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3 Words Mislead Online Regional Mood Analysis

60-Second Science

03:09 min | Last month

3 Words Mislead Online Regional Mood Analysis

"Can tell a lot about people's general state of mind based on their social media feeds. Are they always tweeting about their biggest peeves or posting pics of particularly cute kitties? Well in a similar fashion, researchers are turning to twitter for clues about the overall happiness of entire geographic communities. What they're finding is that regional variation in the use of common phrases produces predictions that always reflect the local state of well-being. But removing from their analyses, just three specific terms, good love and L. O. L. Greatly improves the accuracy of the methods. We living in a crazy Kobe nineteen era, and now more than ever will be using social media to adapt to a new normal land. Reach out to the friends and family that become meet face to face. Tokyo Judaica studies computational linguistics at the National University of Singapore but a woods aren't. Just to understand more, we as individuals stinking feed, they are also useful clues about the community we live in one of the simpler methods that many scientists used to parse the data involves correlating words with positive or negative emotions, but when those tallies are compared with phone surveys that assess regional wellbeing. Jessica says they don't paint an accurate picture of the local Zeitgeist to find out why jet got her colleague Yohannes Istat of Stanford University analyzed. tweets from around the United States, and they found that among the most frequently used terms on twitter are ll love and good, and the actually throw the analysis of in fact when we moved the three words alone be managed to improve upon the simple word, counting methods and obtain better, if not perfect estimates of happiness why the disconnect well, Jessica says one issue is in donate languages, really different beast than regular, spoken or language. We've adapted words from the English or capillary to mean things in different situations take for example L. O. L.. I've tweeted the word. To Flood Express irony, annoyance companies just feel surprise when the mature for mentioning. As a market of happiness included in the nineteen nineties, it still laughing out loud well. There are plenty of terms that are less misleading, says shed are models. Tell us that words like excited. Fun Grades. Opportunity interesting fantastic. Those a better words for measuring subjective OBI looking at the data, their work appears in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences being able to get an accurate read on the mood of the population is no laughing matter, and is particularly important now in the time of covert where we're expecting a mental health crisis, and we're already seeing in survey data, the largest diminishment and subjective oh being. Ten years at least if not ever no doubt we could all use more fantastic opportunities for great phone excitement.

Twitter Jessica National Academy Of Sciences National University Of Singapo Kobe Stanford University United States Yohannes Istat L. O. L.
Robustness to Unforeseen Adversarial Attacks

Data Skeptic

04:31 min | Last month

Robustness to Unforeseen Adversarial Attacks

"I'm I'm Daniel Daniel King King Credit Graduate Student at Stanford University in the Computer Science Department Pad. I am or the Stanford on lab where we work on. Deploying machine learning efficiently Easily also for this particular. I was also volunteered. Open I for some time and tell me a little bit about your specific areas of research. What's most of your time in Grad School? Spent looking at considering. Yeah so Grad School. What I've been focusing on is trying to understand a how to actually deploy machine learning efficiently reliably and effectively. What we've noticed that one machine learning researchers have created these amazing machine learning models that do really well under certain circumstances let the real world is really complicated. There's a lot of issues that crop up. When actually deploying machinery models ranging from Michigan being expensive to deploy ranging from Trinidad of being noisy all the way down to worrying about attacks from adversaries. I've been focusing on trying to understand those issues when it comes to deploy the amazing technology that many machine learning researchers have been making. Yeah the paper I invited you on to talk about his title testing robustness against unforeseen adversaries. And it's interesting you frame that as a deployment issue because in my mind when I think of deploying male I'm thinking of how there's no perfect system in my opinion you know we have onyx files and different stuff like that. You can try but for some reason it's not as easy as it seems like it should be. Do you have any thoughts about why the I guess what I picture is? More lower level aspects of that are still kind of challenging for a lot of people that deploy absolutely so machine. Learning is very different than essentially all software so a lot of software comes into play when applying machine learning. But I don't think there's been a lot of understanding the community both the Research Committee and the industry community and what the difference between deploying standard software underplaying machine. Learning are so as you say. There's a lot of low level. Things for example like onyx files or actually taking a towards wallace say or while and converting to runtime engine. But that's actually being smoothed out. I think in the next year so we're GONNA be seeing a lot more of that. So for example serving has released some stuff but I think at a higher level. There's a lot of issues regarding how to combine data and Code that. We don't really know the answers to yet. And that's part of what my research deals with. A lot of other folks are thinking about as well. Yeah these adversarial attacks if I think about standing up my M. L. Model and exposing it via API. Just give that away where anyone can post to it. Or maybe someone's very clever and figures out how to get to my API for some reason they're going to post. What could be a sizable thing? An image file or something like that that has a ton of data and while that machine learning model it's a function it maps from the full input space to output space. Still we have these challenges. You think this is some sort of temporary thing where this adversarial game is going to eventually be solved or are we just dealing with a very hard problem. That will always be sort of cat and mouse. It's hard for me to predict the future but if you look at standard security ignoring machine learning there's been a cat and mouse game. Basically since computers have been invented sixty seventy years so if I had to guess I would say that. We're unlikely to solve the problem exactly. But I'm hoping that we can at least make it much much harder to attack. Machine learning systems in broadly. Speaking what are these adversarial attacks for anyone? Who hasn't heard of him yet? An adversary attack is think of it. As a procedure to generate an input that will fool machine learning model often for some nefarious mean so to give an extreme example. You might imagine posting a sticker on a stop sign that changes a perception system friction and accelerating car from stop sign to say sixty mile per hour speed limit sign which would cause erroneous behavior in a vehicle and might even cause physical harm now. I've looked into a number of these different techniques and there seemed to be more coming out by the hour. Some of them need the model and some of them need the day to set and some of them need not require too much of anything. What do you see sort of the garden or the taxonomy of these different kinds of attacks? And how much a little bit access helps or hinders. Yes as you say. There's a wide spectrum of attacks. I'll roughly them down. But these categorisations very rough and the tax can span different categorisations as well a high level. There's what I'll call white box and black box. Attacks White box attacks assume access to the MODEL AND BLACKBOX ATTACKS. Don't assume exits the model but assume you can query the model for example in a white box attack you'll have the weights and basically everything a blackbox tax. You might just have. Api access so for example Google's image classification API as an example of where he can query. But you don't have access to the model weights themselves. That's on the model side. There's also as you say a tax on the data side and here the threat model is slightly different. Typically the third as soon as you can tamper with some fraction of the data and by tampering with a small fraction of the data. This will cause the model to have eroneous outputs on typically specific patterns or be in general.

Grad School Daniel Daniel King Stanford University Google Graduate Student Michigan Trinidad Research Committee Wallace
Multistem A Stable

Cell Culture Dish Podcast

06:26 min | Last month

Multistem A Stable

"Dr Van Dockland has served as chairman of the board of directors at Ather since August two thousand and as CEO since the company was formed overseeing the growth and development of the primary business operations of the company and the transition from a venture backed startup to nasdaq-listed Public Company. He also serves as chairman of the National Center for Regenerative Medicine. Doctor Van Lynn received his PhD genetics from Stanford University School of Medicine and earned degrees in both economics and molecular biology at the University of California at Berkeley. I'd like to start by asking. How regenerative medicine therapies are different than traditional pharmaceuticals and biologics? And what value can they bring questions? So regenerative medicine really consists of several different types of their include cell therapy gene therapy gene modified cell therapy and then tissue engineering approaches so those four different sectors. If you've will comprise collectively the the regenerative medicine space and regenerative general medicine is fundamentally different from traditional pharmaceuticals or approaches that have been used to develop biological their babies. Because typically those therapies are very specific entities or single agent therapies that hacked through a discrete well defined mechanism of action. Cells are different in. That sells can actually work through multiple different mechanisms of action so they're multidimensional in that regard. Gene therapy is different because gene therapy is not meant to provide a temporary fix or a specific problem or a specific. But it's meant to provide in some instances permanent you're or a long term cure by addressing the underlying defect that is affecting the patient in causing the condition or causing the disease so gene therapy and cell therapy or a little bit different from one another in terms of how they differ from pharmaceuticals and blogs but together they really represent a broad approach kind of a paradigm shift. If you will in terms of how people think about approaching the treatment The whole range of different diseases and conditions that are really not well served under current standards of care and that regard that really gets to the type of the value that can bring because you can imagine that in contrast the putting somebody on lifetime therapy of different types of medicines to help mitigate the damage specific disease or condition if you can actually offer up a specific intervention whether it be one or a series of administrations of cell therapy or gene modified cell therapy or gene therapy approach and affect long term durable improvement and even cure for many patients. That's a pretty exciting prospect and it also stated with a Bali now. It also creates some potential challenges. Because we're still trying to figure out. How do we establish a reimbursement? Framework for therapies. That might be single or a single administration. That could be cured. It have an impact over many many years. But there's actually been some pretty good progress on that front so both in terms of the way that these therapies work and also the impact they can have in some cases over very long timeframes. I think it's it's pretty exciting. I agree completely. I think it's really exciting. To think about cheers for diseases that have been managed or even untreatable up to this point and also What you mentioned about a new way to look at it is also really important. Because they're more expensive but you have the potential to cure or a therapy. That will last for a long period of time. And so it's exciting to think about these new therapies in along those lines. I was hoping you could share with listeners. In recent years what have been some of the most exciting clinical breakthroughs regarding regenerative medicine. Well it's actually pretty exciting in the sense that there's a growing number of things that either been validated through clinical development now approved by the FDA and other regulators on the cell therapy front. The Car T. therapies. Which are gene modified cell? Therapy approaches? Current therapies are actually tallahassee. You take cells derived from the patient themselves. You genetically modified those cells reintroduce into the patient to help fight the cancer that has in fact. By definition these are patients that have failed other forms of therapies other forms of intervention and the progress on that front has been incredibly exciting where we see several approaches. They've really had an impact. In terms of improving clinical outcomes in many cases for patients. They really had no other no other hope because they had exhausted all the available treatment options and then they were basically treated using these types of approach so those approaches are pretty exciting. I think bed some of the gene therapy there. Several gene therapy products that have been approved over the past several years whether it's Things from Bluebird or he'll chance Ma from onto partis or a vaccine which is the company that Nevada's acquired or looks turn up from spark therapeutics. All of these have shown very very exciting response levels among the patients that are being treated very very high levels of Progress Clinical progress or curative effects or demonstrable improvement in the primary clinical outcomes. And I think in many respects these just represent the tip of the iceberg. If you will in terms of things that are that are coming Recently actually just a few days ago out at the J. P. Morgan Conference in San Francisco the Alliance for Regenerative Medicine. And every year they do state of the industry overview and they present a lot of different data that really describes the phenomenal progress in terms of clinical development and companies advancing to the various phases of clinical development or seeing more more things in phase two and phase three and then also highlighting other things that are well-positioned or could be well positioned for approval. Within the next couple of years. I think all of the data that was presented this year really reinforces and underscores the fact that the regenerative medicine sector and community as a whole is making incredible progress that is attracting live investments a lot of partnerships and as making really good progress with respect to regulatory and clinical side of things. I mean we now have over a thousand programs that are in clinical development the regenerative medicine sector and I think that that really covers a lot of really exciting opportunities that that a lot of people have hope and optimism around in terms of how can change medicine as we know.

