20 Burst results for "Stanford Research Institute"

The History of the Internet

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

08:06 min | 8 months ago

The History of the Internet

"To begin with we as a species. We've been trying to categorize an attain all the knowledge. We haven't to a database of sorts for a very long time right so for example in seventeen twenty. Eight ephraim champions globe maker publishes the cyclopes or a universal dictionary of arts and sciences. It is the earliest attempt to link by association all the articles in an encyclopedia or more generally all the components of human knowledge. He wrote in his preface quote this. We endeavored to attain by considering the several matters. E topics not only absolutely and independently as to what they are in themselves but also relatively or as they respect each other. So we've been thinking about like how to how to access knowledge how to obtain information and organize it in in a in a way so that more people can access it quicker classic enlightenment. Classic enlightenment am my right So in one thousand. Nine hundred belgian lawyers and bibliographer paul outlet and on revilla contain proposed a central repository for the world's knowledge organized by the universal decimal classification. It was called the mondays And it would eventually house. More than fifteen million index cards one hundred thousand files and millions of images and in nineteen thirty four outlet further advanced his vision for the radiated library in which people worldwide will place telephone calls to his quote mechanical collective brain. And we'll get back information as tv signals. So this was a theory. This is something that they thought could get off the ground then in nineteen thirty six h. g. wells first predicts what's called the world brain He wrote the whole human memory can be and probably short time. We'll be made accessible to every individual time is close at hand when any student in any part of the world will be able to sit with his projector in his own study at his or her convenience to examine any book. any document in an exact replica. Study accurate it's pretty accurate so the world brain was to be a central repository of the world's knowledge organized by complex taxonomy invented by wells. So clearly there has been a precedent for desiring this kind of thing. So the concept of data communication or transmitting data between two different places through an electromagnetic medium such as radio or an electric wire predates the introduction of the first computers right. Such communication systems were typically limited to point to point communication between two end devices. Like semaphore lines are telegraph systems and telex machines so these can be considered early precursors to this kind of communication and the telegraph in the late. Nineteenth century was the first fully digital communication system. So that's just cool trivia fact it been a deeply so up until about nineteen sixty computers were huge unwieldy and self contained. You could use them as a tool. But you couldn't necessarily make them talk to each other or transmit information across any distances using them but there were a bunch of people working towards making that happen so a man named christopher stray cheesy who became the oxford university is first professor of computation filed a patent application for time sharing in february of nineteen fifty nine in june that year. He gave a paper called time sharing enlarge fast computers at the unesco information processing conference in paris where he passed the concept onto to lick lighter of mit like lighter vice president at both derek and newman inc and they discuss a computer network in his january. Nineteen sixty paper called man computer symbiosis so a quote from that is a network of computers connected to one another by wideband communication lines which provide the functions of present day libraries together with anticipated advances in information storage. And retrieval and other symbiotic functions. So super like great reading. You know just like pull it up right. Now read it. Yeah take it to the beach. You know something really exciting. So paul baran then publishes reliable digital communications systems using unreliable network repeater nodes the first of a series of papers that proposed the designed for distributed networks using packet switching. And we'll talk about that for a second. Method used to this day to transmit information over the internet and then a little later. Donald davies the. Uk's national physical laboratory or n. P. l. independently developed the same idea. So there's a little bit of like linear here So while baron used the term message blocks for his units of communication davies. Use the term packets so i was like what the hell is packet. Switching so packet switching is essentially and i. I used the the metaphor of of charlie and the chocolate factory. Ok you know mike. Tv how said the tv you're broken up into little pieces gets reassembled on the other side. That's basically what packet switching is with. Data the pieces get sent over in smaller pieces because they can travel over greater distances being smaller and then they get reassembled on the other side so that's packet switching s perfect. I'm gonna get a lot of emails. Okay so. Jc are lick lighter so jc are lick lighter. He was known as either. Jc are like friends. Call them lick several shame. I guess it's shorter than say j. C. r. guess so or just like yourself jim anyway He became the director of the newly-established information processing techniques office. Or the ipo within the us. Defense department's advanced research projects agency or darpa. So then robert. Taylor becomes the director of the information processing techniques office. Pto in nineteen sixty six and he intended to realize lighters idea of an interconnected networking system so he proposes to his boss the arpanet so the advanced research projects agency net which is a network that would connect the different projects that arpaio was sponsoring so a way to like keep everything together and at the time each project has its own specialized terminal and unique set of user commands so in order to talk to each terminal you had to physically go to the computer terminal that only spoke to that individual one so he was like what if we just had one computer that connected to everything and that was arpanet basically bam bam so there were like great. I love this. So they awarded. Arba awarded the contract to build this network to bolt beranek and newman or bbn technologies. And they're involved in the early stages of the internet in a major way and so all mentioned them like a bunch of times so the first arpanet link was established between the university of california los angeles and the stanford research institute at twenty to thirty hours on october. Twenty ninth nineteen. Sixty-nine the first message was the word log in that's boring. I know it's super boring computer guys. I was necessary to jump. It wasn't the first text message. Merry christmas oh. I don't know maybe it was being at least that s something. Yeah or what. Does it come here. I need you. That's the one for the telephone log in. Yeah right fine. at least it's easy to remember. Yeah i message sent over. The internet is the message lock-in so sent over arpanet between the network node at ucla and a second one at sri. So leonard kline rock of ucla said at the ucla and they typed in the l. and asked sri by phone if they received it got the l. Came the voice reply. Ucla typed in the. Oh asked if they got it and received got the oh. ucla then typed in the g. And the darn system crashed boy the beginning on the second attempt. It worked fine so by the end of that year. Four host computers connected together in the initial arpanet so this was like the beginning of of the end. Basically

Paul Outlet Revilla Christopher Stray Wells Newman Inc Paul Baran Established Information Proces Donald Davies Oxford University Information Processing Techniq Unesco Derek Paris Baron Davies Bolt Beranek Defense Department Darpa Charlie Stanford Research Institute
Computer mouse co-inventor William English dies at 91

This Week in Tech

01:07 min | 1 year ago

Computer mouse co-inventor William English dies at 91

"I think I should probably mentioned before we wrap up the passing of Bill English. he was ninety one years old. You may not know the name, but he built the first computer mouse stuggling Bart his colleague at the Stanford Research Institute Sri came up with the idea. Angle Burt was a fellow engineer they made. The mouse he helped put on the demo the what was it called the demo to end. All Demos. Where we saw for the first time, a mouse graphical user interface windows. Doug Engelberg I had the pleasure of interviewing at on the screen savers twenty years ago passed away in twenty thirteen. He brought that original mouse, which is just a big wooden box with rollers and stuff But very cool. So the mother of all Demos, which is December ninth nine, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, eight. Where we for the first time, saw the computing that we would all be using eventually. Bill English one of the creators. passed away at the age of ninety one

Doug Engelberg Angle Burt Bill English Stanford Research Institute Sr Bart Engineer
"stanford research institute" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"stanford research institute" Discussed on KTOK

"The BBC's recent the Secret Life of Burry Geller and there are others as well worry they have looked at you pro poked prodded to try to see what you what you do and you keep coming up perfect I just complete this story about Edgar Mitchell the sixth man to walk on the moon when them when Mossad he didn't know what to do with manta how to discover all experiments with my powers they basically called the CIA CIA they were very interested in me because they were concerned and worried that there are Russians thank you who have the kind of similar powers of the book now to America straight to Palo alto the Stanford research institute and they started me and one of the experiment turns one of the scientists who was involved with it make sure and I defended Meechan for years we were very close and he was a huge huge believer in UFOs extraterrestrial stations to our planet and he told me stories that just I got goosebumps when I heard the the amazing amazing experiences he went through so that that was my connection with ed Mitchell you know that George most people out there are.

