35 Burst results for "Stanford University"

Haptic Intelligence With Katherine J. Kuchenbecker

The TWIML AI Podcast

02:09 min | 1 d ago

Haptic Intelligence With Katherine J. Kuchenbecker

"I'm really looking forward to digging into our conversation and your work. Which is at the intersection of robotics and machine learning. And i'd love to have you start us off with a little bit of background. How did you come to work in the field. Yeah i grew up in california. Actually although my name looks german. And i live in germany. I'm actually american. And i was raised by a research psychologist. My mom who said now retired professor and a surgeon and i was always fascinated by how things work and i wanted to create technology. Head helped people. I also did a lot of art. And i like riding ahead. Many many different interest and i was an athlete and athletics that led me to study at stanford university which was also enough to home but far enough away and i studied mechanical engineering. I really enjoyed understanding physics than how all had also design and build things produce functionality in the world and i was always drawn more towards like smart systems with sensors and actuators. Programming actually delayed taking programming class. Because i'd heard so difficult on the other athletes libel player. They all said oh. You know the programming class so hard. I loved it beyond words. And then i just i took more computer science punching i decided to stay for master's degree and i worked actually in as a teaching assistant a machine shop for two years helping students learn design and manufacturing like welding and casting bronze and milling aluminum and making parts sticking the shop late at night and i really fell in love with working with younger pupil helping them design and create things and i also took this amazing metrics class. There like realized. I wanted to become a professor and i that i needed a phd. And i needed a phd adviser. So i looked around and found a new professor. Was his first fish student. his name's Niemeier and he was one of the first engineers at intuitive surgical a robotic surgery company. That most of you probably know make davinci robot and we got along soup. Well was also volleyball player. And yeah the mechanical engineering computer science electrical intersection. It's really robotics Turning to do something useful whether that's in health or in consumer products or at work on so many different things now.

Stanford University Athletics Germany California Niemeier Volleyball
States To Offer Lottery Tickets to Incentivize Americans to Get Vaccinated

News, Traffic and Weather

01:16 min | 2 weeks ago

States To Offer Lottery Tickets to Incentivize Americans to Get Vaccinated

"Wants to use incentives like a lottery or reduction in property taxes to try and get more people vaccinated. This comes in several states have started using different forms of giveaways to persuade people to get the shot. Almost like popping reports on how these methods are actually improving Vaccination rates. If there's one thing that we need to do with money related to Cove, it's to get people healthy. And that's fueled King County Council member Reagan done to consider what his county might be able to do with some of the millions of federal dollars that have been sent to King County during the pandemic. His ideas were thinking about rental assistance is one idea we're thinking about Even things like lottery or scratch Lotto tickets as well. It's a creative approach that has proved to be effective in getting more people to sign up for a vaccine. New YORK, New Jersey, Maryland and West Virginia have all used some form of incentives. In Ohio. They started a lottery were five people could each win a million bucks. That incentive led to an over 50% weekly increase in vaccinations games are been showing in vaccines to enhance vaccine knowledge and improve vaccine uptake Doctor Ashby monk with Stanford University. Says these games can significantly improve inoculation numbers that's call most

King County Council King County Reagan West Virginia New Jersey Maryland New York Ohio Ashby Monk Stanford University
Increases in Extreme Precipitation Cost the U.S. $73 Billion

Climate Connections

01:09 min | 3 weeks ago

Increases in Extreme Precipitation Cost the U.S. $73 Billion

"Torrential. Rainstorms can flood homes. Wash out roads and bridges and destroy crops over the past. Three decades flooding from heavy precipitation has caused about two hundred billion dollars of damage in the. Us francis davenport is a phd student. In earth system science at stanford university. She wanted to know how much of that enormous price tag can be blamed on global warming. We've seen that extreme precipitation events are increasing in frequency or intensity and so we wanted to quantify what are the financial costs of those changes in precipitation. Her team analyzed historic rainfall trends and financial data about flood damages over decades. They estimated that between nine thousand nine hundred eighty eight and twenty seventeen about seventy three billion dollars. A flood damage can be attributed to increases in extreme precipitation. That's more than a third of the cost of flooding over those thirty years. So devonport says that people are already paying the financial cost of warming world. I think having those hard dollar amounts is really important for some of these policy conversations about what to do.

Francis Davenport Stanford University United States Devonport
The Family's Role in Addiction and Recovery.

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

02:08 min | 3 weeks ago

The Family's Role in Addiction and Recovery.

"Alright let's jump right in. Because i have a hot topic today that i haven't talked about for awhile and that is families and recovery. Wow this is a big big big topic so many of us. The addicted people have difficulty with our families. Some don't but the majority of us do in that sense given that the family thinks it's all our business right. As soon as the problem becomes obvious out there in front of the whole family it becomes the problem of the person who's addicted to get. Fixed no bueno from this therapist. We're gonna talk today about the long held notion. That addiction is the person's problem and get more realistic and talk about why. It's a family issue. No matter no matter what kind of family. You have the researcher. I'm going to use for today's podcast. Is stephanie brown phd. She's a clinician researcher and consultant in the field of addiction and she founded the alcohol clinic at stanford university medical center in nineteen seventy seven and served as its director for eight years developing the dynamic model of alcoholism recovery and its application to the long term treatment of all members of the alcoholic family. Yep old language but yes. I'm reading from her websites amusing her language. Dr brown served on the california state. Alcoholism advisory board and was a founding member of the national association for children of alcoholics. Now the national association for children of addiction in a cola child of addiction

Bueno Stephanie Brown Stanford University Medical Ce Nineteen Dr Brown National Association For Child California National Association For Child Cola
Brain Implants Let Paralyzed Man Write on a Screen Using Thoughts Alone

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:28 sec | Last month

Brain Implants Let Paralyzed Man Write on a Screen Using Thoughts Alone

"A man who lost all movement below the neck after a spinal cord injury in 2007 was able to write again with his mind. Stanford University. Researchers use artificial intelligence software and a brain computer interface to help the man with immobilized limbs to communicate by text When the man who has implanted with two microchips in his brain imagined he was using his hand to write on a note pad. The computer converted his thoughts into text on a computer screen. I cannot even begin to

Spinal Cord Injury Stanford University
The Pandemic Is Taking Its Toll on Health Care Workers

Short Wave

01:56 min | Last month

The Pandemic Is Taking Its Toll on Health Care Workers

"A year ago when the pandemic hit the united states took to argue even solid was working. As a researcher stanford university solace is a surgeon but wasn't practicing medicine at the time but seeing the need for doctors in new york city flew there in april of last year to volunteer her time at hospital. Working in the icu. Now remember spring of two thousand twenty. It was still the early days of the pandemic and new york was the first city in the united states to be hit so hard all my feelings and thoughts were by far by the people. Dying wasn't much in terms of treatment for covid. Nineteen at the time and the number of people getting hospitalized and dying was climbing fast almost every day for almost every patient. I'm calling saying there is no improvement and maybe things are worse right from the start of the pandemic healthcare workers have stepped up beyond what many of them were trained to do so to say that this past year has been stressful for them is an understatement for me. I think it's mostly been anxiety. I think that i've had Definitely tendencies toward depression. And i have seen a therapist in the last six months or so. A recent poll by the kaiser family foundation and the washington post found that about six in ten healthcare workers a struggling with mental health issues as a result of the stress of the pandemic more than half say they're burnt out which is a response to chronic stress at work. One of the things that has come out of my time in the icu has been a need for more connection with people. I think when we see people dying every day We need some reassurance that that there is

United States Stanford University ICU New York City New York Kaiser Family Foundation The Washington Post Depression
Do We Age More at 34?

Forever35

01:30 min | Last month

Do We Age More at 34?