National Center For Regenerati Alliance For Regenerative Medi Chairman Stanford University School Of Dr Van Dockland Van Lynn Mechanism Of Action Nasdaq-Listed Public Company University Of California CEO Berkeley J. P. Morgan Conference FDA Tallahassee San Francisco MA Nevada
Exporting Authoritarianism

Why It Matters

05:19 min | Last month

Exporting Authoritarianism

"I will relate that interesting story. The president of Kazakhstan actually visited a company called hike. Vision is another one that provides surveillance technology visit their office in China and he saw how with one. Click on a person's face. You could get that person's school history work history financial situation. Wow and wait for it. How did this person spend his or her leisure time? So where did this person go to have fun? Did you go to the movies? Did you stop by the bank to go to the post office where you hang out with friends? Did you participate in a protest and his reaction after seeing all of this was we need this technology. That's not where I thought the story was going. This is probably not the first time you're hearing about China's surveillance technology and that's because it gets a lot of coverage it's like a Black Mirror episode. It gives us visions of a dystopia in future but this technology and the eagerness of some countries to begin implementing. It is only a small part of a much bigger story about China through its belt and road initiative China's in the process of building and funding infrastructure projects across the globe and loaning vast sums of money in the developing world. Some observers argued that as it does this. China is also exporting its authoritarian model of government and eroding democratic norms. That many of us take for granted others say that China is simply taking business opportunities where it sees them and providing countries with an alternative to a global order that has gone unchallenged for decades. The debate comes down to one question. How will we choose to view China as they pour money into hospitals ports and roads around the World I'm Gabrielle? Sierra and this is why it matters today is China exporting authoritarianism. I think the most important thing to understand about China's foreign policy over the past ten years or so is that it really has been transformed. This is Elizabeth Economy. She's a senior fellow and director for Asia. Studies here at the council. She's also a distinguished visiting fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution beginning in about two thousand and eight with global financial crisis China's hosting the Olympics. These are really moments that defined in the minds of many Chinese leaders that China was rising. Chinese have many goals for these Olympics. One of them was to announce to the world. The China is back after two hundred years. China's economy has grown faster than that of any other major country. The Asian giant has now grown into one of the most important export markets for manufacturers from all over. The world is a period of historic change in China. There haven't been many periods in history as fascinating as this so there was a real sense within China for the first time that they had always expected that at some point China was going to surpass the United States but maybe that time was coming sooner than they anticipated. But what really has changed the game on the ground has been Xi Jinping everything for Xi Jinping is under the mantra of the great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation and it is a call for reclaiming a much greater degree of centrality for China on the global stage. Xi Jinping became China's president in two thousand thirteen some observers have called him the most powerful Chinese leader since Mao Zedong. Look I think there are any number of objectives and we can find them all and Xi Jinping's writings and speeches but fundamentally what I think. Xi Jinping attempting to do is simply to make the world safer authoritarianism. Teaching is a dictator but dictators. Still have to answer to domestic constituents. This is Jessica. Chance Weiss associate professor of government at Cornell and a leading expert on Chinese politics. She has a different take on China's expansion. One that sees it as being less offensive and more defensive. China's concerned about a whole lot of different risks. Some of them domestic others ones. That emanate from abroad sparks. That might start the prairie fire and bring down the Chinese government and might take units overriding purpose is to continue to make the world safe for the Chinese Communist Party to strive at home. So this is a world that safe for autocracy to coexist alongside democracy in the international space. So it's not been as ideological I think and it's foreign policy is some admitted. It out to be so. China is trying to find a way to sort of fit in with a world. That might not be comfortable with its model of government tried to make space for its form of government to be regarded as one that can continue to exist that is legitimate than democracy isn't the only form of government so to speak and so this has made it easier for other authoritarian states to survive

China Chinese Government Xi Jinping Visiting Fellow Chinese Communist Party President Trump Kazakhstan Elizabeth Economy Olympics Mao Zedong Asia United States Jessica Stanford University Hoover Institution Weiss Associate Professor Cornell
Carbon emissions fall 17% worldwide under coronavirus lockdowns, study finds

Total Information PM

00:47 sec | Last month

Carbon emissions fall 17% worldwide under coronavirus lockdowns, study finds

"And due to coronavirus lockdowns carbon dioxide emissions around the world could fall by up to seven percent this year CBS news correspondent Matt Piper with more on a new study just out this study analyzed daily CO two emissions across sixty nine countries and all fifty states and down the between January and April emissions fell on average seventeen percent compared to the same time last year carbon dioxide emissions will fall this year at a rate we haven't seen since World War two study co author from Stanford University rob Jackson from London to Los Angeles cities have weeks of blue sky's gonna clear like this every day a couple in the lecture cars with clean power the most significant decline in activity aviation with a seventy five percent decrease driving a decrease of fifty percent Matt Piper CBS

Matt Piper London CBS Stanford University Rob Jackson Los Angeles Matt Piper Cbs
Lockdowns trigger dramatic fall in global carbon emissions

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:53 sec | Last month

Lockdowns trigger dramatic fall in global carbon emissions

"With so many factories shuttered in planes and cars idle there's been a dramatic drop in climate warming carbon dioxide emissions around the world Stanford university's rob Jackson says their study found emissions were down seventeen percent last month at the height of the lockdown we see that historic drop in greenhouse gas pollution carbon dioxide emissions will fall this year at a rate we haven't seen since World War two perhaps ever cities around the world have clear skies around Dadi ruin lives in India which is home to seventeen of the world's most polluted cities he told sixty minutes when it's normally like in Delhi when normally it is dystopian you know it especially in the winter months sometimes that smog is not just outside your house is inside your house and suddenly religious seeing blue

Stanford University Dadi India Delhi Rob Jackson
Nick Saviano from world the renowned Saviano Tennis Academy

The Functional Tennis Podcast

07:58 min | 2 months ago

Nick Saviano from world the renowned Saviano Tennis Academy

"Hi Nick Welcome to the Functional Tennis podcast pleasure to be here. I've been meaning to get you on the show while we have your honor top academies around the world page which is probably one of our most viewed pages on the website. So it's great to of see. We've the Blurb Rebecca Academy and all the details would. It's great to speak to the main mind as well so delighted to chat which tell me how is life at the moment with all this cove? It situation has DECAPA me gone well. Unfortunately we have had to shut the academy down at least temporarily as all the Kaddoumi's in Florida have done and I guess around the World. But we've been able to stay in touch with our players and we are poised and ready to go as soon as they open. Things are coming in the next week or two. So we're pretty excited to get back out on the courts and fully functioning. Well that's great news. You haven't locked all your players in Lake. Rafeh did no. I didn't know he locked them all in but no we have not done that in a lot of our players actually are here with emily members or they're at private housing so we're good to go. He had me. Did Inscribe live with I think was Andy Murray Sane? Whenever they got closed down whoever was stuck there had to stay there. Nobody's lead in or out so he's running a tight ship over there. Well you have to. Whenever you're dealing with. Young people is enormous responsibility. So you always have to err on the side of caution. Yes no true. It's different when you're entrusted by parents to do the best for the kids so I think you're right. It's really important. So tell me a bit of empty Kademi. How long has the KADEMI being an operation? Well I started the academy shortly after leaving the US. Ta at the US was a national coach for boys tennis. I was eventually director coaching for men's tennis for the United States. I played on the tour for nine years and then I was also the head of high performance coaching education which was really actually exciting and then after that when I left I opened the academy in two thousand and three in. I started working with a few players I decided I really wanted to go out on my own and established my own methodology and a lawsuit for coaching and working with young people. So way back then. Two thousand three. That's when we started and it went extremely well and some of the believe it or not some of the first people I was working with were jan-michael Gambill. And also Vince Spadea. And also very young. Eleven year old. Sloan Stevens came a few years later and Jeannie Bouchard and Monica Point Again. A lot of other really good players started evolving or coming. And so it's been really exciting. It's been an amazing experience. Actually over the years up really really enjoyed it. Let's just cut back a bit before the academy and before. Usda tour life. You're a top fifty player. What was it like in the late seventies being a top fifty player? It was an amazing experience. I was one of the top. Juniors in the United States at the end of the year is ranked tree in the country. Then was the top recruit going into college so I wanNA going to Stanford. University was an all American there my freshman and sophomore year. Then I turned pro but back then I was one hundred thirty two in the world when Charon pro took me only four months and I was in the top hundred so the depth and the game wasn't quite the same as it is now so in one respect it was. Let's say less of a long grind to get into the top one hundred but on the other hand the rewards weren't as great nowadays. The players go to phenomenal hotels. They get paid and qualifying. The money is great. I remember I got around sixteen. At Wimbledon twice and the specific number I remember was four thousand pounds now. Four THOUSAND POUNDS. That probably is about seven or eight thousand dollars. Not even that much and today. I'm not sure what the guys in the gals paid for a fourth-round let's say Wimbledon. But I would suspect it's probably in the two hundred thousand range so money has changed a lot but it's more than just the money the quality of the way everything runs on the tour the ability to communicate with people. You know you have the phones. You have computers when I was playing. We didn't have cell phones. Believe it or not so completely different world when you went away for six weeks you really were far away. It was tough to get phone calls back with your families and so is a different way of life back then than it is now and I enjoyed it. I love playing the Grand Slams but I retired at twenty eight years old. I spent about eight and a half years on the tour and when I retired I was still in the top hundred for singles and doubles. I was recently married and we had our first child and when my first child was born. Nicole our daughter that was it. I said I'm done and I'm going to get a head start on the rest of my career which turned out to be coaching. Those a good decision and tell me what was your most memorable match. Great question one of the most memorable matches I ever had was in England. At Wimbledon I was playing a match against Pat Dupre. Who was a semi-finalist the year before and I believe at the time was ranch around twelve in the world and the day before I played buster macho from England and he was number one British player and I remember having served to save the match five or six times so I one nine seven in the fifth set and so I had to come out the next day and play again against Patty pray and this match was in cold fog long match and I remember my body aching and wound up winning at one. Twelve ten in the fifth set and I remember just kind of overcoming the exhaustion and at ten all eleven ten. I was ahead and I finally got a break point and I remembered to this day thinking okay. Should I go for this and ripped return because you know I just can't seem to break and this is one opportunity so I cheated thinking he was going to hit back in he did and I happened to hit it? Just right and boom. It was a winner and thank goodness over. I had a couple long matches. In Wimbledon at one with Brian Godfrey four in the world and that took either three or four days to complete believe it or not and I was down two sets to love and five two and it was almost nine o'clock at night the US keepers. Were all there waiting to the targets of the courts. So they're waiting for me to lose so I was down two point quickly. Want Upholding Sur. Five three and I played one of the best games of my life. Five four I bright serve. I hold sir. I break him and win the set then because we were there late. They didn't put me on I the next day and so they had a women's match on it rained a lot that day so that was a Friday. We only got like five games in so then pushed us over till Saturday but of course we were onto cords till very late again and so they didn't put us on ride again so we wound up playing one set and then it got dark again and then of course Sunday play so then we have to wait and then on Monday morning we played. We've finished the match and it had a happy ending. I one six one fits so those were my two good memories of Wimbledon long matches that stood out.

