18 Burst results for "Stanford Mit"

"stanford mit" Discussed on Modern Ruhles with Stephanie Ruhle

Modern Ruhles with Stephanie Ruhle

05:25 min | 8 months ago

"stanford mit" Discussed on Modern Ruhles with Stephanie Ruhle

"We've got a moment. We're in crisis. Can we do better. Ron lieber is asking that very question in his new book. The price you pay for college is the author of the new york times personal finance column your money ron for years and years and years. We weren't thinking about the price of college the value of college. Is it worth it. Well i think you have to start by asking yourself what college is right. what is college for. I wasn't sure what the answer to. That question was so i asked you know scores of families and i heard the same things over and over again colleges for getting an education for having your mind grown in your mind blown. It is for kinship. It is for finding the people who will carry you through life. It is for getting a credential whether it's the gold plated one that will open doors or just the degree that will allow you to grasp hold of the middle class and hopefully stay there and so in order to answer. The question of whether college is worth it. You need to find it for your individual family that we as a nation can dictate for any given individual but then how did we get to this place right. My dad worked in the summer and put himself through school and had a tiny bit of debt. After how did college get this expensive. There are so many more things pulling on our household incomes than there used to be. We are entirely responsible in most instances for our own retirement. We're paying more and more out of our own pockets for healthcare. Many people are paying off their own student. Loan debt well into their forties or fifties right so people don't have the same kind of disposable income as they might have earlier states have reduced their subsidies towards higher education which means the price of the state schools has gone up and the private institutions. They've gotten more and more expensive so the middle class. There is being squeezed. This whole idea of i want to go to a liberal arts college and better myself and in the world is will be. My voice. teacher is kind of an antiquated thought. Sure i'd like to enrich myself but not if it's going to put me in hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of debt. I remember when i was a senior in college. I went to lehigh and lee. Could absolutely help you on the career services front. If you wanted to go work in an accounting firm or be an engineer i wanted to work in investment banking so i drove to new york city with my mother and i stuck into the career services office at columbia university and i borrowed these giant binders. That had every piece of information that you needed for every bank every financial institution so you could apply for the summer internships. Now i went to the photocopy machine to start and you needed to have a school. I d to use the photocopier. I got caught. And i got kicked out the reason i bring this up. We send these kids to college but the best jobs are directly linked to only a few schools. So do we need to start looking at. Here's a college. What is the job. My child is going to get on the other side because otherwise they will be sitting here in hundreds of thousands of dollars with a debt. Yes to all of that first of all. That is the most bad ass career services story that i have ever heard your description of this as quote unquote best jobs right. I mean it is true that the best jobs in investment banking very narrow feel from certain institutions. Right unless you beat down the door but are those. The best jobs in america are the best jobs for anyone. Goldman sachs's is hiring. All these people in salt lake city now do not come from columbia and harvard and stanford mit. So then we have to ask ourselves well. These are iconic jobs in in certain social classes but are they really the best jobs out there for any given twenty two year old. I don't think so. Before the pandemic we knew there was a skills gap in the united states. We were at full employment yet. We had millions of americans who are not making enough money to support themselves. We had people who had jobs but good enough jobs. But you hear people making that argument saying you cannot afford to support yourself and your family working in a fast food restaurant but that job was never intended for someone who has a family to support. Is there an opportunity to actually create a real jobs program. A skills retraining program so it's not just about raising minimum wage. It's about retraining. People to qualify themselves for better higher paying jobs yes and that infrastructure already exists we can use the community college infrastructure to provide that skills training but we also have a shortage of qualified instructors to teach some of these skills. Why because the skills are so in demand that the people who would be doing the instructing are making five times as much money being actual practitioners. If you're a master plumber. You're not going to spend twenty hours a week teaching at a community college even though it would be a service to the community if you are a welder with twenty five years of experience right same thing is true. So how are we going to create the budget that allows for more people to be pushed through rigorous training programs. And so we need to do more I think from a state perspective and from a federal perspective not just provides the money but also to ensure equity and access to these programs

Ron lieber america twenty five years columbia united states fifties harvard forties five times Msnbc both goals new york city twenty two year old salt lake city columbia university nbc hundreds of thousands of dolla one twenty hours a week united states of america
What the pandemic has revealed about the real value of college

Modern Ruhles with Stephanie Ruhle

05:25 min | 8 months ago

What the pandemic has revealed about the real value of college

"We've got a moment. We're in crisis. Can we do better. Ron lieber is asking that very question in his new book. The price you pay for college is the author of the new york times personal finance column your money ron for years and years and years. We weren't thinking about the price of college the value of college. Is it worth it. Well i think you have to start by asking yourself what college is right. what is college for. I wasn't sure what the answer to. That question was so i asked you know scores of families and i heard the same things over and over again colleges for getting an education for having your mind grown in your mind blown. It is for kinship. It is for finding the people who will carry you through life. It is for getting a credential whether it's the gold plated one that will open doors or just the degree that will allow you to grasp hold of the middle class and hopefully stay there and so in order to answer. The question of whether college is worth it. You need to find it for your individual family that we as a nation can dictate for any given individual but then how did we get to this place right. My dad worked in the summer and put himself through school and had a tiny bit of debt. After how did college get this expensive. There are so many more things pulling on our household incomes than there used to be. We are entirely responsible in most instances for our own retirement. We're paying more and more out of our own pockets for healthcare. Many people are paying off their own student. Loan debt well into their forties or fifties right so people don't have the same kind of disposable income as they might have earlier states have reduced their subsidies towards higher education which means the price of the state schools has gone up and the private institutions. They've gotten more and more expensive so the middle class. There is being squeezed. This whole idea of i want to go to a liberal arts college and better myself and in the world is will be. My voice. teacher is kind of an antiquated thought. Sure i'd like to enrich myself but not if it's going to put me in hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of debt. I remember when i was a senior in college. I went to lehigh and lee. Could absolutely help you on the career services front. If you wanted to go work in an accounting firm or be an engineer i wanted to work in investment banking so i drove to new york city with my mother and i stuck into the career services office at columbia university and i borrowed these giant binders. That had every piece of information that you needed for every bank every financial institution so you could apply for the summer internships. Now i went to the photocopy machine to start and you needed to have a school. I d to use the photocopier. I got caught. And i got kicked out the reason i bring this up. We send these kids to college but the best jobs are directly linked to only a few schools. So do we need to start looking at. Here's a college. What is the job. My child is going to get on the other side because otherwise they will be sitting here in hundreds of thousands of dollars with a debt. Yes to all of that first of all. That is the most bad ass career services story that i have ever heard your description of this as quote unquote best jobs right. I mean it is true that the best jobs in investment banking very narrow feel from certain institutions. Right unless you beat down the door but are those. The best jobs in america are the best jobs for anyone. Goldman sachs's is hiring. All these people in salt lake city now do not come from columbia and harvard and stanford mit. So then we have to ask ourselves well. These are iconic jobs in in certain social classes but are they really the best jobs out there for any given twenty two year old. I don't think so. Before the pandemic we knew there was a skills gap in the united states. We were at full employment yet. We had millions of americans who are not making enough money to support themselves. We had people who had jobs but good enough jobs. But you hear people making that argument saying you cannot afford to support yourself and your family working in a fast food restaurant but that job was never intended for someone who has a family to support. Is there an opportunity to actually create a real jobs program. A skills retraining program so it's not just about raising minimum wage. It's about retraining. People to qualify themselves for better higher paying jobs yes and that infrastructure already exists we can use the community college infrastructure to provide that skills training but we also have a shortage of qualified instructors to teach some of these skills. Why because the skills are so in demand that the people who would be doing the instructing are making five times as much money being actual practitioners. If you're a master plumber. You're not going to spend twenty hours a week teaching at a community college even though it would be a service to the community if you are a welder with twenty five years of experience right same thing is true. So how are we going to create the budget that allows for more people to be pushed through rigorous training programs. And so we need to do more I think from a state perspective and from a federal perspective not just provides the money but also to ensure equity and access to these programs