BBC Burry Geller Edgar Mitchell Mossad CIA America Stanford research institute Meechan ed Mitchell Palo alto George
Mainframes: The GE 225 and the Birth of BASIC

Command Line Heroes

08:11 min | 1 year ago

Mainframes: The GE 225 and the Birth of BASIC

"Mr Adams finds his new checking account very useful instead of collecting the money. Direct wreck from the Ellendale National Bank. The company does it through its own bank like many other banks it sends its checks to the Federal Reserve Bank for Collection Action. The Federal Reserve Bank is set up to handle thousands of checks from hundreds of banks in a single day in nineteen gene. forty-seven a check winds. Its Way through a bank to get the positive and legions of bank workers are clocking in countless hours to deal with all those checks. The Post War economy was booming but that meant banks were now drowning and paperwork. They were forced to close at two PM just to leave time time for filling out ledgers by hand and they were still falling behind a fast powerful machine was urgently needed to keep up with the pace of business over Bank of America. They had millions of checks to handle each day. Here's William Casio professor at the Kellogg School of Management Cement and northwestern university. Can you imagine the world banking without computers. I mean this is heavy paperwork intensive in the street and particularly the case of Bank of America with all the multiple branches. So there's all this information that they want quickly and To be able to communicate and also due process it So that was really important for for such a large company and I couldn't. They understood that computers was the way of future. So in nineteen fifty fifty be of a contracted Stanford Research Institute to figure out how to automate the handling of all those checks it took Sri five years ears to build a prototype which they called the electronic recording machine accounting or IRMA. The machine had over a million feet of wiring Eight thousand vacuum tubes and weighed about twenty five tons it has the potential to handle fifty thousand transactions a day Bank of America with keen to start producing the IRMA. Right away so they sent out a request for proposal to electrons manufacturers to bid on on the job of course everyone figured the winner would be the Juggernaut of business machines. Miss Snow White herself. Ibm Doc Baker was the VP of electrons division over at GE and he knew his boss quarter didn't want to move into IBM's territory. He new computers were out of bounds when he got wind of Bank of America. RFP Will Baker saw an opening he didn't want to miss he approached Barney. Oldfield the manager of GE's Microwave Laboratory in Palo Alto which was the nearest facility to Sri and he made oldfield a proposition. Here's John Joseph and associate professor of strategy at the University of California Irvine. You know I think here was was somebody who was a very successful aggressive entrepreneur type at GE and was a savvy manager and businessman and saw this as a huge opportunity to grow the division Baker along with Oldfield was able to convince as their boss coordinator that this would be a special purpose process control system not a general purpose computer not something that would upset IBM. Ge was certainly not going into the computer business. The reason I think Coordin- eventually capitulated was that that he put a condition on them going after it and said just this contract. We don't want to enter the business machine market or generally we we want enter specifically this particular bid and you can go after it and so he said go coroner let them go ahead with the RFP feeling confident that they wouldn't win the contract anyway. Let him blow off some creative steam and then old fueled hand-delivered their proposal Rosal to the Bank San Francisco office and waited then much to everyone's surprise IBM pulled Out of the race and even more unexpectedly. GE's proposal rose to the top Bank of America. Awarded them the contract not any of the other technology manufacturers the underdogs got it the underdogs. Ge one the multi million dollar their contract on April Ninth Nineteen fifty-six be of as board of directors accepted GE's proposal Baker signed and a thirty one million dollar contract without running it by his boss Corner. This impossible project was becoming Lille. All Oldfield Oldfield needed now was a place to build the armies and Oh yeah an actual computer

Bank Of America GE Oldfield Oldfield Doc Baker Federal Reserve Bank IBM Ellendale National Bank Mr Adams Coordin Lille Stanford Research Institute Irma William Casio Professor Kellogg School Of Management C Northwestern University Associate Professor John Joseph San Francisco
"stanford research institute" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"stanford research institute" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Your question one of the scientific discoveries in laboratories in accidents happened at Stanford research institute S. R. I. international is sell out though in California formally associated with Stanford University and okay later had to break off during that after the accident because of the Vietnam War students were upset that the university was accepting some money defense dollars so the SR I international had to break off but in the in the research laboratory ingo Swann who was the original developer of the original military protocols listen to a target and completely identify the target described and so on couple years later John with monocle one of the natural psychics that was being tested it as Orion S. R. I. international was sent to the same target couple years later yes enjoyment monocle who was one of the military remote viewers again he was a natural not not one of the training of your if you want a natural of yours he was sent to the same target in laboratory in the laboratory at at Stanford research institute and started to describe the exact same target and then it near the end of the session he said but there's one thing that's odd over my shoulder behind me ingo Swann is standing there what actually happened was usually when you remote view it's not an out of body experience with some aspect of yourself sort of materializes there becomes part of the scene and another remote viewer can perceive it so the one here in my view something you actually become part of the history of that spot and for example something of you in effect remains there it remains there for it in my book I was given I I in my book cosmic voyage as a as a political a calibration targets just to check on the that's a verifiable target just to check on your use of the procedures I was given the target under totally blind conditions again the battle of Gettysburg and you know after doing the procedures I did end up at at the battle of Gettysburg in describing it and even identifying it at the end of the session this is about the case it was a hard man to stand it was very emotional good I just I never saw so much so much of life ended don't show coming out of it don't you come out of them drain I mean how can you go through the battle of Gettysburg slowing it feeling that often does happen some of a remote viewers go through a couple sessions three four sessions a week and a couple some of them go through one because one week depending on the nature of the session if if if the target is the Eiffel Tower there's not much training there but in that case for example in the battle of Gettysburg that was really quite an experience for me to see that many people kill themselves and if some other remote viewer were to go to the battle of Gettysburg and the poke around long enough they eventually find me meaning they'd see something that they call the there's some subspace fascinating hovering above the battle I'm with you doctor listened on for a second while I ask this doesn't this go back to our discussion of the nature of time well this is a fascinating subject we we now know that time in reality does not exist explain why I that would seem to validate it is what I would say yeah but there's more to it and you will be shocked when you hear this because when I heard it it took me to my to my absolute boot the problem is the following we found out the time really doesn't exist what we have one where in this three plus one dimensional world in the in the physical bodies what we have is not time but we have is the limitation of perception when we're looking with our eyes it's as if we're looking out the window of a fast moving train and everything the boulders pass the window we see but in a moment it's gone and just because the train passes by a tree and you can momentarily see it but then you can't see it anymore yes it doesn't mean that the tree doesn't still exist what we found is that there's no experience all different at all when you remote view something in the past present or future right this is it all in the here and now and what we now know is that since time really doesn't exist the only thing that exists is a limitation of our perception so we can only see instantaneously what's occurring in the now what we really have is.