"Okay so i googled. Okay like what is refined koogle like age. More at thirty four and what i found was that this comes from a study conducted at stanford university school of medicine and will link to an article. That was on stanford's website it says stanford scientists reliably predict people's age by measuring proteins in blood and then lower down in the article. So it does say here. That aging is not done perfectly even pace. And then it says there seems to be a more herky-jerky trajectory with three distinct inflection. Points in the human life cycle which occurs at thirty four sixty and seventy eight because the proteins in your blood. Change noticeably change. This is what the article says okay. I'm not a scientist as we've established many times neither story okay so cool i mean but it sounds like that's that's detecting it in internal internally as opposed to like grey hairs coming out. I mean i have friends who went gray or fully bald at the age of twenty. So i think i think all this study shows and the article makes his point that like we have kind of three points in our life like you know young adulthood says late middle aged and old age right so this seems like nothing new to

Koogle Stanford Stanford University School Of
Study: No partisan benefit from mail voting in 2020 election

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 3 months ago

Study: No partisan benefit from mail voting in 2020 election

"Mail in voting generated quite an uproar in last November's election but a new study finds it didn't particularly increased voting numbers and it didn't help the Democrats researchers from Stanford University used voting comparisons in Texas to conclude mail in balloting had zero effect on turnout with the study's lead author saying voter interest was really driving turned out more than convenience voting forms Democrats were more likely to vote by mail then Republicans in twenty twenty largely because former president trump had polarize the issue but that didn't help them win the election the Stanford study found that Democrats were equally less likely to vote early in person or on election day the research is only the latest in years of studies that found no partisan benefit to mail in voting hi Jackie Quinn

Stanford University President Trump Texas Jackie Quinn
Wildfire smoke is especially dangerous for children

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 3 months ago

Wildfire smoke is especially dangerous for children

"As the climate warms more devastating wildfires are raging across the west and filling the air with toxic smoke. The smoke at self is composed of hundreds of toxins predominantly though. The smoke consists of particular matter. That is very very small. Two point five microns or less and the reason. This is so dangerous as that particular matter of that size when it's inhaled it can go all the way to the base year long and crossover into the bloodstream. And then re kavak in many different ways throughout the body. That's mary mckee of the sean parker center for allergy and asthma research at stanford university. She says children are especially at risk because their bodies are still developing they also tend to more physically active than adults so they may inhale smoky air deeper into their lungs so she recommends that parents monitor air quality and keep their kids inside when the air is polluted and certainly if a child has any type of respiratory disorder. Make sure you have a prescription refilled and on hand. If they should need an inhaler or something like that in the moment she says these precautions can help keep kids. Safer as wildfire seasons. Get more extreme.

Kavak Mary Mckee Sean Parker Center For Allergy Stanford University Respiratory Disorder
Clubhouse Becomes the Latest Hot App By Doing Everything Wrong

Business Wars Daily

04:04 min | 3 months ago

Clubhouse Becomes the Latest Hot App By Doing Everything Wrong

"From one three. I'm david brown. And this is business. Worst daily on this tuesday march second. Let's say you were invited to a party. Where the guest list included oprah drake and jared lehto as well as top venture capitalist business executives journalists and all manner of influencers. Would you go well. That party is happening on a beta version. Social media app called clubhouse and in about nine months. The app has gained an estimated three million users and a billion dollar valuation clubhouses content is like a series of audio only presentations and panel discussions he s. That's right audio. We'll get to that in a minute. These talks happen in so-called rooms which are really like well conference calls there's a presenter or panel other people are listening to anyone can raise a hand and ask a question or participate in the discussion. You can meet people and have conversations and because presentations are not supposed to be recorded by users. You're either there or you missed out the thing about clubhouse though is that it appears to do everything wrong. First of all as i said earlier. It's audio based that's right. Viral video challenges or memes. Not even a cute cat photo. That means that all of those people who hate to use the phone have to logon and have an actual conversation also android users. Sorry you're out of luck. This app is for apple devices. Only at least for now finally membership is by invitation. So unless you know someone who's willing to fork over one of their coveted invites you're locked out again for now. Clubhouse founders say that eventually the format will be open to all but what is that for now. Exclusivity is what's driving growth in roughly nine months. Fomo fear of missing out has fueled the apps popularity some even say that the old school style of having conversations is the key to its success. You have to listen and be able to say something meaningful. So people are striking business deals finding content partnerships and having conversations with some truly interesting people. Some are even finding romance on the app. According to a report in forbes clubhouses his popularity is even turned the head of industry giant facebook. Which has reportedly started developing an audio product to compete with clubhouse the new york times reports facebook founder mark zuckerberg made an appearance on the app earlier this month to give a talk about augmented and virtual reality. Facebook didn't confirm the report but the times also noted that the social network has a habit of buying upper competing with apps that dabble in areas. That could pose a threat to its user base like most media platforms clubhouse. Has its issues to the app. Urges you to give it access your contact list and uses that information to identify others for you to invite according to forbes quote even if you've no interest in joining clubhouse whatsoever the service may well know your name mobile number and how many friends you have on the network. It may even be violating european privacy laws. The report suggests clubhouses apple exclusivity also has some trying to hack the app so it can be streamed on android devices tech crunch report last week. Clubhouse had its first significant data-breach when someone managed to stream audio feeds on a third party website according to bloomberg the stanford internet observatory or s. I o a stanford university internet watchdog programme race security concerns earlier this month in light of these issues clubhouse says it has taken measures to prevent any such breaches from happening again. But it's not clear. Exactly what is being done.

Oprah Drake Jared Lehto David Brown Facebook Apple Mark Zuckerberg New York Times The Times Stanford Bloomberg
Text messages promising $1,400 daily stimulus checks are actually scams, IRS warns

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:55 sec | 3 months ago

Text messages promising $1,400 daily stimulus checks are actually scams, IRS warns

"For people who have lost their jobs in their security to Corona virus. The text message is a god sent there now eligible for $1400 daily, through covered relief program. You have been Smith, the text contains a link to instructions on how to get your money. But kneeled US wanting of Stanford University's Advanced Security certification program says that merely clicking on the link could expose the recipients. Personal financial data relief will arrive in the form of a check in the mail. Or a direct deposit to the bank account that you've used in the past with the I R s far from receiving a stimulus payment. The victim stands to lose everything from his or her bank account. Federal Trade Commission has received over 350,000 reports of such scams resulting in total fraud losses north of 336 million has realized that as him as might appear, take a screenshot of it, Send it to the I. R s and then delete the message with Tech trends. Jim Ryan ABC News At the Kamo news time Now for 14. Other update on

Advanced Security Certificatio Stanford University Smith Federal Trade Commission Jim Ryan Abc News
Your smartwatch could detect COVID

Talking Tech

02:04 min | 3 months ago

Your smartwatch could detect COVID

"Your apple watch or your fit bit or samsung galaxy. Watch or other wearable device and tracker could eventually signal whether you've been infected with covid nineteen or other illnesses such as the flu. Most of the research studies underway suggests that a few days before a person would test positive for the coronavirus their heart rate or activity level. Changes enough to suggest your about to do so. Now you probably know this most of our listeners. Probably know this but where will just the apple watch and samsung galaxy. Smartwatch fitbit and other devices already collect information such as heart oxygen data as well asleep and activity levels so researchers at mount sinai hospital in new york and at stanford university's healthcare innovation lab. And there's more places like the scripps research translation institute in la hoya california and in the universities like university of washington purdue are all at various stages of research looking into this and fitbit is actually also working with the department of defense. The department of veteran affairs at nasa on covid nineteen detection. So there's a lot of interest here but the findings aren't foolproof. Because could be false positives and things like that. But at stanford eighty one percent of the thirty two patients who became infected with covid nineteen had changes in heart rates. Time spent sleeping and daily steps that they've taken the researchers wrote in a publication. They put out in a journal called nature biomedical engineering now. Most of the covid nineteen patients there about sixty three percent had changes that could have led to early detection before the onset of symptoms. They found researcher. N- probably not ever going to be able to tell you definitively that you will develop covid nineteen based on the variations in your heartbeat. Or how much sleep you got. How much activity level you've had and how that's changed. However if there's a way to give you a heads up to get a test and perhaps quarantine that could potentially prevent the spread of covid nineteen or other illnesses to other people including your family friends and coworkers so this research is ongoing to the studies are looking for more participants. The links are in my story on ticked usa today dot com. And this is a topic. I'm sure we'll be covering in the weeks and months

Samsung Scripps Research Translation I Universities Like University O Department Of Veteran Affairs Apple Stanford University Mount Sinai Hospital La Hoya FLU Department Of Defense Nasa New York California USA
Filling the archives with stories from Black Silicon Valley