Ron Lieber New York Times RON Stanford Mit Lehigh Columbia University New York City LEE America Goldman Sachs Salt Lake City Harvard Columbia
"stanford mit" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

03:01 min | 11 months ago

"stanford mit" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"Joe biden won the presidential election by bringing in a wide range of voters. Democrats republicans independents progressives moderates conservatives yano urban suburban rural gay straight transgender. Wait latino asian. Native american especially those moments in this campaign was as low as the african american community stood up again. We want to take a deeper dive into the demographics. Because who voted how they voted and why is fascinating and it's full of surprises. You'd think scenes of kids in cages at the us mexican border or president. Trump's so-called muslim ban would mean that biden had a lock on latin x and muslim voters. That simply wasn't the case. So for a deeper dive into voter demographics we pulled in charles stewart. He's a professor political science and the founding director of the mit election data and science lab. He's also co director of stanford. Mit healthy elections project and the cal. Tech mit voting technology project. Charles welcome to reset great to be here. It's great to have you all right so big picture. How many voted in. How does a number compared to previous elections. Well it looks like once. All the votes are tallied. There's gonna be something like a hundred and fifty million Nationwide which is Almost exactly two thirds sixty seven percent of the voting eligible population in the us. And it put that in context. We haven't had turn out at that rate since the election of one thousand nine hundred and of course back in nineteen hundred women didn't have the franchise eighteen year olds and have the franchise In a much of the country african americans were effectively kept from the polls so this is quite something on in terms of voting over the last century context when there's a chicago municipal election. I think the thirty percent and they're like wow that's turn out that we're talking about two-thirds that's amazing so did you identify any demographic shifts that stood out to you with all this talk about kind of churning in the electorate and all the rest of the end of the day the demographic patterns look pretty similar to twenty sixteen. I mean there are some big differences that grab your eye but you know. They're pretty subtle other. They might have a special consequence in some swing states. I'm for instance. You know one of the things. That's been a noted is. There's an uptick in support for biden. Like small towns around in the in the suburbs in the mid west and of course there's a surprising surge in support for trump among hispanic voters especially in south florida and in in texas. But that's the sort of thing that we're seeing in terms of the changes are small and expected and sometimes in very specific places when we talk about this election and it'll be talked about for years to come but it really is almost a cult of personality but the issues drove voters in twenty twenty. What were the issues that people a covert nineteen. Well i mean it depends on what part of you who you candidate. Was you know there were intense feelings about donald trump. And i think the evidence is that that kind of drove..

Joe biden donald trump charles stewart african american community republicans mit us president founding director stanford chicago texas south florida
"stanford mit" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"stanford mit" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"This is a special presentation of Silicon Valley insider now back to Silicon Valley insider once again your host Keith who answers will come back to civilian side we keep to my special guest today is Jason Moore CEO in chief mentor of three EQ his firm is empowering students leaders CEOs investors I really had to be a next generation leaders welcome back Jason thank you you know it dawned on me that we had such a conversation today we talked about x.'ers and millennials and students we really haven't had a chance to talk about generation Z. so is so huge Jane see what why for information to what today's got seven point eight billion people one quarter to close person one third including Africa okay in other countries is gonna be Gen Z. and Gen Z. in our practical purposes initial is Ali you're talking about the early professionals the college university graduate students high schoolers and middle school gets right so I touch on college students where they can goals are important so but high school kids I'm sure their parents you're right then high school kids are actually very simple but also very complicated the simplicity is that the most important goals from mobile most of on the cheap our culture missions yes please right and in my business that's very core in my in what I do and I and I it's a joy to mentor our high achievers seventy majors why is invaluable the most of all right there there there there the frontal cortex is still developing until the mid twenties so I sing for costumes I even told my Genji daughter twenty three twenty I say to that your prefrontal cortex are still developing got a reminder that the funds that job quite stuff that joke factory here at that's about conservation center that's the most important life stayed close allies car kits import my face goes are you know court positioning first job internship other things on them enjoy college life not to get all stressed out and anxiety still depressed right did you guys know that I bet you a lot of them well you guys don't know what it gets applied to capture tend I believe our Stanford MIT and Berkeley law's gets actually stressed out of their minds winnings IT some depressed they don't talk about it right and stick it on the wraps because the parents and kids in high school what about high school all they think about contributions I collect contributions myopia short sightedness right then I I I I'm usually people know me to be very inspirational bro loving very compassionate but here I'm I'm putting my you know closely but not to be bluntly honest with you or a book a polite right directly honest with you because as a mentor I'm not quite sure I gonna have to tell you the truth serving to the truth and a survey to dreams right then a lot of parents right no matter how successful you are and I got CEOs and tech companies and and all and second I'll be right there are successful people and you know but I see some of it meant not mine might might not quite so myopia denial pride overwhelmed not collect you're sick an inmate based additions on the states is like what type of high quality position economic or high quality impositions Bender results are gonna be subpar right it's a very normal patterns because a lot of my high school might impact the bulk of my high school students right or actually they already go to these top private schools in Atherton right you can you get all of them I I coach gets over the past fifteen years I'm not gonna name the schools right after ten in San Jose and you know you know all over if the sump it right this is actually the most competitive in the area right just like Manhattan in Boston similar to Seoul Hong Kong Shanghai right simpler there somewhere are a lot of tiger families here right M. sold the prognosis is that you know like for me I've got so many kids out or you got a minute to all eight Ivies right your heart your consent Columbia penned on the bomb canals Stanford MIT Caltech Chicago burping Jenner etcetera the top fifty of the kitchen right yeah and I got in fact I celebrate I catch up with my former students quite a bit right is that what what you're doing some of the some of them from the governments accountable or in my book youngest reporter right and this some kids are doing well some kids said that out not my students I see a lot of kids that graduate from top schools the power tools not my students in the mid twenties and early twenties what they do to me is actually not that impressed they're still just professionals to not even a management some of them want to rise up maybe they lack this week they want to top top schools right so that's what what's wrong with the picture I see it's my job to help you reach your delta early on so that you know what your doctor is higher your rise up faster right do do it again I tell my kids my my kids are doing well to help you get twenty imagine initially you'll work with your peers from Harvard from Sanford from Wharton from Berkeley from Georgetown imagine in the future if someone's gonna end up working for you right because you're going to see you can be seen you gonna be a beer right that's how I think that's how I coach my students right I'm not saying that all the students aren't that good so when it comes to high school kids Gen Z. despite the structural changes may seem right now from a pandemic what remote running and you know you know test optional for for honor ID's and and all that right S. C. optional bottle out for one year a lot of stuff going on remote running semi open semi not one thing that doesn't change its hyper competition doesn't just hyper competition to get any more adaptable navigating through the yes right now right and college kids they want to enjoy college life not get all stressed out right sending so moving forward the future work and education is ever more important right now to what we work on in addition to goal achievement right you know in Silicon Valley we all lot of Taipei's right got you got your back wonderful I just wanna wanted to court right if so between for me I'll have to.

