35 Burst results for "Stanford University"

Prominent Conservatives Issue Report Rebutting Trump Election Claims

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:10 min | 3 weeks ago

Prominent Conservatives Issue Report Rebutting Trump Election Claims

"A group of conservatives now reading from a CNN article, a group of conservatives, including prominent lawyers and retired federal judges issued a 72 page report. Categorically rebutting each of the claims made in court by former president Donald Trump in his supporters over the 2020 election results. So you've got a group of these jurists. Who are we talking about? Thomas B Griffith, retired federal appeal court judge, J Michael ludig. A guy I know, Michael McConnell, a very smart guy, and professor at Stanford University, former solicitor general Ted Olson, former U.S. senator John Danforth, and Gordon Smith. And a couple of other people. Now CNN does admit quote several of them are longtime Trump critics. So these are these are kind of never Trump jurists. And they contend, and it looks like this report. It's a 72 page report that was produced to help the January 6th committee. In other words, they're working in a sense to support the democratic narrative on this. And they say that Trump and his supporters quote had an obligation to recognize the election debate was over. Now, on what basis do they come to this remarkable conclusion? Well, it turns out, all that they do is they review in some depth, the cases that went before various courts. Now they admit this group does that many of these cases were not adjudicated. Some of them were dismissed for lack of standing or you filed it in the wrong court. You should have filed this one before the election. And this one is now moot. And so it seems to me that, I mean, I don't have difficulty believing that in those cases, filed in the immediate aftermath of the election, there was insufficient evidence there. That the election was stolen.

Thomas B Griffith J Michael Ludig Michael Mcconnell Senator John Danforth CNN Ted Olson Donald Trump Gordon Smith Stanford University U.S.
Title IX creating opportunities for international athletes

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

Title IX creating opportunities for international athletes

"Maria bonanova from Russia was recruited for the bowling team at Vanderbilt university on the golf course Alain Crowder from Stuttgart Germany had no opportunity to play in Europe College sports is not a thing in Europe at all So I think the U.S. really has a unique opportunity there and then obviously title and I'm just tough set off and make sure we're better Crowder is at Stanford University Heather Lynn was a top player in Taiwan Luckily I play a lot of junior tournaments growing up from like 14 to 18 years old and play a bunch of AJ Jerry tournaments USGA and that's how coach D found me She's talking about coach Derek Bradley at the university of Oregon There are several agencies set up to help foreign female athletes by putting them in contact with various coaches and universities I'm Ed

Maria Bonanova Alain Crowder Heather Lynn Vanderbilt University Europe Stuttgart Bowling Russia Aj Jerry Crowder Germany Golf Stanford University Derek Bradley U.S. Taiwan Usga University Of Oregon
Who Is Dr. Andrei Illarionov, Former Adviser to Vladimir Putin?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:44 min | 5 months ago

Who Is Dr. Andrei Illarionov, Former Adviser to Vladimir Putin?

"He is a former economic adviser to Russia's acting prime minister jago gadar, chief economic adviser to Russian prime minister Viktor Chen midin and chief economic adviser to Vladimir Putin, doctor Andre il lardo hilaria. Welcome to America first. Thank you very much. Sebastian for inviting me. You are very, very welcome. You have an illustrious resume. I have three pages worth of your qualifications in front of me. We do not have many people with your prior access inside the Kremlin speaking out on American media regarding the events occurring in Ukraine. So let's start at the beginning. Will you walk us through our millions of listeners and viewers across the country, your background before you came to the United States, your qualifications, you've studied in the UK and Austria at Stanford University. So may I ask you just to introduce yourself to our listeners? I'm going to buy my training and I spent most of my time at The Economist and studying economic policy inviting on economic policy. You mentioned some of the people whom I advise to. For almost a TSI was economic adviser to current Russian president. And that time Russia was able to have a pretty remarkable economic growth that double GDP of the country and GDP per CAPiTA was in ten years. It was a little economic miracle for the Russian economy. But it was everything in the past. Since 2008, after three years after my departure, a Russian economy went into stagnation and seeing them economic growth of Russia was not more than 1% per year on average. So instead of doubling GDP within ten years, it's a kind of 10% growth. So 7 to 8% per year country was growing about 1%. It wasn't 1% per year. Now definitely it's a crisis and the intentions of the Russian leadership and first of all of mister Putin right now is very opposite to what you have demonstrated in your initial slight when Putin was talking about a little bit about democracy, freedom or whatever. It's definitely wrong. It's Putin does not pursue this goals anymore. He's intentions are imperialistic. His intentions are conquering the neighboring country, establishing a new world

Jago Gadar Russian Prime Minister Viktor Andre Il Lardo Hilaria Russia Vladimir Putin America Sebastian Ukraine Stanford University Austria UK Mister Putin Putin
Who Is Dr. Scott Atlas?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:42 min | 7 months ago

Who Is Dr. Scott Atlas?

"He is senior fellow in health policy at the Hoover institution and author, most recently of a fabulous fabulous book, a plague upon a house, my fight at the Trump White House to stop COVID from destroying America. Welcome, doctor Scott Atlas to America first. Oh, thanks for having me. I appreciate that. So we've been tried for the longest time to get you on the show, your buddy Victor Davis Hansen constantly said, yes, you gotta get him on, you gotta get him on. We're delighted to have you on. I've got a multi page multi page resume CV bio for you, so you clearly have the cres for those of our millions of listers who may not have watched you at those press conferences. Please if you would just start as we do with all of our one on one guess, give us a potted summary of who you are, your qualifications and what you are focused on as we speak. Sure. So I am a senior fellow in health policy at a policy institute at Stanford University called the Hoover institution. Where I research and work on healthcare policy solutions, I've been doing that for more than a decade full time before that I had about a 25 year history, a career in academic medicine as a professor in the school of medicine for the last 14 years before the ten years as a professor in chief of neuro radiology at Stanford University school of medicine. And I had a previous experience and the medical science that various top level medical centers in the U.S., including iterative mania, graduated from University of Chicago with my MD degree.

Trump White House Scott Atlas Hoover Institution Victor Davis Hansen America Stanford University Neuro Radiology School Of Medicine Stanford University School Of U.S. University Of Chicago
Would MLK Support Things Like Affirmative Action?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:09 min | 7 months ago

Would MLK Support Things Like Affirmative Action?

"Today is Martin Luther King day and we're going to be treated or perhaps subjected to the usual over the top tributes to king. Now I do admire Martin Luther King. I admire what he stood for. And I admire especially what he stood for in the critical part of his career. Early in his life, Martin Luther King was involved in some scandals, he was he had a plagiarism, scandal, for example, and he was in many ways a flawed man. I don't really need to go into that. He also became sort of radical toward the end of his life. He wanted a massive redistribution of income, he became a sort of, well, he became very close to a socialist, if not a socialist. But the one thing he never did was he never deviated from his central idea was that we as a country should be judged on our merits as individuals. In other words, in his own words, by the content of our character not the not the color of our skin. This was Martin Luther King's famous dream. This is why we have Martin Luther King day. That's what defined king. And the left now tries to imply that somehow king gave up that idea became an advocate of affirmative action, supported race based preferences. And none of this is true. In fact, I had to debate years ago with the reverend Jesse Jackson and you know this was at Stanford University. And I challenged the reverend Jackson. I said, 'cause he was like, I knew Martin Luther King, you see, he would have definitely been on board with affirmative action, and I said, well, quite apart from this kind of appeal to personal familiarity, can you point to a particular example where king does not support compensatory justice in a particular case, but a system wide nationwide system of race and ethnic preferences. Let's just say in college admissions or in job hiring or in government contracts. Absent a showing of actual discrimination show me where king advocated that. And of course he couldn't do it so he resorted to his usual deflections. Iambic pentameter, you know, those famous clearing of his throat and

