20 Burst results for "Stanford Medical School"

Lori Gottlieb, psychotherapist and author: "The uncomfortable is a great place to be."

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:05 min | 2 d ago

Lori Gottlieb, psychotherapist and author: "The uncomfortable is a great place to be."

"Hey everyone the show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches. The scam is still working from home for the time being because of covid nineteen today Lori gottlieb joins us on skin from the couch. She is a psychotherapist and an author. She writes the Dr Therapist Column in the Atlantic and She's also the author of the bestselling novel maybe you should talk to someone which I read I loved and then recommended to every member of my family Lori. Thank you for joining US welcome to skin from the couch. Thanks so much for having me Lori we're very excited I. Feel like we're about to have therapy. We're going start though putting you on the on the hot feet, which just can you skim your resume for us? Yeah. Sure. After graduating from college I worked in the entertainment business. I. I worked on the film side and then I moved over to NBC, and you're I there to. You May for premiering when was called Er and the other was called breads heard of them. When I was working on Er, we had a consultant who is an emergency room physician at and he would do research with us and help us to choreograph the scenes and make sure that everything's accurate and I spent a lot of time in the ER, and he said to me I, think you like it better here than you like your day job because I was spending a lot of time in the ER and and I was like I'm lacking to go to medical school. Like I like in my late twenties late that I went to medical school. So went to Stanford I went to medical school when I got there, it was the middle of the DOT com the first sort of DOT com bill before i. And a lot of people were saying you know managed care it was coming into the healthcare system and would be able to do the kinds of work that I wanted to do with my patients. I worked at a DOT COM for a little bit in the summer between first year second year of medical school and ultimately assert writing and I left to become a journalist and. I felt like as a journalist I could really help to tell people stories the way that I wanted to, and it was about ten years later after being a journalist for wile still a journalist but I had a baby and I was desperate for adult interaction and ups guy would come ons I would lose him in conversation at he hated that nearly describing me in corn to. Like that and so he would always try to avoid the at eventually start telling to my door putting the APP just down very gently. So I would not open the door, engage him in conversation, and so I called Dean at Stanford and I said, maybe I should come back Andrew Psychiatry and she said, you know you always wanted these deeper interactions with people welcome to come back. But if you do psychiatry probably doing a lot of medication management, it's not what you WANNA do. Why don't you get a graduate degree in clinical psychology and do the work want to do it was really this is a moment it sounds obvious. In, retrospect which I think a lot of career things do where you know something that is right in front of you you had thought of, and so I did that and I, have this hybrid career where I'm a psychotherapist I have clinical practice here Los Angeles I'm still a writer I write books I writes the weekly called the Atlantic Avenue podcast coming out therapy. So I see like what I do is I look at story of the human condition and I just express it different means what something that is not on your Lincoln profiler bio that people would be surprised to know about you maybe that I was competitive chess player. You have another fallback career. I. Wasn't good never for career but I was really serious about it and I think I use that a lot in my career. So I think with chests there's a lot of strategy. There's a lot of anticipating the consequences of your moves and you can't plan everything out but I think that people look at my career they think I made these very impulsive decisions like you're working in Hollywood and boom you're going to go to medical school you're working on e. r. and then boom you want to. Tell stories in different ways to you're GonNa go Ri- and then you're GonNa go the therapist and you go from telling people stories, changing people's stories, right? All of that is true but I think I very much ought ahead about why was I doing reflecting on why was doing so many people said to me you are crazy. You don't leave medical school when you get into Stanford Medical School right? You don't leave Hollywood when you're at NBC and you have this job you're successful journalists would you mean you're going to go back and do therapy and why would you leave? And so I think it's really about I. Think in chests you have to kind of really be reflected about what you're doing. When I think about being reflective as an adult I think that means being reflective and going inside to that place of knowing and not listening to all the noise out there that the reflection is an inside job and not an outside job.

Lori Gottlieb Dot Com Stanford Medical School NBC Stanford United States Dr Therapist Column Hollywood Atlantic DOT Wile Consultant Andrew Psychiatry RI Los Angeles Lincoln Chess Writer
US to Pay Over $1 Billion for 100 Million Doses of J&J's Potential COVID-19 Vaccine

KNX In Depth with Charles Feldman and Mike Simpson

03:08 min | Last week

US to Pay Over $1 Billion for 100 Million Doses of J&J's Potential COVID-19 Vaccine

"It's good to be in the cove ID vaccine business, apparently Moderna, the pharmaceutical company rushing to develop a vaccination against covert 19 already taking pre orders and doses. Johnson and Johnson also working feverishly on a vaccine just sold 100 million doses of something that hasn't been developed as yet to the U. S government for well over $1 billion. Dr. J. Bhattacharya directs the program on medical outcomes at the center on the On Demographic on Demographic Economics of Health and Aging at Stanford Medical School. One of the things I've learned doctors, you guys gotta get shorter titles. That's one of things I've learned in the past few months, so it does seem odd for a lot of people. Ah, maybe it isn't. But it does seem odd that a product that hasn't yet really been proven to do anything. Ah, value that is, is being sold, apparently at great value to some of these companies. Is that odd or my just thinking the wrong way? No, it's in something unprecedented. And it is part of Ah policy actually, such as the United States government many, many governments around the world that made That they made a bet. They've said that if the vaccine does turn out to be effective, we wanted to be immediately available. At scale to everyone who you know, sort of everyone who was at risk from cover, which is basically everybody, so in order to avoid the delays, that would happen if you wait To see the doctor is going to work then then you ramp up manufactory months of delay. The decision's made again by the U. S government, but also by the government to basically make that investment now, even before we know what the facts, whether it actually gonna work or or or or or, you know, have detailed information about it. What's that? If it does work, we're ready to go. It doesn't work. We'll have lost that. We've lost a lot of money. I guess the wager is it's waiting would end up costing more than just trying to produce all this right now. So if you do hit on something, you have it ready. The prices you see, the money is being spent taxpayer dollars modern cases, is it The right cost. I mean, of course, that you hindsight will know for sure if the vaccine turns out to work out on actually application safe and then yes, it will avoid a lot of really uncomfortable discussions about who should get the vaccine first, you know, inequality, vaccine distribution. All those issues would be ramped up to 11 if you if you did, if we have different waited and the vaccine works, and then we have a massive fight in a sense now, But in the sense we're making. We're paying the taxpayer dollars real. It's real money. In order to say, Let's avoid that fight down the line if it works. In retrospect, it comes out It doesn't work. Then we'll look back and say, Gosh, Was it a good investment? It's an unprecedented unprecedented policy. But it's one that I think many countries around the world making just just because of the scale of the epidemic and the potential benefit from the From about scene if it does

U. S Johnson Moderna Stanford Medical School Dr. J. Bhattacharya United States
"stanford medical school" Discussed on Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