Stanford research institute one week
"stanford research institute" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

16:08 min | 2 years ago

"stanford research institute" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"We are back with David Moore. We'll take calls with David next hour. We're talking about his work ever, Lucien, or metaphors gave it, you seem to tie objections crop formations UFO's into a package. Tell me a little bit about that, because I like the way you've done that. Yes. That was one of the main things I had going behind the idea of evolutionary full symbol that you can look at and have a deeper sense of reality, and meaning that go on what we already know. And the reason why is because the, the whole phenomenon seems to just offer it self up as a mystery seems to work and tricks to light nitro as well, which is the first strike all of that. And to get really underneath that skin and begin to sort of it tight an forces to us face questions. And this is the thing I wanted to really push with this book is to, to try to bypass trickery a little bit, and, and Mike is more active with a psychology towards I think, and this is why in the in the back of the Boakye, I'll give type of the integration about mines towards anomalous phenomena and deepening consciousness. Also, the Colt becomes a useful to look into the symbolism things as crop circles. And then to look at the theatrical nitro, the addiction phenomena and also because of mainly the work of Willie Stargell and. Communion and bike the transformation. I really read food those books and had a sense that Streep to its converging upon this esoteric dimension of the UFO on the addiction phenomenon as he calls it the visits phenomenon and as well as we said, she's like junk, he'll play Shen surgeon horse, and I tell became very interested in the type of mine that works behind paranormal phenomena, as well as poltergeist activities ghosts crop circles. And that synchronicity is quite an important role in this as well where the, the everyday reality seems to be Bokan food with meanings, which transgress ordinary sense of space and time, where magical events can happen, which lead you to investigate the things and so on. So this seems to be going full feeling that too. And like if. The human mind can accelerate to its level. We might have to communicate to on the more positive level is there in evil side to some of this, David when you look at the cult, and how it's tied into the UFO phenomenon we'll get into synchronicity and just a moment. But is there something evil about any of this? It's a hard thing to say about evil on the phenomena because a lot of it can be misinterpreted and inside something was threatening. It might prove to be transformative and it was in need needful shock 'cause you could call it but they can be evil. There's no doubt about that. One of the things that caused concern for me. It's movie, the synchronicity phenomena, because, oh, that we can seem positive say, if you have in the backyard synchronous steak and meeting, soulmate or something this, you can get a sense of meaningfulness in the new pathway opening. You think that's true. You know, these these criticism things that haven't been locked do point to go with the positive thing, but that could easily be negative, which occurred to me of the day say if it was a full wanted you to convince you that something was true. And these macula things happened in your life you could quickly in the opposite direction. You can quit towards the evil Duchesne, but you think you'll have to do something because these molecular signs in your life point in that direction. And that's if there was a false that wanted to convince someone if something and it could work and this way, it would completely road that like entity to the point where they become convinced of the meanings, I say in the world, this can be a pathology, but it's behind the pathology they could be. I, I, I probably normal dimension possession. O- o-, some full XP hind that you, you could quickly see how am cycle meaningful concidence is could boy and take someone to doing something able, and I don't believe personally in coincidences, I think that they're synchronicity, but that everything happens for a reason, you know that. Yeah. If, if some of occurs, it's the synchronicity it's not just a coincidence. What do you think of that? I can't trade and I used this throughout my, my whole life, and more and more as I gotten older. And when you look back on events in your life, you'll see that they convergent very meaningful life and that lead to things on down in your life. And I didn't think this is just looking back with, with a need to see meaning I think those meaning not its meaning as they important thing, find is. And that's why my book on UFO's is about UFO's all the way ties in with the meaning of existence. But the differences, I accept that, that's another dimension to -ality and due to seeing a UFO and then subsequently haven't institutes of my, and I can show a good example of a synchronous stay that sums up for me is I'm when I was. Walking with a fund years ago. I was going to throw a little time. I know talking to my friend, about the associates cynical to Stein. And I didn't know anything about reduction at the time. He, he created a school called Stein at schools, and these education, just a basic full of tentative schooling in the true recognized that heels has a Colt and screened beliefs as well about that Saint Michael and the Mike Alec. Evolutionary fools at the time I didn't know this. So I asked my friend said he's very interesting, but what all the benefits have on what the benefits of philosophy. And but I asked the question what all the foods of anthroposophy which she's he's what and I walked into a shop and the shop had only a matter of about thirty to forty books into low decline? It's a secondhand bookshop Facebook up Atlanta is called the foods of apostasy. No need the question strange. But they finding with the exact same title. It's, it's, it's even stranger. It's been stranger that, that's one of the things that really not would from doing, you know, the slat set beneath my fate, realize that these things kind of exciting. I mean you could spend it due to coincidence, but the likelihood in the meaningfulness of it at the same time, it makes you question reality. How do the synchronicity crossover with the UFO phenomena? How did you tie those two together? Well, I am in strange. I am. Because if you eat a lot, the UFO literature, there's always this sense about the island knows a head of you and can flow in these miraculously events. And, and in my book, I actually with two Andrea Pahala his book about you e gala. Exactly. And we know very well. He's been on our show a lot. He's very interesting. Any becomes more interesting as you look into his life, and especially these scientific experiments for him in the Stanford research institute. But he had loads of sin Christie expertise, even things being delivered to his has which couldn't have physically traveled that far into Israel. He wanted some sort of weight lifting equipment in the US it just popped into his head. And the next day it was a pit no, actually, the hotel, and he had all of these, and it's very good one. It's a good example. Whether whether you believe in not that there's a lot of to. We sit which suggests that synchronous very yet with the most recent one is them. The Oxford University press book can cause make it by -ducted Diana pet Solta, and in that she talks about and expose very high end individuals in the NASA program, which, you know, they have often in the in the book sites, you can't them. But saying it's an economic book and I have synchronised is them to technological breakthroughs. And so they to UFO experienced island contact, but it also can always tends to come through strains form of communication other than bedroom. Productions I seem to have hints that happen in their life and seems to be communicating related to the UFO phenomena science fiction author, Philip k dick who died, we. Too early as far as I'm concerned is highlighted a lot in your research. I'll come. The reason that is he had so many approaches to everything in laws. And one of the things I pick up his, his vast active imagination chopped to active imagination, which is. Book violence, vast active intelligence system. I didn't not he split with levels of reality, and meaning into lying everyday life, and one high pick, particularly as it comes up tea cold, zebra as in he, he used to believe that God would wear universe like a jacket, and he was concerned of how you would know when was occupying you'll spice. So he came with this camouflage, which he calls, zamba and the island intelligence behind the Vallis experience, you had he described to sort of involve mental thoughts, invisible, full permeated reality communicated to synchronicity, and so, so he's what is very good. I think for at least a dating and believe me symbol. And I think he believes himself he was a well on his way to being an expert. 'art in the pure normal. I mean his science fiction, writings were great, but he also really dived into the paranormal didn't he? Yeah. Lights a life Vallis is experiences pink light hitting in the fed I on the on the track and the to the head and he said, he had visions of hidden didn't ski paintings projected onto the wall, rapid succession and typical psychedelic experience like something of two thousand one space odyssey and he seemed to have a download information and no about space and time. And he started to look back at his older works such as you big, and the one that was based on blade blade when it was based on two hundred electric sheep, and he's still a Patna emerging. Well, my civic he's whole life. He was in conscious of this uh. This is the self of Philip k dick, which he starts to integrate to the end of his life, although he did have a very tabula lights life. But at the same time he's creative energy exploding. He'd be ninety one today. What do you think he think about what's going on today? Oh, he would love it. I be Hetty attempt to try to think of Philip k dick will it is chaotic. Well, now, I think with all the site news, what so called fake news, and he would look to spending and being the, the hypocrisies of the modern world and, and point them, I think. What's going on in England, by the way, prime minister's how everybody's up in arms thinks com or what? Oh, god. It's, it's, it's quite chaotic, isn't it? The truth seems to be. One of my jobs is to keep track of all of the political things in the UK. It's a with Brexit and wanting to leave your opinion union and everyone wants into the vote. It's, it's all up in the air. That's why it's kind of nice David to let your mind drift into the paranormal isn't it? Oh, absolutely. You can say is. I don't I live it as a to read it to get into these new ways. And then you look at the, the mall say mundane world of politics and the bickering and the all that happen. And then you go into the power normal, and you realize that the world is Aibo in which place absolutely here, and it gives you a lot of energy. I find it. If, if you like me, my life is divided between politics and paranormal and all the joy, I get from the co books, and so on. I'm I'm not deeply involved with politics. I just simply coinc- obstacles, and, and analyze coinc- variables and things. But because of that step between two realities and sometimes, I think, and I look at the world, and I think things symbolic as well. You can see events in the modern world, which represent the atmosphere and the general tensions lying. You know, I think there's a lot of coal micro Colt events that happen in the mainstream. Now, we don't know of the manipulation of news and so on. And you can see so magician behind the stage. It's but it's very hard to penetrate to that and get to the hawk fan. You you've written a chapter on Shamanism in the book. What are your thoughts on? Shamans. Shaima NHS they ha they all visionaries, and they, they look out to the actual and see symbols of deeply, and that they believe in portend synchronicity is, and so say that, that very good examples of the kind of country, we need to develop to understand the phenomena. And of course, the humans Allston recall UFO like experiences and diction experiences focus on in my shop to the chapter school walking between worlds this walking between. Well, it's this division between the mundane reality, and the coping to she's really the hall of my book and focus on credo twelve from Africa. He's one of the last living lawns Fizuli people, and he's basically walking lively of that culture. And he claims very similar experiences. He calls the islands the malevolent alliens man today. And I can't remember the aliens that he claims addicted in took him to these looms, which he describes as smelling sofa. Megs. I think he just s and giving him medical procedures which seemed to unlock psychical Bility's intend him into this Schoeman and each step from being an outsider to being one of the most important people amongst missoula's. We're gonna come back in a moment..