Keith CEO Jason Moore
"stanford mit" Discussed on CATALYST

CATALYST

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"stanford mit" Discussed on CATALYST

"Have two huge engines driving this process. I feel again. There's a lot of excitement But I'm starting to feel that it's lost in the debate. Nobody has this sense of urgency. At least I see it. Maybe I'm wrong But I do like the quotes from one of the leaders at Google were actually started the deep learning initiative and do any. He said You know. A is a new electricity so if it is a new electricity and what electricity Did to our industrial revolution in this country. A hundred years ago we should be talking about it. We should be Engaging in it Taking classes which by the way of free there's not to lose only time You can take classes from Cornell Stanford Mit through courts. Are you only pay? If you complete the clause and you WANNA certificate. Would you can learn how to use machine learning in everything you do and again? I look at my a direct environment whether it's research practice. I don't hear many people may be one of my colleagues write as an exception we sang. I'm taking a class. I'M GONNA use much to see if we can improve strategic decision making but I know he's months maybe years aware of getting traction. Because very lengthy process to learn how to program right bill does ABS- those interfaces and intestinal so More excitement would be great in the US right. Especially I guess at the government level. Exactly right I think we does the beauty of the US we have a very solid innovation ecosystem. We relied on private incentives ACTORS. And we don't rely on the government for innovation That's a great point that you're making but at this point I think because China is doing it. I think we should be doing it. And how would that work in the US? What what's the solve? So I think it could be again. Multi pronged strategy. I don't think that there's anything wrong imitating what's been working in other countries whether it's Germany looking at the strengths of AI. Not The fears right. Germany us taking people across the spectrum from the fear the anger and so forth all those phases you know when you have a big change happening with disruption the focusing on the strengths of AI. France. I think it's working empowering people to regular the I feel good and I'm sure they're going to measure a measure what people do with it and Supervise from a government standpoint Francis. Very good at keeping an eye on people typically and they will see if anybody is going a little crazy with it indoors expectations but then again. China doing a law to basically get everybody excited about it. The young generation the older generation and putting money where the mouth is which is typically also going to ignite more private investments. Right so I think we can copy and imitates You know what seems to be working overseas and then see. Where does maybe we can have another take on as well Very American take would be you know. Government state funding and then private funding maybe tax breaks on investments. And so forth. I would like to thank Bertrand for joining me today. And for sharing information about artificial intelligence people seem to have a peripheral view of a and that may mean they feel resistant to it. It's important to recognize that. Ai Can also create jobs. Help reduce human error increase productivity and improve lives and isn't that the point of innovation. Maybe a bigger question is is the world ready for such a symbiosis between humans and machines. I hope you'll join us next time until then. I'm tiffany sumner. And this is catalyst..

US Ai China Germany Cornell Stanford Mit Google tiffany sumner Bertrand France
"stanford mit" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:56 min | 2 years ago

"stanford mit" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Soft edge were great companies find lasting success a book about values in addition to his recent book he's a naked economic for a market forecaster entrepreneur angel investor and board director and is the founder of silicon valley's Primera business in tech form the Churchill club and he is as keynote speaker highly sought after to global one thousand companies. as a top book reviewer I received a copy of this new book which is new bark late bloomers side in the spring just before was published and as some of you know I've been working with people in transition through my church since two thousand and one in this book really resonated with me I immediately reached out to rich to ask him if he would serve as a gas matter and he responded within ten minutes and said he'd love to this is really important topic I should say topics as it touches on two important themes pressure on kids to over achieve and the perception of failure by those over thirty who haven't reached levels that you see on the cover of a magazine. so let's get started and welcome rich thanks for joining us today in the studio I'm delighted to be here Tom. so what are you actually doing today what is I mean I know you're the the publisher but what other things have you got going I gave some less but worse your time being spent. yeah to be fair now that I'm in my sixties my careers publisher Forbes's entered what I would call it's emeritus phase I do a lot of our conferences are in the M. C. of our annual global CEO conference I do a lot of speeches it forms a Vance and I'm the lucky son of a gun who gets the host Forbes investor cruises on crystal cruise ships but I also write books a consult with a couple companies and have a have a rich and fulfilling life right now. and. this work there was a catalyst something happened in Palo alto tell us what happened and how that inspired you to write this book can actually do a lot of researchers if this was an off the top of your head you did quite a bit of research. well number one is that I've always regarded myself as a late bloomer and we can go into the details of that if you wish really some pretty pathetic lack of achievement all throughout my mid twenties to late twenties. but. I feel that I was very fortunate that I that all happened during an agent it was easier to make a recovery we didn't have social media we didn't have the pressures that we put on kids today and so although in my mid twenties I was not capable of holding any kind of a serious job other than security guard dishwasher nothing wrong with those jobs that if you've got a college degree at a good university you should be able to do better than that but I wasn't able to and finally began to blossom in my late twenties. I always wondered if that would be a valuable story to share with people as embarrassing as it was particularly some of the low points and I kind of put that aside knit periodically would pop up in my brain but living in Palo alto California fairly said to be the epicenter of Silicon Valley a neighbor of of of the elite Stanford University high pressure environment is is high pressures they come in the United States the word was getting out first in the local media and then the national media that there is an epidemic of anxiety depression and tragically enough suicides at Palo alto's three high schools in fact a writer named Hannah Rosen for land it monthly wrote a cover story in August twenty fifteen called the Silicon Valley suicides there were six of them three eight one high school to another and and and wanted a private girls school. and that was just tip of the iceberg because beneath that there were more than forty hospitalizations for what is called suicide ideation that is kids who were actively talking either on social media or with people that they were thinking about doing that too. and those numbers were accumulated by March of the school year so if you extrapolate toward the middle of June you probably wind up with something like sixty. hospitalizations and I thought what what is going on here we're living in one of the most dynamic economies micro condom use in the whole world Silicon Valley and affluence galore these kids have so much to look forward to you talk about privilege kids kids who go to Palo alto license are privileged kids. and yet there was this level of despair and so I really dove in to figure out why and was really quite shocked to find though it was certainly in the wind around where I live was shocked to find the level to which these kids feel subjected by the pressures of getting straight a is an advanced placement courses and getting into the most elite universities in the world and if they fail to do that somehow they feel like they're losers. and I it's interesting this morning on the radio I heard that the anxiety and depression with teenagers is up sixty percent just over the last few years so this is a national problem not just Palo alto and even an international problems I talked to the the person is going to be the next prime minister of Singapore and he used to be the is now the finance minister used to be the education minister and he said the same thing exists in Singapore same thing exists in Hong Kong London you go all around the world and wherever you have these economic super cities you have attended without these super pressures that aspirational parents and the and the school systems putting on these kids. and what do you think the root cause of all of this this time I think it has to do with the economy if you look at the two most lucrative parts of the American economy our last ten years they would be Silicon Valley kinds of high tech and Wall Street kinds of high finance both of those industries are are very biased quite frankly the screen very heavily for for young people who went to maybe one of ten universities schools like Stanford MIT Harvard Business School and and they both are in love with what you might call rapid algorithmic giftedness that turns out to be correlated you know with a good being a good software programmer good high frequency trader and the SAT really gets to that rapid algorithmic giftedness. we're gonna come back in at after breaking talks more about the children of parents and then a late bloomer we'll be right back with rich Kharghar the publisher and comma publisher emeritus.

