, the word artificial was put together, but that is. My own hypothesis. I don't know what was his thought process. Thank you human centered approaches to a I they are at the core of your work here at Stanford on campus. But also at Google at tell us a little bit more. What is behind this? This this explicit focus. Let's call it human centered AI rather than just yes. So part of this whole development of human center was summarized in the New York Times op-ed, I published about a month and half ago. And it's kind of accumulation of what I've been thinking about where is going for for the next for the future. Because clearly the past sixty years has as a field we've developed ourselves. We've we've begun to make a big difference in real life. But where? Our next face. So we think about human centered or I advocate to think about was entered the three important. Elements or pillars of however or focus areas. However, we call it the first part of human center AI is actually the core technology itself is as much as there's a lot of euphoria of the credibility of machines machines are in general still pretty dumb compared to Huma. So there's a famous saying in one thousand nine hundred seventy s by expert, laughing that's saying itself still reflects today's state of being a it goes like this the definition of today's is a computer that can make a perfect chest move while the room is on fire. So you can swap the word chest to go or whatever specific task you will do that's data driven. But the bottom line is a lacks the contextual awareness holistic understanding the nuance and the Alon of complexity of human intelligence, and I think that's where the next phase of core. Technology ought to be taking to consideration is human cognition, human psychology, brain size human behavior to really improve. Capability which brings us to the second focus area or pillar of Huber's centered. I is what is this technology four. When we talk about. I today there's a lot of controversy but one important risk. We face is job displacement. You know, as we ultimately machines, how do we grapple with the fact that it's changing the landscape of labor, and I think there is a model of social issues, but from the technology itself there should be that important recognition that instead of the word replacement. We should focus on the word enhancement. There's so much technology can do to augment people and enhance people. I personally at stead for work a lot in healthcare talking about aging society, we have a project with the senior holding in San Francisco, but whether we're talking about healthcare or education or manufacturing agriculture government. Every aspect of where this technology can be applied. I think there is a chance for this technology to be assistive of humans. So we're at Stanford. I like to advocate a human centered approach to application and development of a technology that focus on the word, you Hansman ornament augmentation rather than pure replacement which brings us to the third and last, but at least. Important topic is I- social and human impact. This field is no longer just a niche computer science field. And we need to recognize the from the immediate impact to the future impact of technology as powerful as a fact, we don't have enough understanding in research is social impact whether it's jobs ethics decision making organization laws and education healthcare privacy security, so many aspects aspects of our society in human lives might be impacted by and it's Gordon to recognize that and fund research and studies and efforts addressing these issues. So these are the three pillars of human centered approach. Thank you fake how much of this third, especially the third pillar is we've. In in your work at Google. I mentioned it you are to cease chief scientists for Google cloud and Google has also tried to pioneer the the way they think about being we've in the the work of a foundation directly into what they're doing with two Google dot org to what extent can we think of the word that you were doing there as twenty-first-century version of what we previously called corporate social responsibility. Is there a way to to weave in your third pillar in the work you directly due for Google? So those are good cushion. So first of all I most about co Google evolving been there for a year. And I'm still learn the industry world myself, a not very familiar with that big eighty thousand people company yet. As a technologist. I try as much as I can. So I'm not a major decision maker in many many aspects, as you know, it's a huge gigantic carrier ship, right? So. For example. A lot of our work is to listen to the industry needs in transforming the digital technology, and the gives me a very nice perspective of the pain points of of the traditional industry that are going through transformation. I love healthcare as an example, we listen to the pain point of health care and. Try to deliver technology that helps them to whether it's too short manage their decision making process help to improve decision-making process, or or or help efficiency or whatever it is. That to me is a human centered approach we care about the bias issue machine. Learning Google has not under me, but has a research team working on basic sized research of bias emission earning. My team collaborate with them and try to bring that perspective to any technology. We deliver to customers. I also not wary. My Google week collaborate with Google dot org through my nonprofit organization AI for all which was established a year ago as a. As a nonprofit focusing on education of next generation, AI technologists

Google AI Stanford professor John McCarthy New York Times San Francisco Jomar Huber Gordon sixty years
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