David Moore Philip k dick Mike Alec Willie Stargell Bokan Stein Lucien Streep Facebook Africa Fizuli missoula Stanford research institute US Oxford University Andrea Pahala UK Vallis NHS hawk
"stanford research institute" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

Talk Is Jericho

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"stanford research institute" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

"And and to be fair, you know, Ken, cress, and you. He left the project before Pat died when they took Pat into CIA can already was sort of seen as being you know, too much in the tank for the psychics because he has seen all the stuff firsthand. And even though he was very, you know, non-judgmental very level headed physicists, you know. They wanted somebody different. So he can't tell us what happened once price went into CIA. But you know, Russell you went out and visited him on on the farm, right? What was that? Like, we'll Roy's was there in costume. They had price dressed up in his Bip top overall straw hat with a pitch for pretend to be as like a from central casting to be a farmer because they were nervous about him. The reason they were nervous about may. They didn't out my security. I still had my top secret clearance. But in the film crow said, well, you were to into the aspic as well. I spent ten years a dark room teaching people auto find submarines airplanes. So as I have no doubt that I thought that. He has P was real how about you. And they were they were concerned about my enthusiasm. They took price away the reason that the army wanted us to train up army officers to do remote viewing that they were embarrassed about having to always come to us. All right and Callum is the California affect they didn't want to have to come to California to find their down bomber submarine. And thus why we trained up the army people to create a army psychic core in Maryland. One of the things I found that would another decade one of the things I found fascinating about the sort of idea of SRI being Stanford research institute, and all of this was completely unknown. The work was not known that was going on. I was completely classified. But they would get all of these visits from dignitaries. You know, senators, and yeah, and you know, people like that who were highly skeptical of what was going on. And we were like I have to see this for myself and they'd show up. Lab. And then Russell, and how would say, well if you wanna see it. Okay. But we're not going to show it to you. You're going to do it. And they sit him down on the chair and then make them the remote viewers, and I found that so fascinating. And there's so many great stories about how it would just completely shake up these generals and senators and people who would come in completely spectacle and go, oh, this is ridiculous. I'm just I don't see anything. I just see the back of my eyelids in Russell would say, that's okay. Just pretend imagine it make it up, and then they would like make this stuff up, and somehow they were tapping into something because then later they would take them out to the place where they're attache or someone else was hiding in Palo Alto somewhere in. It would be exactly correct. And then they would all of a sudden become big boosters for the program. That's actually how they kept their their program going for so long more will be Mako. Psychic was the assistant secretary of defense on the US government. So I had Waterloo. Bearish Kamau's show me something like in. Go his adjutant would go hide somewhere with how? And I sat with the undersecretary in say, well, you'll have to close your eyes describe what you think those two guys have gone. I don't know where it is. But just tell me what you see in. He drew a wonderful picture of a circular brick pavilion the fountain, and then we took him there. And he was blown away. Because the thing we're looking at just what he had drawn could believe it as been wind down here is so you know, Russell you talking about yourself a Pat price at angles swan and kind of the the OG generation of.

Russell Pat CIA army Ken Stanford research institute undersecretary Kamau Roy assistant secretary of defense crow US Waterloo Callum California Maryland Palo Alto ten years
"stanford research institute" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

Talk Is Jericho

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"stanford research institute" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

"So you know, we actually have a firsthand account and the guy actually producing the film. So yeah, we're happy to be. Here just to to kind of jump right into it here. I'm a big disciple of art bell. He talked about remote viewing so much. Russell you're on it quite a bit. But just explain exactly what remote viewing is for those who aren't familiar with the term or don't know a lot about it. I missed our Bill was on with him many times start route psychic abilities. I listened to you on their many times. Exactly. And he was always mentally remote viewing. It's like abilities and being a mall multi-mm` guests on the he was he was so he was so good as an interviewer. And he really drew you into whatever topic he was talking about whether you knew about it or not, well, I was trained to physicist, but I was always interested in the psychic abilities to I did magic the child Zoya spent first few years teenage years on the stage pretending to be magician. But really doing tricks like any other guy on the stage. But on the stage, you sometimes get images from what the personnel. Audience is thinking, and you can supplement year nasty. Oh magic trick. Wisdom genuine ESP that comes your way. And I've talked to Mellberg Christopher and the great Chris can say, well, we don't really support ESP, but we often ever chance to supplement our magic with whatever he has p comes comes to us. So I felt the I was on the right track. The by the time, I was even college. I was very familiar with the decades of thinking abilities that went on. And I was interested in learning. How to do it and how it was done? So in nineteen seventy two I've been working with lasers for two decades. And I decided to bet my career that I could create a ESPN research laboratory, and I'd already been working for NASA and working for the CIA. A so wouldn't have my old, buddy? Is back at the puzzle Palos as that I've got something entirely new to do. I wanna start a ESP laboratory where we can teach. Your guys was your C I A operatives. We can teach them how to get in touch psychic abilities and describe was going on in the distance. And the thought it pretty crazy. But I done tough things for them before we got the starter program as Stanford research institute in nineteen seventy two now remote viewing which is what we were doing remote viewing inability. We all have to quiet our mind in describe and experienced was going on in the distance. So we can see in the distance. We can see into the future in the most interesting thing that I can tell you early that interests me, the physicist is that as no harder to describe. What's going on in Soviet Siberia than it is to describe what's going on across the street in Palo Alto. Increasing the distance two thousands of miles did not make it any harder burn experienced provoke viewer accurately, describe what Brezhnev's off like crap and not only that we could see into the future up two days or weeks. So modern physics these days talks about something called. Local space time. I'm non locality is the hot topic and modern physics, and that's what we see in. Our remote viewing is on local in the to the distance see into the future, and that making things further away did not make it harder. And the really good news is that is a general ability people are able to learn to do it after I left yesterday program. I traveled all over the world doing workshops. He's young people in Scandinavian, Italy and England Japan teaching people how to do remote. And the ability is so general that I was stand up on the stage in Milan, for example..