Martin Luther King Jesse Jackson Stanford University Jackson King
How Elizabeth Holmes Soured the Media on Silicon Valley

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 9 months ago

How Elizabeth Holmes Soured the Media on Silicon Valley

"Their owners founder Elizabeth Holmes has taken the stand at her trial you can't tell your side of the reporters trailed Elizabeth Holmes as you looked at federal courthouse in San Jose California the fall in Silicon Valley star took the stand late Friday afternoon in her trial for criminal fraud will back again on Monday the former entrepreneur will attempt to refute allegations by federal prosecutors that she bamboozled investors and patients about her start up Theranos and blood testing machine called Edison that she claimed would reshape health care homes began her testimony by recounting her early years as a student at Stanford University her interest in disease detection while working with the respected chemistry professor who later joined the company she talked about dropping out of school at the age of nineteen and convincing her parents let her use your college savings to found a startup the government's evidence included internal documents and emails and

Elizabeth Holmes Federal Courthouse Silicon Valley San Jose California Stanford University Government
Victor Davis Hanson's Take on Glenn Youngkin's Upset Victory in Virginia

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:41 min | 10 months ago

Victor Davis Hanson's Take on Glenn Youngkin's Upset Victory in Virginia

"Victor Davis Hansen senior fellow at the Hoover institution at Stanford University and author most recent so many things. Anything with his name on it, buy it, but the dying citizen out now follow him at vide Hansen. Professor Hansen, welcome to America first. Thank you for having me again, Seth. So much to discuss, personal news on your front with regards to a very storied conservative publication, but let's talk about the events in Virginia of the last few days. My take is the following. I would like you to be the sanity check for this. We have seen 9 out of ten of the analyses post the young con victory have been incredibly sophomoric, very, very simplistic, basically half of them have said, this is an indictment of Donald Trump because young and isn't Trump and the other half said this is a victory for Trump because he's just like Trump and critical race theory, et cetera, et cetera. I think the truth lies somewhere in between a very cautious candidate who didn't go full America first. However, embraced a culture war issue much like president Trump, which propelled him to the top of the ticket, who is to blame or who gets the credit for this massive upset victory professor. I think you have it right. I think he ran more successfully or at least as successfully in those red counties of Virginia than Trump did. So he was able to get the base. He was able to keep the base because Trump endorsed him and he didn't no issue did he disagree with the Trump magazine. He might have downplayed abortion in the particular suburbs. But he didn't, and he thanked Trump and that he won. He said that I appreciate that. But Trump made it easier for him because let's face it, this ostracism of Trump on social media, boomeranged against Silicon Valley. Because Trump found out that when he wasn't commenting on personalities every day, that in time people are remembering his record and not what he tweeted. And his tweets bothered some people. Some people they encouraged. But the point I'm making is people looked at Biden's disaster's first 9 and a half months and they've said this was all self created. The opposite of what Trump did. So Trump's stature has risen the more I don't know how to say it because it's a contradiction or paradox, the more remote. It's almost as a Trump is everywhere in the mind of the Democrats, but he's nowhere on social

Donald Trump Victor Davis Hansen Professor Hansen Hoover Institution President Trump Stanford University Virginia Hansen America Trump Magazine Seth Silicon Valley Biden
"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:49 min | 10 months ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"On senate so think sort of break apart. So he fought the hicks vase. Experiment you six hundred fifty times the mass of a problem. Yeah but it's we usually use this unit called a gig electron-volt and the proton is a little less than that and in that unit. It's one hundred and five of these giga electron volts or. Gv sill. Till i understand. Is that dole lines but so my understanding that he also essentially Bratty also sorry mediator mass. That's right not yet not gravity. It's doesn't directly have anything to do with the gravitational force but we have a mass which is an inertial mass and how things accelerate without having to talk about gravity and the higgs on is understood. There's a framework the particle physics standard model in which the higgs bozon first of all. I should say that every in quantum mechanics anytime you have a particle. There's also a field. I should say. In quantum field theory so like in electromagnetism the particles of electromagnetism or the photons and the field is the electromagnetic field in the case of lego. It is producing gravitational waves. Those waves are the classical cousins of what we particle physicist would call the gravitons but also we think that the higgs bows on the particle is associated with something called the higgs field. And furthermore this higgs field we think that it has a sort of non zero value everywhere in space time and this This crazy field talk to particles an endows them with mass so that particles that otherwise would have been massless. Feel this field and they get mass this way and and we can make predictions based on that for the relation between the masses of the forces. That the carriers of the weak force the which we call the w bozon's in z and. There's some successful predictions from that says the caucus the the hicks boss over mass mediation interact with a gravitons gravity. I mean gratitude mediation. What's the connection there. Well we i would say that. The higgs bone gives particles mass and gravity interacts..

higgs bozon dole senate
"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:59 min | 10 months ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Stanford university and slack. He's interested in noble fictions of relativistic particles. Scattering of those insights applied to like your problems. That lance thank you for me on guilt. Yeah thanks for doing this. so briefly described last. I am so mathematically incompetent. And so but i find this topic's extremely interesting. I go to sleep taking about falling into a black hole most nights and it has been very useful in getting to sleep but cisa can't some conversations as audience news about light wind blew. Go that is detecting Gravitational waves Advanced goldberg on. Now we got said going onto doing leisa taking it to the next level And then be edited doing a many particle physics experiments. The most people think of these things are distinctly different debts. Black holes are big things not necessarily diameter but big mass and momentum and so on and the individual things had via the sort of squashed together at. Let's see of a small business. So so let's the black horse. You have a court here from He sees a black hole of nature. I the most ludovic macroscopic arcades at the university. So what do you meet. Why this luggage. He made the most pacific macroscopic object. I think he meant the they were very. Mathematically precise there is a way of describing them If a black hole is not spinning we say that they saw a certain equation bull which einstein pro down his field equations of general relativity and the solution to them to those equations. There was one found. Boy schwartz shield early in the twentieth century and it gives a very precise in very simple description of what space time looks like everywhere near a black hole and as far as we know black holes. Obey the these relations perfectly and In the real world they can sometimes have accretion disks of gas and dust around them but but sometimes they appear to be very naked or or shorn of that dust and then they should obey these equations. And we've seen examples of that with the lie go detectors at least seeing the gravitational waves when two black holes coalesce and so far it seems to be described by einstein's equations as well.

Stanford university leisa lance goldberg Boy schwartz einstein
Is the Biden Regime Illegitimate?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:58 min | 10 months ago

Is the Biden Regime Illegitimate?