United States Rebecca Academy Vince Spadea Florida Andy Murray Tennis England Pat Dupre Lake Kademi Rafeh Emily Director Brian Godfrey Charon Sloan Stevens Usda Stanford Jeannie Bouchard Monica Point
Biden says he would pick Michelle Obama as running mate 'in a heartbeat'

KCBS Radio Overnight News

01:30 min | 2 months ago

Biden says he would pick Michelle Obama as running mate 'in a heartbeat'

"Democratic candidates a Joe Biden is forming a committee to look for a running mate meanwhile the party is looking for the best person to bring their message to the the people people and and there's there's talk talk about about having having former former First First Lady Lady Michelle Michelle Obama Obama take take on on that that role role for for more more on on the the campaign campaign key key case case CBS CBS news news anchors anchors Jeff Jeff Ellen Ellen Patti Patti rising rising spoke spoke with Bruce Cain Stanford University political science professor and director of Stanford's center for the American west professor a great headline obviously to put Michelle Obama out there is a potential running mate Ailey validity to that are from all indications the people that know Michelle Obama and I work with no I think it's probably more in that category you know putting performer you know we have somebody that would be very intriguing but hasn't actually run for office and usually when people haven't run for office after they passed the age of forty there it's because they really don't want to run for office it's not a pleasant thing to do so it's an intriguing possibility in never say the things are impossible but until the person really wants to do it it doesn't seem like it's very likely about using her more just to actively in the campaign rallies bring people together raising money do you see are taking an active role I think that she might justice I think Barak might if they're polling indicates that it could be very

Joe Biden CBS Stanford Professor Michelle Obama Barak Lady Michelle Michelle Obama O Jeff Jeff Ellen Ellen Patti Pa Bruce Cain Stanford University Professor And Director American West Ailey
How air quality has improved during the coronavirus crisis

Live from Here with Chris Thile

03:23 min | 2 months ago

How air quality has improved during the coronavirus crisis

"Soon this drop in carbon emissions I mean how much of a drop are we talking here yeah it's definitely starting to add up because were flying less driving less and some industries and factories are slowing down in February China reduced its emissions by roughly twenty five percent and U. S. officials estimate about a seven percent reduction in carbon emissions this year which is about the same as two thousand nine when when there was the financial crisis it's really hard to say it's still early to tell bites if the slowdown continues worldwide through the summer scientists say it's possible global emissions might drop three or four percent this year compared to last year that would be the largest drop recorded in the last century my goodness I mean does that mean that the world may actually be on track to cut emissions the way scientists have been recommending long before this crisis no actually okay don't get your hopes up exactly to avoid the worst impacts of climate change like extreme sea level rise and heat waves the world needs to be cutting emissions by around seven percent every year according to the U. N. yes I did say that will take fundamental changes different than what we're doing right now like switching to solar and wind power instead of using coal countries were actually supposed to meet this fall to negotiate new agreements to cut emissions but the U. N. has delayed that meeting until twenty twenty one because your governments are stretched very thin right now and keep in mind when economies come back there could be a big rebound in admissions right one thing I'm curious about you so many people are saying right now that the air in their cities has been amazingly clear that you can see far into the distance you can smell flowers instead of exhaust what you think is that revealed that thing that we're proceeding or is that just our collective imagination okay well people are not imagining things actually air quality monitors are showing cleaner air now and any given day you know your air pollution depends a lot on the local weather conditions but Los Angeles has been showing very clear it's been a trend to compare until this time last year and it's actually creating sort of an interesting experiment for scientists who we're looking at what would happen if we did make big changes like this I asked environmental scientists are Robert Jackson at Stanford University about that it's as if a third of the cars on the road were suddenly electric running on clean electricity and the air pollution is plummeting it's really remarkable experiment and it shows the benefits of clean energy the difference he's talking about is that you know instead of burning gasoline electric cars run on electricity in California gets a lot of its power from solar and wind so it's cleaner another thing I'm wondering about people are reporting strange animal sightings on social media what's going on with animals right now okay so it's always important to say don't believe everything you see on social media some of these things have been hoaxes summer real but you know if if we're seeing an uptick it might be that people are home just observing things more looking out their windows but scientists are starting to study this to get some real data you know they're looking animal tracking studies where they have GPS tags tags on animals and right now it's gray whale migration season on the west coast so if there's less shipping traffic on the water maybe fewer whales will be struck by ships this year and that would be a big

Controlling the Activity of Cell and Gene Therapies with Precision

The Bio Report

09:04 min | 3 months ago

Controlling the Activity of Cell and Gene Therapies with Precision

"One of the challenges selling gene therapies pose is how to control how much and when a desired protein is delivered. Obsidian therapeutics has developed a platform that allows a small molecule drug to control with precision the and level of protein expression from these therapies. We spoke to Paul Wotton. Ceo of obsidian Therapeutics about the company's platform technology. How it works. And how it may improve the safety and efficacy of cell and gene therapies. Paul facts for joining us. Pleasure to be here. We're GONNA talk about obsidian its platform for creating controllable cell and gene therapies and the implications of this technology. We've seen the emergence Cell gene therapies in recent years particularly in the area of cats are. This is come in the form of Cartesian therapies. What would you say? The challenges these therapies face today. Well I think the challenge which we've identified and addressing at Obsidian is really about how to provide physician control over both cell and gene therapies and That would include card Z's so today if you get a prescription from a physician you go to the pharmacy and you get a prescription that is written for a particular drug Given that particular those in terms of quantity and then taken once a day for example when you get a gene therapy The physician that she doesn't know precisely what those is. GonNa take the facts and more importantly conradi control it will I need to do is to be able to provide Precision control over both selling gene therapies and their ability to express proteins by using what we call signs of drives here at Obsidian. Well obsidian platform allows the physician to control the the expression of protein and terms of the clinical studies behind these therapies. How much of a therapeutic range is it? Is it a safety issue an issue so The very question the technology itself was derived from a platform that was invented at Stanford University Cocco professor homeless. And and what we do is we were able to instruct cells to produce what we call truck responsive domains refused to proteins of interest and those truck responsive Mainz then controlled by the Ministry of a small molecule drugs and the expression of the protein is directly proportional to those of the small molecule. Drunkenness given those little molecule truck that we moving into the clinic Cuidad cells in the next eighteen to twenty. Four months is actually a drug test. It's very safe. Drug Sweat established it was originally approved for using humans in the nineteen fifties. So it's very whether stop this track record. Today is used to treat altitude sickness in some people. So we're GONNA use that as a truck that we control protein expression with using technology. The most thing about this drug is very wide dose range. So there's a lot of points on the dial that will enable us to provide precise dosing of sides of cons and proteins For both so I'm gene therapies. So how does this work? You just attaching a receptor to the south as if that's a great question so what we do. Is We genetically engineer? So manufacture a fusion protein in actual fact and that season protein is structured in such a way with the cell produces all the time but it started in such a way that against concert off to the precious time in the cell and which is effectively the sort of sash container within a cell recognizes proteins to the slightly misspelled it and when we give a small molecule drug. Su Hyphen talks to sell. We'll happens is drug responsive to Maine on that fusion protein changes its structure and that means now that the frozen does not get carted off to the proteas son and plenty the road. We can control the amount of drug This given into the system also means we control the amount of protein that does not get off to the concept of the process. That's why we can vary the level and also the timing of which proteins are expressed by by cells. Are you able to use the same drug across targets or does the particular protein? You're trying to act on affect the drunk. You can use for that domain. Actually the technology now is that we can control Multiple proteins using this one single truck. We have also develops The technology using different drugs that we like you said there's all the reasons I mentioned earlier that we've been able to control of variety of proteins from membrane bound proteins overweight through to transcription factors which can produce. Proteins can be secreted by cells. So we really have found dates approacing that we haven't been able to regulate now using a substance and this was a breakthrough company about twelve months ago identifying that particular drug and the associated. We'll be their main roads alongside it in order to be able to control protein expression of numerous sites. Kind things I'll to I l fifteen. I'll twelve as well as various transcription factors. We worked on this well. How precise actually riddick sergey have precisely? Are you able to control a gene or cell therapy with this approach? Actually that's amazing precision because the approach that she looks at the protein expression in response to those of the drug that follows the type of ESCA that you've signed with a typical pharmacology experiment from decades ago. Which is very well defined. So we've been able to really regulate expression in terms of quantity Very effectively and also the timing of it can be controlled tightly as well. Typically control protein expression. I want to remove the drug because back down to normal levels within six to hours. And can you fully modulate the activity with this approach? Can you up and down regulated or shut it off it will? Yeah that's that's your question Nelson's both so The you mentioned a military things like kill switches for protein expression We don't have just an on off switch but it is also nothing down switches. Well so the more drug you would actually give it to somebody. The more of the sexes logic. Here's somebody for example The mall protein expression you get as a result and so those dependent way of being able to control protein expression and to my knowledge. There isn't another system out there that she's able to do that. There are companies using synthetic biology to kind of do the same thing as a synthetic biology approach. This is definitely that policy platform that we have here. It's one. That is interesting for me to come into the stage Mike Trick. I grew up in the small molecule world initially and Gravitas talks by attack was saying today is really a fusion of traditional small molecule pharmacokinetics combined with tossing edge technology in biology which is where the industry is heading.