Russell physicist Brezhnev Stanford research institute Milan Soviet Siberia CIA ESPN Mellberg Christopher Zoya NASA Palo Alto Italy England Japan Chris two decades two days
"stanford research institute" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

13:55 min | 2 years ago

"stanford research institute" Discussed on KTRH

"Welcome back to coast to coast as I mentioned, Paul Bannister was the national enquirers chief reporter of the paranormal visited about forty countries for the inquirer in search of the weird and the wonderful. He broke stories like the CIA as contract to develop and train psychics as spies, and what a story that was. He has covered. Oh, gosh. All kinds of bizarre stories. He has interviewed Edgar Mitchell. The late astronaut, of course, in our dear friend, God rest, his soul. He knows Geller so much Paul. I'm going to have some fun with you tonight. Welcome to the show. Good morning. Georgia's good to talk to you. We had a guy involved in the Kennedy assassination by the name of guy. Banister? Oh, really beat me. And no relationship. Very good. You work is called what tabloid man. Yeah. Yeah. Tabloid man. And the baffling chair. We'll talk about that to the library licking the how in the world. Did you get involved in the bizarre? Well, I was a journalist in the UK I worked for the BBC and I worked for a couple of national newspapers, and a friend of mine require moved from New York to Florida as a very skeleton operation, and then studied recruiting and a friend of mine was one of the few three or four reporters who what that I in the beginning in Florida, and I bumped into him in Manchester. Imagine Manchester's the duchy industrial city in the north of England is a rainy wins day. And this fellow walked into the pub in a white suit open night white shot fedora on the town. I mean, it was like seeing a peacock in a chicken house. You know, I said what Solis high what they said. The National Enquirer Sony wanting led to another. I did some freelance stories for them. And when they started to expand this stuff about six months later, they didn't quite remember me. But I got an interview with them on. I was able to point to a particular story. I done for them. Tom had made the page one lead. So you know, you can't deny me a chance to try out. And after that. And. That was the baffling chair of death story. You know, I was always always intrigued by the Enquirer. I would see it Paul at supermarkets, and you know, the cover's always captured you the headlines a picture of alien meeting, the president how much of that was real how much of that was made up just to grab us. Well, a lot of people confuse the Enquirer the old inquire was black and white you might remember Joe against rain. But when they went to cola, and I can't remember exactly went probably about seventy seven. The they use the old presses. And they made a million copies a week of the weekly world news that was the pay for all the attention that was along with bat boy. And you know, I use my dad babies faces an ashtray that kind of story. Yeah. And people confuse a lot the inquired self. I was actually not the celebrity title sheet that it is today. We had about sixty seventy Catholic was a stories on the how to stretch your budget Dala how cure arthritis life after death predictions. Sounds like my radio show, Paul not as good as your show, George. Come on. Thank you, sir. I mean, they had a whole spectrum stories and the publisher Jean Pogue generous pecunia wanted to make this a good read on. So he he went for accuracy. We had medical stories that we take to the American Heart Association. The foundation on whomever to be checked before they went in the paper. The same went for the, you know, the kind of stories I did which as I say selling to the paranormal, and where we could we you know, we did a pull checking on them. I mean, some people obviously cheated that has to be sure, but we had a research department headed up by time magazine's former head to research. Probably two dozen goes who listen to our tapes and check them off word by word or the dot over every word. Of course. I mean, some, you know, some people cheat, and they would they would do a read back of a story. So that instead of you having the whole interview, they say, I'll call you back stories you and you can approve it. It was real. And then they call one of the friends and fake it. Okay. That's a wonderful patient and love it did get in to get the worst sort of. People who took shock. I mean, did they get they got sued a lot didn't. They not really. No, no. Because usually there was at least a grain of truth in the in the celebs stories. They were the only things really contentious. I mean, you know, somebody says, well, we found ancient astronaut pictures on the wall in the cave in you know, in Afghanistan who's gonna sue. You know? No, the I think the biggest lawsuit the one that people. Always remember was Carol Burnett, and it was like an eighteen would gossip item that implied. She was drunk in public. And she made such a fuss. She cried in court and said how how did it hurt because mother was an alcoholic and go up like a two million dollar judgment point four million dollar settlement. That was reduced on appeal to like two hundred thousand and nobody ever heard that part. No. And you know, she she didn't she continued to play alcohol on her show. So we don't feel she was really as as she might have been. How did you find your stories that you wrote about well, well ways, actually, I travel with a few months? Great guy wasn't. He I miss him was a wonderful, man. And he was asked, you know, to help us set up some contacts in the past psychology. So you know, I went to see I went to many foundation with him. I went to my monitor these hospital to see on the ten and the dream lab. You know, we we what was he introduced me to tug and pull it off who during the CIA psychic spying program. That's right SRI. The Stanford research institute, as you know, things so he sort of gave you some contacts we made contact. So I went to conferences, I go to the I trip the in situ for. I knew a conference and go through these huge sick pay volumes of of research papers looking for one. That says, you know, you can read your brainwaves swell. It was science fiction then but fifteen years later, it's real, you know. They they're finding people's emotions can be read from outside the scope they wear a skullcap with sensors on though close. Edgar was a great believer Paul is you know, that we have been visited I asked him anytime soon. I I wanna see what he told you. But he always admitted that he never saw anything on the moon, and I believe him, but he didn't he did some experiments on his ways with Johnson. That's right. But he told me a lovely story from white signs. You know, he didn't see this himself. But he he was major in the marines when he's fly around the country and fighter jet, and he couldn't do white sounds something. And they were getting ready to launch some, you know, with a satellite, whatever on had a high speed camera trained on it. And the camera operator saw something unusual and had the wit star. The camera going on he showed his films at a couple of days later because he knew that interesting. This was found of the ions institute for ninety signs is was extremely interested, and it was a frisbee sized salsa that suckled its way up the bud up their rocket. He said like a humming, bud. Surfing around it going all the way up to the top. I'm then just took off of high speed. So edsall. With a lot of interest. High speed camera know, good quality all the rest of it. Very very interested. Very intrigued. And he talked to somebody about it. And they went back three days later to look at the film and ended vanished. Gone somebody, you know. Okay. We don't really need that out the unbelievable. He was with the navy by the way, he's a navy marines. Yes. Okay. I think the majors I'm willing. Does have made in the navy who knows? Navy captain, which is the equivalent of. Okay. He would he would tell me he told me in early Geller story in you, you know, early as well. Very very well. Yeah. Did they ever tell you the tie clasp story that Mitchell had lost? I think it was a NASA Thai class, but little pin any lost it, and he was in. He was having lunch with one day in Geller was eating some ice cream. And all of a sudden he felt something in his mouth, and he took it out. And it was the Teich claps that Mitchell had lost years ago. Interesting story weird. Because I've got something like that. But he he was telling me about when Gallo was first being tested by put off and talk. Well, they were they were doing the remove doing experiments, you know, gala had sort of state. They wanted to see how he would the foam if you know, if he could on that famous orange couch that that's all right, and they gone for the evening too. I think talks house in Palo Alto at a few bottles of wine and Geller down a couple of you know, Spoon-bending things for nothing very significant. An Ed said he went back to his own car opened the door and two bottles of wine self apparently fell through the roof of the car onto the seat. No idea. Believable. Unbelievable. Drove he drove a caution the block to the end of high street lab. Russell lived on the road sign the road. Sign was twisted around and a complete loop. Now, you can't say, okay, then you know, or he did this. But they being trying to get these fax and something something happened that night. They say that they'd be trying some experiments didn't why they're going through they'll coming through a lab of some sort passing magnetometer and stops waved his fist it and shouted to it and the thing start working. Who's a big, you know, two hundred and fifty thousand dollar piece of equipment. He's done stuff. Like that on the radio show, Paul. He had everybody take their watches clocks in hold them up to the radio. Right. And they started running again, these these these watches and clocks had been dead for years. Right. And they started running that was amazing. But the the most amazing aspect of what he did was about a year later, we will take some of our programs and rerun them on the weekends. It's sort of a best of and so our producers picked the Geller show. I did with him and all of a sudden that following weekend. I'm getting emails from people. Sim- by my watch is working, and I'm going what the heck is only to realize. Oh my God. That's the show. They picked right to run on the weekend. He had the same ability in a program that was on tape to make to make watches and clocks run. It was unbelievable. Hopefully, I can totally support your story. I went down to Mexico City where he was living at the time. And we agree. We did a couple of these experience, you know, with inquire we put we print a picture of Lori in the paper. And then we tell rita's at a given time on a given day, you know, put your broken watch or whatever on it, you spoons and Mexico City with him. And. He did his thing. He just came to my hotel room. And she didn't even you know that we didn't even go to his house was very informal. Just photographer myself or a he insisted on give me more metal around me mall. Metal. And he got the photographer fortunate had some hot case cases to carry his gifts, and he got all these around himself. And then he did his things that right? Okay. Send it out. And we on the.