"We are one on one with Stanford University's professor Victor Davis Hansen. Given that you have said all the synonyms, the deep state, the permanent bureaucracy, justified, not hyperbole, we have the empirical evidence. If we add to that, what we witnessed last year, 80 million unbidden mail out ballots sent out. Democrat governors across the nation saying we don't need to verify signatures. We can stretch the dates suitcases of ballots being pulled from under tables on CCTV. And Hunter Biden, the Hunter Biden story being literally censored at the source by Silicon Valley, the oldest newspaper in America, Alexander Hamilton's New York Post, not being allowed to re post the story of the contents of the hunt of mine laptop. Is it again? I'm using you as my sounding board. Is that hyperbole? It is an exaggeration to say that this quote unquote regime, this White House is illegitimate professor. Or I'm not going to adjudicate because that's what Hillary Clinton did and discouraged. Remember, she said that he was that he was not fairly elected. Stacey Abrams did that. All I will say is that when you transition in a single election cycle to the highest you've ever had mail in ballots in 2016 of 40% roughly. And you go to 63%, a 102 mail in or early ballots. And the error rate goes from a typical per state average of three to 4% rejection rate. And it goes down to .2 to .4, depending on the state. And then you're told that when you more than double the amount of work, the tabulate those ballots. And you need double the amount of workers. Yet you're going to find less air than you usually would when you have half the bowel, I just don't believe that's

Hunter Biden Victor Davis Hansen Stanford University Stacey Abrams Alexander Hamilton New York Post Silicon Valley Hillary Clinton White House America
3 US-based economists win Nobel for research on wages, jobs

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 10 months ago

3 US-based economists win Nobel for research on wages, jobs

"Three economists who work in the US will share the Nobel Prize in economics and what they found in their research may surprise you David card born in Canada's with the university of California Berkeley his pioneering research shows that an increase in the minimum wage does not lead to less hiring and the arrival of immigrants does not lower pay for native born workers those two findings challenge commonly held ideas the other two economists who share the award with them are Joshua angriest of M. I. T. and Guido invents of Stanford University they created a way of studying these types of societal issues in the real world I'm Rita folate

David Card University Of California Berke Nobel Prize Canada M. I. T. United States Joshua Guido Stanford University Rita Folate
Northern California Has Been Hit With A Startling Increase Of Wildfire Smoke

Environment: NPR

02:19 min | 11 months ago

Northern California Has Been Hit With A Startling Increase Of Wildfire Smoke

"Wildfire smoke is especially harmful to children and rural communities in northern california has been hit hard starting an increase in smoke and that's according to a new investigation by our california newsroom. Collaboration remember station k. Q. e. d. freda jabballah romero reports. On how dangerous air is affecting schools their high school sports events anchor. The town of willis california one hundred miles north of sacramento at a friday night. Football game in this of six thousand cheerleaders shake their golden purple pompoms case covers nearby mountains in this part of the sacramento valley as mega fires burn in northern california. When there's too much smoke. Schools cancel outdoor activities like football. Today's better obviously. Because we're playing the game. Stacey lancy has to teen sons one of them a student at this high school. she's also a third grade teacher and says the better quality is affecting students as far as kids going out to recess playing sports and kind of like overall health. We don't know why were having headaches. Runny nose was in recent years willows has endured ninety one days of smoke per year on average up from sixty six days a decade ago. That makes this town one of the smoky places in america. That's according to an analysis of a decade of federal satellite images by california newsroom and partnership with stanford university's change and human outcomes lab. The investigation found millions of americans from san francisco to boston. Are breathing a lot more smoke. From western wildfires in the small town of willows physician. Assistant brett brown regularly treats patients at the hospitals family clinic when their smoke in the air he sees more patients suffering asthma attacks intense migrants and stress. There's always somebody says something about well because of the smoke. Insert you no problem here. Whether it's you know. I haven't been able to breathe as well because my allergies are so bad or i haven't been able to see my mom and dad you know because of covet and now i can't even go outside so my mental health is so much

California Freda Jabballah Romero Stacey Lancy Sacramento Valley Willis Sacramento Northern California Football Assistant Brett Brown Headaches Asthma Attacks Stanford University Willows America San Francisco Boston
Elizabeth Holmes, From Blood Test to Facing Prison

Slate's If Then

02:26 min | 1 year ago

Elizabeth Holmes, From Blood Test to Facing Prison

"In twenty thirteen. Abc news correspondent. Rebecca jarvis was working on a story about high medical costs and we featured a woman who was spending a lot of money on blood tests and after that story ran. Rebecca got a pitch about a new start-up. Hey there's this blood testing company theranos and they can save your viewers a lot of money. She checked it out but couldn't get anyone to independently verify that these theranos blood tests which only used a finger prick and not a traditional vein. Stick we're actually going to be better and cheaper. It was one of those things where This just it. It doesn't fully lineup. it doesn't live up to what it would take for me to even consider covering it as a solution. So rebecca did news story but other reporters did and then shortly after that pitch elizabeth started showing up in all of these places and was very much a celebrity. Elizabeth was elizabeth homes stanford dropout their nose founder and ceo millionaire superstar and media. Darling elizabeth homes left stanford university at the age of nineteen to build a company. A healthcare pioneer is being compared to visionaries like bill gates and steve jobs this morning elizabeth homes is part of the news. Time one hundred list just out. Homes promised to revolutionize blood testing. She was young rich charismatic and seemingly everywhere whenever there's a quote unquote glass ceiling. There's an iron woman rape behind it but the theranos blood testing devices didn't work like they were supposed to. The company was secretly running patient tests on standard commercial machines even as they doctors patients and the media otherwise there nose founder. Elizabeth homes has now officially been indicted on federal wire. Fraud charges the us turning twenty eighteen. The united states filed criminal charges against her and her former. Ceo and boyfriend sunny belt wani next week three years. After she was first indicted homes goes on trial for conspiracy and fraud. She faces up to twenty years in prison and has pleaded not guilty.

Rebecca Jarvis Theranos Darling Elizabeth Abc News Stanford Elizabeth Elizabeth Homes Rebecca Bill Gates Steve Jobs Sunny Belt Wani United States
"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"At stanford university and the slag national excavated laugh. He switched focus on actuators and x ray free electron lasers that themselves. I talked to have to have here. Yes thanks for doing this. so couple of technical papers. You wanted to get do but before we do that. I will serve sector convicts for conversation we're gonna talk about excellent leases. But i want to be one time. Tabet agla all the way back to rays so xrays tabitha's for about two hundred hundred twenty years now. More than one hundred years i believe started at from rankin. Right right right and so So you look at the last hundred years and if you take us through from the from the x ray invention to what we are currently doing And the connection to the x rays electron laser. What what have been the biggest step function changes during the last couple of years in this field. Okay you can't try to give my perspective's of course is sink. x-ray was discovered in eighty nine hundred ninety five by franken and Was the humidity or sensation Because the he shined on his wife's a finger we had rain. Which is you know. One of the first images When when you talk box that's one of the first images of people pops up immediately find the medical application but also scientific obligations Third not not law for that There is a work by Brac of a father and the son brax. I'm bracknell and the work by law. We are understanding. what happened. If you shying x-rays on crystals which gave you gave the name the field actually x ray diffraction. I'm talking about scientific not will not emphasize on the medical field. Which i think as you know you go to your dentist. You need to get x-rays on the on the scientific side. So the x ray source has always been the so called x. Ray cues aware similar to us in donkeys. Office that has been saying with us A state of art x ray source for probably fifty years. You know my you know. My number may not be exact But that also if you the the other in terms of x ray diffraction another famous picture. He's the one took by rosa rosal in frankfurt on the daily double helix structure and That was actually taken. I forgot the exact he year but safety. I think guys wrong time and Dow was taken was actually cube in the lab but from there Watson under creek deduce the x-ray You know the from the x. Richter deduce the dna double helix structure. you know. Of course that was one of the biggest discovery of the twentieth century and interpret. Yeah so people definitely realize x ray diffraction very useful tour for understanding atomic on the modern structures So there are also also need to have better access resources. I think in terms of actually source development The next major milestone. I will say a discovery of a synchrotron radiation Where basically people find though when the when especially using particle accelerator They accelerate on store say electron. Beam either relativistic energy. Those the electron beam. When they're being bandied in a circle trajectory they geek yield radiation relation to synchrotron radiation And stat. Was initially. I saw justify product of the high energy accelerator but he winter people find the in the south out..

Tabet agla stanford university tabitha rankin franken rosa rosal frankfurt Richter Watson
"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"At scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil. At eappen dot info yesterday is purposes. Stephen kahn was particle physics. Physics at stanford university kadam you fox and scientists Welcome good to be here. you talk. s. t. I guess we disapprove really renamed into the abuna mubin of surgery. Recent may see people here from science drivers to restrooms design and superior data parts you major advances in our understanding of the universe senior rights from dramatic improvements to accurately measure as inaugural quantity aided by information technology..