15:18 min | 3 months ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

"The sleep up the so there's always a connection between obesity and obstructive sleep apnea and. It's another vicious circle so we should be looking at you know in terms of the four functions of the Human Body. We're talking about we'RE TALKING ABOUT SLEEP. We're talking about nutrition and we're also talking about emotions of the mind because I like to bring in this. You know we see people who remember depression anxiety and when you start investigating their sleep that often tell you that they're wake up feeling exhausted and then if I asked him well. Has Anybody ever referred you to do a sleep study to check out do you have obstructive sleep apnea dancers often? No and I think it's the reason being is because all too often we consider the person with depression. They're exhausted because of their depression. But maybe it is the exhaustion that is causing the depression. You know the human body is to interwoven just to money. Connections Darren bidirectional relationships between one function on another and in medicine. Every function has been isolated. But you can't do that. The human body because every function is intertwined. You'll have to look at the big picture and that's exactly it. It's almost like the ground. Zero of problems is somewhat other. You could definitely argue is breathing. Ron. Because that's that's the start of it and if you have breathing correctly you not going to rot and it becomes ambitious. Sokoll is you told just exponentially escalating the answer. There's a number of significant studies that like Utah. Those whole minds of that. Same ground that just a couple of things But very dude specific indicators of of hundreds of things are implied that if you draw slave we'd have prayed correctly Put up body into many of problems. Such as potential can't saw a metabolic syndrome diabetes Alzheimer's all those kinds of things he tossed on The The the the things wants to meet him Oxygen Saturation. I absorption. So it's all well to have a Alex as we said Alison Saturation Doesn't change too much so the importance of is actually. How much muscles absorbs isn't that? How much oxygen yesterday have in terms of your hemoglobin separate assets ratio? It's more a case of how much body absorbs tossed upon not Can you just I like. This is actually more for the him before. Side of athletes So what happens the oxygen during our workouts and wondering what's it removing while what I would say is if I was working. Madani alita are recreational athletes? I would always tell them to do something recreation. I I say for recreational athlete. You should do all of your physical exercise. But you're Mike closed on here. Here's the reason being. It's tougher at the start for the first six to eight weeks and the reason being is because you are breathing. Truest smarter entry and as a result. You know your nostrils are smaller than your mouth. And it's forcing you to do physical exercise. You know which are mark closed that you're exposing the body to an increased air hunger now. An increased air hunger. During physical exercise is due to the increased carbon dioxide in the blood and if you continuously exposure body says increased air hunger air hunger diminishes over time so what it means is Dan for a given level of physical exercise? You don't need as much breathing. So there's an economic saving there because it it does this there is cost associated with moving your breathing muscles. You know if you if you're arresting where about two to three percent of our video too is going to support the breathing muscles and if we go for walk about maybe five percent six percent if we do fairly intense physical exercise is probably about ten percent and if we do maximum physical exercise it's about thirteen to fifteen percent but if we do have a breathing pattern disorder it increases dash and for individuals who were during the hyperventilation provocation test. That's when they really breathed deliberately hard for thirty seconds to three minutes the oxygen consumption to support their breathing muscles increase to thirty percent. So does all about breathing. Efficiency NUMBER ONE IS. How do you teach in athletes to do more with less the next load on them? So for the recreational athlete I would say do everything which closed yet. It's tougher but keep doing ish and then it gets easy and that's when you start you know you're breathing lighter forgiven intensity of exercise for the elite athletes. I would say do fifty percent of your training which are closed. Why because it adds an extra load onto you and again. It's the same reasons and I say to a fifty percent which are mouth open so that you don't have muscle deconditioning because initially when you do trauma to nose breathing you're not going to have the same intensity because you're feeling that restriction drew to the air hunger but that's that's up -tations of the body and nose breathing allows you to take the air deeper into the lungs and the greatest concentration of blood is in the low regions of the lungs so nose breathing also increase the oxygen taking the blood. Now I know I already said that. You can't increase the blood oxygen saturation by by increasing your breathing but you can increase the Buxton saturation by switching to nasal breathing. Now it might be one or two percent but at the same time when you're doing a physical exercise but breathing through your nose. The carbon dioxide and blood is is higher and wit sustained physical exercise with nasal breathing. You can tolerate a higher and pressure of carbon dioxide in the blood. I'm Wa- discipline allow more to released from the red blood cells to tissues so if you if you look at the work the professor George Dahlem. Da L. A. And Dan. This is so understudied that there're very few papers in the words investigating the benefits of nasal breathing versus mouth breathing or any difference between the two but he is looked at it and one paper that was published in twenty ten recreational athletes. He got some breathing through their nose for six months. During physical exercise he done tests dumb after six months. When the physical adaptations had taken pace they were able to achieve one hundred percent of their work regime. Ten St on the graded exercise test with nasal breathing versus moat. But with twenty. Two percent less ventilation so twenty. Two percent less less breathing and an increased carbon dioxide in the blood forty four millimeters of mercury versus forty which in turn led to a reduction in the fraction of expired oxygen so D- individuals breathing through the nose that I had a better oxygen taking the bud but they had a better oxygen delivery to the tissues. Now if you look at a few other studies that were published back thirty years ago by Dr John Doe Yard looking at the brainwave states in nasal breathing versus map breathing. Nasal BREEDERS ENTERED FLOW. Stace not breathing mouth breathing trouser. Evolution is associated with fight or flight. Our ancestors didn't Jews their mouths debris during physical exercise look at the research of neanderthals two years ago researchers found the undertows toilets had these really wide nostrils to allow the conditioning of a large volume of air. Trudeau knows not just during rest but also during physical exercise we we have lost the art of breathing and we have lost the art of breathing. Only relatively recently now. I know some people will say well. Dr Western price book wasn't very scientific or etc. It was really an observation and it was using the best available science at that time published back in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight and he'd locked. Ash. The craniofacial changes of individuals. Spend a switch from traditional died over to a process dies first generation. Children became operators. These children had deformed dental actress data overcrowding of teat dead higher per pilots and they didn't have good airway. And you know you have to consider if you want to be developed not leash you need a good airway so breathing. Efficiency is one thing but human development is another thing yet. You touched upon sympathetic and the passive pathetic death so miss you so just to reiterate you signed it. Used to be dominant through the past sympathetic. And now it's through the sympathetic because of the fact that why that we've changed out. I Guess Breeding Patterns Zach when I suppose you know we always want to kind of have an optimal. You want to have a balanced between the power sympathetic and sympathetic. Because we want to be resilient we want to be able to adopt whatever. Environmental changes are whatever comes our way but I would say to mouth breeders a definitely more stuck in that sympathetic tone Lauren. That fight or flight response more agitated education of the mind if you think of. How do we breed when we get stressed well? We breed fast and shallow. How does a map reader breed fast and shallow because your nose imposes resistance to your breathing? That's two to three times out of the moat and by slowing down your breathing. This helps to calm the mind. So again twenty seventeen Stanford medical school if you were to Google Stanford Medical School and slow breathing. They identified a new structure. In the brain the locus corollas and they said that the primary purpose of this structure is despite on your breathing. So when you really slow down your breathing destructure will determine that you are slowing down your Brett and destruction would relay signals of come to the rest of the brain but Mao printers. Don't have slow breathing. I wasn't a slow breeder when I was a map reader because you have no resistance to your breathing during wakefulness and also mapping always activating the upper chest and our diet from breathing muscle is not just for expiration. You know even if you were to look at it from the point of view functional movement. Can you have functional movement unless you have functional breathing? Is it just a coincidence? That ninety percent of people who have good functional movement also have good functional breathing and if breathing is normalized movement is normalized and movement is normalized. You're more risk of injury however there's also connection between die from and the mind so if you're breathing using the die from just breathing low breathing lash reading slow breathing deep and use an acronym. Lsd So people remember so light is about the biochemistry of breathing. Slow is about bringing a cadence of breathing more specifically practices between five point. Five to six bits per minute and that's to stimulate the vagus nerve to increased heart rate for your buzzer improve. Response resigned Arrhythmia stimulate. What's called borrow receptors or pressure receptors? But basically slow breathing to restored by these systems which are disturbed by stress. And then we look at depressing which is targeting the bio mechanics and the problem with breathing. Donnas that people are all in their own little silos and I was in my silo to whip you take. Oh as my background. I looked primarily at the biochemistry. It's not enough so the oxygen advantage is very much bio chemically focused. But the next book is going to be different. That's one currency rising. I'm GONNA broad broad Nash in terms of looking at functional breathing from three dimensions the biochemistry the cadence of the Brett the by mechanics and true the Brett when you really break down. What's going on there? I think it's amazing. I think I'm only scratching the surface here. Have the more I go down this rabbit hole. I'm twenty years down this rabbit hole and the more. I'm down there that the less realized I do know it's incredible and I'm sitting here. I'm writing notes. I'm Jay rotting notes as you. It just from personal development is a renowned always paypal you reference Essentially what you you with Athlete's the ability to do more with less. And we've seen that in hot consistently with allergy training. I believe you referenced. The first this was not in sixty eight Mexico impacts pictures that right. Yeah it it it was. I really when kind of you know. Strength and conditioning coach is on coach. Started wondering how are the athletes that were performing up? There now didn't do very well. You know at altitude but it was fun to come back down to sea level to started surpassing their personal best on. Dong drew the question. That was just something in this. In terms of altitude training so attitude training would be when did spends a period of time. Maybe a couple of weeks at an altitude of maybe two thousand meters terabytes and an order to expose the body hypotheses for the body to make adaptations including increase red blood cells For example the hormonal rich reporting or EPO. Epo when the body is put into a HYPOC STACE. The kidneys understood that liver to a lesser extent. Synthesized this hormone and a richer appointee in repeal. It's goes as a maturation of the red blood cells in the bone marrow. So by increasing red blood cells increases your oxygen carrying capacity and that in turn increases your view to Max now we do Brett toiling and we deliberately put the body into a high poxy state. But it's intermittent and it's not just that we're dropping blood oxygen saturation. But we're also increasing carbon dioxide. So what we would be doing is doing intermittent type pox ick high per capita training. And I think the biggest effect of what we're doing is instead it's disturbing the acid base balance that were increasing hygiene in the blood and were deliberately putting the body into a state of acidosis to force the body to improve buffering capacity which is probably happening inside in the muscle but this intern then can delay lactic acid fatigue. So if you think about the two are doing high intensity and for training to stimulate ANAEROBIC glycolysis. Well if you're wearing a potok similar which is a little device that you wear in your finger you know. And it's got a red light and infrared lightness and it tells you of all your hemoglobin. How much of it is occupied by oxygen? If you do high intensity interval training with your mouth open your blood oxygen saturation. Were drop down to about ninety three percent. If you do it with your Mac.