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:02 min | 4 months ago

Filling the archives with stories from Black Silicon Valley

"We talked last week about how the stories of lack inventors were literally left out of the history books. Documenting the early internet now. A story about preserving that history in late twenty nineteen archivists from stanford university met in fremont california with over a dozen black engineers and entrepreneurs who had been working in the tech industry for decades. One of them was. Danny allan also been first engineering. Professors say some people in this class. That don't belong five of us thirty so actually wound up hating engineering. While to become an engineer. Alan worked as an engineer for bank of america and the electric power research institute in palo alto. He's now the vice president of global diversity and inclusion at sap labs stanford was interviewing allan and others for a new archive dedicated to the history of black people. Working in silicon valley henry low would helped build stanford silicon valley archive as a curator at the university. And he had realize that the stories of allen and others at that meeting were missing from the university's records to realize that there are substantial communities successful people who've not been fully represented. The archive is a. You know a bit of a shock. It's kind of sad disappointing. That that were at this position. But you very grateful to be be in a situation where i can try to respond to it though it had been inspired by kathy cotton. A longtime silicon valley recruiter turned archivist. She saw that. No one was telling the stories of the many black engineers and software developers. She knew were important to. The tech. industry's success. So

Danny Allan Sap Labs Stanford Silicon Valley Henry Stanford Silicon Valley Archiv Stanford University Fremont Electric Power Research Instit Bank Of America Palo Alto California Alan Allan Allen Kathy Cotton Silicon Valley
Why Tech Companies Are Limiting Police Use of Facial Recognition

Short Wave

09:33 min | 4 months ago

Why Tech Companies Are Limiting Police Use of Facial Recognition

"All right emily kwong so. We're talking about this announcement from a string of tech companies that they are going gonna put limits on their facial recognition technology especially when it comes to law enforcement amazon microsoft and ibm yes on june eighth. Ibm said it would discontinue general purpose facial recognition or analysis software altogether. Get out of the business completely and it made an impression after. Ibm's big letter. Amazon announced a one year moratorium on sales of they're very popular software recognition spelled with a k. To law enforcement to give congress time to implement appropriate rules so a one year ban. Yes microsoft took it a step further saying it wouldn't sell products to law enforcement at all until a federal law is in place. Here's microsoft president. Brad smith speaking to the washington post we need to use this moment to pursue a strong national law to govern facial recognition that is grounded in the protection of human rights and for matali in conde who has been pushing for regulation changes in tech for years. This was a big deal when these words were coming out of silicon valley. She felt all of the feelings. My initial was thank god. Thank god i was. I was happy. I was pleased. I was optimistic. I was short of breath. I was exhausted. Tally is the ceo of ai. For the people a fellow at both harvard and stanford universities for her. These announcements shifted the conversation. But that's about it. So i'm pleased. It's got us incredibly far but we're by no means the woods not out of the woods because for all of the advancement and facial recognition systems. Still get it wrong. They'll incorrectly match folks what's called a false positive or fail to associate the same person to two different images of false negative. Yeah and what's vaccine. Is these errors are happening. More often. when the machines are analyzing dark-skinned faces and that can disproportionally affect already marginalized communities prone to unconscious bias at the hands of law enforcement leading to false accusations arrests and much worse so until there's action on this metallic said words just aren't enough gotcha. So let's unpack this a little bit. Let's talk about how biased gets into facial recognition systems in the first place. I'd love that okay. So it starts right with how the systems learn to do their jobs. A process known as machine learning so to make facial recognition systems engineers feed algorithms large amounts of what's called training data in this case. That would be pictures of human faces. Yes the way machines learn is that they repeat task again and again and again and again and again developing a statistical model for what a face is supposed to look like so if you wanted to teach the algorithm to recognize a man you'd put in like millions of pictures of men you got it. The machine will then measure the distance between the eyes on each picture the circumference of the nose for example the ear to measurement and over time the machine starts to be able to predict whether the next image it seeing is quote a man which sounds okay right here comes the but but the machine is only a smart as its training data so remember joy ghulam weenie who i mentioned at the top of the episode. Yeah the the mit yes. So she and her colleague timid gabe developed a way to skin color in these training sets and the two they looked at were overwhelmingly composed of lighter skinned subjects. Seventy nine percent for ibi dash a and eighty six percent. For etienne's these are two common data sets that were largely as joy. Put it pale and male. So basically the training data used to create these algorithms is not diverse. And that's how that bias gets in The diversity of human beings is not always being represented in these training sets and so faces outside the systems norm. sometimes don't get recognized. Here's matala explaining what the research meant to her. That goes back to this other issue of not just hiring but a bigger issue of those no one in the team to say that you haven't put all the faces you haven't put all the digital images of all human beings could look like in the way that they sharpen society in order to recognize these faces. And it's so. After realizing how unbalanced these training sets were joy intimidate decided to create their own with equality in race and gender to get a general idea of how facial ai systems performed with a more diverse population so basically they fed it more diverse pictures to to look at. Yeah it was kind of interesting. They used images from the top ten national parliaments in the world with women in power specific yes specifically picking african and european nations and they tested this new data against three different commercially available systems for classifying gender one made by ibm the second microsoft and the third by face plus plus an running these tests joint him knit found clear discrepancies gender and racial lines with darker skinned faces getting mis classified the most. Here's mut-ali again. So one of the things that joy blue armies amazing work looks. That is the coloration between short hair and gender so many many many black women with afros where mislabeled as men mis gendered because the system had trained itself to recognize short hair as a male trait and this research project mattie produced a massive ripple effect further studies legislation in december the national institute of standards and technology or nist published a big paper of its own testing one hundred eighty nine facial recognition algorithms from around the world and they found biases to looking at one global data set some algorithms in their study produced one hundred times more false positives with african and asian faces compared to eastern european ones and when tested using another data set of mug shots from the us. The highest false positives were found among american indians with higher rates in african american and asian populations again depending on the algorithm. Wow yeah that is not what you want from your data. And i'm guessing white. Men benefited from the highest accuracy rates. Yes they did now. The knicks study did conclude that the most accurate algorithms demonstrated far less demographic bias but for multi. This evidence of bias raises a bigger question about the ethics of relying on. Ai systems to classify and police at all the problem with ai. Systems machine learning is that they're really really really good at standard routine tasks and the issue with humans is that we are not standard. We're not routine. Were actually massively messy right. We're not the same but when a police officer searches face in the system. They're not making arrests based on just spat match alone are they. Oh absolutely not. Yeah it's a tool for identifying potential suspects but if you think about how there's already implicit bias in policing critics. A facial recognition are basically saying. It doesn't make sense to embrace technologies riddled with bias to right if all this research has shown. These tools are capable of misidentifying black people. We cannot use biometric tools that discriminate against a group of people who are ready discriminated against within the criminal justice system but policing most specifically mattie. When i first spoke to mut-ali in march she was open to moratoriums on facial. Recognition like amazon is doing buying time for these systems to improve regulations to be put in place but the protests have her views. Because why why am i being moderate with completely reimagined how we interact with technology so now she wants to see facial recognition banned from law enforcement use which some cities in the us have done. Moutallos has tried to push for legislation to outlaw discrimination in technology before but it seems like now people are paying attention and have a language for talking about structural racism that they just didn't have before whether why america listened to me or not. I was gonna continue with this work. I believe that technology should be an empowering force for all people and that's my work but now having old and new ala not just allies but co-conspirators bright. I'm so happy. Because i didn't think would happen in my lifetime and it's an it's

IBM Microsoft Emily Kwong Matali Amazon Ghulam Weenie Brad Smith Matala The Washington Post Stanford National Institute Of Standard Harvard Etienne Congress Gabe Mattie ALI Knicks
Elon Musk - The Man Behind Tesla and SpaceX