Stephen kahn abuna mubin stanford university fox
Scientists Were Wrong About Climate Change Then and Are Still Wrong

Mark Levin

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Scientists Were Wrong About Climate Change Then and Are Still Wrong

"Dot com Mr Producer This goes back to April. 22nd 2009 and I dug this up. Birthday predictions of 1970. This may have been on Instapundit actually. The reason you shouldn't believe Earth Day predictions of 2000 and nine And they point out even back then, 12 years ago. For the next 24 hours. The media wall saw this with tales of imminent disaster that always accompany the annual Earth Day Doom and gloom extravaganza. Oh, it's only gotten worse. Ignore them. They'll be wrong. We're confident in saying that because they've always been wrong and always will be need proof. Here's some of the hilarious, spectacularly wrong predictions made on the occasion of Earth Day 1970. That's when it was founded. We have about five more years at the outside to do something, Kenneth what Ecologists. Civilization will end within 15, or 30 years unless immediate action is taken against problems facing mankind. George Wald, Harvard biologist. We're in an environmental crisis, which threatens the survival of this nation and the world as a suitable place of human habitation. Barry Commoner. Remember him? Washington University biologist Man must stop pollution and conservatives resources not merely to enhance existence but to save the race from intolerable deterioration of possible extinction. New York Times editorial the day after the first birthday. Population will inevitably and completely outstripped whatever small increases in food supplies. We make that death rate will increase until at least 1 to 200 million people per year will be starving to death during the next 10 years. Paul Ehrlich, Stanford University biologist. 1975. Some experts feel that food shortages will have escalated the present level of world hunger and starvation in the famines of unbelievable proportions. Other experts more optimistic. The ultimate phone population collision will not occur until the decade of the 19 eighties. Paul Ehrlich,

Mr Producer George Wald Barry Commoner Kenneth Washington University Harvard New York Times Paul Ehrlich Stanford University
NASA's 'Hedgehog' Robots Hop, Tumble in Microgravity

Innovation Now

01:20 min | 1 year ago

NASA's 'Hedgehog' Robots Hop, Tumble in Microgravity

"Comets asteroids and hedgehogs these spiky little robots are perfect. Fit for low gravity exploration. This is innovation now exploring comets. Asteroids and small moons can be a difficult task. So what kind of design could be used for exploration a joint team. From nasr's jet propulsion laboratory stanford university and mit believe that hedgehogs are the answer. Let's hear more from. Ben hoffman a graduate student at stanford university working on the project. We've done a lot of modeling with various different types of analytical numerical models. And we've learned a lot the hop angle is more a function of the shape of the rover. So with this type of impulsive. Breaking cubic shape provides a nice forty five degree hop on average. The team is experimenting with fly. Wheels and friction belts to create the momentum that allow the hedgehogs to hop or spin across the surface. We took this prototype down to houston and flew on the vomit comet for two hundred. And if you guys aren't familiar with that it provides about twenty second windows a relative weightlessness. So in each of these twenty seconds we were able to test maneuver so far. The prototypes funded through. Nasr's innovative advanced concepts program are just what the engineers order

Nasr's Jet Propulsion Laborato Ben Hoffman MIT Stanford University Houston Nasr
"stanford university" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence in Industry

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence in Industry

"Were speaking this week in our next few episodes every tuesday but the topic of ai in defense one of our most popular articles of the last eighteen months was called the seven weaknesses of the west which has to do with the i race between the united states and china clearly. There's a lot of interest from emerge listeners. And readers in terms of how artificial intelligence is changing the nature of war in the military. And there's so many lessons from changing the big stodgy cultures of defense and military that translate to how innovation has operate in almost any enterprise so out of transferable lessons here is also a lot of interesting use cases and trends that affect not only our business but the balances of international power. It seemed like it would be worth kicking off a series. So that's exactly what we've done. And what better guest to talk about the dynamics of innovation defense and the impact of artificial intelligence defense than steve blank himself. Steve blank needs really no introduction. But i'll give you one anyway. Steve blank is arguably one of the best known as silicon valley thinkers alive today. His book called the startup. Owner's manual had a profound effect on myself. And i'm sure many many many other entrepreneurs it's a remarkably popular and one of many that steve has authored he is also an adjunct professor at stanford university where he teaches about innovation but also innovation in modern war. Steve has a background in the military. He was in the airforce before moving out to silicon valley and starting and selling a variety of companies from convergent technologies to ardent to epifani. And more since then his teaching and writing has been massively influential and again he's maintained an emphasis on innovation in modern war. Today steve speaks to us about how innovation has to operate within the military and what the united states department of defense might do better to adopt future technologies and evolve more quickly in the face of a very capable adversary in the form of china. Steve is really no-holds-barred here. I was frankly surprised by his level of candy. But i was very pleased by it because i think frankly we need to hear it for those of you. Interested in the global dynamics of power this will be a fascinating episode about the united states and china for those of you interested in how to make big stodgy enterprises and organizations evolve and what kind of systems have to evolve within them and how leaders thinking must evolve. Steve provide some gyms that should be immediately applicable to nearly any industry so all this episode is about defense. I hope it's transfer ability will be useful for literally everybody tuned in. I'm grateful to be able to have steve with us. Somebody who's read. His work genuinely appreciated his contributions. So we're happy to have him here to kick off this three part series on a i in defense. We have worked awful hard here at emerged. Make sure ricky get the best possible guests if you've learned a lot from these episodes and you've enjoyed these episodes be sure to stay subscribed to the i. Business podcast on itunes. What is now called apple podcasts and consider leaving us a five star review. Not only does it help us. Learn what episode you like most but it also helps people learn about the show so if you want to support the program and support our efforts to bring on world class guests to bring.

Steve steve blank five star Steve blank itunes china Today steve this week i. Business seven weaknesses stanford university today tuesday three part silicon valley one united states last eighteen months ricky
"stanford university" Discussed on AI in Business

AI in Business

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"stanford university" Discussed on AI in Business

"Were speaking this week in our next few episodes every tuesday but the topic of ai in defense one of our most popular articles of the last eighteen months was called the seven weaknesses of the west which has to do with the i race between the united states and china clearly. There's a lot of interest from emerge listeners. And readers in terms of how artificial intelligence is changing the nature of war in the military. And there's so many lessons from changing the big stodgy cultures of defense and military that translate to how innovation has operate in almost any enterprise so out of transferable lessons here is also a lot of interesting use cases and trends that affect not only our business but the balances of international power. It seemed like it would be worth kicking off a series. So that's exactly what we've done. And what better guest to talk about the dynamics of innovation defense and the impact of artificial intelligence defense than steve blank himself. Steve blank needs really no introduction. But i'll give you one anyway. Steve blank is arguably one of the best known as silicon valley thinkers alive today. His book called the startup. Owner's manual had a profound effect on myself. And i'm sure many many many other entrepreneurs it's a remarkably popular and one of many that steve has authored he is also an adjunct professor at stanford university where he teaches about innovation but also innovation in modern war. Steve has a background in the military. He was in the airforce before moving out to silicon valley and starting and selling a variety of companies from convergent technologies to ardent to epifani. And more since then his teaching and writing has been massively influential and again he's maintained an emphasis on innovation in modern war. Today steve speaks to us about how innovation has to operate within the military and what the united states department of defense might do better to adopt future technologies and evolve more quickly in the face of a very capable adversary in the form of china. Steve is really no-holds-barred here. I was frankly surprised by his level of candor. But i was very pleased by it because i think frankly we need to hear it for those of you interested in the global dynamics of power this will be a fascinating episode about the united states and china for those of you interested in how to make big stodgy enterprises and organizations evolve and what kind of systems have to evolve within them and how leaders thinking must evolve. Steve provide some gyms that should be immediately applicable to nearly any industry so all this episode is about defense. I hope it's transfer ability will be useful for literally everybody tuned in. I'm grateful to be able to have steve with us. Somebody who's read. His work genuinely appreciated his contributions. So we're happy to have him here to kick off this three part series on a i. In defense we have worked awful hard here at emerged. Make sure we get the best possible guests if you've learned a lot from these episodes and you've enjoyed these episodes be sure to stay subscribed to the i. Business podcast on itunes. What is now called apple podcasts and consider leaving us a five star review. Not only does it help us. Learn what episode you like most but it also helps people learn about the show so if you want to support the program and support or to bring on a class guests to bring.