physical exercise nose breathing mouth breathing Brett obesity Darren metabolic syndrome Sokoll Ron Utah Mike apnea Google Stanford Medical School Alison Saturation Dr John Doe Yard Stace
"stanford medical school" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

01:52 min | 6 months ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

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"stanford medical school" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

01:39 min | 6 months ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"Their care and with their providers. in more informative ways those issues that come together to create an environment which technology has not had the same sort of transformative effects that it's had in virtually every aspect of our lives. You know other than healthcare for example today the way you and I or the goods and services waypoint thin- financial transactions. That's radically different than it was a decade ago yet today most of us still pick up the phone and place a call to an office of the doctor or other health care provider for make an appointment and we still bring paper records with us or we have the facts to the doctor's office in advance we haven't seen that same sort of disruption occurred in every other sector of the economy. It does seem though I mean I. It seems like every day. I'm doing another story about a a a new health tech startup or somebody that's raised around or whatever and in the book actually you you have the actual data you pointed out then in two thousand eighteen eight point. One Billion Dollars was invested in digital health startups. That's up from the five point. Seven billion the year before and up from just one point one billion about a decade ago. I'm curious What do you think is changed? That has suddenly made healthcare a fertile ground for investment and new companies. I think several things have changed. What is that was soon? Some really bright energetic entrepreneurs.

"stanford medical school" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

05:55 min | 6 months ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on Here & Now