15:00 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric ni. Managing editor of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI dot org. Emerging technologies like biotech and artificial intelligence have the potential to transform so many of the systems that make up the world around us at our two thousand eighteen frontiers of social innovation conference, Catherine Milligan who directs the Schwab foundation for social entrepreneurship spoke with a few savvy social entrepreneurs who are harnessing these tools for social impact right now. Milligan speaks with Keller Rinaldo CEO co-founder of zip line, which is using drones to live or blood and medicines to remote parts of the world. Kristen groups Richmond revolution foods, which is using technology to increase access to fresh healthy food in underserved communities and David Risher CEO and co founder of world reader, a global nonprofit that provides people in the developing world with free access to digital books via e readers and mobile phones. I am. Without further ado, delighted to be joined on stage by three of the social partners in the schwa- foundation's global community, Chris Richmond's of revolution. Foods Keller Rinaldo of zip line and David Risher of world reader, welcome. I thought I would start this panel with a confession. More in the Luddite camp than I am in the tech savvy guru camp. And so when I started preparing for the session, I was momentarily stricken with imposter syndrome. But then I came across something that you said Keller about bringing up Aguirre's mind to an issue and not being afraid to ask questions. And so I thought I would turn that into an advantage by putting all the less tech savvy among us in the audience at ease. You're in very good company. And you don't my goal here with the conversation that we're going to have this morning is to really strip away all of the impenetrable language and intimidating jargon. Just have a really acceptable informal conversation. So the title of the session is shorthand for the fourth industrial revolution. That's a book by professor Klaus, Schwab, the founder and executive chairman of the World Economic Forum and the co founder with his wife Hilda at the foundation for social entrepreneurship in that book just to get folks really quickly on the same page with that term in what we mean, he argues that quote, we face both the opportunities and the challenges of a range of powerful emerging technologies from artificial intelligence to biotechnologies to advance materials and quantum computing that will drive radical shifts in the way, we live fourth industrial revolution technologies are not merely incremental advances on today's digital technologies, but are truly disruptive up ending our existing ways of sensing calculating organizing acting and delivering over time. They will transform the systems we take for granted today from the way. Produce and transport goods and services to the way, we communicate collaborate and experience the world around us, unquote. So we're going to impact that in about fifty seven minutes easy task. So look my first question to all of you. That sounds so big and overwhelming, it's hard to know, how to wrap your mind around that. So let's start with mindsets. And I'm not going to ask you where these technologies will be in five years, and what are your predictions? I think you know, the reality is that. It's impossible, but still as leaders of organizations making major strategic planning decisions, you know. How are you reading interpreting the trend lines of the four I r and how is that informing your decision making so whoever? Yeah, I can. So the way we think about it is that the future is weird. And especially in a in a in a world where technology is moving faster than it has in the past. Like you mentioned like predicting trend lines. We don't even try. Because what I mean by the future is weird. Is that looking five years ahead things seem so strange like we don't even believe certain things are going to work, and then they end up working like, you know, five years ago ten years ago, most people in global public health thought, the idea of cellphones exploding across Africa was outrageous today, it's like universal and today most people think that the idea of artificial intelligence or robotic starting first in Africa. They think that idea is outrageous, and we'll be showing a little bit is that it's not that outrageous. So I guess for us like it's not so much about predicting. But rather understanding that the future is so weird that we can't really predict it, but it will be very different than where we are today. So if if we just view it as like if our actions are predicting that things will generally be the same five years from now, then we will not be successful because we'll be fundamentally wrong. Whereas if we're willing to suspend disbelief and try new things like radical new things and test them and see if they work and understand that doing that. Inherently means we'll be taking risk than some of the things that we do end up working. And that's kind of the whole point of what we do. Well, I'll add I'll try and then as the founder of revolution foods, and I think I would have originally thought I would have fallen in the same camp as you described Catherine, which is how much are we really going to use technology to change a food system and make healthy fresh affordable clean food available throughout the US, primarily and underserved communities and schools to drive health outcomes and academic outcomes. And I think when Kitson I founded red foods a decade over a decade ago. I don't think that we honestly thought about technology as a huge lever to do that. And now we do every day. And we also I think our humble enough to realize that we don't know exactly how that's gonna look in three years five years ten years. But when it comes to designing, and I'll talk more about this but designing our meal, so that they're not just healthy. But kids, love them and. Lethem? So they have a huge impact and technology related to that. When we think about producing and distributing. It comes into play for us in a pretty big way at this point. So I'll talk more about it. But you know, that's it's it's a part of everything we do know and David hoses affecting your strategic decisions. So we have kind of interesting way of thinking about this. I think which is we look a lot at what changes fast and to your point Keller. It's easy to say easy to predict a lot will continue to change. But we also like to look at what isn't going to change, and what's going to be very durable over the long term. And if you look at the kind of friction between those two I think maybe that's where some of the most interesting insight can happen, for example, fairly sure that reading which is our world is not going to become less important over time. And and no one's going to wake up one morning and say, gosh, I wish you know, fewer kids knew how to read or you know, or we would teach kids. To read later in life because that somehow mix it's like that doesn't make any sense at all. So some things you can predict with certainty reading we'll matter eating will matter, by the way. That's another thing. We can predict what. Hi, sir. Socializing connecting people will matter. Those are things that won't change now technology that will change, but even within technology. It will get cheaper. It will get more. Ubiquitous it more get more powerful. It will get more personalized. So I think to a certain extent if you can if you