Steve steve blank five star Steve blank itunes china i. Business Today steve this week seven weaknesses stanford university today tuesday three part silicon valley one united states last eighteen months united
Haptic Intelligence With Katherine J. Kuchenbecker

The TWIML AI Podcast

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Haptic Intelligence With Katherine J. Kuchenbecker

"I'm really looking forward to digging into our conversation and your work. Which is at the intersection of robotics and machine learning. And i'd love to have you start us off with a little bit of background. How did you come to work in the field. Yeah i grew up in california. Actually although my name looks german. And i live in germany. I'm actually american. And i was raised by a research psychologist. My mom who said now retired professor and a surgeon and i was always fascinated by how things work and i wanted to create technology. Head helped people. I also did a lot of art. And i like riding ahead. Many many different interest and i was an athlete and athletics that led me to study at stanford university which was also enough to home but far enough away and i studied mechanical engineering. I really enjoyed understanding physics than how all had also design and build things produce functionality in the world and i was always drawn more towards like smart systems with sensors and actuators. Programming actually delayed taking programming class. Because i'd heard so difficult on the other athletes libel player. They all said oh. You know the programming class so hard. I loved it beyond words. And then i just i took more computer science punching i decided to stay for master's degree and i worked actually in as a teaching assistant a machine shop for two years helping students learn design and manufacturing like welding and casting bronze and milling aluminum and making parts sticking the shop late at night and i really fell in love with working with younger pupil helping them design and create things and i also took this amazing metrics class. There like realized. I wanted to become a professor and i that i needed a phd. And i needed a phd adviser. So i looked around and found a new professor. Was his first fish student. his name's Niemeier and he was one of the first engineers at intuitive surgical a robotic surgery company. That most of you probably know make davinci robot and we got along soup. Well was also volleyball player. And yeah the mechanical engineering computer science electrical intersection. It's really robotics Turning to do something useful whether that's in health or in consumer products or at work on so many different things now.

Stanford University Athletics Germany California Niemeier Volleyball
States To Offer Lottery Tickets to Incentivize Americans to Get Vaccinated

News, Traffic and Weather

01:16 min | 1 year ago

States To Offer Lottery Tickets to Incentivize Americans to Get Vaccinated

"Wants to use incentives like a lottery or reduction in property taxes to try and get more people vaccinated. This comes in several states have started using different forms of giveaways to persuade people to get the shot. Almost like popping reports on how these methods are actually improving Vaccination rates. If there's one thing that we need to do with money related to Cove, it's to get people healthy. And that's fueled King County Council member Reagan done to consider what his county might be able to do with some of the millions of federal dollars that have been sent to King County during the pandemic. His ideas were thinking about rental assistance is one idea we're thinking about Even things like lottery or scratch Lotto tickets as well. It's a creative approach that has proved to be effective in getting more people to sign up for a vaccine. New YORK, New Jersey, Maryland and West Virginia have all used some form of incentives. In Ohio. They started a lottery were five people could each win a million bucks. That incentive led to an over 50% weekly increase in vaccinations games are been showing in vaccines to enhance vaccine knowledge and improve vaccine uptake Doctor Ashby monk with Stanford University. Says these games can significantly improve inoculation numbers that's call most

King County Council King County Reagan West Virginia New Jersey Maryland New York Ohio Ashby Monk Stanford University
Increases in Extreme Precipitation Cost the U.S. $73 Billion

Climate Connections

01:09 min | 1 year ago

Increases in Extreme Precipitation Cost the U.S. $73 Billion

"Torrential. Rainstorms can flood homes. Wash out roads and bridges and destroy crops over the past. Three decades flooding from heavy precipitation has caused about two hundred billion dollars of damage in the. Us francis davenport is a phd student. In earth system science at stanford university. She wanted to know how much of that enormous price tag can be blamed on global warming. We've seen that extreme precipitation events are increasing in frequency or intensity and so we wanted to quantify what are the financial costs of those changes in precipitation. Her team analyzed historic rainfall trends and financial data about flood damages over decades. They estimated that between nine thousand nine hundred eighty eight and twenty seventeen about seventy three billion dollars. A flood damage can be attributed to increases in extreme precipitation. That's more than a third of the cost of flooding over those thirty years. So devonport says that people are already paying the financial cost of warming world. I think having those hard dollar amounts is really important for some of these policy conversations about what to do.

Francis Davenport Stanford University United States Devonport
The Family's Role in Addiction and Recovery.

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

02:08 min | 1 year ago

The Family's Role in Addiction and Recovery.

"Alright let's jump right in. Because i have a hot topic today that i haven't talked about for awhile and that is families and recovery. Wow this is a big big big topic so many of us. The addicted people have difficulty with our families. Some don't but the majority of us do in that sense given that the family thinks it's all our business right. As soon as the problem becomes obvious out there in front of the whole family it becomes the problem of the person who's addicted to get. Fixed no bueno from this therapist. We're gonna talk today about the long held notion. That addiction is the person's problem and get more realistic and talk about why. It's a family issue. No matter no matter what kind of family. You have the researcher. I'm going to use for today's podcast. Is stephanie brown phd. She's a clinician researcher and consultant in the field of addiction and she founded the alcohol clinic at stanford university medical center in nineteen seventy seven and served as its director for eight years developing the dynamic model of alcoholism recovery and its application to the long term treatment of all members of the alcoholic family. Yep old language but yes. I'm reading from her websites amusing her language. Dr brown served on the california state. Alcoholism advisory board and was a founding member of the national association for children of alcoholics. Now the national association for children of addiction in a cola child of addiction

Bueno Stephanie Brown Stanford University Medical Ce Nineteen Dr Brown National Association For Child California National Association For Child Cola
Brain Implants Let Paralyzed Man Write on a Screen Using Thoughts Alone

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Brain Implants Let Paralyzed Man Write on a Screen Using Thoughts Alone

"A man who lost all movement below the neck after a spinal cord injury in 2007 was able to write again with his mind. Stanford University. Researchers use artificial intelligence software and a brain computer interface to help the man with immobilized limbs to communicate by text When the man who has implanted with two microchips in his brain imagined he was using his hand to write on a note pad. The computer converted his thoughts into text on a computer screen. I cannot even begin to