"Will that little marker Parker on the old mercury thermometer says it all ninety eight point six except that nearly one hundred seventy years after that was determined to be the norm. Scientists say it's lower lower. Now we know our bodies our little engines with cells turning food into energy creating heat and temperature. But what does it mean that it's lower. The new study from researchers occurs at Stanford Medical School is called decreasing human body temperature in the United States since the industrial revolution researcher. Catherine lay joins us now and debt-related. What's the new finding ninety eight point six two high and we think that the average normal human body temperature is closer to ninety seven point five but let's back up? How did we determine that the temperature for a well-functioning engine should be ninety eight point six? That was determined in eighteen. Fifty one a German physician position called Carl Wunderlich measured millions of temperature measurements from twenty-five thousand patients. And that's how he came up with ninety eight point point six so that population in an era where people were really quite different. That was a lot of infection in the population like tobacco. Syphilis listen syphilis and Perry Dot Davis Lots of chronic inflammation That may well have we think influence the normal body temperature of that era meaning meaning what people were having to fight off more infections. They might have just run a little hotter. Yes well we know that since then. Our standard of living has increased dramatically medically economic development changes in hygiene. We've taken all sorts of infections away. Yeah well and we've also made it these year for us to fight them. We have heating. We have air conditioning. The body doesn't have to do as much. That's absolutely right. We know that we spend a lot of time trying to keep our core temperature temperature the same in extremes of heat and cold and in the eighteen fifty s the houses were rarely heated by the nineteen twenties. We had had lots of Heating and then we've had cooling coming through and more recently so the amount of time that our buddies have to spend outside of a pretty narrow band where we don't have to use energy to stay at the right temperature has increased a lot. Well in continuing with your research. What data did you look at to come to the conclusion that it's it's our average temperatures lower? We had readings from the pension records of civil war veterans starting in the eighteen sixties all the way through one thousand nine hundred forty. We looked at a data collected by the CDC in the early Seventies. And then we had data here from Stanford from the two thousand seven to two thousand seventeen and overall we found that the temperatures of the civil war veterans higher than the measurements taken from the nineteen seventies an intern. Those measurements were higher than those collected. In the two thousand and two things were really striking one the amount of change across that time period and the fact that the temperature is has continues continues to decline at the same rate across that time period. Talk about the role of Anti inflammatories. In maybe reducing our temperatures so their our goal is to reduce inflammation so we have aspirin and Stanton's and non-steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs and decreasing inflammation is associated with reducing temperature richer and these are drugs like ibuprofen generic form of advil. Motrin does this mean that overall because our temperatures are a little bit lower we you're healthier. We believe that that's the case. We don't know that body temperature really matters as a measure of wellness on an individual level. We don't even know. Oh what average temperature means for a population We do not for example that temperature on average is higher in women than in men that older people are cooler than younger people that temperature increases with your weight and that does a huge variation across the day right. It's interesting interesting because I've always had a lower temperature so I've always known that if I am up at ninety eight point six I might have a slight fever. So that's true right. I mean everybody. Nobody has to know what their baseline is on. That's that's exactly right. If you're an elderly person making morning visit to a doctor's office complaining of illness with a temperature of ninety eight point six then we really have to think what that means. It's not normal for an elderly person to have that temperature so early in in the day and so we really should start thinking about normal temperature on an individual level based on age and sex time day height weight. Yeah well and because we read that in early in the morning we haven't warmed up yet so all of our temperatures are a little bit lower. It's really fascinating. Kids are GonNa have a field day with this announcing to say you don't have a fever or go to school really I do. Because they have lower temperature I think that's That's some of the work that needs to be done right. Actually generating adding the values for normal temperatures for our individual age and sex height weight time of Day That Stanford Researcher Catherine Lay one of the authors of a new study showing the average human temperature the norm as it was called no longer ninety eight point six. It's been falling since the industrial revolution. And right now it is drum roll. Ninety seven point five. Kathryn thanks so much UH and Tanya. I had my temperature taken recently with one of those fancy doctors things and it was ninety six degrees. I'm so glad to hear you know like I'm not dead. That's right just know your baseline that's the important takeaway. This is going to work into all the arguments over the The the Thermostat in offices production of N Vr. I'm Robin.

Catherine Lay researcher Syphilis Stanford Medical School United States Parker Stanford Carl Wunderlich N Vr Perry Dot Davis Kathryn CDC fever aspirin intern Stanton ibuprofen advil
"stanford medical school" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:04 min | 8 months ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Into the third year how Stanford Medical School assistant professor Mayer Rosten Slater is co author of the study for students who are exposed to these events that are not even directly hurt in a physical way these shootings have the long term mental health impact and that's just looking at the impact for kids who are getting treatment I think it'd be really important to study the effects of these shootings looking at self medication via illicit drug use suicides and other risky behaviors and the educational trajectories for these youngsters later in life Rebecca chorale KCBS a new poll by the institute on taxation and economic policy discovered that ninety one of the fortune five hundred companies paid no federal income tax what so ever in twenty eighteen SF gate reports three of them are bay area companies Levi Strauss chevron and sales force some companies even GA refunds the report study that the effects of the first year of the trump tax cut was highly successful for the firms but not so much for the country is the federal deficit ballooned to nearly one trillion dollars according to the report if the a ninety one companies that paid nothing had contributed something that the it could have generated as much as seventy four billion dollars in revenue vote visa is now warning Californians about the growing scandal taking place the gas pumps the stealing of our personal information here's KCBS is Jim Taylor first we're talking about those old school mag stripe credit cards the ones without a chip and pin no surprise say the experts at a technology that's basically the same as a cassette tape will be open the half niece's says cyber crime groups are actively exporting a weakness in gas station point of sale networks to steal credit card data bases for destruction teams investigating several incidents in which a hacking group has been the floating gas station operators and maybe you unless you pay cash for graduate to a chip and.

Mayer Rosten Slater Jim Taylor Stanford Medical School assistant professor KCBS Levi Strauss
"stanford medical school" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks for having me pre right off the bat. Let me just ask you this. How disappointed where you're South Asian parents that you do not become a doctor? It's it's it's actually a bit of a sore point. My mom will we made a couple of medical videos, and actually we had partnered with Stanford medical school to do them. I'm forty three. Now. This was I was probably this is when Khan Academy had already become a real thing. I I must have been about thirty six thirty seven when my mom found out about those videos. She literally asked me whether I could now get a little credit for Mets faster. Did you make joking? Did you make? I know when we talk about our parents were never joking. Did you do that in part to appease them in part? Maybe. Did nothing it just it. Just amplified the disappointment. How'd you how'd you pick the name? So so interesting the name Khan Academy. How did you? How did you come up with that? You know, hey, I'm actually quite sensitive about that. Because I fun of I used to make fun of people who would name things after themselves. I thought it was a very narcissistic thing to do. But in the early days of Khan Academy before it was even called kind of kademi when I was working with family members. I was writing software for them. And I wanted to call it something this was before I'd even made YouTube videos, and a lot of domain names were already taken up, and the one thing that was available was was kinda kademi. And the reason why I picked academy. I was almost a joke. It was me. And my family members my last name, and then my the kademi I thought it would be nice if it had an air of being something that could turn into an institution, and that's something that eventually I I do want it to turn into another dimension of it, even when we incorporated as a nonprofit that actually was a reason in a pseudo strategic way while so wanted Convair because an for profit. I don't own any shares. There's no formal. Lover of control. But I thought, hey, you know, at least if my name's on it. They would only fire me in an extreme circumstance that would have to find another con or they would have to change the name. Although, you know, pecan academies. It sounds cool and it works if your name if I'd done this. I'm not sure Berar academy would have worked. It's too many syllables. I think he's got a ring to it. But if you had if you had a podcast, you might call it. Stay tuned with pre. So I put my name in it also. So I so I also can't be judgment. So a lot of people may not be familiar with the amazing story of how Khan Academy started. So you disappointed your parents by not going to medical school? Maybe made them feel a little bit better by going to a hedge fund, and you're a hedge fund guy and explain what happened. Yeah. My real training and background was in tech..