Paul Bannister Geller Edgar Mitchell CIA National Enquirer Manchester Mexico City Banister Kennedy Georgia Florida time magazine Carol Burnett American Heart Association reporter Stanford research institute UK England Solis
"stanford research institute" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

Mysterious Universe

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"stanford research institute" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

"Mysterious universe season. Twenty one episode eight coming on this show. We've got secret Soviet zero point weapons psychically infiltrating, the NSA and Lance Mongia joins us to discuss his new film third eye spots. I'm Benjamin Grundy joining our rights. I'm so incredibly excited for this interview. Because I thought with the remote, you topic that you on everything I thought I cable we know the story we know about what's happened with the NSA the CIA the DIA. This new talk mentoring has just blown me away. Comprehensive is over thirty interviews. Just just about anyone you can think of involved with those secret programs run by intelligence agencies and the military Lance is the director of the new film, third ice spies. It's Koper juice by Russell tog who've caused is the co founder of Stanford recessions shoot who really kind of launched remote viewing onto the world. And and introduced absolutely I a I'm amazed how down to earth he actually considering the top of race such that he's been doing all these years in the contest off the high level classified stuff. He's been involved in any still has this way about him. Which is quite almost wouldn't say jovial Russell. Yeah. But it's almost like he's just it's like this stuff is fact, this is what he's done. He's not trying to convince anyone he's just getting his story out there. And he's very matter of fact about it. I like that his amazing guy his historians. Incredible. And he is in a way the feature of this. New documentary waves around tile of Russell tog trying to find answers of mystery surrounding the death of one of the key remote view as Pat price. And it was so great to speak to Lance because not only see the director of this film. He knows his stuff. He knows this topic back to front, and it was really fantastic to hear someone speak about this who so passionate about it and just understands so well from every different angle. So if you very new to the topic, I mean, most of you, I'm show of who have been listening to the show for a while would be very with very across remote viewing you understand what it is. But for those of you that Papp's new to the show, you haven't heard about remote viewing. It is essentially the ability of the trained ability of someone to be able to retrieve information that they couldn't do physically through any other means it's a psychic way, you might say of gathering information. Remotely now. Again, this was developed at Stanford research institute founded by Russell tog, and he's co found how off let me just read some of the blood for the documentary because I think this really sets the scene it says more than twenty years the CIA used psychic abilities in top secret program. It's like expi- program developed during the Cold War escalated after a Stanford research institute experiment publicized classified Intel as a result. The highly successful work physicist, Russell tog was co opted by the CIA and heathen Fidel aids ju to the demands of national security, but when America's greatest psychic spied dies mysteriously tog fights to get their work declassified, even if it means going directly to his former enemies in the Soviet Union to prove the reality of a as pay to the world that lodge now revealed for this first time, this is the newly declassified. True story of America's psychic spies. It includes the implications of this excess and shows us all what would truly capable of let me play some of the audio from the trailer. And then we'll jump into our chat with Lance. Let's take a listen. If you had an ability. To be able to remotely perceive stuff any place in the world. That could be extraordinary intelligence sorts. We've found that many individuals are able to accurately describe what's going on and distant locations. During his it was a research facility that was all that we were gonna tell. The Russians have made spending millions of dollar. Investigating so-called ESP. Psychic spies. Almost a psychic arms race here. Is there any real application to this viewing has been demonstrated over the twenty years of work that's been sponsored by the government? Producing crucial and vital intelligence to the NSA CIA, D A and the secret service. I began to feel frightened kids you'd be did amend. What's really going on here? Disaster nation was lying. They wanted to kill. The storm brewing seems real. I say no more secrets. What this information now?.

Russell tog Lance Mongia CIA NSA director Benjamin Grundy NSA CIA Stanford research institute Lance Stanford Intel Papp Soviet Union America Pat price co founder physicist twenty years
"stanford research institute" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"stanford research institute" Discussed on KTOK

"All the Stanford research institute. Testing of of Geller of the remote viewing group. He was responsible for that. He helped get money for that. And because he thought it was deeper. You know, he thought it was deeper than just ET's visiting us. He believed that remote viewing consciousness in sciences. I it fascinated him all of this part, which is part of you follow Aji Geller, who's a dear friend of ours. He's going to be at your events later on in the fall, isn't he I e well, actually what what are- said is that he would Skype in his if his schedule permitted it. But that was very nice of him because I've known him for a long time. And when I was in Europe, I I used to spend some time with him. And by the way, he is really is not a fraud. I've seen him take two spoons together and just touch them. And they both band at the same time up in the air. I mean, I've seen him do amazing things. Early is very very unusual person. And he believes that an mind-over-matter with the average human is very important. So he's more of a motivational speaker. And I asked him because my conference in November is on remove viewing what he talked about. What you know becoming a psychic spy? See this is what the problem always is. Somebody has any powers or someone has a talent. It's used for military purposes. I so hurry was tested. But hurry also works for the intelligence community because he can perceive things and he can shut down radar. He can do a lot of things. So hurry was you and there's a book about hurry, the psychic spying? The CIA papers were declassified on Geller. So I'm fascinated. And so was that GRA metro with this stuff in in in in November every group of remove viewers to to talk about this. In in a way, if you look at it, we if we call remote viewing something else. We'd call it ESP that is the language that the AT community or the cosmic whatever, you know, us with contact dis direct suck transfer which is ESP Mitchell used to tell a story Paulo that retailer cooperated in you know, it happened. He had a little Tyke clasp that NASA had given him and he lost. It had no idea where it was. I mean, he lost it for years. And he was having lunch with herb Geller who is eating ice cream and re put his spoon in the ice cream started eating and felt something kind of hard and lumpy took it out of his mouth, and it was the tie clasp from like ten years ago. How does that happen? We'll explain that. Then they went back into the into the offices and the other part of the Thai class fell from the ceiling right down just plunk down you want explain that. I mean, this is where the paranormal these people that do nuts and bolts, and, you know, have to have a, you know, proof of everything. This is reality. It's very strange that really did happen. Those are credible people that are telling the story. So then maybe we need to study this in another way. How much do you miss Dr John Mack? Oh my goodness. Explains it right there. See these people, you know, Dr John Mack Allen Hynek once a year Balducci, Edgar Mitchell, and you in Roger Lear, there's a picture of us with Roger leered. Do you? Remember, it's that guy. It's hard. It's hard because you know, this was a part of a community that really had their heart into disclosure, and John Mack, the his method and of dealing with the was so gentle of dealing with contact dealing with the speaking to you when he'd speech, you you were the only one in the room. He would he was present. He listened to every word you'd say this kind of talent doesn't happen anymore. I mean he and then he was Harvard University. You know, psychiatrists list is career is entire career to support the contact scenario. And so do I miss him. You know, again, I love to have conversations with these people. I mean, just to sit down with a glass of wine with these people that are so wise, and you asked me before do we have any? Very very few very very few were left, perhaps jug, Vallejo. And we're not we're really not replacing them with younger people. They're not coming up. No, they're not. I don't have an answer for that Georgia. I don't know. It's very difficult. I mean, I enjoyed speaking to Jim Penniston because he's a military man is very very nuts and bolts, but he's also grown from is exactly follow. We're gonna come back and continue. Chatting also will take phone calls with. You Paula Harris with us or website is your name, and she smells like pile P A, O, L A, Harris.