Spinal Cord Injury Stanford University
"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"If you're trying to hire a really good coder to do something in particular for your company you can go out and it's easy to get lots and lots of people to apply will have credentials and encoding in this particular language or whatever it might be. That doesn't guarantee that they're going to be able to do the job for you right But if you have a coder who knows exactly what's involved and you say. Look give me recommendation of somebody who can do this job then. They're gonna find somebody for you that that you know they know exactly what's entailed in this and have other people probably were either friends from college or or other people that they know who could code and can do it for you and that's true and it's silicon valley. It's also true in the northeast. That could be true. If i'm trying to do this at a financial firm. And i want to look for an analyst and i want to say look you know. Is there somebody else who could do the same kind of financial analysis. You're doing that. that's very particular job at it. It's not somebody can just hire off the street for and that's true in a lot of different settings and so i think that firms all over the world rely on this. Yeah you got some really interesting policy ideas and the people do Met one of them. i don't have it in front of me but Rather that prescriptive affirmative action type Type policy What you're suggesting is more market baseball. right so if you pull out athens if i'm just gonna be mad. And if if the if the fullness selecting at random or something like that you you could still get much much better outcomes Without any sort of Part of it is is what you need to do is break the strength of the network and so getting the firms to be hiring even at random from the population will start to break that out and part of the you know the important aspects of this is that if there is a group that's underrepresented Once they start getting their foot in the door then that feeds on itself and they can start giving recommendations to their friends and so forth so it can grow outward and so these things have multiplier effect so once you start breaking the effect of the network which can be costly in the short run because now firms are getting worse matches in the short run but even if they hire people at random you know that that can propagate itself through the next generations in sort of improve the overall networks and how things are spread through the society and reduce the inequality..

baseball
"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Of as the world urbanize and people move out of these rural settings. Where they're you know really helping each other and part of that. When they went to the big city with that mean that our networks would disappear in and And then robert putting them head a book bowling alone a series of studies. That seems to suggest that this would be less tight communities in this kind of world I think when you look overall the networks evolve and they evolve in complex ways and it's it's not quite as easy as we would imagine to just say that everything's gonna disintegrate it's sort of you have new connections you have different kinds of connections your connections through your workplace become more important or your school or your family and so there's different types of connections and technology now means that you can be in pretty constant contact with people who might live at a greater distance from you but you know are you're still well connected to and i think you know that's something that's changing and we don't really have the full understanding of yet when with the ultimate whether people are going to end up being more isolated or or more connected and and what you were points out. Is that It has to be studied deeply. And understood by policymakers as well. Because if you're going to again going back to covid nineteen if we want to get the vaccination program implemented a high level it will require Influences leaching influencers Designing a sort of a program that provides inflammation in a trusting band song. Right up that all the mechanics It's not going to go wait. What and there'll be some settings where the mechanics worked pretty well where you know you're going into a hospital is necessary for the doctors and nurses to be vaccinated and frontline workers and so forth but then as you get down as as we need to get herd immunity and we need to get a two-thirds of the world vaccinated. We have to get to you. Know small remote villages in all kinds of places in places that don't believe in vaccines and And and we have to get them vaccinated and that. I think in the longer run to make sure that the the world has immunity and not just from covert nineteen bet for measles and for all kinds of and from future pandemics which we see a probably not going to be as rare as we imagined. you know that that's that becomes essential in getting news out and getting it out. In a reliable way a trusted way becomes more vital. And you know..

bowling robert
"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"They do a remarkably good job at picking out the most central and the best broadcasters of of of information in in their in their communities and i would imagine that network by which a bad bad bad news travels would be different from office network. Yeah yeah actually. I'm so that's something we haven't tested. So we've we've just about particular you know good news kinds of things but you're right. It could be that that you know the kind of of network you want to spread one type of information can be very different from the type of network that you want to spread different types of information and some people might be better at spring. Numerous other people might be better at reading. You know good advice. Those to those people could be very different. Yeah i mean the problem that has good. News photos knauss physics. Bad news can't travel faster than light or something similar. Gummy that mentioned so the question. One question be asked inside the company to sort of identify the highest influence influencing people. Is the question that you know if you have adult about in this case at some sort of a scientific question If you have a doubt not not a specialized scientific question but a general doubt could you go i denote as escobar debt and you can see the just come. The frequency of that people mentioned and they're not higher dog nation in the inaugural hierarchy. You can pick them out But in the network llc they're highly prominent rape. Yeah yeah yeah definitely. And i think it's. It's interesting because i think it as you're pointing out there can be two things that are sort of going on at the same time. One is how well connected these people are and how many people they but there's also some level of trust in whether this is a person that you would go to You know for particular kinds of information. There was actually a study. I did with some psychologists that at stanford meals sake and.

escobar stanford
"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Dominant or say. Let's think of who's the most influential person or who's the most important person that can take different forms in different settings and is it just who can reach the most people or who is seen by the most people or is it. Somebody who's a key gatekeeper between different groups who has information nobody else has. There's different ways to be very influential. But they all depend on on networks depending on the circumstances You can you can think of ways of measuring who's the most influential and and who makes the biggest difference in in a society yeah i wonder if you've done any of this type incite companies. I remember in the late nineties early. Two thousands. I was at a pharmaceutical company. A large company. If be looked at you know sort of the networks inside the company and You know of typical network analysis. You find you know people who are video. Heidi connected the others in the company but Cutest libby found that the people have most influence in the organization are not those who are highly connected at least cosmetically the network analysis I don't know if you have if you've seen this essay or if that yes certainly So so actually when you there's a number of studies that people have done going into Companies in mapping out first of all what sort of the official relationship of who who reports to whom or whose in communication with whom and then. What's the actual communication network and that can be very different and then as you're pointing out you know just looking so one. One naive thing that we often do is just judge people by how well connected they are. So if you're if you're on twitter and you have more followers that must be better But what's really important. Think about twitter for instance. If you tweet it's not just that first set of people that you're tweeting to it's the re tweets and so forth that make a big difference and so it's not just how many followers you have but if you have followers that have a lot of followers that can be more important. Having a few followers who have lots of followers can be more important than having lots of followers yourself. And so you know it multiplies out that way and so you know we've done studies like we did a study in india and karnataka on trying to get information about microfinance program out and there. We found that that the kind of centrality that really matters is not just this raw number of people. But it's how well connected your friends are and so forth out to about a distance of three So you can actually map out. How far out you have to go to to really measure this and that you know that can identify very different people than Than you would get by just counting friends right. Yes sort of the middle structure. How how how. Much sort of multiplying out as ical fullwood. But it's also as say Whether you're network the people that you connected this Abedian each right. So going back. The critic sample you may have only a thousand followers but those thousand followers really engaged looking at everything that you do and lead tweeting that that is much more powerful network than perhaps having ten thousand followers school alkyl might regularly exactly so so it's it's a combination of their engagement and their own networks in terms of how much they can reach once they do get engaged right and so you want to sort of if you want to be influential and in some sort of social media you want to reach people but you want to reach people who can reach others and get them excited about what you're doing or what you have to say..

libby Heidi twitter ical fullwood karnataka india
"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"I think you're correct in pointing out that that as we move over time. We're we're entering a phase where we're starting to move backwards. A little bit in terms of of the way that globalization is taking place and and for while we just saw more integration and more trade and now seeing countries separate themselves and isolate themselves and going to trade wars and the more we see blocks emerging where there's most of the trade going in within blocks almost none going across blocks. No then you have to rely on military might and fear to deter conflict rather than than economic interests and and the wind Incentives and. I think that then we move into a more dangerous phase and and you know. I think that the more that economy economics is taken into account in long-term Politics where people say. Look you know we have to really think about these trade relationships. Not just as Current economic drivers but as long term political devices for ensuring peace and prosperity. Then we get to a healthier View of the world and hopefully of maybe things move back in right direction. Yes as traders is to teach instrument Not just not just economic gains But leave motorboat's all fatty of keeping ps and and doing that at least cost for. Yeah it's it's something that's easy to under appreciate because you now. After a few decades of relative peace we tend to forget what the world was like before the war were constantly in turmoil and constantly burning resources and killing people and then wasting a lot of the world. And i think that now as we move into a a setting where things get more peaceful people tend to forget the importance of trade and globalization for for avoiding conflict yet. The beauty of this also met in venue have video trade. And you get you into network a set of nations you also reduce the probability of a madman coming to power and unleashing kale's because the system so connected did guinot..