Talk, Tales and Trivia

07:44 min | 4 months ago

Elon Musk - The Man Behind Tesla and SpaceX

"Well who's elon. Musk well if you don't know you're gonna find out right now. There is so much news internet entertainment on ilan mosque. And i want to tell you that this is only the basics of aeon. Musk who he is. There is plenty to find out about him. I will leave some of the links and the show notes. So don't forget to look but who is elon. Musk and how does he lawns story began. Well he is a visionary entrepreneur and the co founder of paypal and tesla motors as well as the founder of the new space x program which is very popular to day his astounding success has given rise to comparisons to the uniqueness of howard hughes and the tenacity of a henry ford but he did have an often difficult childhood like most of us kids his own age made fun of him from his own descriptions the years were lonely and brutal alon is quoted as saying they got my best friend to lure me out of hiding so they could beat me up and that hurt. That's when i realized that they were going to go after me non stop. That's what made growing up difficult for a number of years. There was no respite. You get chased around by gangs. These gangs tried to beat the insert. Swearword here out of me. And then i'd come home and it would just be awful there as well but not all was wasted. This difficulty cultivated itself into a relentless work ethic a never ending tenacious vision of the future. You see enron was born and raised in south africa and he spent some time in canada before finally moving to the united states thin and the united states. He was educated at the university of pennsylvania. A very good school majoring in physics. That's when ilan started to excel and experiment to soon. Become a serial tech entrepreneur with early successes like zip to an x dot com. He took on two majors at the university of pennsylvania but his time there wasn't all work with a fellow student. He bought a tin bedroom fraternity house which they used as an ad hoc nightclub will. Musk graduated with a bachelor of science and physics at all as a bachelor of arts in economics from the wharton school for ilan. Physics made the deepest impression. He is again quoted as saying and somewhat giving directions to boiling things down to their fundamental truths and reason up from their. Musk was twenty four years old when he moved to california to pursue at phd in applied physics at stanford university with the internet. Exploding in silicon valley booming. Musk had entrepreneurial visions on his mind and dropped out of the physics program just after two days but in two thousand and four. Musk joined to engineers to help. Run tesla motors. You've all heard of tesla motors right. Well this is where. Musk was integral and designing the first electric car. There's no doubt the electric car is the car of the future. But his first car the he designed was the tesla roadster as we are all aware of the tesla has become one of the world's most popular and coveted car brands and is still growing in popularity in the united states and in many different countries tesla and the electric car are taking over but we must never forget about musk's early interest in reading philosophy science fiction and fantasy novels and how that played a big role. I mean a huge role in the inventor that he is today. It is reflected in his sense of idealism and concern with human progress. He aims to work in the areas he has identified as crucial to our future specifically the internet. The transition to renewable energy sources and space colonization and. Ilan has been all over the media. Making three podcast episodes on the joe rogan experience while the first one in which he smoked. Marijuana was pretty funny but in a maximum article. I found this elon. Musk's third appearance on the joe rogan. Experience podcast the genius. Tesla and spacex. Ceo did reveal intriguing plans for a floating tesla. Musk revealed that the long awaited second generation tesla roadster could have a space x package that would allow it to hover at a limited altitude above the ground. Something that we have never seen before with all these new inventions floating around. Is it any wonder why everyone is watching. And curious about ilan's next big thing. Well at tesla fans are awaiting the cyber truck which will make an appearance at the end of twenty twenty one and the exciting numbers are in for ilan's wealth elon. Musk started twenty twenty with a worth of about twenty seven billion dollars and was barely in the top fifty richest people then in july of twenty twenty. Musk past warren buffett. The great billionaire to become the seventh richest person in november. Musk raced past bill gates to become the second richest person. Musk has gained more wealth over the past twelve months then gates his entire net worth of one hundred and thirty two billion dollars and according to cnbc elon. Musk just became the richest person in the world. With a net worth of more than one hundred and eighty five billion dollars alone recently had a new marker for his wealth and that is so cool because of all his inventions and his time spent caring and wanting the united states and the world to move ahead has made a name for himself. There is no doubt an increase in tesla's share price pushed. Musk past jeff bezos of amazon. Who had been the richest person since two thousand seventeen. You see musk's wealth surge over. The past year marks the fastest rise to the top of the rich list and history but why because he is investing in the future. It marks a dramatic financial turnaround for the famed entrepreneur. Because he cares about what happens in our future so with all his wealth experimentation and knowledge elon. Musk is our future and for those. That are young enough to dream about being an elon. Musk it must start with your curiosity with reading and learning more and more about new and different things and that i want for you and your children now and in the future.

Musk Tesla Ilan Mosque University Of Pennsylvania Wharton School For Ilan United States Ilan Elon Howard Hughes Alon Joe Rogan Henry Ford Enron Paypal Stanford University South Africa Silicon Valley Roadster
George P. Shultz, secretary of state under Reagan, dead at 100

Mo'Kelly

00:29 sec | 4 months ago

George P. Shultz, secretary of state under Reagan, dead at 100

"In the measure. Former Secretary of state George Shultz has died. He was 100, the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, says he passed away yesterday, Schulz served as the nation's chief diplomat during the Reagan administration. As secretary of state for Ronald Reagan. He played a major role in shaping the administration's foreign policy. He also served as Richard Nixon, secretary of Treasury. Secretary of Labor and was director of Nixon's office of Management and Budget. Schultz was one of only two individuals to serve in four

George Shultz Hoover Institution Stanford University Schulz Reagan Administration Ronald Reagan Richard Nixon Nixon's Office Of Management A Treasury Schultz
Reagan and Nixon cabinet member George Shultz dead at 100

Sean Hannity

00:41 sec | 4 months ago

Reagan and Nixon cabinet member George Shultz dead at 100

"Veteran statesman who served in both the Nixon and Reagan administration's has died. George P. Shultz was 100 Schultz had been the oldest surviving former Cabinet member of any administration. He died Saturday at his home on the campus of Stanford University, according to the Hoover Institution. Ah think tank where he was a distinguished fellow. Schultz was labor secretary and Treasury secretary under President Nixon before spending more than six years as Reagan's secretary of state, Schulz negotiated the first ever treated to reduce the size of the Soviet Union's ground based nuclear arsenals. The 1987 accord was a historic attempt to begin to reverse the nuclear arms race.

George P. Shultz Schultz Reagan Administration Nixon Hoover Institution Stanford University Cabinet President Nixon Treasury Schulz Reagan Soviet Union
Reagan's longtime secretary of state George P. Shultz dies

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 4 months ago

Reagan's longtime secretary of state George P. Shultz dies

"I'm Julie Walker president Ronald Reagan's longtime secretary of state George Shultz who spent most of the nineteen eighties trying to improve relations with the Soviet Union and forging a course for peace in the Middle East has died he was one hundred Schultz had been the oldest surviving former cabinet member of any administration he died Saturday at his home on the campus of Stanford University according to the Hoover Institution think tank where he was a distinguished fellow Schultz was labor secretary and treasury secretary under president Nixon before spending more than six years as Reagan's secretary of state Shilts negotiated the first ever treaty to reduce the size of the Soviet union's ground based nuclear arsenals the nineteen eighty seven accord was a historic attempt to begin to reverse the nuclear arms race I'm Julie Walker

Julie Walker George Shultz Schultz Ronald Reagan Soviet Union Hoover Institution Middle East Shilts Stanford University Cabinet President Nixon Treasury Reagan
"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:46 min | 5 months ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:36 min | 5 months ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Mike yesterday. expensive. Feed clean all who specific policy in school of humanities sciences at stanford university he's also senior fellow stanford institute for economic policy research but copied driving it. Thanks for doing this. So i want to start with one of your people from twenty sixteen to set the context for a larger conversation and tape was entitled the gdp bet set across countries. And time. you save you. Propose that somebody statistic for economic wellbeing of people in the country incorporates consumption leisure mortality inequality fuss for nazi countries using detailed might rotate and more broadly using multi-country datasets. But one of the issues. I see peak than economist. Talk to talk to the public When be used to like a utility at share Sometimes those limbs some too technical too abstract for people to really really connect with so so so you have a qualitative Measure due to get let so some more gently. What do you mean by. Yes so we'd like to look at what people are willing to pay in terms of consumption that they sacrifice in order to say try to live longer or Enjoy more leisure time So utility is just our way of saying you know how much what people are trying to get out of consumption. Leaser living along. Boeing lights But utilize are meaningless like. There's no units called utilize that we care about. That's why in this..

stanford institute for economi stanford university Mike Boeing
"stanford university" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