herb Geller Harvard University Stanford research institute Edgar Mitchell Europe Dr John Mack Allen Hynek CIA Paulo Paula Harris GRA Georgia fraud Jim Penniston Vallejo Skype NASA Roger Lear Balducci ten years
"stanford research institute" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"stanford research institute" Discussed on TechStuff

"Hey there and welcome to tech stuff. I'm your host Jonathan Strickland. I'm executive producer love all things tech. And this is our fourth episode about DARPA. And after this episode, I will switch to some other topics for a while. But Dr bas history is incredibly complicated, and it's intertwined with some of the most important technologies we interact with today. So we will revisit this topic in the future. We'll come back and continue the story of DARPA, but I did not want to turn tech stuff into DARPA stuff. So after this one I figure we'll move onto something else. And maybe in a few weeks. We'll pick up where we left off today in our last episode, we covered a lot more of the technology that was developed as part of the efforts in the Vietnam war, and I guess now it's a good time to remind everyone that DARPA which back in the sixties was known by its original name Arba was not an are in defense itself. Not truly. It was more of an agency that would award contracts to other organizations such as think tanks, universities defense, contractors and stuff like that Arpaio slash DARPA would fund the work, and they would also set the expectations the guidelines. You know, why was that they were hoping to get out of it? But the actual science and development was going on throughout the United States and all these different facilities. And these projects were frequently top top top secret. Meaning the people who worked on them would keep it quiet even from their co workers. So only people at the top of DARPA really tended to know all about the bits and pieces and sometimes even the director wasn't fully aware of everything that was going on. That's how classified some of these projects were in nineteen sixty-nine while several Arba research projects were all tied up in the Vietnam war, a group of computer networking specialists would initiate the original Arpanet connections. Arpanet was the RND. Project to create a means for different computers to send data back and forth between each other. Even if those computers relied upon different computer languages, and even if they were separated by many, many miles from one another part of this required, the design and production of a brand new technology, a router Arp behead contract, the company BBN technologies to build the first routers back in nineteen sixty eight took a year, but on October twenty ninth nineteen sixty-nine computers at the Stanford research institute at the university of California and Santa Barbara and at the university of Utah would connect through these routers. The first message sent across this three node network was low L O. This was actually Christopher Klein's attempt to log in L O G I N to the SRI computer remotely, but the Sarai. Computer crashed in mid message. And so low is all we got also held typical is it the server goes down. Just when you have something important to send to it. It dates all the way back to the beginning of the Arpanet, but more seriously this connection showed that remote. Computers would be able to send data back and forth using network communication standards. And also relying upon technologies like packet switching that involves dividing data such as the data that represents a file into smaller packets and each packet has information about where the data's from where it's going and how it fits into the overall collection of information. So that you can when I say you so that a computer, can reconstruct the file these ideas, we get fleshed out over the next several years and important moment would happen in nineteen seventy four when Vint CERF and Bob Kahn would publish a protocol for packet network interconnection which laid out the principles behind. PCP, but I've done full episodes about Arpanet. So for this episode. We'll just remind you that that was something that was happening at this time, and we'll also point out some of the big moments as they tie back into our. So the main purpose of Arpanet, by the way, that was just to create those Bethel Ogies for computer networks, but one of the applications perhaps one of the benefits that are Bose really interested in was the idea that by creating distributed networks of computers, the US could maintain some communications and command structures in the event of nuclear strike. So it's kind of scary..

DARPA BBN technologies United States Jonathan Strickland Arba executive producer Dr bas Vint CERF Arpaio Christopher Klein Santa Barbara university of Utah Bose Stanford research institute director Bob Kahn
"stanford research institute" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"stanford research institute" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Where where where they're getting government entity because it's passed through through private contractors so you know it's pentagon funding or contract comes through the stanford research institute that's all right which actually was one of the main you know researchers on arpanet back in the day was it helped create the internet it was one of the main groups that helped create a lot of the technology that's gonna get to the internet and so that's all right but it's a pentagon contract that they get and so they tried to hide the extent of their their funding when i when i had it all up and i went through all the years that i could get my hands on financial documents i found out that us government funding adds up to anywhere between ninety to ninety eight percent of their budget wow so yeah it's crazy yeah it's it's insane and and so that is you know that is what really i think because when i first started reporting that even before i wrote sort of working in my book that is what got me you know basically you know attacked in the way that i've never experienced journalists as investigative journalist you know who when after the coke brothers i've i've i've seen my fair share of tax and smears and and threats and things like that but i was not prepared for what was coming my way when i began expose what is sensually an intelligence operation right to mask to mask privacy technology all right.

stanford research institute pentagon ninety eight percent
"stanford research institute" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"stanford research institute" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Longtime listener i just happened on the show this evening i wanted to ask the gentleman dr i had from one of your past shows george stephen gibbs gives that was his name a time travel machine he talked about time travel a couple of years ago i was fascinated went on bought the machine my question for your guest is have you heard of this and it didn't work for me i was very disappointed i tried everything ultimately in the end they said i think you know you gotta go to sedona where there's more of a book let let me comment on the machine because i get a lot of requesting phone calls and emails about this there will be no time machine developed until the year three thousand fifty so all these time machines they may sound like ticket all excited about them but i'm just telling you right now they don't exist now if they did believe me we would know about it so the todd and his development of the wormhole in your accelerator is not gonna be until about the year three thousand fifty so it's gonna be quite a while so there are no time machines now i know there's a lot of movies and tv shows about it and x files episodes and it's cetera as it's nice entertainment but it's not the reality will it be a time machine bruce why not just the mind well okay you understand this the governments in the scientists involved they don't like to deal with the mind yesterday the stanford research institute the sri project that the cia is doing you know they did that in in the old days in the seventies and you're still doing it when i hear about trying to get people remote viewing so they could steal the secrets from moscow or whatever but machines simply are people relate to machines it's simply a more efficient way it's predictable and you can't use just the mind and expected to do something you have to actually he want reliability and consistency a machine will do that for you next up is keith in cleveland ohio.