Palo alto publisher Forbes forecaster Churchill club global CEO Vance director Tom. founder sixty percent ten minutes ten years
"stanford mit" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"stanford mit" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"And welcome back to school for startups radio. We are going through the myth of entrepreneurship and talking right now about creativity. Let's jump back into that conversation. And learn why creativity is not needed as an entrepreneur and crazy stuff play soccer and all that and maybe some tennis courts and all that. But our campers didn't wanna do that stuff. Anyway, we had to drag them out to make them go outside our clientele. And so any way the facilities were the exact same being at MIT or Stanford came with absolutely no other benefit that the that the location where you are happen to have a certain name, right? They are professors were not involved with our programs facilities in terms of computers are laboratories or not involved with our programs facilities. We used for recreational in dining. Right. We didn't even use their libraries, right? We brought our own computers. Though in no way, where we associated other than just the coincidence of location, right, but people paid an extra premium for that the ability to simply say what's your kid doing my kids at Mitee? This are studying computer electronics ATM. Oh, it sounded really cool and special and in fact, later on we had parents writing thing could they put that on their college locations that they had studied in the summer at MIT. And we were like, you know, it's your application. Do whatever you want. Never the less. Back to it. It's all about execution. By year, five or six for us all of our promotional materials went out on a beautiful CD with beautiful docket. You know, easy thing Mailer and everything it was all high tech and the other guys are still using the exact same brochure that they used for twenty seven years just in a different color. That's the every year. It was a different color, and it wasn't even four color. It was black and white with one accent color in just several little places. And so all they did was change the colors were, you know, we were evolving getting better and better and better every year and executing better and better and getting more and more locations in doing more and more cool things, for example, back in ninety six I think or maybe ninety eight or maybe it was two thousand we had CNBC reporters kids that were associated with our programs at conventions reporting. Hang on television networks tie-ins and cool things like that. And so we continued to get better. Everyone saw us as the dominant player we were in fact, a copy of someone out we just did it a thousand times better. Do I lose points for that? Is the question. Do I lose money we made more money than they did. I lose something because the idea was a copy, I just did it better. We had tie with Microsoft, Intel and EA and Sony. They didn't we were at Stanford MIT, they weren't Orne Orton Orton. According to the global entrepreneurship monitor which is run by Babson university and the London School of economics. They have this thing called Jim GE and the global entrepreneurship monitor and every year, it surveys countries around the world and establishes levels of entrepreneurship and a bunch of other things around the world in particular. They studied the differences in opportunity and necessity entrepreneurship in different countries. Are you an entrepreneur because you're going to starve to death and you're selling oranges on the street corners, or are you a notch entrepreneur because you see an opportunity, right? There's a huge difference there. Anyway, the global entrepreneurship monitor reports that ninety three percent ninety three percent of businesses worldwide are replication of other existing businesses ninety three percent. Are copies. Mcdonald's. Burger king. Crystal Jack in the box, right?.

Orne Orton Orton MIT soccer tennis CNBC Burger king Stanford MIT Crystal Jack Mailer Mcdonald Mitee Babson university Stanford Jim GE London School of economics Microsoft Sony Intel ninety three percent
"stanford mit" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:42 min | 2 years ago