Obsidian Therapeutics Paul Wotton Mainz CEO Stanford University Cocco Maine Mike Trick Engineer Professor Nelson Riddick Sergey
Arlene

PODSHIP EARTH

08:05 min | 3 months ago

Arlene

"Dr Arlene Blum is a biophysical chemist and author a mountaineer and Executive Director of the Green Science Policy Institute. The Institute Scientific Research and policy work with government and business has contributed to preventing the use of harmful chemicals including flame retardants and fluorinated chemicals like pizzas in children's sleepwear furniture electronics and other products worldwide. Arlene blum received a PhD from UC Berkeley and has told at Stanford University and Wellesley College. But that's only a fraction of Alino story arlene the first American and all woman ascent of an opponent. One considered one of the world's most dangerous and difficult mountains. She Co lead the first women's team to climb. Denali completed the Great Himalayan traverse across the mountain ranges of Bhutan the Pollen India and height the length of the European Alps with her baby daughter on her back. She's the author of Ana Pana a woman's place which was named one of the top one hundred best adventure books of all time by National Geographic. She also wrote the highly acclaimed book breaking trail. A climbing. Life. In two thousand eighteen bloom was inducted into the California Hall of fame. She was chosen by the Guardian as one of the world's one hundred most inspiring women. Dr Bloom is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. And if that wasn't enough Eileen was elected to the whole of mountaineering. Excellent Hey uh keep me from getting. You remember the day where we're sitting right now. I mean we're sitting in Tilden Park on. Trail called seaview with a wonderful view of the bay. While flowers greenhills Gorgeous California. And why so many people on the trail today? Well it turns out that everyone has been ordered to stay home or go outdoors and everything's closed so there are a lot more people outdoors than usual. Which is a good thing and you walk every single day. Tell us about that routine and and how you got into it. Well I do pretty intense work and I work really hard because I have so many opportunities and I've discovered that if every day I take a walk with friends or colleagues or sometimes even the chemical industry executives with whom I do not see eye to eye. It's extremely good for my physical health. My mental health and my work. You have an incredible history of climbing of mountaineering. Have you always had a passion for climbing and mountaineering? How did that start? I was raised by incredibly cautious and conservative Orthodox Jewish grandparents in Chicago and was not allowed to do anything and I push push push to just be able to take swimming lessons and so I guess I started early with coming up with things I really wanted to do and then pushing to be able to do them. When I was a Grad student at Berkeley I heard about an expedition to Denali Mount McKinley. The Highest Mountain in North America. And I'd been climbing a lot with my friends from Reed College and had climbed higher than Denali in Peru and apply gone the trap and was told that women could go as far as base camp to help with the cooking. And when I called to say well I've climbed higher than Denali. They said. Yeah you were the only woman. You probably didn't do your share you know. Women really can't time high mountains. I wonder if a team of all women could climb high mountains and I found five other women and we went and kind to Nali ourselves. All women were the first all women's team and indeed not only. Did we climb it? But our leader had altitude sickness and became unconscious just below the summit and at that point. I was twenty five. I was the deputy leader because I'd organized and suddenly I was in charge of our Denali expedition with an unconscious person at twenty thousand feet and a big Arctic storm. Coming in and We actually made a stretcher dragged her down the mountain and it was really empowering to me. I mean I'd had a lot of negative messages in my childhood about what I couldn't couldn't do and I thought wow we got grace down from Denali Alive. We can do anything. We dream up so that was really inspiring for me to realize sick. We can all do things and we believe possible when we have to then. You just kept going though. That wasn't the end of your mountaineering. No I love being in the mountains. I love being outdoors. I love being here. I seem to like challenge. I was on a nineteen. Seventy six expedition climbed Everest. We were the second American expedition in those days. Hard to believe we have the whole mountain to ourselves and I climbed to nearly twenty five thousand feet and on the way back. I thought at that point all the world's highest mountains over eight thousand meters. That's kind of a magic height They all had been cleaned by men but no woman had ever climbed eight thousand meters and people were saying maybe women couldn't and I thought well we climbed. Denali got twenty four Everest. Let's give him a chance. So on my way back from I I applied for a permit for Anna Purna one and it was the first eight thousand meter peak ever climbed. It has the highest fatality rate. And it's now considered the hardest climb and we did not know that and so In nineteen seventy eight. I did organize an an all women's expedition and we were successful. We were the first women and indeed the first Americans to climb out of that reinforced my belief that we can all do seemingly impossible things and I'd say now is a good time for all of us to be doing seemingly impossible things because it's it's tough right now. Your experience shows me and the tough things that I've done in my life is that you can move past them that they're not insurmountable and even if they are to continue moving forward with with those challenges. I've never been above eight thousand meters. What what is it like? I mean the physicality of losing that oxygen. Do you get addicted to that. It feels like a very rarefied club of people that understand and know something that the rest of us don't well first of all it's the most beautiful place ever being above timberline with clouds on your feet the extreme beauty and peace and so it is so beautiful. But you know being here until the park is so beautiful to you. Don't have to be on top of Anna Perna and there's a huge amount of focus. You have a goal and you get a great team and everybody shares ICAL. But I'm always kind of looking for family and a climbing expedition is like a family but perhaps better family dynamics and some families have so you have a family of people all focused on a goal. And you're in a beautiful place using every bit of your physical energy but your mental energy problem solving. So it's it's super focused. Every since I became a mom didn't want to risk my life because if you know this but the chances of dying about one in ten climbing those mountains so it seriously dangerous so for me as a mom. I don't want to risk my life on the other hand what I'm doing now which is reducing harmful chemicals that are in our bodies and our products and our planet so it's got a very similar similar feeling of of getting a great team family of people who share a common goal and then persevering through avalanches and storms and Yetis. And what have you

Dr Arlene Blum Highest Mountain Denali Mount Mckinley Denali Ana Pana Great Himalayan European Alps Alino Green Science Policy Institute Institute Scientific Research Executive Director Guardian Anna Perna Stanford University Reed College Dr Bloom Wellesley College Tilden Park Berkeley
Restrictions Are Slowing Coronavirus Infections, New Data Suggest

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 3 months ago

Restrictions Are Slowing Coronavirus Infections, New Data Suggest

"New information suggests tough restrictions on people's movements are working CBS news correspondent Vicki Barker has more now from the foreign desk in London data from China and Europe and preliminary data from the US to just stay at home and social distancing orders can reduce coronavirus cases and deaths faster than many mathematical models predict New York is on the main Stanford university's Michael Levitt accurately predicted when China's pandemic would peak has turned the corner Switzerland has turned the corner we hope that Spain is also joins select type of people who opposed in the courts but epidemiologists are warning that all that progress could be reversed overnight if restrictions are lifted too soon the Barker CBS news

Vicki Barker China Europe United States New York Stanford University Michael Levitt Switzerland Spain CBS
Coronavirus: Air pollution and CO2 fall rapidly as virus spreads

This Morning with Gordon Deal

02:48 min | 3 months ago

Coronavirus: Air pollution and CO2 fall rapidly as virus spreads

"Lives saved due to reduced air pollution and carbon emissions since we're not on the road as much here to go in depth as Doyle rice weather reporter at USA today Darla explained yeah we were looking at both the air pollution and carbon pollution and kind of determined that air pollution of the known killer worldwide it's responsible for about nine million deaths a year across the across the entire planet and anytime you get a chance to reduce air pollution which is you know which is what happened in in some countries including China and Italy among others the amount of air pollution that's being spewed into the air by factories and cars is has been reduced due to that people are staying at home from the coronavirus so you kind of counter intuitive and of course the you don't make light of something like the coronavirus but it has been a lifesaver in in some parts of the world that is crazy so and and some of the stuff is do you save some of its visible from space you have it the the satellite so we've got a bunch of satellite but they're both the maps and European bump the mothers making actually with specialized equipment detect a level of and different levels of pollution different kinds of pollution around the world and they can you pinpoint cities and instead of seeing now instead of seeing bargain instead of seeing of some of this other type of type of pollution they're seeing clear skies and that that is yeah obviously it directly to direct result of the reduced industry and the reduced levels of people driving so based on some of these calculations who's gassing the amount of lives that may have been saved from a pollution standpoint well there was one that one expert the name of Marshall Burke out of Stanford University and he said it was likely that the economic disruptions save twenty times more lives in China than in current currently been lost to the infection due to a coronavirus and he estimated the number at you know close to eighty thousand size save save the lives of about almost eighty thousand adults and children in China just due to the due to the lack of air pollution and yet again you have to tread carefully to say that it's not you know nobody's saying this is a blessing in disguise any stretch but it just makes you want to you know make sure Priscillian realize the just the status quo of things like air pollution due to the smog muse it's not something that you have it it's not something you want to just take lightly either if the killer in its own

Reporter USA Darla China Marshall Burke Stanford University Italy Priscillian
"stanford university" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

04:22 min | 3 months ago

"stanford university" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Medicine at Stanford University so I know we don't do recriminations or not today but when it when we talk about the the lockdown and indeed the entire economy shut down one suggestions made by the imperial college study that suggested a half million people were going to die in the U. K. and now estimated that down to twenty thousand or less in the U. K. over the course of three days the people who are in charge of study basically suggested the reason for that that is number one the death rate being lower but number two that the lockdown is actually effective at preventing this if you let people out of lockdown is on the twenty thousand it's a hundred thousand there's a study that came out from university of Washington today suggesting that the total number of deaths in the United States over the next four months could be eighty thousand I'm not sure what death rates that apply in that study and trying to figure that out all day long here do you think that the lockdown and and people staying home has been effective in at least reducing the transmission how many excess deaths had actually been prevented I'm not looking for you know hard number but but like I right I find that I can give you a hard number on this which is difficult right but I think the key thing there is but that you can see the uncertainty in practice right right in front of you that the argument for the shutdown essentially so not a lot of healthcare systems like yours in Italy's top imminently that's actually not unreasonable I mean it depends on what the terms on the capacity the health care system to deal with large numbers of people need validators in ICU beds and things like that so I think that died it's hard for me to save my comment directly I think I have to be very careful attention to detail college studies study and the last I saw just this morning but you're free from the P. I expect that he just just basically changes wanted something like that to look more carefully I think there that that that that's I mean TA you see people putting numbers and look to see are prevalent especially as soon as your problem can definitely number initially that led to this massive massive shut down policy that number it isn't justified by that actual study will part of the population they they they guess that number I mean I think we we definitely much more careful about about a more humble I think about you know the confidence with which we said let's do this when we when we don't actually know number we should be we should say we don't know that number or to reflect the uncertainty in our in our in our confidence in our our statements much more more effectively we typically do and Dr J. final question for you let's let's assume that we actually do get these tests in place that we start running all these zero prevalence has that that puts your problems by the way just get your check my definition is to make sure I'm getting this right that would be checking the prevalence of the of the antibodies in people's blood basically one has racked what once the once those tests aren't correct then how soon do you think this laptop how soon could we could we be looking at getting out of get out of I want to yesterday I want this test yesterday I went down yesterday I want the number medially and we have our studies that I'm I'm working on with some of my colleagues to get the generality and end up in LA county took it to get those circles of nice but we are nationwide study and we support for nationwide said you need to keep sticks to to keep things are missing right now is we need a large number of antibody test and we need to have some funding source to pay for pay for that task and we can get those we can get that running with the whole I mean the scientific community around but the folks I'm talking with they want these numbers also so this is not something that's controversial I don't think it's partisan I just think it's we just need we need the number I'm hoping will know it in in that two weeks on that the latest what name really amazing amazing stuff and an interest and vital stuff here from Dr J. Bhattacharya professor medicine it's never really appreciate your time Sir and thanks so much for hard work on this topic yeah I think it was a real pleasure to care well coming up we're gonna talk about president trump apparently members media very very angry that president trump's numbers are up in the midst of all of this because of course everything is from fall gets that momentarily first let's talk about some stuff that you can do in the near term like right now you are locked down at home well first of all you can help your fellow Americans how can you do that as a member of the community well yes my name then two four one four nine zero take the love America pledged today how can you help out local businesses that are just getting slammed well you could purchase a gift card from them you could commit to social distancing which is going to be useful regardless what happens next you.