can sort of contrast what, you know won't change versus some other things that will change, but even in some maybe some predictable ways. That's maybe how you can start to form a framework around experimentation, do the most interesting work. Definitely. Well, so now, let's take opportunity to dive into examples and really give everyone in the audience a clear picture of what you're actually doing. And Chris I'd love to start with you. I'm sure many folks here are familiar with revolution foods in your model. But can you explain a little bit about how you are creating systems change with a whole other constellation of actors in the system. So our really key question. We asked ourselves when we were kicking off which was a little over a decade ago. At Berkeley, actually was you know, how do we create systems change in in food? We realize that the quality of food that our students we started in schools and are still really heavily providing healthy food in schools. But we were asking ourselves how do we dramatically change? The quality of food that students are receiving every day. We have a very small amount of money to to work with. But we believe there was a way to do it. And so we really bought built built the company brick by brick and thought about how do we create meals breakfast lunch snack and supper every single day? So it's amazing over you guys may may not know this. But over fifty percent of every family every child in the US eats at least one meal a day at school at this point and many eat two to three particularly in the communities that revolution foods is serving. So there's a tremendous opportunity for impact. But we knew we had a huge challenge ahead of us. And so we really thought about how to make how to create a supply chain from scratch to create the first all-natural clean label supply chain there just wasn't one available for creating these meals that we were serving into schools, and then we thought about. How do we design foods that kids are going to love? And so now, I'm sitting up here not only as an entrepreneur, but as a mom with two little boys, and this is a topic that relates to everyone out there who struggles with that every day. You know, how do I how do I serve my kids healthy food? But also food that's gonna come home eaten from their lunchbox. And that I know is going to that we know is going to nourish them every day. And this is where I think this conversation gets really interesting because working within a tiny. Tiny financial limit to do. This requires really thinking about how to leverage for us now technology in terms of creating these meals at scale at a price point, that's affordable to have the highest level of impact. So the couple of topics. I wanted to hit one is just engagement respecting consumer base design. So we now serve over two and a half million meals a week across thirty cities in two thousand schools, and we take it very very seriously that we are only designing the meals that our students in communities feel is respectful to them, and again, cultural relevance is a huge part of that. So we're out gathering data every single day from our students and processing data and saying, okay. What are those menu options and meal formats that will deliver not only health but also delight right because we want to build a community. We want to be. Lifelong healthy eaters. So that's one area. That's that's really important to us. The other piece that I would say is a. A place where we are thinking hard about what kind of technology. We can utilize is in creating access to fresh in. What would have traditionally been called food desert? So how do we think about packaging technology and shelf-life technology that enables us to bring fresh meals into communities that haven't had fresh food access every day. And that requires less drops more volume, you really have to cost optimize everything you're doing. So that's a big big part of our work and then finally distribution. So thinking about when you're delivering thirty thirty. Southie sufferers day to fifty YMCA's our boys and girls clubs around a community. That has not traditionally been a an economically viable thing to do. So how can we utilize different technologies again too? To help make that kind of delivery financially viable, so that all students and all youth will have access to these meals in after school settings as well. But those are couple of things I wanted to hit quickly. A thank you so much for that. Million meals a week. I'm sliding through these and I can talk more about. As well. I think is such an important element to the Keller in Davos you. It was quite a lying, you know, sort of if if drones can take lives drones and also be used to save lives. So why don't you share with us a little bit about how you and the entire team zip line are doing that. So zip line is building autonomous delivery networks to deliver medicine and two parts of the world did typically don't have access to medicine today. And we as a team design, the the onyx the aircraft the distribution center. And then we operated as a service, you can couldn't think of us like a twenty first century version of ups, and we work directly with governments and ministries of health to basically provide universal access to health care at a national scale. So what that looks like today in Rwanda, we're contracted by the ministry of health to serve twenty one hospitals today in the country. We're delivering about twenty five percent of the national blood supply of Rwanda using Thomas aircr. Raft today, and we'll be at about fifty percent in late June. So it's expanding really really quickly. And and what we're currently undergoing today in two thousand eighteen is actually we just added. So just to give you a sense for what we're actually looking at here the Z in the middle of the map is the distribution center that we're operating from from that distribution center, we can cover about sixty percent of the country. We just finished construction of a second distribution center that you can see now in the eastern half of the country. And that means that by the end of twenty eighteen and we're also expanding from blood to about one hundred and fifty different medical products. So that means that by the end of twenty eighteen Rwanda will be the first country in the world to provide universal access to health care any medical product delivered in fifteen minutes or less to all million of its citizens. I'm just saying

Keller us Catherine Milligan Rwanda Chris Richmond David Risher co founder founder Keller Rinaldo Africa Schwab foundation Keller Rinaldo CEO Richmond Eric ni schwa- foundation Managing editor Schwab David