guinot
"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Effect like a bump up and trade really makes a huge difference in in the drop in conflict and makes a lot of sense. If we're trading together you know the idea of going to war just doesn't make any sense because we're going to be cutting off our own economy and hurting a lot of our own industries and and conflict is just really dangerous that way and if we think about you know what goes on the european union in the last fifty years. It's almost inconceivable that two countries would be at war with each other now it would be just devastating to their economies. But you know you go back a hundred years and it was almost constant that they were with each other. You know it's it's it's a dramatic change. Once you have that trade anchoring you know makes you symbiotic. It makes you really care about what the other country is doing and You know even if you look at the. Us and china There can be conflict and trade war trade wars in some ways and a lot of back and forth and bargaining but the idea of military conflict. would really be devastating and and just be in neither country's interest an interesting thing so you know the the gains from trade us competitive advantage and and and all of that on the positive side have been pretty clear pointing out said beacon also reduce the negative side through the using the linear for war. Yes adding a high load of trade right. Yeah i think when if you look at things like the middle east conflict these days It's it's it. It's something that when you look at it from an economic perspective you think look you can try and write trees all you want. But until all those countries trading with each other they don't really have each other's interests aligned right earn in mind when when they're making decisions. And i think the more the more you can start to cement trade between countries in the middle east. The eventually you can get to a point where you can sign treaties that are really gonna be respected by them but now it's just sort of a piece of paper that says look this at this particular point in time we're gonna try and avoid conflict but the economics don't really drive it and and it's not very stable and you know practically knowledge. It's just a a stalemate in terms of military strength but You could imagine that middle east erupting in different ways. And and that's something that if we really want to solve that in the long term you really need to get the country's interests aligned and they never agree religiously or politically but at least if they're agreeing economically that cements that relationship right. Yeah and so. This could be a policy. Instrument that in terms of increasing trade reduces the probability of what i'm thinking and i know that you have done some work in the southeast asia installing fifties india pakistan have fought of wars. I.

middle east european union china Us southeast asia india pakistan
"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Extended faculty member of the santa fe institute and is split into the game theory. Society jackson was interested in gave. The and steady of susan and economic networks on bt has published many articles and books to books human network and social and economic networks matt. Thank you guilt heavy beer. Yeah thanks for doing this. So i want to start with one..

santa fe institute jackson susan matt
"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Mike yesterday. expensive. Feed clean all who specific policy in school of humanities sciences at stanford university he's also senior fellow stanford institute for economic policy research but copied driving it. Thanks for doing this. So i want to start with one of your people from twenty sixteen to set the context for a larger conversation and tape was entitled the gdp bet set across countries. And time. you save you. Propose that somebody statistic for economic wellbeing of people in the country incorporates consumption leisure mortality inequality fuss for nazi countries using detailed might rotate and more broadly using multi-country datasets. But one of the issues. I see peak than economist. Talk to talk to the public When be used to like a utility at share Sometimes those limbs some too technical too abstract for people to really really connect with so so so you have a qualitative Measure due to get let so some more gently. What do you mean by. Yes so we'd like to look at what people are willing to pay in terms of consumption that they sacrifice in order to say try to live longer or Enjoy more leisure time So utility is just our way of saying you know how much what people are trying to get out of consumption. Leaser living along. Boeing lights But utilize are meaningless like. There's no units called utilize that we care about. That's why in this..

stanford institute for economi stanford university Mike Boeing
"stanford university" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

08:12 min | 1 year ago

"stanford university" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Stanford University. And it was about they actually went and tried to study. The crowds that are showing up for the president at his rallies. And Come on. I mean, those crowds are huge. And they're they're everywhere, and there was one last night at midnight in Ocala, Florida. He's been there before, and the crowds were still there and I mean, he's out in the middle of doing rural America. Mostly. That's where he's got to get the votes from rural America. That's what worked for him four years ago. The big cities are going to go Democrat, the rural part of the world of the country is going to go Republican. A twisted did four years ago. I don't know if they'll do it again tomorrow, but I kind of expect that the interesting part about our country when you want to break it down. It's not so much the north, the South, the East, the West. It really is. Three groups of us. Those of us who live in cities. Those of us who live in suburbs. And those of us who live in Rural America in the country. And the cities are dominated by Democrats. The rural like I said, dominated by Republicans at least four years ago wasn't that way In the past. They were very Democrat, but not four years ago, and they're expected to go very heavily for Donald Trump. But there's fewer off them than the people in the city, so they've got a really get everybody out to vote in rural America. And the big question mark where there is still a pretty good crowd of people is in the suburbs. So That's where the fight is. This year. The fight is for the suburbs. And which I know we keep hearing about the suburban woman, but I just think the suburbs in general And one of the things about the suburbs. Which I'll find interesting when this election is all said and done. Is a lot of people move out of the central urban part of his city. Out to the suburbs. When they want to raise a family. Or they want more space for their family. So a lot of suburbia is made up of people with Children. And what is the big issue in this country that unless you have a child in school There's a lot of really upset parents. About what? Schools. And are the schools open? Are they hybrid? Are they close? Are they do they do the schools know what they're doing about teaching online? And the the parents apparently are fresh, greater beyond what you can imagine. So I don't know what that means for their vote, but they're not happy Campers. They are not happy campers and when it comes to wanting to get this virus over Talk to suburbia. I think they wanted over while they wanted over more than two people out in the rural areas, people in rural areas of space. You're not worried about social distancing. I get some funny e mails from time to time from people that tell me where they live. And they say I'm out here basically rural America and I like this social distancing. I've always been About separating myself from other people. So the rural people like their space, the city people don't have any space, but the suburban people move there to get space and they want their kids in school. And they are ticked. I don't. I haven't heard any parent who's just thrilled with the way their schools are operating. So then you've got these events. I don't know where they come from. Because the president is not in Manhattan. He's not on Michigan Avenue in Chicago. He's not down on Wilshire Boulevard in L. A. He's out in the country, small city small towns. So this this study came out from Stanford. Saying that the rallies have led To over 30,000 confirmed Koven 19 cases. And from there, they're guessing they say, likely caused the death of 700 Americans. So 30,000 confirmed Koven 19 cases coming from people that were at the rallies now, did they get him at the rallies? Stanford Look up the study from Stanford. They they don't mess around when they do studies. They examined 18 rallies between June and September. And they follow the subject for 10 weeks after each rally, and they came up with 30,000 people came down with the virus 700 of them died. So I I went online to where you get tickets for the next event. And here it is. Black and white. Of confirmation. SMS will be sent to your phone. Please follow the instructions to confirm your tickets. By registering for this event. You understand and expressly acknowledged at an inherent risk of exposure to covert 19 exist in any public place where people are present. And attending the event you and any guest voluntarily assumed all just related to exposure to covert 19 and wave release. And discharged. Donald J. Trump for President Inc. The Republican National Committee, the host venue or any of their affiliates, directors, officers, employees, agents, contractors or volunteers from any and all liability under any theory. Whether in negligence or otherwise for any illness or injury. So this was written by a good Philadelphia lawyer, and if you get sick do not soon. Uh, no, no, no, no, no, I know there's a lot of lawsuits around, but The president can sue. Lot of election people, but you cannot sue him. No way. Jose So that's the big disclaimer that you have to in order to get tickets. You've got to agree to that. That was kind of interesting. So this is also a referendum on What the president has been able to achieve. Versus covert 19. And the Koven 19 numbers. Could not be any worse. For President Trump as we head into Election Day. They're Dr Scott Gottlieb talking about the very latest. No things are getting worse around the country. I think Thanksgiving is really going to be an inflection point. I think December is probably going to be a toughest months. When we look at what's happening in states right now you're seeing accelerating spread. We're right at the beginning of what looks like exponential growth in a lot of states, the Midwest, the Great Lakes region, even states like Texas, where you see 6000 cases. Illinois 8000 cases. Florida 5000 cases, Wisconsin 5000 Cases reported Friday. These very worrisome trends there about 23 states right now that are accelerating the spread right now there's the positivity rate is above 10% 15 states. And all the states haven't are above one, which means that they're in expanding epidemic right now, so this is very worrisome as we head into the winter. Jeff Yeah. 23 States, But all states every one of them have growing Cove in cases now will that lead to.