08:12 min | 7 months ago

"stanford university" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Stanford University. And it was about they actually went and tried to study. The crowds that are showing up for the president at his rallies. And Come on. I mean, those crowds are huge. And they're they're everywhere, and there was one last night at midnight in Ocala, Florida. He's been there before, and the crowds were still there and I mean, he's out in the middle of doing rural America. Mostly. That's where he's got to get the votes from rural America. That's what worked for him four years ago. The big cities are going to go Democrat, the rural part of the world of the country is going to go Republican. A twisted did four years ago. I don't know if they'll do it again tomorrow, but I kind of expect that the interesting part about our country when you want to break it down. It's not so much the north, the South, the East, the West. It really is. Three groups of us. Those of us who live in cities. Those of us who live in suburbs. And those of us who live in Rural America in the country. And the cities are dominated by Democrats. The rural like I said, dominated by Republicans at least four years ago wasn't that way In the past. They were very Democrat, but not four years ago, and they're expected to go very heavily for Donald Trump. But there's fewer off them than the people in the city, so they've got a really get everybody out to vote in rural America. And the big question mark where there is still a pretty good crowd of people is in the suburbs. So That's where the fight is. This year. The fight is for the suburbs. And which I know we keep hearing about the suburban woman, but I just think the suburbs in general And one of the things about the suburbs. Which I'll find interesting when this election is all said and done. Is a lot of people move out of the central urban part of his city. Out to the suburbs. When they want to raise a family. Or they want more space for their family. So a lot of suburbia is made up of people with Children. And what is the big issue in this country that unless you have a child in school There's a lot of really upset parents. About what? Schools. And are the schools open? Are they hybrid? Are they close? Are they do they do the schools know what they're doing about teaching online? And the the parents apparently are fresh, greater beyond what you can imagine. So I don't know what that means for their vote, but they're not happy Campers. They are not happy campers and when it comes to wanting to get this virus over Talk to suburbia. I think they wanted over while they wanted over more than two people out in the rural areas, people in rural areas of space. You're not worried about social distancing. I get some funny e mails from time to time from people that tell me where they live. And they say I'm out here basically rural America and I like this social distancing. I've always been About separating myself from other people. So the rural people like their space, the city people don't have any space, but the suburban people move there to get space and they want their kids in school. And they are ticked. I don't. I haven't heard any parent who's just thrilled with the way their schools are operating. So then you've got these events. I don't know where they come from. Because the president is not in Manhattan. He's not on Michigan Avenue in Chicago. He's not down on Wilshire Boulevard in L. A. He's out in the country, small city small towns. So this this study came out from Stanford. Saying that the rallies have led To over 30,000 confirmed Koven 19 cases. And from there, they're guessing they say, likely caused the death of 700 Americans. So 30,000 confirmed Koven 19 cases coming from people that were at the rallies now, did they get him at the rallies? Stanford Look up the study from Stanford. They they don't mess around when they do studies. They examined 18 rallies between June and September. And they follow the subject for 10 weeks after each rally, and they came up with 30,000 people came down with the virus 700 of them died. So I I went online to where you get tickets for the next event. And here it is. Black and white. Of confirmation. SMS will be sent to your phone. Please follow the instructions to confirm your tickets. By registering for this event. You understand and expressly acknowledged at an inherent risk of exposure to covert 19 exist in any public place where people are present. And attending the event you and any guest voluntarily assumed all just related to exposure to covert 19 and wave release. And discharged. Donald J. Trump for President Inc. The Republican National Committee, the host venue or any of their affiliates, directors, officers, employees, agents, contractors or volunteers from any and all liability under any theory. Whether in negligence or otherwise for any illness or injury. So this was written by a good Philadelphia lawyer, and if you get sick do not soon. Uh, no, no, no, no, no, I know there's a lot of lawsuits around, but The president can sue. Lot of election people, but you cannot sue him. No way. Jose So that's the big disclaimer that you have to in order to get tickets. You've got to agree to that. That was kind of interesting. So this is also a referendum on What the president has been able to achieve. Versus covert 19. And the Koven 19 numbers. Could not be any worse. For President Trump as we head into Election Day. They're Dr Scott Gottlieb talking about the very latest. No things are getting worse around the country. I think Thanksgiving is really going to be an inflection point. I think December is probably going to be a toughest months. When we look at what's happening in states right now you're seeing accelerating spread. We're right at the beginning of what looks like exponential growth in a lot of states, the Midwest, the Great Lakes region, even states like Texas, where you see 6000 cases. Illinois 8000 cases. Florida 5000 cases, Wisconsin 5000 Cases reported Friday. These very worrisome trends there about 23 states right now that are accelerating the spread right now there's the positivity rate is above 10% 15 states. And all the states haven't are above one, which means that they're in expanding epidemic right now, so this is very worrisome as we head into the winter. Jeff Yeah. 23 States, But all states every one of them have growing Cove in cases now will that lead to.

president Donald J. Trump America Stanford Rural America Koven Florida Stanford University Ocala Dr Scott Gottlieb Republican National Committee President Inc Illinois Great Lakes Chicago Midwest
"stanford university" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"stanford university" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Medicine at Stanford University so I know we don't do recriminations or not today but when it when we talk about the the lockdown and indeed the entire economy shut down one suggestions made by the imperial college study that suggested a half million people were going to die in the U. K. and now estimated that down to twenty thousand or less in the U. K. over the course of three days the people who are in charge of study basically suggested the reason for that that is number one the death rate being lower but number two that the lockdown is actually effective at preventing this if you let people out of lockdown is on the twenty thousand it's a hundred thousand there's a study that came out from university of Washington today suggesting that the total number of deaths in the United States over the next four months could be eighty thousand I'm not sure what death rates that apply in that study and trying to figure that out all day long here do you think that the lockdown and and people staying home has been effective in at least reducing the transmission how many excess deaths had actually been prevented I'm not looking for you know hard number but but like I right I find that I can give you a hard number on this which is difficult right but I think the key thing there is but that you can see the uncertainty in practice right right in front of you that the argument for the shutdown essentially so not a lot of healthcare systems like yours in Italy's top imminently that's actually not unreasonable I mean it depends on what the terms on the capacity the health care system to deal with large numbers of people need validators in ICU beds and things like that so I think that died it's hard for me to save my comment directly I think I have to be very careful attention to detail college studies study and the last I saw just this morning but you're free from the P. I expect that he just just basically changes wanted something like that to look more carefully I think there that that that that's I mean TA you see people putting numbers and look to see are prevalent especially as soon as your problem can definitely number initially that led to this massive massive shut down policy that number it isn't justified by that actual study will part of the population they they they guess that number I mean I think we we definitely much more careful about about a more humble I think about you know the confidence with which we said let's do this when we when we don't actually know number we should be we should say we don't know that number or to reflect the uncertainty in our in our in our confidence in our our statements much more more effectively we typically do and Dr J. final question for you let's let's assume that we actually do get these tests in place that we start running all these zero prevalence has that that puts your problems by the way just get your check my definition is to make sure I'm getting this right that would be checking the prevalence of the of the antibodies in people's blood basically one has racked what once the once those tests aren't correct then how soon do you think this laptop how soon could we could we be looking at getting out of get out of I want to yesterday I want this test yesterday I went down yesterday I want the number medially and we have our studies that I'm I'm working on with some of my colleagues to get the generality and end up in LA county took it to get those circles of nice but we are nationwide study and we support for nationwide said you need to keep sticks to to keep things are missing right now is we need a large number of antibody test and we need to have some funding source to pay for pay for that task and we can get those we can get that running with the whole I mean the scientific community around but the folks I'm talking with they want these numbers also so this is not something that's controversial I don't think it's partisan I just think it's we just need we need the number I'm hoping will know it in in that two weeks on that the latest what name really amazing amazing stuff and an interest and vital stuff here from Dr J. Bhattacharya professor medicine it's never really appreciate your time Sir and thanks so much for hard work on this topic yeah I think it was a real pleasure to care well coming up we're gonna talk about president trump apparently members media very very angry that president trump's numbers are up in the midst of all of this because of course everything is from fall gets that momentarily first let's talk about some stuff that you can do in the near term like right now you are locked down at home well first of all you can help your fellow Americans how can you do that as a member of the community well yes my name then two four one four nine zero take the love America pledged today how can you help out local businesses that are just getting slammed well you could purchase a gift card from them you could commit to social distancing which is going to be useful regardless what happens next you.