Stanford University
California - Schools hamstrung over feeding students as coronavirus leads to closures

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:36 sec | 3 months ago

California - Schools hamstrung over feeding students as coronavirus leads to closures

"California schools are stepping up to feed their students despite being shut down because of the coronavirus shelter in place order according to data compiled by the big local news program at Stanford University three hundred ninety schools in twelve counties around the bay area are offering free meal pick ups while they're closed the data show about eighty percent of the schools offering meals will serve any child eighteen years or younger not just students some of the schools are open just a few days a week with access to several meals at once while others are

Stanford University California
"stanford university" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

08:32 min | 3 months ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"Of like Chopin's Jim Honor Ballot And like they're they're people who can play it in like I'm like. Oh this is very nice and like I can appreciate this and there are some people who can play it And it like every time I listened to it one hundred percent of the time I get goosebumps on my spine like like provokes of very intense emotional reaction and I just wonder whether part of that is. Because I know that there's this person on the other end in there and some sort of emotional state playing at that resonates with mine and whether or not I like. You'll ever have a computer able to do that. Yeah that's I mean this gets kind of philosophical question at some point. No it was a human or computer than what kind of what a have. Yeah and I actually had a philosophy. Professor in Undergrad who Like ask the question like would would it make you any less appreciative of Chopin composition? Knowing that he was being insincere posing as like he was. You know doing it for some reason. I was like yeah. I don't know like it's a well one of my piano piano teachers Used to say that you kind of have I. It's kind of like a theater. You have to convey your emotions but there has to be some even when you go wild to has to be some element of control on the back because You need to kind of continue the thread and Yeah for sure but but also It is For me also just Vaca Plan as the pleasure of it's not just Having a recording. That's That sounds good. Yeah no I'm very jealous That you had the discipline and did all the work to like. Put this power into your finger. It's awesome well. Thank you so much for For taking the time to be with us today. This was a fantastic conversation and I feel like I've learned a lot. Yes thanks for having me my pleasure. It's awesome so that was Kevin's chat with Percy Lang from Stanford University and Kevin. You know what was really interesting was hearing both you and Percy reminisce about your experiences with hypercard and that was Percy's kind of introduction to computing programming. That was actually my introduction to programming to in your awesome. Yeah before I the web pages I was building hypercard things. And what kind of struck me as you were talking about. How to teach The next generation and talking about different tooling the idea of a or the concept of like a hypercard for AI. That's something that I think would be really really beneficial. What what are your thoughts? Well I think he was getting at that. A little bit When he was talking about his ideas around program synthesis ended the interview. So it's really interesting. I find this to be the case with a lot of people that the inspiration like the thing that I tugged you into computing and programming oftentimes sticks with you your entire career. And so he started his computing experience thinking about hypercard which is very natural easy way to express computations and still to this day like the thing that he's most excited about is how you can use these very sophisticated machine learning technologies to help. People expressed their needs for compute at a more natural way so that the computer can go help people out like I think that's so awesome. Yeah I do too. I thought the same thing when he was talking about the program. Synthesis that has some people I think. Understandably maybe freaked out right like idea that oh these things can right themselves but when you put it in that context of it might make things more accessible and less intimidating and more available across a variety of different things. I think it becomes really exciting. Yeah I've been saying this a lot lately. There's there's a way to look at a bunch of machine learning stuff and get really freaked out about it and then there's a way to look at machine learning where you're like. Oh my goodness piece of technology is creating a bunch of abundance that didn't exist before or it's creating Opportunity and access that people didn't have before to more actively participating in the creation of technology and that's the thing that really excites me about the the state of machine learning and twenty twenty. I agree I think that there is massive potential for that and kind of pivoting from that one of the things. The two of you talked about towards the end of your conversation was I guess the relationship between academia and industry when it comes to AM L. And you were talking about near the tremendous amount of computers often needed for these different projects and for these different research. Things being someone who's been on both sides like you have. What do you see as the opportunity for academia and Industry to work together? And what do you think are the? What's maybe one of the areas where there's friction right now? Yeah I think that Percy nailed it in his assessment so there's certainly an opportunity for industry to help academia out more with just compute resources although I think these compete resource constraints in a sense aren't the worst thing in the world like the the the brutal reality is that Even though it may seem that industry has an abundance of compute relative to a university research lab if you are inside of a big company doing these things the appetite for compute for these big machine learning projects is so vast that you have scarcity even inside of big companies and so I think that's a very interesting Like constraint for both academia industry to lean all the way into and to try to figure out cleverer ways for solving these problems. And I'm super excited about that but like the the point that he made Which I found particularly interesting is the fact that if we could do a little bit better job sharing our problems with one another. We could probably unlock a ton of creativity that we're not able to bring to bear solving these problems right now. And that's something that one of the reasons. I love doing these podcasts. So I'M GONNA go back and do my job as CTO of Microsoft. And see if I can try to make that happen more. I love it. I appreciate you doing that and I appreciate. Percy's work as well. That's just about it for us today but before we end I just have to say Kevin. I have been excitedly anticipating the release of your book which will be out on April seventh. It's called reprogramming the American dream and I've actually had a a tiny sneak peek. And it's really really well written. It's really good thank you. You are too kind. I am I'm looking forward to being out as well. I got a box of books in the mail. The other day This is the first book that I've ever written so I was like I had this pinch me moment When I opened this box and there were the stack of hardcover books that had the words printed in them that I written so. That's sort of amazing. That's so cool. I love that so much and I'm definitely going to be recommending it to my friends and my fellow tech nerds out there Because what I really like about the book is that it really does break down a lot of the things we've been talking about in this conversation. Like Hey I. In an understandable way in a way that is pragmatic and not scary. Yeah that was a goal. I was hoping to take a bunch of material that can be relatively complex in presented in a way that hopefully it's accessible to a broad audience so I think it's actually critically important like one of the most important things is to have all of us have a better grounding of what it is and what it isn't so that we can make smart decisions about how we want to employ it and how we want to encourage other people to use these technologies on our behalf. I love it. I love it all right. Well that doesn't for us as always please reach out anytime at behind. The tech at Microsoft Dot Com. Tell us what's on your mind and sure as hell everyone you know about the show. Thanks for listening..

Percy Lang Kevin Microsoft Chopin Professor Vaca Plan Stanford University CTO
Is Ibuprofen Really Risky for Coronavirus Patients?

All Things Considered

02:33 min | 3 months ago

Is Ibuprofen Really Risky for Coronavirus Patients?

"Is it risky to take ibuprofen if you have symptoms of covert nineteen the French health ministry says yes over the weekend it warned doctors not to give ibuprofen and other nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs to patients with the disease but experts on the frontlines of this pandemic say there is no reason for alarm NPR's Maria Godoy reports the concern over IB Provan started with a brief letter published in the medical journal the lancet last week the authors hypothesize that medication such as ibuprofen and other and states could raise a person's risk of developing a severe case of code nineteen the theory was that these drugs increase levels of an enzyme that would make it easier for the virus to infect cells but leading global health officials say there's no evidence is actually the case you know sometimes discussions off the cuff turning to letters turning to social media turned into a lot of discussion and you have no idea what kinds of what I tax Dr Anthony Fauci head of the National Institute of allergy and infectious disease bottom line is I have not seen any certain data indicate there's a problem well it's a true that there's not a problem the world health organisation agrees it issued a statement on Twitter saying it's been in touch with doctors treating coronavirus patients and hasn't heard of any negative side effects from ibuprofen beyond those already known for instance patients with kidney problems shouldn't take ibuprofen because it can cause kidney damage when used long term in high doses Dr Angela Rogers pulmonary and critical care physician at Stanford University says that's one reason why hospitals routinely avoid ibuprofen for patients sick enough to be hospitalized with any sort of infection when patients are very ill with fevers and hospitalized they're at risk for kidney injury and so Tyler all really is the go to one that we use Tylenol doesn't work the same way as and states and it's thought to affect the part of the brain that regulates temperature the Tylenol is it risk free either it can damage the liver in high doses so if you have mild symptoms of covered nineteen and want to treat them at home if people are you know having a liver disease either and and could make them feel a little bit more security start tiling offers that might be a reasonable way to do it but if you take ibuprofen or other in states for other medical reasons Roger says talk to your doctor if you're worried but for now there's no reason to stop taking them Maria could away

Ibuprofen French Health Ministry NPR Maria Godoy Ib Provan Twitter Kidney Damage Stanford University Tyler Liver Disease Roger Dr Anthony Fauci National Institute Of Allergy Dr Angela Rogers
"stanford university" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

15:25 min | 3 months ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

"At the end of the day we're building no systems of for the world and I think human snake mistakes have fallacies biases they're not super transparent sometimes and why Inherit all these win. Maybe you can design a better system and I think computers already clearly. How many other advantages that. Humans don't have hi everyone. Welcome to behind the attack. I'm your host Kevin Scott Chief Technology Officer for Microsoft in this podcast. We're going to get behind the tech. We'll talk some of the people who made our modern world possible and understand what motivated them to create what they did. So join me to maybe learn a little bit about the history of computing and get a few behind the scenes insights into. What's happening today? Stick around? Uh Hello and welcome to behind the tech. I'm Christina Warren's senior advocate at Microsoft and Scott. Today our guests is Percy laying. Percy's an associate professor of Computer Science Stanford University and one of the great minds and ai specifically in machine learning and natural language processing. Yeah and Percy talks about the need for a I to be quote safely deployed and he says that given society's increasing reliance on machine learning it's critical to build tools that make machine learning more reliable in the wild. Yeah I completely agree with person's point of view and honestly with Like a bunch of his other very interesting ideas about how machine learning and natural language processing or unfolding over the next few years. Some super interested in having this conversation. Let's find out what he's up to. I.