president Donald J. Trump America Stanford Rural America Koven Florida Stanford University Ocala Dr Scott Gottlieb Republican National Committee President Inc Illinois Great Lakes Chicago Midwest
"stanford university" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Medicine at Stanford University so I know we don't do recriminations or not today but when it when we talk about the the lockdown and indeed the entire economy shut down one suggestions made by the imperial college study that suggested a half million people were going to die in the U. K. and now estimated that down to twenty thousand or less in the U. K. over the course of three days the people who are in charge of study basically suggested the reason for that that is number one the death rate being lower but number two that the lockdown is actually effective at preventing this if you let people out of lockdown is on the twenty thousand it's a hundred thousand there's a study that came out from university of Washington today suggesting that the total number of deaths in the United States over the next four months could be eighty thousand I'm not sure what death rates that apply in that study and trying to figure that out all day long here do you think that the lockdown and and people staying home has been effective in at least reducing the transmission how many excess deaths had actually been prevented I'm not looking for you know hard number but but like I right I find that I can give you a hard number on this which is difficult right but I think the key thing there is but that you can see the uncertainty in practice right right in front of you that the argument for the shutdown essentially so not a lot of healthcare systems like yours in Italy's top imminently that's actually not unreasonable I mean it depends on what the terms on the capacity the health care system to deal with large numbers of people need validators in ICU beds and things like that so I think that died it's hard for me to save my comment directly I think I have to be very careful attention to detail college studies study and the last I saw just this morning but you're free from the P. I expect that he just just basically changes wanted something like that to look more carefully I think there that that that that's I mean TA you see people putting numbers and look to see are prevalent especially as soon as your problem can definitely number initially that led to this massive massive shut down policy that number it isn't justified by that actual study will part of the population they they they guess that number I mean I think we we definitely much more careful about about a more humble I think about you know the confidence with which we said let's do this when we when we don't actually know number we should be we should say we don't know that number or to reflect the uncertainty in our in our in our confidence in our our statements much more more effectively we typically do and Dr J. final question for you let's let's assume that we actually do get these tests in place that we start running all these zero prevalence has that that puts your problems by the way just get your check my definition is to make sure I'm getting this right that would be checking the prevalence of the of the antibodies in people's blood basically one has racked what once the once those tests aren't correct then how soon do you think this laptop how soon could we could we be looking at getting out of get out of I want to yesterday I want this test yesterday I went down yesterday I want the number medially and we have our studies that I'm I'm working on with some of my colleagues to get the generality and end up in LA county took it to get those circles of nice but we are nationwide study and we support for nationwide said you need to keep sticks to to keep things are missing right now is we need a large number of antibody test and we need to have some funding source to pay for pay for that task and we can get those we can get that running with the whole I mean the scientific community around but the folks I'm talking with they want these numbers also so this is not something that's controversial I don't think it's partisan I just think it's we just need we need the number I'm hoping will know it in in that two weeks on that the latest what name really amazing amazing stuff and an interest and vital stuff here from Dr J. Bhattacharya professor medicine it's never really appreciate your time Sir and thanks so much for hard work on this topic yeah I think it was a real pleasure to care well coming up we're gonna talk about president trump apparently members media very very angry that president trump's numbers are up in the midst of all of this because of course everything is from fall gets that momentarily first let's talk about some stuff that you can do in the near term like right now you are locked down at home well first of all you can help your fellow Americans how can you do that as a member of the community well yes my name then two four one four nine zero take the love America pledged today how can you help out local businesses that are just getting slammed well you could purchase a gift card from them you could commit to social distancing which is going to be useful regardless what happens next you.

Stanford University
"stanford university" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Of medicine at Stanford University so I I know that we don't do recriminations or doctor David when it when we talk about the D. locked down and indeed the entire economy shut down one of the suggestions made by the the imperial college study that suggested a half million people were going to die in the U. K. in asked mated that down to twenty thousand or less in the UK over the course of three days the people who are in charge and study basically suggested the reason for that that is number one the death rate being lower but number two that the lockdown is actually effective at preventing this if you let people out of lockdown is on the twenty thousand maybe it's a hundred thousand there's a study that came out from university of Washington today suggesting that the total number of deaths in the United States over the next four months could be eighty thousand I'm not sure what death rates they're playing in that study I've been trying to figure that out all day long here do you think the deep locked down and and people staying home has been effective in at least reducing the transmission how many excess deaths had actually been prevented and I'm not looking for you know hard number but but later on tonight although I can give you a hard number on this which is difficult right but I think the key thing there is that you can see the uncertainty in practice right right in front of you that the argument for the shutdown essentially is not alone healthcare systems like yours in Italy this is what's happening lately that's actually not unreasonable I mean it depends on what the terms on the capacity the healthcare system to deal with large numbers of people meet validators in ICU beds and things like that so I think that died it's hard for me to save my comment directly I think I have a very careful attention if your college studies study and that I I saw just this morning but you're free from the P. eyes that study just just basically changes wanted something like that to look more carefully I think they're the best that that's I mean do you see people putting numbers and the sheer prevalence essentially assume it's your problem that's right number initially that led to this massive massive shut down policy that number it isn't justified by that actual study will part of the population they they've they guess that number I mean I think we we need much more careful about about that more humble I think about the confidence with which we said let's do this when we when we don't actually know number we should be we should say we don't know that number at work toward reflects the uncertainty in our in our in our confidence in our our statements much more more effectively we typically do and Dr J. final question for you let's let's assume that we actually do get these tests in place that we start running all these zero prevalence has said that personal problems by the way just get checked my definition is to make sure I'm getting this right that would be checking the prevalence of the of the antibodies in people's blood basically has backed what once the once those tests aren't correct then how soon do you think this what's up how soon could we could we be looking at getting out of get out of I want to yesterday I wanted because yesterday I went on yesterday I want the number medially and we have our studies that I'm I'm working on with some of my colleagues to get the Ali and end up in LA county to get together does your call so sorry but we are nationwide study and we support for initialize that you needed to keep the extra to keep things are missing right now is we need a large number of antibody test that we need some funding source to pay for pay for that task and we can get those we can get that running with **** I mean the site if you need to round up the folks I'm talking with they want these numbers also so this is not something that's controversial I don't think it's partition I just think it's we just need we need the number I'm hoping will know it in in that two weeks on that latest what name really amazing amazing stuff and an interest and vital stuff here from Dr J. Bhattacharya professor misunderstand really appreciate your time Sir and thanks so much for hard work on this topic yeah I think it was a little pleasure take care but coming up we're gonna talk about president trump apparently members media very very angry that president trump's numbers are up in the midst of all of this because of course everything is from fall gets that momentarily first let's talk about some stuff that you can do in the near term like right now while you are locked down at home well first of all you can help your fellow Americans how can you do that as a member of the community well text my name then two four one four nine zero take the love America pledge today how can you help a local businesses that are just getting slammed well you could purchase a gift card from them you could commit to social distancing which is going to be useful regardless what happens next you.

Stanford University David