Stanford University
"stanford university" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"stanford university" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Stanford University so I don't we don't do recriminations or doctor David when it when we talk about the D. locked down and and the the entire economy shut down one of the suggestions made by the imperial college study that suggested a half million people were going to die in the U. K. and now estimated that down to twenty thousand or less in the UK over the course of three days the people who are in charge of study basically suggested the reason for that that is number one the death rate being lower but number two that the lockdown is actually effective at preventing this if you let people out of lockdown is on B. twenty thousand maybe it's a hundred thousand there's a study that came out from university of Washington today suggesting that the total number of deaths in the United States over the next four months could be eighty thousand I'm not sure what death rates they're playing in that study I've been trying to figure that out all day long here do you think the deep locked down and and people staying home has been effective in at least reducing the transmission how many excess deaths have actually been prevented and I'm not looking for you know a hard number but but like I although I can give you a hard number on this which is difficult right but I think the key thing there is that you can see the uncertainty in practice right right in front of you that the argument for the shut down essentially to not overwhelm healthcare systems like yours in Italy this is what's happening lately that's actually not unreasonable I mean it depends on what the tournament after the health care system to deal with large numbers of people need validators in ICU beds and things like that so I think that died it's hard for me to save my comment directly I think I have a very careful attention if your college studies study and at last I saw just this morning but you're free from the P. I expect that he just just basically changes wanted something like that to look more carefully I think there that that that that's I mean TA you see people putting numbers in the C. are prevalent especially assume it's your problem can definitely number initially that led to this massive massive shut down policy but that number it isn't justified by that actual study will pop up the population they they've they guessed that number I mean I think we we need much more careful about about that more humble I think about you know the confidence with which we say let's do this when we when we don't actually know number we should be we should say we don't know that number or to reflect the uncertainty in our in our in our confidence in our our statements much more more effectively we typically do and Dr J. I don't question for you let's let's assume that we actually do get these tests in place that we start running all these zero prevalence has that that puts your approval and by the way just to check my definition of this to make sure I'm getting this right that would be checking the prevalence of the of the antibodies in people's blood basically one has backed what once the once those tests aren't correct then how soon do you think this laptop how soon could we could we be looking at getting out of get out of I want to yesterday a long discussed yesterday I went down yesterday I want the number medially and we have our studies that I'm I'm working on with some of my colleagues to get the generality and end up in LA county took it to get that circle so sorry but we need a nationwide study and we support for nationwide said you needed to keep the extra to keep things are missing right now is we need a large number of antibody test that we need some funding source to pay for pay for that task and we can get those we can get that running with **** I mean the site if you need to round up the folks I'm talking with they want the numbers also so this is not something that's controversial I don't think it's parties and I just think it's we just need we need the number I'm hoping will know it in in that two weeks on that the latest what name really amazing amazing stuff and an interest and vital stuff here from Dr J. Bhattacharya professor medicines can't really appreciate your time Sir and thanks so much for hard work on this topic yeah I think it was a real pleasure to care but coming up we're gonna talk about president trump apparently members media very very angry that president trump's numbers are up in the midst of all of this because of course everything is from fall gets that momentarily first let's talk about some stuff that you can do in the near term like right now all you are locked down at home well first of all you can help your fellow Americans how can you do that is a member of the community well text my name Ben two four one four nine zero take the love America pledge today how can you help out local businesses that are just getting slammed well you could purchase a gift card from them you could commit to social distancing which is gonna be useful regardless.

Stanford University David
"stanford university" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"stanford university" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Of medicine at Stanford University so I I know that we don't do recriminations or doctor David when it when we talk about the D. locked down and indeed the entire economy shut down one of the suggestions made by the the imperial college study that suggested a half million people were going to die in the U. K. in asked mated that down to twenty thousand or less in the UK over the course of three days the people who are in charge and study basically suggested the reason for that that is number one the death rate being lower but number two that the lockdown is actually effective at preventing this if you let people out of lockdown is on the twenty thousand maybe it's a hundred thousand there's a study that came out from university of Washington today suggesting that the total number of deaths in the United States over the next four months could be eighty thousand I'm not sure what death rates they're playing in that study I've been trying to figure that out all day long here do you think the deep locked down and and people staying home has been effective in at least reducing the transmission how many excess deaths had actually been prevented and I'm not looking for you know hard number but but later on tonight although I can give you a hard number on this which is difficult right but I think the key thing there is that you can see the uncertainty in practice right right in front of you that the argument for the shutdown essentially is not alone healthcare systems like yours in Italy this is what's happening lately that's actually not unreasonable I mean it depends on what the terms on the capacity the healthcare system to deal with large numbers of people meet validators in ICU beds and things like that so I think that died it's hard for me to save my comment directly I think I have a very careful attention if your college studies study and that I I saw just this morning but you're free from the P. eyes that study just just basically changes wanted something like that to look more carefully I think they're the best that that's I mean do you see people putting numbers and the sheer prevalence essentially assume it's your problem that's right number initially that led to this massive massive shut down policy that number it isn't justified by that actual study will part of the population they they've they guess that number I mean I think we we need much more careful about about that more humble I think about the confidence with which we said let's do this when we when we don't actually know number we should be we should say we don't know that number at work toward reflects the uncertainty in our in our in our confidence in our our statements much more more effectively we typically do and Dr J. final question for you let's let's assume that we actually do get these tests in place that we start running all these zero prevalence has said that personal problems by the way just get checked my definition is to make sure I'm getting this right that would be checking the prevalence of the of the antibodies in people's blood basically has backed what once the once those tests aren't correct then how soon do you think this what's up how soon could we could we be looking at getting out of get out of I want to yesterday I wanted because yesterday I went on yesterday I want the number medially and we have our studies that I'm I'm working on with some of my colleagues to get the Ali and end up in LA county to get together does your call so sorry but we are nationwide study and we support for initialize that you needed to keep the extra to keep things are missing right now is we need a large number of antibody test that we need some funding source to pay for pay for that task and we can get those we can get that running with **** I mean the site if you need to round up the folks I'm talking with they want these numbers also so this is not something that's controversial I don't think it's partition I just think it's we just need we need the number I'm hoping will know it in in that two weeks on that latest what name really amazing amazing stuff and an interest and vital stuff here from Dr J. Bhattacharya professor misunderstand really appreciate your time Sir and thanks so much for hard work on this topic yeah I think it was a little pleasure take care but coming up we're gonna talk about president trump apparently members media very very angry that president trump's numbers are up in the midst of all of this because of course everything is from fall gets that momentarily first let's talk about some stuff that you can do in the near term like right now while you are locked down at home well first of all you can help your fellow Americans how can you do that as a member of the community well text my name then two four one four nine zero take the love America pledge today how can you help a local businesses that are just getting slammed well you could purchase a gift card from them you could commit to social distancing which is going to be useful regardless what happens next you.

Stanford University David
"stanford university" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