Percy Kevin Scott Microsoft professor of Computer Science Chief Technology Officer Christina Warren
Percy Liang: Stanford University Professor, Technologist, and Researcher in AI

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

09:12 min | 3 months ago

Percy Liang: Stanford University Professor, Technologist, and Researcher in AI

"I guess today's Percy Lag. Percy's an associate professor of computer science at Stanford University also one of the top technologists that semantic machines. His research goals are to make machine learning more robust fair and equitable and to make it easier to communicate with computers through natural language. He's a graduate of MIT and received his PhD from UC Berkeley. Hey Percy welcome. Show things have happened so we always start. These shows with me asking How you first got interested in technology. Were you a little kid when you realize that you're interested in this stuff? Yeah I think it was a round maybe and of elementary school or Middle School My Dad always had a computer so it was around but he didn't let me play with it. And what you do. He was a mechanical engineer. Gotcha and I remember maybe my first memories are In after school In middle school there was a computer lab and there was There is a hypercard which is multimedia program for the Macintosh back then and it got really fascinated and building these Militantly simple applications. But they had a scripting language so you could start to code a little bit and there's animation and all that so it was kind of fun to get into that I remember hypercard as well I I believe one of when the first programs I wrote I maybe a little bit older than you are But I do remember at one point writing a hypercard program that was Like a multimedia thing that animated a laser disc like you remember laserdisc gigantic precursors to DVD's Yeah this is really such a great tool. Yeah at that time. I also tried to learn see but that was kind of a disaster. What are pointers and all this stuff? This is sort of a formidable Formidable first language to attempt to learn I mean like one of the things like given that you are Your Computer Science Educator You know I. I'd be curious to hear how you think about that. Evolution of entry into computer science on some levels now. It seems like it's a lot easier to get started than when we were kids. Maybe but in other ways it's actually more challenging because so much of the computing environment like the low level. Details are just abstracted away and like the layering is very high. It's a lot to get through Yeah so somehow. Computer Science Thrives on abstraction right from the low level machine code to to see and we have python programming languages and At some level you just have graphical interfaces so picking the right entry point into that for someone as I think. There are multiple ways you can go probably wouldn't start with see if I were teaching intro programming class but more at kind of a conceptual level of here are the kind of computations that you want to perform And then separately. I think it's different class with talked to you about how this is actually realized because I think there is some value For A computer scientists to understand how goes all the way down to to to machine code but not all at once yet? It's I am still convinced that one of the one of the most useful things I had to learn as Like a programmer. Who LEARNED TO PROGRAM? The eighties was fairly quickly. I had to learn assembly language. Like you had to know what the low level details where the machine now granted the machines were more or less complicated back than they are now but like just sort of at that atomic level knowing how the actual machine works Just made everything else that came after it. Less intimidating yeah. It's Kinda satisfying. It's kind of rounded playing with blocks. So you you started with hypercard And like where did things go from there? Yeah so for a while. I was I I think I also learned basic. I'm just kind of tinkering around There was and Like today as many resources as you can imagine for just. No kids interested in Programming so a of it was kind of on on my own I think maybe a turning point happened at the beginning of highschool where I started participating this Usa Computing Olympiad. Which is a programming contest? You can think about is the programming contest. But I really think about as kind of algorithm problem solving contest so the the problems that they give you are It's kind of like a puzzle and you have to write a program to solve it But much of the the work is actually kind of coming up with insight of how to what algorithm to do kind of efficiently so an example might be How many ways are there to make change for Two dollars museums certain set of coins and it would be kind of Rica moment when you found. That's how you can do it. And then you have to code it up so I think that competition really got me to And a value this type of Kind of rigor and attention to detail but also a kind of creative aspect of computing. Because you have to come up with on news types of solutions that's awesome and so what was What was the most interesting problem you had to solve? In one of these competitions oh That's a really good question I think it's been a while so I don't remember all the problems but one. I think One memorable maybe class of problems is Around the idea of dynamic program and so this idea that you can write a program and if you do it smartly you can make something that would otherwise run in years millennia in a matter of seconds and I remember having to it was always these problems and you have to really figure out. What was the recurrence relation to make it all all work and a lot of problems. Were centered around. Yeah was it one of the amazing things about the dynamic programming technique is it really does teach you and it might be one of those foundational things when you're getting your head wrapped around how to think. Algorithm Mickley about problem decomposition. Yeah because like I. It's one of those magical things. Where if you break the problem down in just the right way. All of a sudden A solution to the problem becomes Possible when it was intractable before. Yeah Yeah I think I liked it because it was an that you had to memorize a bunch of things or you learn if you learn these ten algorithms and ub set but it was kind of a much more open ended way to think about Problems yeah that's awesome and so You go to. Mit As a undergraduate student. How soon did you know exactly the thing inside a computer science that you wanted to do that? I think took a little bit of evolution so coming out of high school. I was much more interested in his algorithm IQ questions and got interested in computer science theory because that was kind of a natural segue So it was and I started doing research in this area and it wasn't until towards the end of my undergrad where I Sir. Transitioning INTO MACHINE. Learning or AI. When was this what year this was around? Two Thousand Four. Okay Yeah says still like machine? Learning was people didn't use the word back. Yeah Yeah Yeah I mean I remember like right around that time was when I joined Google and I've been a compiler guy when I was in academic insult like I'd never done I never done at all and like I didn't know what machine learning was when I started and yet you know three months after I joined Google I was tasked with doing a machine learning thing. You know reading this giant stack of papers and formidable textbooks Trying to trying to get myself grounded but it means a very interesting time like two thousand four and like you know you sort of picked a great time to learn annoy idea that it would be the feel that it is today and why. Why was that interesting so I can sort of get? Why the theory was interesting. Love these problems and the challenge of what was interesting about machine learning. I mean I think there's definitely this Background would be kind of mystical aspect of intelligence that I think I'm not unique and can be drawn to so When there was an opportunity to connect the things that I was actually doing with a theory with some element that I took opportunity to kind of get into that and they say that Mit for my masters which was on Machine learning natural language processing So then that kind of Roy cemented kind of direction that I really started

MIT Associate Professor Of Compute Percy Percy Lag Google School In Middle School Stanford University Berkeley Middle School Usa Computing Olympiad Programmer Rica AI ROY
Book critics give fiction prize to Edwidge Danticat

All of It

00:34 sec | 4 months ago

Book critics give fiction prize to Edwidge Danticat

"During the national book critics circle just announced this year's winners among those recognize were as weak data cat for her story collection everything inside for fiction she now Miller was awarded an autobiography for no my name her book about being sexually assaulted by Stanford University student Brock Turner and Morgan Parker's magical Negro received the national book critics circle award for poetry upon finding out Morgan tweeted holy bleep I honestly don't know what to say I work so hard thank you thank you thank you thank you this is for all the

Miller Brock Turner Morgan Parker Stanford University National Book Critics Circle A
Bay Area sporting events affected by spreading Coronavirus

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:25 sec | 4 months ago

Bay Area sporting events affected by spreading Coronavirus

"The spread of the corona virus is starting to have a big impact on sporting events and other large gatherings in the bay area KCBS as Matt Bigler has more on that part of the story Stanford University has announced it will either cancel or scale back large scale events through next month for example it will only sell enough tickets to fill one third of each sporting venues capacity this in response to advice from Santa Clara county's public health officer Dr

Matt Bigler Stanford University Santa Clara County Officer
"stanford university" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