"stanford mit" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"For startups radio. We are going through the mist of entrepreneurship and talking right now about creativity. Let's jump back into that conversation. And learn why creativity is not needed as an entrepreneur and crazy stuff, you know, play soccer and all that and maybe some tennis courts and all that. But our campers didn't wanna do that stuff. Anyway, we had to drag him out to make them go outside our clientele and so any way the facilities worthy. Exact same being at MIT or Stanford came with absolutely no other benefits. Dan that the location where you were happen to have a certain name, right? They are professors were not involved with our programs there facilities in terms of computers are laboratories or not involved with our program. So and facilities we used for recreational. And dining, right. We didn't even use their libraries, right? We brought our own computers. Though, it no way where we associated other than just the coincidence of location, right, but people paid an extra premium for that the ability to simply say what's your kid doing I kids at MIT this Amar studying computer electronics and HTML? Oh, it sounded really cool and special and in fact later on we had parents writing thing could they put that on their college applications that they had studied in the summer at MIT. And we were like, you know, it's your application. Do whatever you want. Never the less. Let's get back to it. It's all about execution. By year, five or six for us all of our promotional materials went out on a beautiful CD with a beautiful jacket. You know? Thing a Mailer and everything it was all high tech and the other guys are still using the exact same brochure that they used for twenty seven years just in a different color every year. It was a different color, and it wasn't even four color. It was black and white with one accent color in just several little places. And so all they did was change the colors were, you know, we were evolving and getting better and better and better every year, executing better and better and getting more and more locations and doing more and more cool things, for example, back in ninety six I think or maybe ninety eight or maybe it was two thousand we had Z NBC reporters kids that were associated with our programs at conventions reporting on television networks ins and cool things like that. And so we continued to get better. Everyone saw us as the dominant player we were. In fact, a copy of someone out. We just did a thousand times better. Do I lose points for that? Is the question. Do I lose money we made more money than they did. Do I lose something because the idea was a copy, I just did it better we had tie ins with Microsoft, Intel and a and Sony. They didn't we were at Stanford MIT, they weren't or or or. According to global entrepreneurship monitor which is run by Babson university and the London School of economics. They have this thing called the Jim GE and the global entrepreneurship monitor and every year, it surveys countries around the world and establishes levels of entrepreneurship at a bunch of other things around the world in particular. They studied the differences in opportunity and necessity entrepreneurship in different countries. Are you an entrepreneur because you're going to starve to death and you're selling oranges on the three corners. Or are you an entrepreneur because you see an opportunity, right? There's a huge difference there. Anyway, the global entrepreneurship monitor reports that ninety three percent ninety three percent of businesses worldwide are replication of other existing businesses ninety three percents. Are copies. Mcdonald's Burger King. Jack in the box, right. How many different burger places? Could we name we could list one hundred right five guys apple and Dell Nike and Adidas and Coca Cola and Pepsi Hilton in high and hundreds of other hotel chains right? Restaurants, dry cleaners. There's no rule that says we can't have a 'nother in a certain space to the opposite extreme it can be really difficult to be the only one are the first one into a space. You have to not only establish that you are a credible player in the space, but you have to establish the space. Right. And so it can be very very difficult. It can be really complicated to go out and not only create your company but the industry right though. Sometimes it's much better to be the follow along player. Right. Not always, right. The second Facebook. Now Facebook is certainly getting challenged by other things which they just simply by but never the less. Most businesses are copies of other businesses that are already existed, and so this idea. I will wait on the sofa until I get a new idea syndrome is the exact opposite of what entrepreneurs do entrepreneur see something around them. I can do that better. I look at this guy. I can do that. Except better an entrepreneur is someone who sees someone doing something perhaps and goes and says I can execute that better. I can do a different way a different spin a different niche and make my own business very successful. And that's a great great great strategy having good way to go about it. So think about this instead of waiting for God to strike you at the creativity. Why don't you preemptively find a business to start? Find a problem to solve that is so much easier. Right. That's a cool way of going about it that one way to do. This is to not wait, but the pro active and. And make yourself a business owner, not wait for the creativity. All right. We're going to take a quick commercial. And I'll be right back. And we're going to talk about creativity pow to become more creative. And I'm gonna give you two inside secrets tips that are gonna blow you away on how to find new business ideas. These are so amazing there. Oh my gosh. They're going to blow you away to incredible ways to find a business to start even if you have absolutely no creativity. We have established so far that waiting on creativity is a excuse. It's a a I don't care mentality. It is simply in nurse in action. Right. You just don't want to start a business. You just don't care, and therefore you are blaming creativity or your lack there of on it. And so that is one of the things that we just have to deal with maybe some of you. Don't wanna start a business. And you'd just rather plain to be creative. I think we've shown that that is simply wrong, and I promised in this segment. We were going to show you two things about creativity that will blow you away and really changed. Your view on how easy it is to replace creativity with something else. But before that, I wanna tell you a little creativity story from my own personal life. And this is why I grew to be so. Non creative. I thought right since I've been I've been in the last ten years the last fifteen years as an entrepreneur, I've been accused of being very creative. Right. I've done some very creative things. I have been told. However, I can always go back in my mind to wear I'm copying them from right? So I don't see it as creative myself, and I can always stem it back to this one story this one incident. I was in second grade in MRs leads I think was my teacher might have been third grade something like that right around. And then and our assignment was to draw a monster on a sheet of paper, and I remember this vividly as if it was yesterday. Though, I was drawing this monster and had three heads and MRs leads came over and looked at it. And I was like Jim you can't do that. That's not a correct monster. Everyone knows that monsters can only have two heads. Wow. I didn't know that. I thought I was supposed to draw whatever I wanted to be reatives. I was told that now I am being told that my version of creativity. Does not even a right. The the what you want to be creative doesn't even exist. And that's quite earth shattering to a kid that young age. I learned right, then and there, and it followed up with art teachers along the way that I was not reactive that meant to them that I could not draw which of course, I couldn't at that point. Because no one had taught me how I was not an an eight inherently skilled are like so many people are I just couldn't do it. And I didn't know how and no-one taught me, and therefore I was not creative in their minds. And so I had to learn to live with that horrible burden of not being creative. And it's really hard. To consider yourself an entrepreneur when you've been told that you're not creative. Right. And I bet there's billions of people out there that that has happened to. I hope you share. This message with them the two things I want to let you in on.

MIT Facebook MRs soccer tennis Stanford MIT NBC Dan business owner Jim GE Babson university Stanford Microsoft Burger King Jack Mcdonald apple
"stanford mit" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"stanford mit" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"We have little ships thinking we have little frigate thinking, we got a focus on the passenger ships and the bigger ship. There's nothing else we can do. And that is way life is sometimes, and that's what they did. And I did a brilliant remarkable job. I can't believe that people still complain about tarp. And what the government did it's really because they literally lack and understanding of how the system works out interconnected. All the system is. And what was the impetus for you starting? Your second business j f. Second business. The part that I love most about being in the business was really the research in the idea of matching your wits against the world. Or or everyone else in terms of researching ideas, looking at new ideas that come up every second being at the cutting edge. And that's the excitement of doing what I do just because I just do financial that doesn't mean the biggest thing I'm looking at is crisper, which is literally changing the world. It scares the hell out of me because of of what its potential is. That's the basic, gene editing technique that came out of Stanford MIT and Ahrvard it. But it it's just mind boggling what the implications are. And so I look at everything that doesn't mean it always links up to what I invest in. Because we have a broad mandate in financial, which is a big area. But that doesn't mean the same way. That I was in well Gaz Alice fifty years ago forty years ago, I still look at women gas every hour every day and the same thing in the medical area, you're dealing in ideas, you're dealing in new thoughts. And that's really what we do. What's the most exciting idea that you've seen in the market? The most interesting thing that people should look at today, and it's very very very early is in the tax code. There is a provision that crates. What we call opportunities owns and the governor's everywhere in the United States have declared different places opportunities owns and I think that's quite an interesting area. What do you do with that? That's an economic opportunity. So it's printing a tax advantage way to invest in. In these areas, which I believe over time will have a big impact. And certainly one of the biggest impact over time is on the Konami because I believe it will be one to three trillion dollars. Remember, this is a eighteen trillion dollar economy. And because the way they did it it has to be done quickly. Sometimes would has an impact is because you have to put the money to work in build factories and build new apartments rather quickly. That has the biggest impact I mean, people say, well, the tax Bill haven't seen the impact. Yes, it's true. Because they takes months it takes a year repatriation was three trillion dollars. You haven't seen the first factory built it takes a year for apple to build their glass factory or takes three years or five years. You got a planet. To find the site. You gotta engineer it. So what's on our whether Farmaceutica companies? This is an example where things are going to happen. Unbelievably quickly, it's going to create enormous loan demand for small banks regional banks all over the country. And I believe we'll see I I've been wrong a lot of times before. But I believe this will be one of the major major events in the country similar to how big the oh eight oh nine crisis was in your.