08:32 min | 1 year ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"Of like Chopin's Jim Honor Ballot And like they're they're people who can play it in like I'm like. Oh this is very nice and like I can appreciate this and there are some people who can play it And it like every time I listened to it one hundred percent of the time I get goosebumps on my spine like like provokes of very intense emotional reaction and I just wonder whether part of that is. Because I know that there's this person on the other end in there and some sort of emotional state playing at that resonates with mine and whether or not I like. You'll ever have a computer able to do that. Yeah that's I mean this gets kind of philosophical question at some point. No it was a human or computer than what kind of what a have. Yeah and I actually had a philosophy. Professor in Undergrad who Like ask the question like would would it make you any less appreciative of Chopin composition? Knowing that he was being insincere posing as like he was. You know doing it for some reason. I was like yeah. I don't know like it's a well one of my piano piano teachers Used to say that you kind of have I. It's kind of like a theater. You have to convey your emotions but there has to be some even when you go wild to has to be some element of control on the back because You need to kind of continue the thread and Yeah for sure but but also It is For me also just Vaca Plan as the pleasure of it's not just Having a recording. That's That sounds good. Yeah no I'm very jealous That you had the discipline and did all the work to like. Put this power into your finger. It's awesome well. Thank you so much for For taking the time to be with us today. This was a fantastic conversation and I feel like I've learned a lot. Yes thanks for having me my pleasure. It's awesome so that was Kevin's chat with Percy Lang from Stanford University and Kevin. You know what was really interesting was hearing both you and Percy reminisce about your experiences with hypercard and that was Percy's kind of introduction to computing programming. That was actually my introduction to programming to in your awesome. Yeah before I the web pages I was building hypercard things. And what kind of struck me as you were talking about. How to teach The next generation and talking about different tooling the idea of a or the concept of like a hypercard for AI. That's something that I think would be really really beneficial. What what are your thoughts? Well I think he was getting at that. A little bit When he was talking about his ideas around program synthesis ended the interview. So it's really interesting. I find this to be the case with a lot of people that the inspiration like the thing that I tugged you into computing and programming oftentimes sticks with you your entire career. And so he started his computing experience thinking about hypercard which is very natural easy way to express computations and still to this day like the thing that he's most excited about is how you can use these very sophisticated machine learning technologies to help. People expressed their needs for compute at a more natural way so that the computer can go help people out like I think that's so awesome. Yeah I do too. I thought the same thing when he was talking about the program. Synthesis that has some people I think. Understandably maybe freaked out right like idea that oh these things can right themselves but when you put it in that context of it might make things more accessible and less intimidating and more available across a variety of different things. I think it becomes really exciting. Yeah I've been saying this a lot lately. There's there's a way to look at a bunch of machine learning stuff and get really freaked out about it and then there's a way to look at machine learning where you're like. Oh my goodness piece of technology is creating a bunch of abundance that didn't exist before or it's creating Opportunity and access that people didn't have before to more actively participating in the creation of technology and that's the thing that really excites me about the the state of machine learning and twenty twenty. I agree I think that there is massive potential for that and kind of pivoting from that one of the things. The two of you talked about towards the end of your conversation was I guess the relationship between academia and industry when it comes to AM L. And you were talking about near the tremendous amount of computers often needed for these different projects and for these different research. Things being someone who's been on both sides like you have. What do you see as the opportunity for academia and Industry to work together? And what do you think are the? What's maybe one of the areas where there's friction right now? Yeah I think that Percy nailed it in his assessment so there's certainly an opportunity for industry to help academia out more with just compute resources although I think these compete resource constraints in a sense aren't the worst thing in the world like the the the brutal reality is that Even though it may seem that industry has an abundance of compute relative to a university research lab if you are inside of a big company doing these things the appetite for compute for these big machine learning projects is so vast that you have scarcity even inside of big companies and so I think that's a very interesting Like constraint for both academia industry to lean all the way into and to try to figure out cleverer ways for solving these problems. And I'm super excited about that but like the the point that he made Which I found particularly interesting is the fact that if we could do a little bit better job sharing our problems with one another. We could probably unlock a ton of creativity that we're not able to bring to bear solving these problems right now. And that's something that one of the reasons. I love doing these podcasts. So I'M GONNA go back and do my job as CTO of Microsoft. And see if I can try to make that happen more. I love it. I appreciate you doing that and I appreciate. Percy's work as well. That's just about it for us today but before we end I just have to say Kevin. I have been excitedly anticipating the release of your book which will be out on April seventh. It's called reprogramming the American dream and I've actually had a a tiny sneak peek. And it's really really well written. It's really good thank you. You are too kind. I am I'm looking forward to being out as well. I got a box of books in the mail. The other day This is the first book that I've ever written so I was like I had this pinch me moment When I opened this box and there were the stack of hardcover books that had the words printed in them that I written so. That's sort of amazing. That's so cool. I love that so much and I'm definitely going to be recommending it to my friends and my fellow tech nerds out there Because what I really like about the book is that it really does break down a lot of the things we've been talking about in this conversation. Like Hey I. In an understandable way in a way that is pragmatic and not scary. Yeah that was a goal. I was hoping to take a bunch of material that can be relatively complex in presented in a way that hopefully it's accessible to a broad audience so I think it's actually critically important like one of the most important things is to have all of us have a better grounding of what it is and what it isn't so that we can make smart decisions about how we want to employ it and how we want to encourage other people to use these technologies on our behalf. I love it. I love it all right. Well that doesn't for us as always please reach out anytime at behind. The tech at Microsoft Dot Com. Tell us what's on your mind and sure as hell everyone you know about the show. Thanks for listening..

Percy Lang Kevin Microsoft Chopin Professor Vaca Plan Stanford University CTO
"stanford university" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

15:25 min | 1 year ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"At the end of the day we're building no systems of for the world and I think human snake mistakes have fallacies biases they're not super transparent sometimes and why Inherit all these win. Maybe you can design a better system and I think computers already clearly. How many other advantages that. Humans don't have hi everyone. Welcome to behind the attack. I'm your host Kevin Scott Chief Technology Officer for Microsoft in this podcast. We're going to get behind the tech. We'll talk some of the people who made our modern world possible and understand what motivated them to create what they did. So join me to maybe learn a little bit about the history of computing and get a few behind the scenes insights into. What's happening today? Stick around? Uh Hello and welcome to behind the tech. I'm Christina Warren's senior advocate at Microsoft and Scott. Today our guests is Percy laying. Percy's an associate professor of Computer Science Stanford University and one of the great minds and ai specifically in machine learning and natural language processing. Yeah and Percy talks about the need for a I to be quote safely deployed and he says that given society's increasing reliance on machine learning it's critical to build tools that make machine learning more reliable in the wild. Yeah I completely agree with person's point of view and honestly with Like a bunch of his other very interesting ideas about how machine learning and natural language processing or unfolding over the next few years. Some super interested in having this conversation. Let's find out what he's up to. I.

Percy Kevin Scott Microsoft professor of Computer Science Chief Technology Officer Christina Warren
"stanford university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Stanford University in the senior producer of the lime disease documentary under our skin which premiered at the Tribeca film festival and was a two thousand ten Oskar simul some semi-finalist as well. Newbie also has two degrees in engineering bachelor's degree from the university of Utah master's degree from Stanford and previously. She was a technology writer for apple and other Silicon Valley companies welcome to the program. Chris good to be with you. Thanks inviting me to see today. This is a different very important topic. How in the world you come up with his idea forbidden? Well, the actual book project started. I had done this documentary on line two days. I had a pretty deep background about it. And and that the film did really well, it really educated a lot of people about how serious this disease can bay. It's it's caused by tick bites. It's little 'Bacterial that's transmitted by bites and treat it early. You know, you can get rid of it super fast. But if it it lingers it can cause permanent chronic disease, but the idea for the book came from friend of mine had sent me a videotape of the discover of disease Willie Bergdorf. For who is in his late eighties. And he confessed that he thought the outbreak of Lyme disease which began in the the the seventies and that was caused by biological weapons. Release and. I just thought it was. Shocking because it was crazy at the time. Because of my work with the documentary and just interviewing hundreds of patients and an experts there. There was always something that seemed a little wrong about the disease compared to other these. But you know, Willie Bergdorf irt he was respected scientists he had the most to lose by making that confession. Because what he was saying he lied about the discovery which was announced in eighty two. So in at the time of the interview, he would he had advanced Parkinson's. His each wasn't clear. I mean, he he seemed mentally with it. But it just seemed like it was a really important thing to get to the bottom of for public health to know this and explain why the disease so controversy and political about how to treat it and where it came from. So at that point, I said, I I'm just curious. I just have to get to the bottom of it and marched into this five year investigation into the biological weapons program into Willie's life to really determine is this is this a credible thing. He's talking about the book, primarily deals with with Willie, of course, as the scientists, and we're going to get deep into his life. And I'll even came up with this possibility not the line disease. We talk about the we all have known about as you mentioned, you get it from tick. That's the you know has disinfections bacteria in it. And they're supposed to be able to treat it with any -biotics. Is that the case? If you get it early in the first few weeks yet, it seems like most people can recover nicely. But the problem with the way the disease is now is a lot of people don't see the tech or they don't see. The rash that often shows up when there's a tick bite, so they just come down with the summer flu. It's just typical flu symptoms nothing specific, and they go into their doctor and their doctor says, well, it's probably a virus. You know, come back. If you weeks, it isn't cured, she'll they misdiagnosed it. They misdiagnose it. And then sometimes like patients come in with the rash or tick, and they administer the line has to say, well, let's take a wait and see attitude, and they ministered the test. But the test is not very reliable for lime to these in the first month. So that person might be told by the doctor, oh, it's negative carry on. And then they begin months if not years of misdiagnoses because they don't know the test is bad at the forty year old tests. So that's that's a complicating factor. And even when some when some people are treated with antibiotics after a month or two ten to twenty.