Khan Academy Berar academy Mets Stanford medical school YouTube Convair
"stanford medical school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:55 min | 1 year ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Change your white coat for green. Yeah. So for most of my adult life, I was worked as a basic research. Scientists microbiologists. I was at Stanford medical school for about twenty five years as a professor and. And love their job and had zero interest in. Business and. Very little interest in food. I mean, I I like to eat food. But I don't think of it when I think about it when I'm not eating it, certainly don't photograph. It. So so this was a very unlikely place for me to wind up, but I had a sabbatical. Little over eight years ago. They gave me time to sort of step back from what I was doing which was basic molecular cell, biology, and genomics and cancer research and stuff like that. And and try to think of what's the most important thing. I can do given the things I'm capable capable of doing which is limited set of things. How can I have the highest positive impact on the planet? And I very quickly realized that it was a no brainer that that the use of animals is the technology for producing food is by such a humongous margin. Nothing comes close the most destructive technology on earth, and it's not just climate change, which a lot of people know about it's not just that. It's incredibly water inefficient, probably the most destructive aspect of it is that. Right now, it occupies about fifty percent of earth's land area either grazing or feed crops cows outweigh every wild animal every wild vertebrate left on earth by a factor of ten and the total number of living wild animals on earth. According to the World Wildlife on has dropped by half in the past forty years. There's half as many wild animals on earth today, and that's pretty much across the board. Mammals birds reptiles amphibians, and it's almost entirely, dude. Our use of animals is food on land. It's habitat destruction degradation by the massive land footprint and also. Resource intensiveness of of meat production in in the oceans and rivers and lakes. It's overfishing so animals, the food technology. Nothing comes close in terms of destructiveness. And what I realized was you're not going to solve the problem by telling people to change their diets just give up on that. It's just too hard even for people who know the problem and care about it to make that jump and that basically meant that you have to solve the problem without requiring people to change their diets and the only way to do it is to beat the incumbent industry in the market develop a better technology, that's much more sustainable, but it has to also produce more delicious more nutritious more affordable food because that's how you went in the market. And I was sure that that was doable. Though. I didn't know how to do it at the time. But I felt like it. Nobody else has really trying. And so I would just go on and on it and. Founded this company and started putting together the just by far the best team ever to work on food and studying meet as if it were a disease. I mean, just the way that we would study cancer in my old lab trying to understand the fundamental mechanisms that underlie the flavors textures inducing us and biochemical terms. So that once we understand the mechanisms we can find plant derived proteins that are more sustainable, and that have the same salient properties and make a product that outperforms meet in the ways that consumers care about. So you want to compete on performance not on virtue. You're not after those the Berkeley vegans who right, okay? And so curling Jong you write about food flavors the industry, get let's get your take on these this array of these companies and where they are. There's other companies out there that are trying to have different types of replace shrimp. Or there's other things let's get your take on the landscape that you cover this from a food lover perspective. I think it's a very exciting time because we have all these options now are harnessing the brain power and the technology of Silicon Valley, which is coming up with all kinds of incredible things we never would have imagined ten years ago twenty years ago, maybe five years ago. So the things that Pat and Mike or both creating are really exciting. And I think they're creating a buzz especially in the bay area. Everybody is so interested in the latest greatest newest hottest thing, they want to be the first to try it. And I know when the impossible burger. Versus came on the scene. There was just so much interest in it, especially because spore hearing that oh my God, it bleeds, and it has the texture of a burger and people can't really tell the difference. And I think that got a lot of people interested in it not just vegetarians, but people who are diehard carnivores. I mean, I as a writer who writes about food and just someone who loves to eat. I'm very intrigued by it. And also, I kind of am interested in what the future holds beyond that what else is going to come up with. This is the price point on these things going to be such that everybody can afford it. Because I think that's always a knock against things like this and even organics there's only a certain population they can actually afford this. And they're frankly, the ones who probably don't really need it. So how does that all play out? Let's talk about price because I think it's fair to say, you have sort of the tesla model you sorta starting high and some fancy restaurants, and as you scale the price will come down. We're on that path to getting to kind of an affordable picking something that's luxury but making a more affordable. Well, I'll tell you. We're we're. Very far along on the path farther than I thought we'd be at this point. Without getting into the precise economics what I can say is that. You know, we have our burger is sold as a two arms cheeseburger at white castle. And it's doing really well. The more important point is that the fundamental economics of the way that we produce it because basically resource expensive nece translates into. Fundamental he more expense. We less land less water less fertilizer, less of all the inputs that going into the animal based system and so- asymptotically. There's no question we win. And we think probably, of course, you don't know how long it'll take until you've done it. But I'd say within the next few years with a very high degree of confidence that we will have a product that costs less to produce than any ground beef or any from a cow, and then we can make it affordable to people who can't afford it. And that is a big part of our mission. Is you know, it's not just the original impetus for me is this is the absolute most urgent and dangerous environmental problem in the world right now. But it's also a big cause of food insecurity, particularly protein in iron malnutrition the expensive producing. And so that's something we want to address as well. Mike, southern how about cost is this going to be an elite sort of coastal fancy sushi place kind of thing for for finless foods and also the life cycle analysis. Have you done an analysis to say that you're, you know, tuna from a lab, the environmental impact overall versus one that comes from the interior of being a luxury coastal thing. I really hope not that would really be a bummer and sort of not what we're trying to do. That said, even if all we managed to do is to create a luxury product from this. We actually are making a large difference. They can go into how will drop the cost in a second. But I just want to hit that point at first because. People don't realize what an impact the like, basically luxury market has on the world. I mean, the top ten percent of people economically are the ones creating or fifty percent of the greenhouse gas emissions in terms of their lifestyle. And this is extremely in effect in a place like San Francisco where we are now. So we're producing as bluefin tuna, even if the only people who ever end up eating this the San Franciscans who eat tuna right now, we get a lot of our bluefin tuna from countries like the Philippines, which no longer can afford to fish their own waters because we're buying it out from underneath them. So even if all we do our switch people in luxury markets over to something like this. It actually does make a difference. That said we are trying to drop our cost all the way down to commodity good. We're trying to actually bring this down. So that everyone can afford it and bluefin tuna still makes sense for us. Because since we're working with sells, it doesn't matter if we're working with a really really cheap fish like aura bluefin tuna. It's all the same price to us. So we figured we might as well work with something that is. Luxury anyways in a touch our brand to it. It's funny that you said, you know, patent impossible foods are using the tesla model because we say we are using the impossible foods model. And we tell it to people all the time. So it's really funny to hear it trickled down the stage. But yeah, I mean, we really need to make sure that this is seen as something that is desirable. And tesla impossible foods has done a really good job of that have taken something that before was seen as, you know, not great like an electric car or a veggie burger and making it something so much more because you're selling it as a luxury good, and as something that is good on its own not even for its environmental benefits because if people were buying things based on their environmental benefits like we're talking about just go vegan. But that's not happening. And so we need to like show people that these things can be delicious can be good for you can be interesting to eat create that experience. And then as possible foods has done dropped the price to the point where you can actually create a commodity good that can be sold to white castle. If you're just joining us, we're talking about food innovation with Pat Brown, founder CEO of impossible foods. Caroline, John author of the food gal blog and Mike Selden co-founder of finless foods. I'm Greg Dalton. There are critics of these new kinds of proteins out there. We don't have any of them. On the program. We did interview. Mike Hansen was a senior scientist with consumer union. And he has concerns about this new generation of proteins. Where the new issues get raised.