13:26 min | 5 months ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Outcomes rocket podcasts for we chat with today's most successful and inspiring health leaders today. I have Dr Jeffrey Gertner with us today to chat with a little bit about healthcare. That maybe you're not used to different angle on on surgery as well as reconstructive surgery and startups. Dr Gertner has a a wide ray of experience. He's a professor and vice chairman surgery at Stanford University a plastic surgeon by trade and also research scientists. He has a lab that focuses on translational projects that are developed up in the lab and our commercial is to improve patient care. He's also general partner at Tau Tana Group where they lead the development of new technologies aesthetics reconstruction wound care surgical and bio material devices and. Finally he's founder and director at Neo Dine biosciences. Where they're they're basically an evidence based company developing and commercializing innovative tissue repair devices to minimize scar formation restoring both function anesthetic appearance? It's loud topics that are of interest to you so super excited to have Jeffrey on the PODCAST. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for inviting me until it'd be so Jeffrey anything that I left out in the intro that maybe you wanted to share with listeners. Now I think he covered most of the things that I do so I kind of a little bit guilty Elti of short attention span. I clinical medicine. Have Lab also have tried to work in the private sector to bring new new technologies and innovations to agents Around the world and it's super important work that you do some excited to dive into some of that in the podcast today. Why don't we kick it off with you letting us know why healthcare like what got you in healthcare to begin with? Yeah it's it's a good question. I I think I I again was was looking at lots of different options since growing up in certainly in college and medicine really stood out as I thought about it just because it had a piece of it that was business at a piece piece of it. That was more than science. that a piece that was science than really seemed like For someone again who might be guilty of a short attention span. There are are lots of different paths that you could travel as a physician and it seemed more like an adventure than a job and and so through process of elimination. I kind of just decided that it was a exciting thing to go into and have never looked back since. That's awesome and you. You've definitely done quite quite a bit in the time that you've been in the Field Jeffrey. If you had to zoom in a hot topic that needs to be on leaders agendas listening today. What would you say the hot topic is and how are you and your different organizations? You're involved with approaching it. I think you know just the the thing that struck me being in academic medicine in the private sector is just the real inertia of the medical system in the in the real challenges. We have in not just in innovations in terms therapeutics or devices but even innovating changes in the systems and service models so that we can become more and more efficient and do more with less last and just the natural frictional points that are Hannah legacy parts of our medical system in the United States. That on just really oppose Hose kind of nimble innovation out here in Silicon Valley you see people disrupting gigantic industries left and right and I don't think that's really possible. Molin medicine because there are so many different stakeholders including the federal government That are involved in it but it doesn't mean it's impossible and so I think just is constantly thinking about. How can we make the system? Better how can we think about how to make the care of an individual patient better in trying to knock down those those barriers barriers. Our at least our in the system I think is kind of job. One for all of us were clinicians or scientists or entrepreneurs or executives executives or innovators. It's not a simple thing so it has to be front line for us to be successful at Jeffrey. I think that's a great call out and I feel like the the leaders in healthcare that have been successful at at moving. The needle are the ones like you that decide on vertical and they just stay hyperfocused. Now I know you like to kid around about hey I got a short attention span. But the thing that you've done so well Geoffrey is hone in to your area of specialty and I just I just love that you've done that and that's why you'd gotten the results. You've gotten a love if you could just share with the listeners. How you've created results and maybe some examples through one of your companies Are Your lab. Yeah sure you know it all really starts when I started with patients and just as you go through your your surgical training in my in case you kind of have this illusion that if you become very well trained you're GONNA be able to solve most of the problems for the patients that come into your office and and as you go through your training you realize why there's just a lot of things that we really can't even address. There's a lot of things that aren't evidence base that we do to patients and there's all these unintended consequences downstream and so my whole of evolution has been relatively organic starting with. How can I do a better job for fations nations and then in a certain point you realize what we have to come up with new approaches for some of these things in that leads you to the laboratory and you get to a certain point in your in the laboratory Rian and actually? That's where I was in two thousand five professor at Nyu. And I had all in Manhattan. Had All these things I thought were good. The idea is configured How to get him into the real world? It just wasn't it's not what Manhattan New York City is known for. Not At that time there was certainly not a a tech startup. Culture critical mass I moved to Stanford figuring you know one place on the planet really knows how to innovate. It's it's probably this Geria- and realized pretty quickly that all my great ideas were actually not very good ideas that they were certainly they were not Businesses in any case and learn that that final piece what makes good business and how they have all the stars align so it's just been no unfortunately just dogged persistence trying career out how to how to make a difference in how to advance field of medicine. That really has as kind of always motivated me. And I I think again if you have that as your primary focus than I think it makes it easy to do things that don't make sense like going out and you know as a surgeon in an issue on Sandhill road to venture capitalist. That's actually how you learn you learn by realizing that what you thought were ideas weren't good ideas. There's more importantly like what is a good idea. And that in a of that and then you can move forward so you know. It's very simple motivation for me. At least and that has that's kind of ended up there was never a strategic plan that I wanted to be an entrepreneur. I became an entrepreneur out of necessity because that was the only way that I could see things that might impact patient care getting into the real world. Yeah it's a winding road and Is Pretty Cool that you've taken it. You've been persistent with it and resilient and for that matter and and and if you had to boil it down to the essence of what does make a good idea good business. What would you say the one or two things are I think you? Oh for sure it has to meet for me. At least it has to meet an unmet. Clinical need I think there are arguably good businesses. That are me too sorts of things things you know again. You know. We see a with kind of the therapy for cancer. I mean obviously a great idea if you don't really have the lens of a physician Russian. That's great so now. Everybody is flowing into that sector. But there's all these other areas of unmet clinical need that don't have investment in so trying to keep your eye on a what you know. And so as you alluded to I've I've kind of focused on surgery. reconstructive surgery replastering surgery is I know that area and then you just have to find different ways to innovate. I think remaining focused on the unmet. Clinical need believing you know. I think that the second piece is really really really being sure at your data is rock solid. So it's always easy to fall in love with the ideas and kid yourself and that's just a waste of everyone's time and money is you don't want to spend six or seven years where technology that you were pretty sure is going to work in the real world and then I think being persistent in creative many past the top amount and then figuring out which way to go when you're not in the hottest sector. You're not an immune therapy for answer. How do you foster innovation in those areas? I think sometimes requires just dogged persistence persistence adding it's so true. And that's something that's hugely valuable in you as a leader Jeffrey and listeners that are in the middle of this process process needing to innovate to get their companies ahead to help patients to improve outcomes. That dog persistence is so key in what you're doing in and take some inspiration from Jeffrey and and his winding road in what you're doing. It doesn't happen overnight. You gotta stay with it for the entire course definitely you so just speaking of winding roads. I feel like we learn a lot more from our setbacks than our successes. Can you share a setback that you had. And what did you learn from that particular setback. Sure yes we But ten years ago started a company now is based on again really exciting technology that will be developed in our laboratory and you know is really focused on novel ways to connect blood vessels on Technologies in kind of a classic example example of that. Saying it's. It's not what you don't know that drug shop you know for sure that just ain't so as Mark Twain said and and we went into you with the knowledge that there are lots of way to glue thanks to get real holidays together and we went into it with the knowledge that there were lots of FDA a approved adhesives on the market that were being used clinically indications that we want to go into. They were commercially available on. So we assume the thing we didn't need to innovate on was the fees and and as we went in our core technology that enabled the user interfaces in Hala. Oh tubes were extremely well I mean works. Great a what we found was that for certain applications on these abuses. Were really not good are not great. They weren't they. They certainly weren't adequate for asthma. And so you know that was kind of a real eye opener that you really need to question all assumptions and again these were for things that again had gone through. FDA approval had multiple publications. And as you kind of get into the weeds of how does this. Actually work in ancients realized that these were imperfect things and if we had known that ahead of time we would have certainly saved ourselves. You know a lot of time. It would've changed kind of our assessment of the value proposition. And also the risks of the thing and so now as I look at projects I obviously look at every assumption. It's not just the one that risks not at such a great call out you know and there are a lot of things that we could get into and we assume and Think this is a great call out and love the quote that you shared. It's what you know for sure that is so that really isn't I love of that. And that was Mark Twain Right What a great quote definitely have to look that one up after this and keep it in my in my quote arsenal because it's so true in and and a lot of an all out of us in health care? Meanwhile and we we mean well and we work hard and we're focused. Don't let these assumptions ruin ruin your work and the benefit that you could be providing to patients. Thanks for sharing that. That's really insightful. Jeffrey sure yeah. No I think it's corollary is kind of why arrogance arrogance I think is a real real negative for for people that want to innovate. Because it again assumed that you know things are. You're confident that you know things. I think you really we have to have that kind of learners beginner's mind at all times to avoid essentially stepping into a pothole lava that so true so oh you walked us through. Some of the shadows with that company talked about one of the proudest leadership moments. You've had a date so so one of our One of my companies Neon by scientists and it's started actually when I was an intern at mass general The Boston shriners shriners hospital in the nineties. Take Care in burn patients and and just realizing again that was a situation where all care was free. All Technology was available global. And you just realize that these kids who had these terrible burns at literally were skin deep. We could keep them alive but their lives were immeasurably it changed.

Dr Jeffrey Gertner founder and director Manhattan Mark Twain professor FDA Neo Dine biosciences Stanford University Elti general partner Tau Tana Group federal government Stanford United States Silicon Valley Nyu Geoffrey Hannah Rian
"stanford university" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"stanford university" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Who say with the program for a decade and one of those Joe show McMonagle worn officer who's you're doing a stop as probably the greatest like in America today. And he just walked into my lab was boosted another Jack up said, okay. What am I supposed to do? And I'd say well, Joe, we're looking for your Scottie. What I have no idea where is for you. And I are you're gonna find them and within ten minutes. Joe had drawn a excellent three dimensional rendering Stanford University art museum with pillars fountains. He also the ability to draw which is very nice. So he do an excellent now famous drawing, and this is Joe's target trial number one as a remote viewer. I didn't people. The UK showed vote view is, of course, dot I just gave him permission to use this ability that he'd never used before. Because it was bitten. I gave them probably gave him permission to use his wonderful remote viewing capability. I cracked open the show for him. The documentary is called third eye spies. And you said it's coming out later this month or the beginning of next month. That's probably not how these things go. I was in February February. Okay. And you said it'll be available. I on digital platforms for viewing. And then later there might be a theatrical releases, well, our distributor who or call. The orchards has gotten increasingly excited about this.

Joe Stanford University art museum officer Jack America UK ten minutes
"stanford university" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"stanford university" Discussed on WSB-AM

"I'm just saying listen, we're going to have to make some decisions here is a culture as a society as a country Stanford University told the sigma Chi fraternity to remove its American flag. Why Stanford to improve their image ministry, reportedly told the fraternity the flag could be seen as intimidating aggressive and alienating. Is this is this the country? We want the greatest generation of George Herbert Walker Bush and people like my father the fought for years in World War Two, and so many others in that with Tom Brokaw called the greatest generation an American flag. We're gonna we're gonna now teach kids in college that that flag is seen as intimidating aggressive, and alienating. When all the our treasure, our, kids blood shed lives lost limbs lost, you know, faces destroyed in war, no country, ever accumulating, more power and using it for the good than this one. And we're saying that in college to our kids, and we'll tell him five year olds at Santa doesn't exist. Because we don't we let them run away with the culture. There's no stopping them. This is where I keep warning. You we have we have a dual Justice system. We don't apply the laws equally. We don't have equal Justice under the law or equal application of always we're gonna lose it..

sigma Chi fraternity Tom Brokaw George Herbert Walker Bush Stanford University Stanford Santa five year
"stanford university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"David r henderson of stanford university now for much of india's post independence history the government has been dominated by a single party the indian national congress or congress party it's fortune's have waxed and waned over the years but it remained the cornerstone of indian politics the party the others had to beat that all changed in two thousand fourteen when narendra modi's hindu nationalists bjp swept to power with general election less than a year away he has redefined political debate and threatens to render congress and irrelevance as our south asia correspondent justin rowlatt has been discovering years ago we made it with disconnect when india became independent seventy years ago was only one conceivably govern the country of the midnight when the rose the congress party had led the independence movement and it was to lead india for decades to come but now congress faces its biggest challenge ever that have gone donnay gone down india's current prime minister narendra modi leads the hindu nationalist bahati janata party ob j p he won a landslide victory in the general election of two thousand fourteen one of his slogans was congress looked bottles an india free of congress i'm gonna.

David r henderson stanford university india narendra modi justin rowlatt congress party bjp south asia prime minister seventy years
"stanford university" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"To the next and that's really brand new hard science from stanford university very exciting and you always use examples from nature and animals and i think that you know that deer information is so profound i mean it blows me away that a deer if a deer is eating the wrong foods the wrong time with the year that deer cannot digest those whose an will die they will die they will just get sick bill die splitting it was done when you know dear yet bugs for bark in the winter and bugs for leaves in greens in the summer and if aid park in the summer when they had the wrong bugs he could cause such a level of indigestion it could kill the deer that makes you think wait wait wait what does that mean for us like can we do whatever we want whenever we want all the foods we eat in general or highly processed foods that can stay on the shelf for months and months on end there for no microbes they're not alive therefore we're not repopulating your gut bugs the way we were designed for millions of years so what happens to us well those god bugs 'cause you know gut immunity they protect us from blood sugar issues the epidemic of our time immunity you know cognitive decline these things are all driven by a really good healthy intestinal skin which is supported by the foods we eat seasonally and as a result he really good healthy population of good bugs which need really good seasonally you know adjusted skin in an environment to do proliferate what's so interesting about this conversation is i was just talking with someone recently that was saying that animals no they intuitively know and for example gorillas if you gave guerrillas genetically modified bananas they peel them before the lethem if it's a banana that's not a gmo banana they will eat the entire banana including the skin.

stanford university
"stanford university" Discussed on KSCO 1080

KSCO 1080

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on KSCO 1080

"And next to shannon we have sarah who was teaching science for a couple of years and now she is in a program in management at stanford university and welcome so this issue actually hits pretty close to home for me while i was teaching i lost one of my really close to gun violence and this happened this happened in his own home you know and if we didn't have guns like this he might still be here and so i'm really hoping that we can change all of this and and i just think this shouldn't happen the students especially they should be able to graduate from high school and not have to deal with all this no thanks so much sara condolences to you on your friends the loss of your friend sitting also with us here is radical and she is a medical researcher at it you see sf university of california san francisco and a few thoughts from you if you would radical thanks a lot i think it's just really crazy seems ridiculous that all teachers researchers anything anybody that's trying to head the wood and make it a better place so for me do that good imaging research at tied into diagnosis a patient who have lifestyle diseases and we just wanna make lights better so they can get faster better diagnosis i worked hard.