Willie Bergdorf Chris Stanford University Oskar simul apple university of Utah flu writer producer Parkinson two degrees forty year five year two days
"stanford university" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on WSB-AM

"I'm just saying listen, we're going to have to make some decisions here is a culture as a society as a country Stanford University told the sigma Chi fraternity to remove its American flag. Why Stanford to improve their image ministry, reportedly told the fraternity the flag could be seen as intimidating aggressive and alienating. Is this is this the country? We want the greatest generation of George Herbert Walker Bush and people like my father the fought for years in World War Two, and so many others in that with Tom Brokaw called the greatest generation an American flag. We're gonna we're gonna now teach kids in college that that flag is seen as intimidating aggressive, and alienating. When all the our treasure, our, kids blood shed lives lost limbs lost, you know, faces destroyed in war, no country, ever accumulating, more power and using it for the good than this one. And we're saying that in college to our kids, and we'll tell him five year olds at Santa doesn't exist. Because we don't we let them run away with the culture. There's no stopping them. This is where I keep warning. You we have we have a dual Justice system. We don't apply the laws equally. We don't have equal Justice under the law or equal application of always we're gonna lose it..

sigma Chi fraternity Tom Brokaw George Herbert Walker Bush Stanford University Stanford Santa five year
"stanford university" Discussed on KSCO 1080

KSCO 1080

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on KSCO 1080

"And next to shannon we have sarah who was teaching science for a couple of years and now she is in a program in management at stanford university and welcome so this issue actually hits pretty close to home for me while i was teaching i lost one of my really close to gun violence and this happened this happened in his own home you know and if we didn't have guns like this he might still be here and so i'm really hoping that we can change all of this and and i just think this shouldn't happen the students especially they should be able to graduate from high school and not have to deal with all this no thanks so much sara condolences to you on your friends the loss of your friend sitting also with us here is radical and she is a medical researcher at it you see sf university of california san francisco and a few thoughts from you if you would radical thanks a lot i think it's just really crazy seems ridiculous that all teachers researchers anything anybody that's trying to head the wood and make it a better place so for me do that good imaging research at tied into diagnosis a patient who have lifestyle diseases and we just wanna make lights better so they can get faster better diagnosis i worked hard.

sarah stanford university researcher san francisco lifestyle diseases sf university of california
"stanford university" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on WTVN

"World once you their amazing it it it it really is and i is science investigating this yeah you know the thing is that for many years it was regarded as a few tudo science you know it was it was not taken seriously by dream researchers and psychologists for for many years it wasn't until the 1970s when two researchers keep heroin in england and stephen the verse i here in california at stanford university i independently of one another on did very similar experiments that showed that we should dreaming was indeed a very real phenomenon um what they did was they had um subjects uh go to sleep in a sleep laboratory um they would be hooked up to all kinds of monitors of if they can be verified that they were sleep and dreaming and you know is different stages of sleep and you can see the different stages they were going through on the monitors and they were instructed to make particular movements with their eyes when they were in the lusa dream have this is because you know when you're dreaming when you're a sweep your body goes into a state of temporary paralysis and this is so that you don't act off the behavior of your dreams we sometimes call of the old tags singer yeah you know you like what you don't want a band your head against the wall or from in any short corners or anything like that if you if you know so you so your body gets paralyze y while you're a sleep and uh and i think what you're referring to is during sleep paralysis someplace people wake up and they see you know threatening figures like the old hag like your to the striving but most of that we can talk about that later but most of the time people during sleep paralysis are actually asleep and and.

heroin england california stanford university paralysis stephen
"stanford university" Discussed on Constitutional

Constitutional

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Constitutional

"Jing monopolies of the west he became a trustee of stanford university stanford being a famous railroad baron and field saw the income tax as a form of socialism he wrote in his supreme court opinion explaining why the income tax to be strapped down bats here's the cloud the present assault upon capital is but the beginning it will be but the steppingstone to others larger and more sweeping till our political contests will become a war of the poor against the reg a war constantly growing in intensity and bitterness so that's pretty dark the question of what is the relationship between the federal government and individuals making money that was a hot area of constitutional too vaguely nineteenthcentury both the left and the right thought that the question of exactly how does the government regulate the economy what kind of economy are going to have what kind of inequality regon have what kind of redistribution are we going to have those questions were hot constitutional questions at this time even though today they don't feel like constitutional questions at all to issues lake antitrust issues like the gold standard the income tax these were all major constitutional debates both in the courts and in politics i mean the original conception of how the political konomi was going to work in the united states if you read people like thomas jefferson was weird heavyland of small producers and they weren't going to be dependent on others and then as the 19th century rolls along we get this massive economic upheaval and it quickly becomes clear in the late nineteenth century.

trustee income tax assault united states thomas jefferson stanford university
"stanford university" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Enter the promo code decode at checkout to receive 15 percent off any of the sensor cans with voice again use the promo code decodesimplehumancom for discount on your own voice control sensor can i'd also like to tell you about recode media with peter kafka peter who did you talk to this week hit characters who i talk to this week i will tell you drink uber also known as the ceo and main host of the young turks has been around online on tv forever they're the lefty answer to ripe for i don't know how he described him check we'll tell you these very very famous he would like more money for being famous and he would like with more respect and we can talk all about them school sounds great peter you can find recode media on apple podcast spotify google play music wherever you listened to your podcasts were here with leslie berlin the historian for the silicon valley archives at stanford university and she's the author of a new book called troublemakers silicon valley is coming of age about seven exceptional men and women who were pioneers of today's technology in the 1970s and 80s so tell me about this book what was the impetus for this book and what you are trying to achieve yet with this book i really wanted to aid talk about more than just one person my first and book was a biography of bob noise and hand that he deserved a full biography but it really was apparent to me that innovation is a team effort right it said he org and so i wanted to be able to talk about a more than one person and also talk about people across a variety of industries and the reason why.

ceo stanford university peter kafka apple leslie berlin 15 percent
"stanford university" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on WTVN

"I guess even 'cause i i'm not a doctor you can cost osteoporosis these kinds of things from uh being the on because again it will always be the same but you'll be pulling out with you need from your bones but it's not gonna change that answer so that is is just two aims that i mean i could be wrong but is uh you know uh i will tell you one thing that person i'm working with i don't want to mention the name on the phone but is she is not only the chair of stanford university which is very respected school but she's also one of the top internationally known by cancer specialist in all of people i was with they were professors and their topnotch m but i think this supportive thing i think if people um took what you're talking about ban and we actually gave this stuff and our life instead of fresh in our minds trash in our spirits trashing our bodies we would live a long time but we of use our cell all the things that you're talking about and um so that's why serta believe that if somebody has vowed to say one more thing i'll i'll stop a friend uh two friends of mine are both scientists and they are actually uh per producers of some of the finest echinacea and the world and a lot of other herbal supplements and that's great for for building uram yoon system badin isn't it stuff amazing amazing implant planters are may uh herbs are amazing and carol general you know they're weeds right that's medicine grows out of the crack the sidewalk how how cool is that right the.

stanford university serta
"stanford university" Discussed on Packet Pushers - Datanauts

Packet Pushers - Datanauts

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Packet Pushers - Datanauts

"The way i got here really wasn't bydesign initially i had left stanford university i head down a little bit of consulting and joined one of my clients at the time all covered konica minolta and then left there and thought okay i'm going to step back into another it leadership role but as it turned out most of the roles that were out there that i was finding when i talked to executive recruiters were very much tech center occur operationally centric meaning they were looking for quote unquote you don't see my air quotes here but they were looking for ceos dead were focused on keeping the lights on you know be the ordertaker be the downstream component in our discussion don't really sit at the table don't really have a contributing voice to where the company goes and how to engage with customers will tell you where we're going and that just again seemed odd to me i ended up kenneth stepping away and i had friends and colleagues of reaching out saying hey you've got some time on your hands and you've got this kind of different perspective come talk to me and so one thing lead to another next thing you know it i ended up with a solid book of business and i'm grateful to say that that has carried me now for seven years and it's all through word of mouth it's been an interesting journey i think we need to explain to people what the coo role really is what is it that a ceo provides to the business tim so let me just in a nutshell what is their job function.

stanford university ceo tim executive kenneth coo seven years
"stanford university" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on KGO 810

"Stanford university also have a new book out called getting more of what you want your master he go she asians and i think that a lot of listeners they really only realiser negotiating two major things at home sales job interview were salary and you touched on both of those in the book one of the major hurdles people in the air the negotiation changes she's and that battle is characterized by i'm going to try to get stuff from you that you don't want to give me minded try to keep you from getting stuff i don't want you as soon as i view negotiation has battled armor up and even if my counterpart doesn't have that view of negotiation as soon as they see me all armored up and ready for battle they get armored up and we have a economics with house jason middleton jason kao canas angel investor and the ceo of inside the car which got your fancy right now i am very fascinated with something called equity crowd imagine whatever product yuval last acknowledge barca see you wearing that yes as right the new in your fit bit launched at my audience many years ago launched fast what if you love the first version of consuming you've had multiple versions of this private for a republican you said you know what when i bought it there was a thing that said on august i we're going to south ten thousand people a hundred dollars in equity in the company the company was worth ten million dollars raised a million bucks that way to fund that watch the next generate rachel watching you might say why spent two hundred on the watch about one hundred two get some shares those shares triple i got the watch for free or if it goes 10x i got my whole family watches and if it goes a thousand acts i.

Stanford university ceo jason middleton ten million dollars hundred dollars