Gaz Alice Stanford MIT United States engineer Bill apple three trillion dollars eighteen trillion dollar fifty years forty years three years five years
"stanford mit" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"stanford mit" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"And so I literally got to the page where it was like for people with bachelor's degrees. Kind of American universities because I didn't want to stay school longer than I had to. What was the what was the salary ranking top salary on down for the degrees in the top one was was doubly. And I was like, okay. W sounds good. Then I went to the w page, and I was like, okay. What are the top w schools, and it was like Mitee Stanford. Well, those are obviously out of reach for people where I come from. You mean, you just decided that that was where I come from goes to Stanford MIT. You didn't think you could? Of course, not no, no chance amazing. No, no, no possibility whatsoever. And nobody ever has is not it's not it's not a possibility. So number three was university of Illinois, which I was like, oh interesting. Like, I was in Wisconsin. And so actually it's actually like it's across the border. It's about six hours away. And it's a it's a state school. So I'd have to I'd have to pay out of state tuition. Yeah. But it was it was much cheaper than the sort of the private schools. Those like number is number three in the country. Right for double was like, this is great. So I went to Biden they love out of school out of state students because they full load. Right. So then I showed up and got a job and the job. I got was. I was I was in enjoy coding. So I got I got a job in a software lab. And I just I absolutely loved it. As my kind of first time, I was getting like actually paid like write code and work on things in the physics department in Illinois. And then that that ultimately led to an internship at IBM. And then that ultimately led to a job at NCSA, which was the the the center where we did all the work of mosaic. And so part, you know, there's a there's a big I don't know locker timing or whatever component to it. Which is like it so happened that when I got Illinois. There was this environment right with all this with by the way with all this all of central funding to be able to do, you know, we had we basically had the modern internet at Eleanor there were four universities that have got there were four universities in the US that had gotten funded in the eighties to basically effectively build they were supercomputer centers. It was when supercomputers cost twenty five million dollars. So there was that. And then they basically built what they call the NSF net, which was basically the internet. And so there was it was Cornell, San Diego, Illinois, and Pittsburgh, they will stay there actually all three of the former state schools, and so we basically had on campus. We had actually the modern the web. Yeah. But we had like the modern internet like we had high speed broadband, including even some of the dorms, you know, there were supercomputers there were all these graphical workstations, which at the time was it was a big deal. And so there there was a part of that. It was an. It was seen. It was the scene. Yes. Sure. It was saying it was a fertile environment. Where people who are interested in this. And there was some sort of resources if you have the notion in your head that you were going to change the world. Of course, not you really didn't envision this important for for like, I think people who want to do creative work like the the sort of how grand can the thoughts be like for real. We've trying to solve a specific problem. Or did you have a sense that if we do this work, we might actually be able to influence the world? So it's a it was like I didn't have the vocabulary then, but I haven't now so it was a complex at after system problem. And and it was as follows which is because of all this federal funding for the supercomputer centers. We had a lot of the modern internet running at Eleanor the students could use the faculty used at the researchers use it. My my my work..

Illinois university of Illinois Mitee Stanford Stanford MIT NCSA Eleanor Wisconsin US NSF IBM Biden San Diego Pittsburgh Cornell twenty five million dollars six hours
"stanford mit" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"stanford mit" Discussed on Venture Stories

"And and the other part of it that I also sort of find puzzling some time like be tend to over indexed on hard skills. Hiring candidates rather than the balance between hard schools in SaaS gills, and I think we all know that as a handed mature as a an engineer with chores accompany after the first two or three years at the company, just the hard skills are not necessarily going to be enough in them being able to perform their job. So when you are interviewing only for certain type of profile, oh, they can solve these NFL the make or ending structure per albums. You may be hiring good candidate for the first few years, but they may not do well long. Right. So that that's sort of interesting non-drug is like how do you ensure that one you're being more open to a different supplies different set of candidates that may increase your supply? But also think about a you're judging the performance of the. Candidate itself we process. I don't know if I figured out the great way to do that. But I don't even think that companies have a good way to judge that in the process that we follow. Yeah. I am a bit of data kind of supporting what's has said. So her while in your viewing I o we were. We ran a university hiring program where we were trying to affectively kill career fairs. We ended up sunsetting could make the unit economics work like companies were very invested in career fairs and also like the companies that hire a lot of students tend to have their reset budget. They know that even if they spend it on career Fraser gonna get the headcount of immediate minutes, not like diverse as they want or even if it's not as fishing does they want so just less of a hair on fire problem. But that aside for a while we were on boarding university. Students like crazy, and we were on boarding them from all over the US completely independently where people just fool, and or we noted where people went to school and then later. We looked to see how they performed in practicing. And what we discovered is that there is just not that much difference in performance between students in vary league schools, you know, CMU and Stanford MIT and Caltech another versus know topped your seats and even middle tier states. It was just different. Now. One of I think this speaks to attest earlier, like it's not just about the knowledge the candidate has but some other character. And I think that we ended up with a bit of a self selected group where the students wanted to practice on interviewing IO were little more gritty, right? A little driven and had more initiative than others..

engineer NFL US Caltech Fraser CMU Stanford three years
"stanford mit" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"stanford mit" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Dot com on Twitter at I B. And we talk often about Purdue University. We talk about Purdue global we've talked about how universities are building business pre university their record startup activity, two hundred twenty three startups more than three hundred and fifty million in funding, Gary, dick. Yeah. Story came out on Friday, Tony, and you and I talked a lot about how universities are beginning to get much more gauged in the whole innovation startup economy. If you will in India, and it's been a long time coming you look at places like Stanford MIT, and all these big high profile, universities that have been commercialising ideas coming out of the university for years making those ideas, turning them into companies began has not done that they've really universities in the state have really shied away that for many years that is changing the way Mitch Daniels has been a big driver at Purdue in doing this when he came into office on the west Lafayette campus, and as you mentioned some big numbers producing they breached milestones two hundred and twenty three startups three hundred and fifty million dollars and Sunday and to give you an example, Tony of what these startups these ideas that that start again just with an idea perhaps in a lab or a student idea what they can become one of the startups eighteen years in the making. That that was sold last year at the Indo site. So for two point one billion with a B two point one billion dollars. So these ideas can percolate and can develop into into real companies with payroll and economic impact talking to Gary dick inside Indiana business dot com. Speaking of economic impact have we done the math of what what losing a playoff game. Does. I mean, there were no home games for us for the colts. But it was a bad bad really bad scene in in Kansas City. The loss was was was rather complete there. Is there talk about what that does. Like, you know, if there's a win. There's there's more people going to restaurants more people going to bars more activity more people feeling good. They spend a little bit more about that kind of impact. Yeah. Well, first of all, you're right bad was with Cal caps bad. That was an awful game Saturday and really deflate. A lot. You know, there's so much excitement build up around that game. But as you look at the old the proverbial silver lining. Tony you look at what what the team accomplish this year after that. That's terrible start getting into the playoffs winning a playoff game. And I think there's a lot pointing toward next season. And a lot of men we had one of the colts executives on the show, who's in charge of business development, and and really driving that off-field revenue portion of it and the performance of the team, I think fans generally are very excited about what this team can be next year in the next couple of years that has that has direct impact certainly on economic impact in the community. What that number is. You know who knows? But I think anyone in Indianapolis can recognize the excitement that's around the team, and that has impact certainly off sealed as well. We we heard the story earlier, and you've got an inside Indiana business dot com that fat daddy's in south.