tesla white castle Pat Brown Mike cancer Stanford medical school World Wildlife professor Mike Hansen San Franciscans San Francisco Jong Greg Dalton Berkeley writer Mike Selden scientist
"stanford medical school" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"We're individuals. And yes, you know. It's a horrible thing. Don't think people people who are racist horrible. But you can't let your way. Right. And the overcoming of it is character-building. I, you know, my my son in law is a Jamaican American. My daughter met him at Harvard. No, actually, my son met him at Harvard. And then my daughter met him at Stanford medical school where they both went to medical school. And she will tell you that he worked twice as hard and twice as long as everybody else. Not because he needed to to keep up. But because he's brilliant, and he he deserved to be in those schools competing with everyone else equally. Nobody should come along anytime in question academic credentials NC that was exactly where I was going when he came time for his internship. All of a sudden, he said doors were being sprung open that everybody else was having trouble getting to and he you know, he said I refuse to be used in that manner. I will earn my place and whatever hospital, and by the way, he earned, of course, top fellowships and everything else on his merit. But but he said it's insane. The kind of special access that was given to other students. They went to school with who really had lackluster scholastic records. Yeah. I mean, it's one of the reasons why racial preferences, keeps coming back to the court is society, by the way, this is an eighty twenty. A very big poll last week. Which showed this is an issue which American public is invited eighty twenty eighty percent of the people think that. Support it. So this is this is a clear a clear majority here against.

Stanford medical school Harvard eighty twenty eighty percent
"stanford medical school" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"And so so there's some of these are just sort of bad habits to get picked up. Again, not deliberate is just kind of the momentum of the field. I think also a lot of this is driven by individuals, young scientists who are trying to make a Mark, a lot of the research that go. That takes places actually done in the hands of a post doctoral scientists. Somebody who's gotten their PHD in his trying to build a career in science. That's a tough road because, oh. Probably about twelve percent of these people in who get these post doc will actually end up on a tenure track job, which is kind of what everybody wants. So it's a, it's a very cutthroat world and even highly talented scientists don't make the cut and and so it sort of comes down to you have a few years in somebody's laboratory, and you've got to get fabulous results, or your career is going to take a very sharp turn. And so that kind of incentive is just is just baked into the process. And it's not that someone says, well, I'm just going to do whatever it takes, but people start seeing what they want to see in their experimental results as opposed to sort of stepping back and and maybe being a little bit more skeptical or so on. And you know, I'm certainly not an expert in laboratory techniques. I'm not going to go out there and say that people are just using, you know, terrible laboratory technique, but I think that it is the case that scientists aren't necessarily thinking through these things as carefully as they can because the incentives are not there for them to do that. This is one of those incredibly thorny subjects and Akkad. -demia thinking through the incentive models for scientists because it pokes at training and tenure and money, and it and status. And so it's deeply intertwined with with history and some external pressures that the university faces. And I, I think one of the things like after working at a university for for decades is that most universities that I've seen are small c, conservative in a lot of nature's, they, they usually don't change big structure elements like this quickly. Is that your survey shin and reporting on this book as well? And do you see hope for change around any of these incentives? Both. I agree with you that universities tend to be very conservative and you know, universities really want their scientists to go out and bring home the federal research dollars. So whatever works if they're researchers are bringing in the dollars, that is how they measure success. Even if the studies that they're producing what those dollars. Turn out not to be that helpful in the long run. So so the incentives for the universities are also a little bit askew, but there is hope in an actually I, I am seeing some changes as a result of this of this sort of soul-searching. One great example is I was talking to Steve Goodman who's at the Stanford University medical school, and he was talking about the fact that he'd been asked to write a letter of recommendation for somebody who is up for tenure, and he started doing the usual thing which was reviewing a bunch of their. Journal articles and talking about how many things hit pub. This person had published and so on and doing sort of the quantitative stuff. And his letter was kicked back and they said, Dr. Goodman, what we really want you to do is focus on, you know, get away from all this quantitative stuff, which is unfortunately far too often how scientists get picked for tenure or whatever. And you know, tell us if this person is doing good science and you know, let's get, let's get beyond the sort of, you know how many papers did they publish in science nature and sell because we're de emphasizing that at the Stanford medical school and and Dr Goodman was thrilled to hear that that his own institution was was starting to change its culture about how it thought about this stuff..

Steve Goodman Stanford medical school Akkad. -demia twelve percent
"stanford medical school" Discussed on Throwing Shade

Throwing Shade

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on Throwing Shade

"Per visit creating scheduling days and putting them an hour or more behind their male male colleagues by the end of the day. So so the have longer days we as they're doing their jobs better. Exactly. There's another over there was another thing and you hear about interrupting. It was this isn't. Nothing's gonna be fucking shocking. So Dr Don bar who is a professor at Stanford medical school said that he often talks to students about research into gender differences. How doctors communicate male doctors, he said, are more notorious for interrupting patients in an effort to refocus the discussion. And then he said that female primary care physicians waited an average of three minutes before interrupting a patient. Male doctors waited forty, seven seconds. Ridiculous forty-seven. That's not even hi. How are you? That's barely anything much less like, how are you feeling? It takes at least forty seven seconds to answer that question. What else are you doing? That's your job that is your job? Well, I mean, a lot of them probably are. I'm sure every doctor is with the private practice is extremely overworked. There is something there. Oh, absence also like at another, I don't know at an hour to your day, seed fewer people I'd on now, but like you can't just assume that you know about someone's body better than the person who lives in that body I well, the other thing is is like, okay, if you don't feel like you have time to do this for your patient, here's a woman doing that. Yeah, or give them a Tony Robbins DVD and show him how done and DVD player because I don't think very many people have those anymore. No, I don't think anybody does no found one that you put into that. You could plug into a laptop and I don't even have the the, the hose for it. I know. Me neither, but I'll tell you what I do have the holes for dick. Dick falcon. I really convoluted was saying about Tony Robbins, but I was just saying, I think guys in a position of power are often like no interrupting better because they don't know what they're they really feel and so or or is happening. So I have to do that for them. I don't know if you had like a guru type like Tony Robbins that was a woman Oprah over do that. She doesn't. She doesn't. She doesn't pretend to be a doctor. The great example, Oprah is patient and sits people, and I think she gets the same result. So yes, she tries to get to the bottom of a problem by I, it's almost like talk therapy, but she's certainly not prescribing solutions, no saying really effective things like, you know, if he hits you once he'll do it again. That's where I think she really tries to get through to women that way. I agree. And that's, that's, that's a great example. Anyway, this is all very sad and will my so my acupuncturist was like, you know her. Her boyfriend has had some like so medical stuff that he's been dealing with. With. And she said that he after the last male doctor that he saw, he's like I'm only saying female doctors because they're doing a better job and they're listening to me like he didn't even realize what a problem it was until he saw the difference between and that's the other thing. What if you live in a place where there's only guide doctors, you don't really have a choice. So it's up to. It's not just up to people to be like we have to encourage women to go into the medical field, make sure that they haven't even even playing field, but we also need to make sure that male doctors are aware that they do this stuff and they need to fix it or what you can watch my grades anatomy..