sarah stanford university researcher san francisco lifestyle diseases sf university of california
"stanford university" Discussed on Constitutional

Constitutional

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Constitutional

"Jing monopolies of the west he became a trustee of stanford university stanford being a famous railroad baron and field saw the income tax as a form of socialism he wrote in his supreme court opinion explaining why the income tax to be strapped down bats here's the cloud the present assault upon capital is but the beginning it will be but the steppingstone to others larger and more sweeping till our political contests will become a war of the poor against the reg a war constantly growing in intensity and bitterness so that's pretty dark the question of what is the relationship between the federal government and individuals making money that was a hot area of constitutional too vaguely nineteenthcentury both the left and the right thought that the question of exactly how does the government regulate the economy what kind of economy are going to have what kind of inequality regon have what kind of redistribution are we going to have those questions were hot constitutional questions at this time even though today they don't feel like constitutional questions at all to issues lake antitrust issues like the gold standard the income tax these were all major constitutional debates both in the courts and in politics i mean the original conception of how the political konomi was going to work in the united states if you read people like thomas jefferson was weird heavyland of small producers and they weren't going to be dependent on others and then as the 19th century rolls along we get this massive economic upheaval and it quickly becomes clear in the late nineteenth century.

trustee income tax assault united states thomas jefferson stanford university
"stanford university" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Different operation word that the that the or i was second some of the other day they were making fun of goulash listed it's important invention you donors santa's not today but later there's going to be a facial theme on your face that you will do a are on through but not that one just thought that one which is interesting a lot of the failures i mean i know it's sort of a trope it's silicon valley that failure is a good thing but i don't necessarily think that's a good thing but the conceptual ideas or a good things not the necessarily the products they just failed yeah i mean i i think so much has to depend on we don't why did you fail right you you feel because you're an idiot yeah yeah all right when we ever going to talk about some of the failing now as opposed to then and and what you what are your thoughts on had the evolving is from these people and do you think the people today are reflective of what was the ridley happened or perhaps a mutated version or or where it's going we're here with leslie berlin she is the archivist at stanford university for the silicon valley archives and she's written a book called the troublemakers about people from the 70s and early '80s who had been critical up people you might not know about and critical to the development of silicon valley today show is sponsored by go cd and opensource continuous delivery server built by thought works with go cd your team can really software more frequently consistently and reliably enjoy advanced traceability by visualizing near complex workflows from end to end go cd is open source and free to use professional support and enterprise addons are available from thought works for out of the box continuous delivery visit go see dorgrecode this episode is brought to you by m particle the customer data platform for every screen and i'm here with co founder and ceo michael cats we know that uh people using mobile to research and transact more than ever before which you've talked about um what's the future of mobile commerce and how does impartical help it's a retailer customers like overstock lilley pulitzer and jetta com so the classic notion of a person moving through the funnel is fundamentally broken people may start researching your company's product on their laptops.

santa leslie berlin stanford university co founder mobile commerce ceo michael
"stanford university" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Enter the promo code decode at checkout to receive 15 percent off any of the sensor cans with voice again use the promo code decodesimplehumancom for discount on your own voice control sensor can i'd also like to tell you about recode media with peter kafka peter who did you talk to this week hit characters who i talk to this week i will tell you drink uber also known as the ceo and main host of the young turks has been around online on tv forever they're the lefty answer to ripe for i don't know how he described him check we'll tell you these very very famous he would like more money for being famous and he would like with more respect and we can talk all about them school sounds great peter you can find recode media on apple podcast spotify google play music wherever you listened to your podcasts were here with leslie berlin the historian for the silicon valley archives at stanford university and she's the author of a new book called troublemakers silicon valley is coming of age about seven exceptional men and women who were pioneers of today's technology in the 1970s and 80s so tell me about this book what was the impetus for this book and what you are trying to achieve yet with this book i really wanted to aid talk about more than just one person my first and book was a biography of bob noise and hand that he deserved a full biography but it really was apparent to me that innovation is a team effort right it said he org and so i wanted to be able to talk about a more than one person and also talk about people across a variety of industries and the reason why.

ceo stanford university peter kafka apple leslie berlin 15 percent
"stanford university" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Today show is sponsored by go cd a continuous delivery server built by thought works go cd helps your team release sophomore frequently consistently and reliably downloading use go cd for free visit go see dorgreco today show is brought to you by 'em particle it's the only customer data platform built to address modern data challenges promotes brands today customer interactions are spread across a lot of connected devices and that makes it tough to create optimal experiences and drive the right marketing outcomes that's why brands like spotify ben mot an airbnb use 'em particle it lets them unify customer data into a single customer view then they could easily integrate that data into any market your analytics platform with no additional engineering time required the result is more personalized customer experiences on websites in an apps as well as more relevant ads across all channels and partners visit m particlecom to learn how m particle can help your business unify the customer experience and accelerate growth recode radio presents recode decode coming to you from the vox media podcast network i am care swisher executive editor recode you may know me as someone who makes trouble for a living but in my spare time i talk tech you're listening to rico decoder podcasts about tech in media's key players big ideas and heather changing the world we live in you can find more episodes of rico decode on apple podcast fi google playing music or wherever you this near podcast or just visit recodenetpodcast for more today in the red chair is leslie berlin the historian for the silicon valley archives at stanford university she's the author of a new book called troublemakers silicon valley's coming of age is about seven exceptional men and women who were pioneers of today's technology in the 1970s and early nineteen 80s leslie welcome to rico decode banks and like a little history i'm history buff and stuff like that is nice actually talk about olden times i've got a lot of issues with the current regime so um look to talk about your background how did you become the historian for the silicon valley archives at stanford university and then what the hell are they.

mot stanford university spotify airbnb vox media swisher executive editor rico leslie berlin
"stanford university" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"It to hoover institution at stanford university easy awardwinning author of several previous oxy's written twenty four rhythm and you're going to want to stick around for the whole hour trust me wouldn't have anyone on for an hour anlysts was something special the name of the book the second world war is how the first global conflict was flab and one and its published by basic books said dr hanson meet a clown victor so i'm not just liberty to davis hanson i cannot to tell you what a pleasure it is they have you on today thank you for having me the first thing i did when i saw his book i get very excited of course gonna take a little while ago who 600 pages i i reread this twice i said wait a minute i must be missing something the second world war as held kgb was and one published by basic books and and i reread john brennan it says wars is opposed to war give us an explanation that if you would broke route two or three reasons one is that for war extended from by 1941 from the arctic circle in norway to the era and then from anterior all the way to wake island from it english channel all the way of the volga river still there were so many different landscapes it was hard to connect them both uh strategically and politically i don't think anybody while you're on the active side knew that he was on the same team if i could use that term with somebody in japan fighting in manchuria three thousand miles away or somebody that was in the jungles of burma didn't have much in common with a you golf the coastal miami owner of these seventeen eighteen can feet over hamburg so it.

stanford university oxy world war kgb norway volga river manchuria burma hamburg dr hanson john brennan wake island japan miami
"stanford university" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on WTVN

"I guess even 'cause i i'm not a doctor you can cost osteoporosis these kinds of things from uh being the on because again it will always be the same but you'll be pulling out with you need from your bones but it's not gonna change that answer so that is is just two aims that i mean i could be wrong but is uh you know uh i will tell you one thing that person i'm working with i don't want to mention the name on the phone but is she is not only the chair of stanford university which is very respected school but she's also one of the top internationally known by cancer specialist in all of people i was with they were professors and their topnotch m but i think this supportive thing i think if people um took what you're talking about ban and we actually gave this stuff and our life instead of fresh in our minds trash in our spirits trashing our bodies we would live a long time but we of use our cell all the things that you're talking about and um so that's why serta believe that if somebody has vowed to say one more thing i'll i'll stop a friend uh two friends of mine are both scientists and they are actually uh per producers of some of the finest echinacea and the world and a lot of other herbal supplements and that's great for for building uram yoon system badin isn't it stuff amazing amazing implant planters are may uh herbs are amazing and carol general you know they're weeds right that's medicine grows out of the crack the sidewalk how how cool is that right the.

stanford university serta
"stanford university" Discussed on Packet Pushers - Datanauts

Packet Pushers - Datanauts

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on Packet Pushers - Datanauts

"The way i got here really wasn't bydesign initially i had left stanford university i head down a little bit of consulting and joined one of my clients at the time all covered konica minolta and then left there and thought okay i'm going to step back into another it leadership role but as it turned out most of the roles that were out there that i was finding when i talked to executive recruiters were very much tech center occur operationally centric meaning they were looking for quote unquote you don't see my air quotes here but they were looking for ceos dead were focused on keeping the lights on you know be the ordertaker be the downstream component in our discussion don't really sit at the table don't really have a contributing voice to where the company goes and how to engage with customers will tell you where we're going and that just again seemed odd to me i ended up kenneth stepping away and i had friends and colleagues of reaching out saying hey you've got some time on your hands and you've got this kind of different perspective come talk to me and so one thing lead to another next thing you know it i ended up with a solid book of business and i'm grateful to say that that has carried me now for seven years and it's all through word of mouth it's been an interesting journey i think we need to explain to people what the coo role really is what is it that a ceo provides to the business tim so let me just in a nutshell what is their job function.

stanford university ceo tim executive kenneth coo seven years
"stanford university" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"stanford university" Discussed on KGO 810

"Stanford university also have a new book out called getting more of what you want your master he go she asians and i think that a lot of listeners they really only realiser negotiating two major things at home sales job interview were salary and you touched on both of those in the book one of the major hurdles people in the air the negotiation changes she's and that battle is characterized by i'm going to try to get stuff from you that you don't want to give me minded try to keep you from getting stuff i don't want you as soon as i view negotiation has battled armor up and even if my counterpart doesn't have that view of negotiation as soon as they see me all armored up and ready for battle they get armored up and we have a economics with house jason middleton jason kao canas angel investor and the ceo of inside the car which got your fancy right now i am very fascinated with something called equity crowd imagine whatever product yuval last acknowledge barca see you wearing that yes as right the new in your fit bit launched at my audience many years ago launched fast what if you love the first version of consuming you've had multiple versions of this private for a republican you said you know what when i bought it there was a thing that said on august i we're going to south ten thousand people a hundred dollars in equity in the company the company was worth ten million dollars raised a million bucks that way to fund that watch the next generate rachel watching you might say why spent two hundred on the watch about one hundred two get some shares those shares triple i got the watch for free or if it goes 10x i got my whole family watches and if it goes a thousand acts i.

Stanford university ceo jason middleton ten million dollars hundred dollars