Purdue University Tony Gary dick Indiana colts Twitter Mitch Daniels Indianapolis west Lafayette campus India Stanford MIT Kansas City fifty million dollars one billion dollars eighteen years
"stanford mit" Discussed on a16z

a16z

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"stanford mit" Discussed on a16z

"Advisor to help the person focus more just on the customer communication and less on all the technicality of how they need to search for information to their jobs. So the chat bot not for the customer action. But the help the person be more effective at dealing with other people small categories there. Millions and millions of jobs that are being created as we move into this environment. This not just new class of. Jobs being created, but existing class of jobs being re transformed right? Take the very humble industrial engineer van handy. Ford rolled out the model t and he realized that he needed people who could figure out what was going on the line and therefore created the industrial engineer now the industrial engineers job at one level hasn't changed in all these years. He shows up on the line with a stop watch. And a piece of paper. Now most sophisticated industrial engineers at Stanford MIT would know operations research would understand, you know. Simplex or whatever else they wanna go solve. But the fact of the metro is the bulk of the population just spends according to our customers thirty percent of their time just getting data. Fundamentally using computer vision and deep learning to create a new data set and the really the data set is about people at work and in the context of the manufacturing floor. It's about extracting tremendous improvements in quality in productivity in traceability all aspects that have been here for one hundred years, but what machines have now let us do improve that in a very dramatic way working with people. So now imagine if because of the data set, the industrial engineering doesn't need to spend thirty percent of his time or her time making measurements on the floor and those measurements that are fundamentally renews, right? We all know the hot on infect, we know bias data said small sample sizes all those kinds of problems history. Now, the machine console incredibly complex problems think of line balancing across one hundred and forty one stations, which is what the apple iphone in my hand has built across and trying to align. Balancing one hundred and forty-one stations is almost humanly impossible, but the machine can crank that up. And now the job Java industrial engineering is to interpret it and actually make change happen. So new jobs and existing jobs..

engineer Advisor Ford Stanford MIT apple thirty percent one hundred years
"stanford mit" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

04:25 min | 3 years ago

"stanford mit" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Is it anything important, right? Or is it just collections of neurons? Right. And every time we find some part of the brain or some individual cell that appears the kind of light one stimulus more than another be very excited right in the science community. And so the hippocampus appear to have these cells, the kind of fired preferentially in certain locations. Right. And in fact, when you move, the animals were new place. Those those kind of Matt's would totally redo. Figure right that the change and it was. It was like every time the animal went into a new environment, it sells would set up a whole map. What's been termed a cognitive map of that environment. Yeah, right. And this is very this. This this kind of kicked off this entire trajectory of research, which ultimately led to people kind of taking apart and understanding that entire circuit right, ranging from kind of inputs that come from in Toronto cortex into the hippocampus out to the cortex and now now it's like one of the studies systems in history, but it's all because you know this one patient right, underwent this one surgery and a lot of, you know, a lot of, I mean, and as a clinician, you, you know, all of these stories about so many drugs are discovered by accident ever happened by accident and medicine, and this is kind of this is I think the neuroscientist most exciting one. Yeah, that and. Phileas gauge is another one that people are pointing for other other reasons. A lot of a lot of weird things happen in neuro science that give quasi insights. All right. I've gotta start moving towards wrapping up, Eric. I could talk to you all day. This stuff fascinates the hell out of me and I and it's it's such a massive landscape to to try to get your head around. Eric's Twitter handle is at stoke, could still kept his sto cata station as h. a. s. t. I n. you what was the physicians committee for responsible adults? What was that. I don't know, says you're something about you that I was like. That sounds all right. Forget it. Then now you're integrated direct marketing LLC. Is that correct? No. Also. All right. So what are you doing? What's going forward? What what's what is the president now? Yeah. What does the future hold? Where were you going? What kinda, if I thought you in a year where we talking about, hopefully if you talk to year, we'll have gotten a faculty job. Number one where I don't know that's the, there's a fun kind of it's a lot like the draft and that you know we, there's a pick day and everyone. You know, we all we all apply a bunch of different places. And then at all, you know, God sorts out or where do you wanna go sitting? I'd like to go some places kind of good CS program and goodbye engineering program. Right. So kind of the usual suspects as well as as you know. So Berkeley Stanford MIT, but also you know, UT Austin is a great program. You Chicago's a great program like there's there's, there's a lot of places, and my wife is, is thankfully willing to kind of end up anywhere. So we'll we'll see how that goes, but but a lot of my research these days is very, is very focused on this question, how do we make biological measurement better using a lot of these new algorithm expect Meeks. Right. I mean, when you think about technologies like MRI, right? There's no, there's no photographic film. There's there's no. It's all basically because we're, we're, we're using a lot of algorithms to kind of see inside the body, right. And in fact, there's this entire exciting healed of computational imaging where people basically build different types of hardware that appear to kind of just measuring noise, but then you apply some algorithms that you see things. No one's ever seen before. I think that's kind of fighting place to be right now. So again, to use the Amore I analog, we're just looking at electron spins and sing with energy comes out when you line them all up and magically images generated from that. Exactly. Exactly. So, so MRI works by basically detecting the little magnetic fields generated by the hydrogens in water, and they do all this crazy stuff. And now you know, people we work with are developing kind of single shot. Rapid acquisitions, three d. m. r. i. we're in two minutes..