Tony Robbins Dick falcon Oprah Dr Don bar Tony Robbins DVD Stanford medical school private practice professor forty seven seconds seven seconds three minutes
Editor, America and San Francisco discussed on KCBS Radio Overnight News

KCBS Radio Overnight News

02:40 min | 2 years ago

Editor, America and San Francisco discussed on KCBS Radio Overnight News

"At the editor's desk america's doctors are burnt out and that could be dangerous for all of us kcbs as rebecca corral reports on a new study involving thousands of doctors more than half of the six thousand seven hundred doctors researchers polled at clinics and hospitals all over the country reported feeling burned out on the job and the study's lead author stanford medical schools dr daniel tafiq says burnout can lead to errors mistakes every year there are hundreds of thousands of medical errors that occur what we found was up to ten percent of the that were reported either resulted in a patient dying or major permanent effects tallec says it's not a coincidence that the burn outweight rose from forty five to fifty four percent between twenty eleven in two thousand fourteen that's when dr saw their load of paperwork increased steadily we think i'll have to do with that one of the key drivers of burnout is that concept of finding meaning in your work really seems to be a big project her against out and the more paperwork that physicians are doing they feel like it's not actually contributing to patient care doctors who admitted to job burnout described being emotionally exhausted and feeling cynical many say they've considered leaving the practice rebecca chorale kcbs a federal judge in san francisco says evidence seems week that roundup weed killer causes cancer as claimed it by venetia man with cancer but ruled that experts can still make that claim at trial the ruling today by us district judge vince allows hundreds of lawsuits against her roundups manufacturer monsanto to move forward their lawsuits by cancer victims and their families say the agrochemical giant long knew about roundups cancer risk but failed to warn them government regulators have rejected a link between the active ingredients around and cancer monsanto has also vehemently denied such a connection well it was just one day the fourth of july that's prompting the red cross to issue an emergency call for blood donors kcbs reporter holly explains how the mid week holiday has caused a nationwide shortage retired oakland history teacher steven johnson is a regular donor i know there's a need so but he doesn't have a lot of company these days right now we are looking at our donor center and unfortunately we are looking at a lot of empty beds justin miller is regional manager for donor recruitment goes the fourth of july we had about five hundred fifty zero blood drives and then we typically santa regular week which results in about fifteen thousand fewer donations that's nationwide nationwide correct which is why they're urging people to spare an hour to give at your local bank summers already a tough time since twenty percent of the.

Editor America San Francisco Monsanto Justin Miller Regional Manager Rebecca Corral Dr Daniel Tafiq Vince Reporter Holly Oakland Steven Johnson Fifty Four Percent Twenty Percent Ten Percent One Day
"stanford medical school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And consultants who raised serious concerns right because for for years they were essentially research and development but then they approached walgreens in it enters a new a new sphere but there were scientists and consultants who raised concerns chicago where where walgreens is headquartered and he started you know asking uncomfortable questions and suggesting that they do a comparison study with stanford which elizabeth refused to do he suggested that his firm collaborate in bed someone at theranos in palo alto for period leading up to the to the pilot going live elizabeth also turned him down on that score the first visit was an august two thousand ten that he made to to their offices in palo alto and one of the things that he was explicitly scheduled to do there was to visit the lab which elizabeth had represented the theranos was commercially ready and and he asked about seeing the lab several times while he was there but she she said that in the end she wasn't ready to show it to them he had also asked that his blood and walgreens executives blood be tested with theranos system that they get their results back and then he was going to go with the walgreens executives to stanford medical school and get retested and compare the results and they wouldn't test their blood either and instead of doing that they took the walgreens executives and hunter to a a sushi place in palo alto and and sort of had this cloak and dagger approach where they may everyone leave their their nose offices at staggered intervals and then once they got to this restaurant in the middle of the afternoon no one could use names and it was supposedly not to attract the attention but meanwhile no one was in the restaurant and sunny elizabeth's boyfriend had brought his lamborghini so if there's anything that was conflictwracked attention it was his lamb very inconspicuous in the parking lot and and hunter was immediately on his guards he thought this stuff was silly and he smelled a rat and he tried to alert walgreens executives to suspicions and amazingly the walgreens executives brushed him brushed him off and the reason they did so after a while is that elizabeth and sunny asked that hunter be excluded from the meetings and from these video conference calls they had remarkable and the walgreens executives amazingly agreed to do.

walgreens chicago stanford palo alto elizabeth hunter stanford medical school
"stanford medical school" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"Talk about in the book interestingly enough and that book come we'll be an amazon in june it's it's it's almost ready but it's it's not out yet but the medical information bureau has information everybody on what they use their insurance for i'm not exactly sure that the medical information bureau i don't necessarily know that they're limited from sharing that kind of information i then there's the credit card companies right so if you go to and get a prescription and there's a way to identify it you know that's entirely possible that way but one thing i would say about facebook than i think is particularly interesting that has come out after the cambria analytics debacle that became known by everybody i don't know if everybody knows as much about the fact that facebook was working with stanford medical school as well as the academy of able to think about it but it is a heart it's a academy that has to do with cardiology and conditions that kademi has ten different databases facebook had approach them in order to get medical information from them so that they could match it up with user data facebook user data facebook put that on pause after they cambria scandal broke and but they only put it on pause they didn't shelve it and because of hip those entities stanford and and that database system they can share that information with facebook as a healthcare operation to try and figure out more information about their own patients so.