george stephen gibbs todd stanford research institute cia ohio bruce moscow keith cleveland
"stanford research institute" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"stanford research institute" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Now facing the ultimate challenge will we transcend the problems are we we succumb to that and and this is this is what i feel we have to reorientate ourselves to who we really are we're not the body necessarily we are using the body but we're the greater consciences beyond that that that makes sense the aspect of that and i i hope says deaths where we're going but you know i've been hearing the kunbae tree hugging machinations for a while that all we need to do is come together and work together and then the aliens will make themselves known and nse will pop out of the water and and the spirit world will communicate with us more effortlessly and it just you know it sounds great and theoretical but it again it's sounds like a utopian environment that at in this points in human history does not seem real likely because everybody is so selfabsorbed wiping reacted artwork iraq where we are part of i i used problem you know we're in the six mass extinction there's there's lots of challenges politically but i think this pushes us back to our cells in looking at how are we gonna save us planet ourselves so it's not just uh you know the aliens are going to save us because if they were going to save us they would have done that by now i think we have to look at the true source of what we've created which is our disconnection from from nature and we connect to who we really are as a part of this thing is the as the magic it it's not a joseph campbell said it's not technology that's going to save the world is into wish and so we have to tune into this right side of our brain that it is the trends and dental consciousness that is a non local mind it's what the remote viewers proved to the cia in the '70s and '80s at the stanford research institute that they were not confined to just the body there was spot part of us that could you time and space beyond this round and so that was that was document in cia take that up and so we have to overcome the psychology that.

iraq joseph campbell cia stanford research institute
"stanford research institute" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"stanford research institute" Discussed on WTVN

"Ladies at the stanford research institute that they were not confined to show us the body there was a part of us that could you time and space beyond this wellm and so that was that was document in cia take that up and so we have to overcome the psychology that has helped us but has made us afraid of her own mind enough afraid of rome potential and so we this is the phase where newer in a mystical awakening it's not just like all you know kunbae and everything's great we have to go beyond this this um training this conditioning of thinking that reality is out there and and reality is really what we feel about what's out there it's personal it's subjective and we are in a position to create it the way we want based on how we relate to on our feeling state uh uh uh explain that's a little bit more okay so there's a world around you and yes your house maybe burn down you might have that negative thoughts and you might use these brain wage to activate a new par of us but if we can draw a part of us that wants to feel good that does feel good that is is is um in a place of uh drop into the centre of are being i don't know if that makes sense you at that that is that doesn't look at the outside but looks at the inside that looks at the at the security of ourselves that be on this world i mean this is the work that a joe dispensers doing he says when you have a feeling that greater than what the re hour the out there is telling you you can manifest reality so and manifesting re.

rome cia stanford house little research institute time the body
"stanford research institute" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"stanford research institute" Discussed on WLAC

"Mack then there's there's wacky countered politically but i think this pushes us back to our cells and looking at how are we gonna save this planet ourselves so it's not just uh you know the aliens are going to save us because if they were going to save us they would have done that by now i think we have to look at the true source of what we've created which is our disconnection from from nature and reconnect to who we really are as a part of this thing is the as the magic it it's not a joseph campbell said it's not technology that's going to save the world is in to wish and so we have to tune into this right side of our brain that it is the trans and dental consciousness that is a non local mind it's what the remote view viewers proved to the cia in the '70s and '80s at the stanford research institute that they were not confined to just the body there was a part of us that could you time and space beyond this wellm and so that was that was document in cia take that up and so we have to overcome the psychology that has helped us but has made us afraid of her own mind enough off afraid of her own potential and so we this is the phase where newer in a mystical awakening it's not just like all you know kunbae and everything's great we have to go beyond this this uh training this conditioning.

Mack joseph campbell cia stanford research institute
"stanford research institute" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"stanford research institute" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"That's surprising given her her pedigree sounds fun though well it's a good history either way so we all want to live in that world by when it comes down to a nobody has has taken james randy up on his milliondollar prize right and he gets kind of a rough treatment in this book james randy if you're not familiar with him is a stage magician that looge illusionist who is a big antagonised of all these people who claim to be real psychics and he's like he for years he did this thing where he had lots of money set aside for anybody who could come demonstrate the reality of psychic powers r e s p or telekinesis anything like that under controlled laboratory conditions and a lot of times what people would say it was like oh oh wait a minute if if there are sceptical scientists who don't believe in my powers present they won't work i i wish i could use that that is super power a limitation egging imagine saying that in a job interview or or what it felt like fifty percent of all xmen can only use their powers in in the positive environment right so work via meant school would be rough now living in school so a lot of the government funded psychic research of the kind like we see in stranger things it took place at a think tank in northern california called the stanford research institute or sri especially starting in nineteen 72 and in nineteen 72 sri was the second largest research institute working for the defense department number one of course was the rand corporation i found out not actually named after i and rand kind of a disappointment and his named after dini ran from ironfist because everybody like that netflix show so we jitney say he actually has as a corporation granahan groceries this is we're talking about this earlier does anybody know if the guy who created iron fist was just like a huge fan of atlas shrugged.

california stanford research institute rand corporation dini ironfist atlas james randy rand netflix fifty percent milliondollar
"stanford research institute" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"stanford research institute" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"These ideas quickly became way too big for the eleven acre plot of land that he initially had in mind so the focus shifted to los angeles in 1950 three walt hired the stanford research institute to survey los angeles and the surrounding area for a hundred acre site they would be suitable for what he in the wbd team had in mind and that's how they found disneyland home it was a hundred and sixty acre orange grove in anaheim and this location met all of walt's requirements it had to be freeway accessible adjacent to or within los angeles and affordable yeah and you know nowadays the disney company is huge that is so huge that it's really hard for most people and even me to think about it ever having shallow pockets uh but at the time that it was a very different story uh you know what was really struggling to figure out how he was going to finance this huge vision of his and to build a theme park and it actually led to the genesis of the television series walt disney's disneyland uh that show came out of the need for funding and the wall struck a deal with abc and 1954 that he would for host for them this hourlong weekly series uh which is about disneyland and also about sort of uh you know exploration of concepts in society and technology and storytelling uh and in exchange for him hosting this abc was funding the construction of the theme park project.

los angeles walt stanford research institute abc disneyland anaheim disney walt disney hundred acre eleven acre sixty acre
"stanford research institute" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"stanford research institute" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Now a so he may have her wind weinberger because you recently a guest npr's fresh air which talks about uh about about this book about uh uh this particular chapter here in weinberger points out that in the us a lot of this disease will for paranormal research it came together in the wake of the nineteenth 57 soviets sputnik launch so washington inza moving after this to prioritise research the the creation of the advanced research projects agency that this was the first space agency and it is the entity the becomes darpa yeah and to get into the relevant part of weinberger's article so you rubber you already mentioned the sky sydney gottlieb yahoo was apparently quite a character review he was a a chemist by original training but he was the head of the central intelligence agency's office of technical service that you already mentioned that division earlier in the early 1970s in in the early 1970s this division had contracted the stanford research institute to carry out a programme of experiments in the field of parapsychologist which we already mentioned appear psychology is paranormal psyche phenomena so some of the stuff we've already mentioned too left the telekinesis pre cognition remote viewing i think there were specially into remote viewing because of his life is like having a spy plane that could go inside an enemy basin just see what was on anybody's desk and all that if it actually worked and of course this is something that's explored in a lot of up a science fiction treatments night including a stranger things so of or a firestarter yeah have you know anytime you have a shadowy government lab you often find echoes of of this of these experiments there right so it it's obvious the defense there were anything real to be discovered in this arena like if there is anything to parapsychologist of course it would be of tremendous used to military and intelligence agency.

npr weinberger yahoo stanford research institute sydney