Eric Toronto Twitter Berkeley Stanford MIT Matt president Meeks Chicago two minutes
"stanford mit" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

05:20 min | 3 years ago

"stanford mit" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"One of the probably one of the bigger factors was AIG basically creating a box that basically insured mortgages. It's in what they did really was. I said, look will ensure this box of mortgages for a billion dollars. No ten billion dollars. One hundred billion. It's the same thing. What if everyone in the audience was allowed to. Ensure their house for ten trillion dollars. Well, I can guarantee you the country would go under because one of those houses going to burn down. And when that house burns down somebody, theoretically asked to pay ten trillion dollars and therefore it's impossible for the companies to pay whoever it is, and it has a whole series of knockoff affects when that house burns down. So that was one big factor. But I would say there were many, many factors leading to it. The biggest factor was the loss of confidence. The biggest factor was the failure of the government to take that last bit of action because they got nervous when Leman fail when Lehman fail and the government did nothing. They just simply decided, well, we don't have the thirty to act, which we know is not true because you can read laws a million different ways. Once that. Happened people confidence because what happened there was you had two sets of massive derivatives and the people who were going to lose on it said, look, you know, he fail. We're not taking our laws. You saw what the problem was, but as you said, that's different from acting, how did you then figure out when turn and by? That's very important lesson live because you have to pick yourself up and figure out, okay, what's going to happen next? And how do you go forward? That decision was a lot easier because once the government began to intervene the brilliance of the government, this was at the time of sixteen trillion dollars economy. They said, look, we're putting up five trillion dollars of potential guarantees. We're putting up ten trillion. No, we're putting up twenty Troy. No, we're putting up fifty Trojan. Well. It's like anything else in life. If there is a safety net that's their, you're then not worried and all of a sudden the government never had to put up fifty trolling or forty Troner twenty trillion. But once they said, we're going to put up safety net, not for everybody, but for the larger players, they explained to me look, Manny. This is a hurricane and we have passenger ship sinking. We have freighter sinking. We have little ships thinking we have little frigate thinking, we got a focus on the passenger ships and the bigger ship. There's nothing else we can do. And that is way life is sometimes, and that's what they did. And I did a brilliant remarkable job. I can't believe that people still complain about tarp and what the government did. It's really because they literally lack and understanding of how the system works out interconnected. All the system is. And what was the impetus for you start. Being your second business. He j f. My second business. The part that I love most about being in the business was really the research in the idea of matching your wits against the world or or everyone else in terms of researching ideas, looking at new ideas that come up every second being at the cutting edge, and that's the excitement of doing what I do just because I just do financial. That doesn't mean the biggest thing I'm looking at is crisper, which is literally changing the world. It scares the hell out of me because of of what it's potential is. That's the basic gene editing technique that came out of Stanford MIT and Ahrvard it, but it it's just mind boggling what the implications are. And so I look at everything that doesn't mean it always links up to what I invest in because we have a broad mandate in financial, which is a big area. But that doesn't mean. Is the same way that I was in well, Gaz Alice fifty years ago. Forty years ago. I still look at gas every hour every day, and the same thing in the medical area you're dealing and ideas you're dealing in new thoughts, and that's really what we do. What's the most exciting idea that you've seen in the market? The most interesting thing that people should look at today and it's very, very, very early is in the tax code. There is a provision that crates, what we call opportunities owns and the governor's everywhere in the United States have declared different places opportunities owns, and I think that's quite an interesting area..

government Lehman Manny AIG Gaz Alice United States Troy Stanford MIT Leman ten trillion dollars sixteen trillion dollars five trillion dollars ten billion dollars billion dollars Forty years fifty years
"stanford mit" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"stanford mit" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"It um appear that black people and and maybe even black panthers had kill these white people which would in turn spark a race war they would kill each other and the manson and the reason laughing is because his to so ridiculously impulse implausible in that than the manson family would be the only people left and they could rule the world yet those supposedly the whole thing behind helterskelter so the cops in la advic the sheriff's department and the la cops have um two different murder scenes that are obviously related but early on they didn't they didn't connect them yet and took it took a minute uh but once they did these two murders came to be known as the tatelabianca murders before anyone knew who the manson family was and it was a big deal um but you have to go back even further to understand what's going on and understand the eventual prosecution of the manson family to another murder and we will do i've into that one after this two if you're considering going back to school ask yourself this do you want to earn a quality degree from a worldrenowned university if so consider area zona state university the university named number one for innovation ahead of stanford mit chuck that's pretty serious that's right a issue offers more than 100 highlyranked degree programs all 100 percent online you'll have direct access to success coaches and academic advisers to guide you along your journey for more information about asu online text eight s u two seven nine nine two eight that's eight s you two seven ninety nine 28.

manson murder zona state university la advic la stanford asu 100 percent
"stanford mit" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"stanford mit" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"Universities that are like cool an amazing in programming and robotics and things like that you know carnegie mellon is like right there may be stanford mit carnegie mellon like those are the top three in at least in my mind yeah absolutely i was fortunate enough to work with this incredible robot uscis rut where the car who was one of the i guess founders of the dark red challenge of autonomous vehicles i was gonna ask you about the darpa grand challenge a tell people about what that is that such an amazing a thing as a lesser back in two thousand three or two thousand four is just a challenge to create an autonomous vehicle that drives across the desert down in mexico and the first year was useless people a complete failure by a really kicked off all this research at the next year it was won by i believe session througn at his team from stanford and though now it's just a almost a piece of cake for these autonomous vehicles to complete the course didn't the stamford team eventually more or less move over to google for their google car stuff it's do i have that particular a yeah i believe a lot of them went over there and sebastien througn i think he is very involved in the tacit the effort they have a selfdriving cohort okay yahya this that's really cool too when you talk about the car driving through the desert it's not it's not like it just drove a little ways there's basically a dirt path through the open planes as well as owen into the mountains for like a hundred miles right oh yeah you can check out of the videos from these races and these are like very intense offroad vehicles eyes through the desert in.

carnegie mellon mexico stanford owen google sebastien througn
"stanford mit" Discussed on Mac OS Ken

Mac OS Ken

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"stanford mit" Discussed on Mac OS Ken

"With growth for the iowa us store coming in at only five percent and with that store being one hundred thirty five percent behind googleplay store sound like google plays the winner but you know how this goes when we turn from downloads to paid downloads the ios store mobs the floor with goals play thing apple continues to hold ninety five percent more money spent on apps according to the report even with the disparity in total downloads and that's a bigger lead than it had last year for the june quarter of 2016 the iowa saab store held a ninety percent lead over googleplay store in terms of money spent news of trump and apple two days in row though this news seems a bit more bankable bloomberg says white house officials including the president's daughter of vonk a trump have kicked off an outreach campaign the leaders and tank business education and local government quoting the report president donald trump's daughter on wednesday joined read court is the president's special assistant for technology and michigan gives on a conference call with politicians educators nc owes to discuss stam that's science technology engineering and math education according to to people with knowledge of the call there were said to be a couple of people on the call from the apple side those included the cupertino company's ceo tim cooke and laurine powell jobs widow of apple cofounder steve jobs and education activist in her own right others reportedly on the line included maryland houston ceo of lockheedmartin julie sweet ceo of accenture north america brad smith president of microsoft a so hutchinson governor of arkansas and representatives from the chechen sucker bergen this should've stanford mit and broward county florida schools.

iowa hutchinson brad smith accenture houston maryland steve jobs laurine powell cupertino donald trump white house saab ios googleplay google florida schools broward county arkansas microsoft ceo tim cooke stam michigan special assistant president bloomberg apple one hundred thirty five percen ninety five percent ninety percent