amazon facebook stanford medical school cambria analytics cambria stanford
"stanford medical school" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"Talk about the interestingly enough and that become that will be an amazon in june almost ready but it's not yet yet but the amendment information bureau has information everybody on what they use their insurance for sure the medical information bureau like necessarily know their fare limited from sharing that kind of information i then there's the credit card companies right so if you go to and get a prescription rates identify that way but one thing i would say about facebook that i think is particularly interesting that has come out after the cambria debacle became known by everybody i don't know if everybody knows as much about the fact that facebook was working with stanford medical school as well as the me able to think about it but it is hard cardiology conditions academy has ten different database spokane approached them yup information from them so they could match it up user data piece of user data base for that after cambria handle broke and but they only put it on it didn't show for database can share that information healthcare operation trying to figure out more information about their own patients so they know contract no data use agreement according to news report i don't know if facebook will continue to person so have this could work down the road near you have you come in with a heart condition or pipeline pressure scroll through your facebook find it you're doing you have habits that are exacerbating your medical condition what i mean i just think of all the horrible things that can happen they can pull your insurance because you're not compliant i don't know it just it's not there's no safe harbor anyways it's very good i have a quote in the book ud faulkner who is the ceo and founder healthcare information in their system about sixty eight percent of the american population though most americans have been to some hospital that has an epic system so not all the medical records every ethics but some portion of them are in september of twenty twenty seventeen i think the user's group which are people who the epic record come to this conference because they use the epic records and said something on the order of i m paraphrasing but.

amazon facebook stanford medical school spokane cambria ceo and founder sixty eight percent
"stanford medical school" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on KGO 810

"So elizabeth holmes was a stanford student she dropped out of stanford because she had this great idea based on her own experience according to the narrative the story that she tells she was afraid of neto for she's a known liars we have to take this all with a grain of salt but go on well the story is what's important to get investors to invest so you know the savvy ones they start developing story early on and her story was that she was afraid of needles she had started looking at and taking some courses at stanford and sort of doing her own independent study to figure out a way to draw blood or at least be able to test blood for various things only using a couple of droplets and that was the pitch it would if it was real be revolutionary because it would not only reduce costs but obviously make it really ee much more comfortable and much less painful for people like you know elderly or peep cancer patients for kids children be a game changer for kids well and listen i don't have any particular fear of needles and no more fond of them than anybody else but if somebody says to me oh by the way there's a method to do this that doesn't involve sticking the needle in your vein i'd say yes please everybody would don't even say that anyway what happens next so she got a lot of people at stanford interested and stanford of course it's the hotbed of start up venture capital activity there's always people there who are willing to support mentor in bass there's lots of infrastructure to support people like her but she dropped out and she immediately attracted some very high powered people to invest in her firm you know she ended up with some stellar people like george salts the former secretary of state and some of his colleagues at the hoover institution people from the stanford medical school and one particular guy tim draper from a vc firm called draper fischer interprets and who invested not as like a formal venture capitalists but as a friend.

elizabeth holmes stanford stanford medical school tim draper neto george hoover institution draper fischer
"stanford medical school" Discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on The Interchange

"And so that was the that the steady the results and we were we were asked by the head of the california senate to to testify on a bill that he wanted to introduce that would make gas price posting mandatory and so we did that and it passed and of course now you take it for granted that as all gas prices are posted but that that was an early success it was something that gave me confidence that policy could be used for for a good purpose and it and it also gave me a me at foreshadowed something that i would do uh over and over my career so the work he did as a student is why we have gas prices posted today well you know it takes a team that doubt we started it yeah and i mean was i was a surprise one day that that that it was actually sadly it was george mosconi was the the who would become the mayor of san francisco and be assassinated but he was before that he was the head of this california senate he was the one that just took it interest in it i mean it's it's just a good story of how you you can with research and um kenner of tapping at something that people really care about you can make a difference and then tell us about the years after stanford what you do next has said the years after stamford i i worked at stanford medical school as a research associate writing a helping to write a book about.

california senate george mosconi san francisco stanford medical school research associate california one day
"stanford medical school" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"So this should be a fascinating show we're very fortunate to have him dr moses the phd he is the chief scientific officer of global alzheimer's platform a he worked at ally lilian company where he held several leadership positions including vice president of neuroscience early clinical development and a leader of the global alzheimer's drug development team from two thousand seventy two thousand twelve dr mode most received his ph d in psychology from stanford university and completed his postdoctoral training and pharmacology at stanford medical school before joining ally lilley well dr you're certainly qualified to talk about this cost of all your information i've seen a and i cannot tell you how much i appreciate your being here this is a um a significant issue in this country it looks almost like it's turning into an epidemic now in terms of the number of people that are affected by this so let's just start with your explaining what is alzheimer's people thank you carry amin alzheimer's disease is a disease of the brain it's a progressive condition in which neurons that is the cells that actually make the brain work they began to die for reasons that we don't fully understand we know that there's certain kinds of a abnormalities besides cell death that occur in the brain as as this disease starts you get these things called plaques their clumps of protein that shouldn't be there and it's we know what that protein is they usually form round the outside of brain cells the called amyloid plaques there's another feature called how tangles that's a different protein and it forms these kind of funny looking a spiral staircase like structures inside of brain cells and they're not supposed to be there either but the net result for patience is that they first of all they start to lose their ability to learn new things other memory goes bad they can't remember what the head for lunch yesterday or whatever as the disease progresses and more brain cells die.

chief scientific officer alzheimer development team stanford university stanford medical school lilley brain cells ally lilian company vice president of neuroscience postdoctoral alzheimer's disease
"stanford medical school" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"Time of play on a weekly basis worldwide seven billion hours okay so to my colleagues i would say rather than fight it fight this amazing phenomena joint in the sense the your expertise but this is serious your expertise in our expertise could help all the people in the audience and all the people that the will will interact with understand how to deal with it better rather than banning or i mean it's not going to go away it's just going to grow stronger so ladies and gentlemen i want you to vote yes for the motion i want you to say with us the video games will make a smarter but also that we need to be smarter about videogames thank you thank you actually hear making his closing statement against the motion elias abu shout a professor of psychiatry at stanford medical school best selling the games of 2016 had titles like grand theft ido final fantasy an infinite warfare it's hard to imagine how playing these games hours upon hours has raised our average iq on the other hand these games i think like the internet at large can nurture some rather negative personnel ataman elements aggression narcissism impulsively being some examples and for evidence on how online narcissism an impulsively can lead to offline narcissism and a possibility you can find examples from both sides of the aisle from the last election it's not possible to turn the clock back on technology this is not something that is feasible nor advisable yet some of us are trying to achieve some kind of balance between our online and offline lives but in trying to achieve that balance through faced by two formidable obstacles the first obstacle we can do nothing about and has to do with how our brains are wired and they're not wired mrs certainly in a way that makes us able to resist these technologies and to take them in small doses only but the other obstacle is huge industry interests than huge marketing campaigns are trying to convince as these technologies are actually making a smarter they're good for us we should embrace them even more i'd like to end by bring up a case of a patient i saw a couple of weeks ago or call him jeff a twenty one year old.

stanford medical school professor of psychiatry theft jeff seven billion hours twenty one year