19 Burst results for "Stanford Medical School"

"stanford medical school" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"The hour your home for original reporting. I'm Tom photo in Washington, even his covert 19 spikes again around the country and around the world. Vaccines are on the horizon off federal advisory group today starts planning how to distribute them once they get the OK. Then comes the transport issue. CBS News correspondent Kris Van Cleave US airlines will play a key role. United blew its first shipment of visors vaccine last week, but during his vaccine will be easier to move as it doesn't need to be stored at such a low temperature companies like FedEx will be part of the effort to quickly get the vials from central shipping hubs out to cities and states. Going to be hard Tonto. Imagine this going off without a hitch that there'll likely are unanticipated issues that are going to arise when you're shipping that many vaccine doses all around the country. Meantime, the president's most recent and much criticized top covert adviser whose expertise is not in infectious diseases, is leaving that post after Scott Atlas has been a close an influential adviser to the president, often creating controversy for his political rather than scientific comments about the pandemic, putting him at odds with Dr Fauci and Dr Burke. Spend the coronavirus task force. In an open letter, nearly 80 of his former Stanford Medical school colleagues denounced him for falsehoods. Atlas is no training on infectious diseases and started working for the administration after President Trump noticed him while making guest appearances on Fox News that is CBS News correspondent Lilia Luciano, turning to the presidential transition for president of like Biden a bit of a medical handy camp after a minor foot injury this weekend. And there are major economic appointments for the coming administration, most of them women. While there will be Republican opposition to some of Mr Biden's nominees, there's a key factor with potential confirmation fights. Which party.

president Scott Atlas CBS Mr Biden Dr Burke Lilia Luciano Washington FedEx Stanford Medical school Kris Van United Trump Fox News Dr Fauci
"stanford medical school" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Wait. All right, everybody. Dennis is Dennis. Want to hear the headline in The New York Times takes up the entire top of The New York Times. As of Tuesday, October 6th 2020 This Is it the headline. It's across the entire front page. Leaving hospital. Trump minimizes virus risk. More AIDS get sick as he undermines experts message. Course, the experts that they want to believe that the experts I read T last hour, which are up Quoting professors at Harvard Medical School. Stanford Medical School. You say it's time to get rid of this lock down just a suite that Sweden Sweden is just going along more and more normally. I call it the greatest mistake Robot mistaking history. It was I was Mark for Um, I I agree with the plaque. On whose? Ah who is it again? Lt's Lord Nelson, Admiral Nelson. Fear God fierce in and then fear nothing. We pretty much try to live by that. Wimps. Wimp and left are very much related. I know it sounds insulting and it is insulting and recommend deny it, but it's not meant to insult. It's meant to describe what has happened. We're no longer the land of the free and the home of the brave because of the left. Which believes neither in freedom nor bravery. The president's message was exactly the right when you can't be preoccupied. I haven't been preoccupied with it. I I have followed that. I have led With the exception of lecturing because that just simply dried up. With the exception of flying, which is a big exception. Obviously, I fly flew almost every week for the last 40 years. But the exception of that I have led a fully normal life. I've been with friends. Every weekend. Cough since the lock down since since March. That when it started march, 1st wondered about around that what we've generally dated On.

Admiral Nelson Dennis The New York Times Sweden Sweden Harvard Medical School Stanford Medical School Cough president
"stanford medical school" Discussed on Latina to Latina

Latina to Latina

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on Latina to Latina

"Yana. . Nino thought BS planned to spend the summer before her first year at Stanford Medical School doing contact tracing working retail. . But when her job search a dead end, , she went back to seasonal fruit picking work. . She's been doing since she was fourteen. . At the end of one long day she tweeted about farm workers like her being paid seven dollars for two gallons of blueberries. . She then asked how much do you pay for your blue various? ? I had talked to her I did and learn so much about her path to medicine as a first gen college student indigenous rights farm worker's Rights on. . We'll consumers need to know about the people who make their food possible. . Jeddah. . Where are you right now? ? I'm Linden from California Palo Alto our new you're back at school ivax going out here. . I always remember those summers during college going home in it's. . It's so strange because you have all this independence when you're at school and then you come home and your parents. . Treat, , you like you're still in high school, , right? ? Right and every time I go home. . It's just there's just a large expectation fairly for my mom is my own expectation that I should be like helping my mom in linked doing some chores and like lightening her load guy at school it's like you're right like complete freedom I do whatever I want whenever I want. . Do you perceive your mom to have a heavy load Yeah absolutely. . I think she's our only period and. . I think that you know we go to work and she has to come home and make them some meals for everyone. . There's five of us and she kind of like cleaned for Yooglie <unk> of she loves house being cleaned. So . I help out with all those things whenever I can. . To Lot Yeah You're born you're born in Eastern, , Oregon, , you grew up in eastern Washington state. . Told me about where you grew up. . So Eastern. . Washington is very different from Seattle. . I think that's why. . Like columnists conception that I. . Get is that the thing it's just like satellite super rainy it's actually not. . So eastern Washington Eastern Oregon both desert in the rain shadow of. . E mountain range. . So we get like very little rain, , it's very conservative. . There's very little diversity out there I think the main communities of color that live out there my farmer communities in the needle in communities I think it was a great place ago by the you grow up because it is so rural. . There's so much nature around there so much like the outdoor activities to do Saigo peron alarm really enjoyed around a lot of fields. . So my working in the field I love Eastern Oregon eastern Washington I would love to go back someday is that the plan to go back? ? Yeah. . Absolutely. . How old were you when you started working in the fields? ? I was fourteen years old. . What was your first day of work like? ? I. . Think I was super excited for my first year. . We're ten years ago. . And they all super excited because I would get to contribute. . Tie Household I, , think the causes for me was like, , okay I can use this money to go to my mom to make your life easier and then she would let me keep some of it so that I could spend it on what I wanted to nature's like take my siblings than I on a shopping spree for for school. . So he went to buy school supplies in. We . were very excited like Bonnie backpacks unlike brand name markers and stuff like that. . I have three younger siblings. . So they were all little and they were excited because we had never done that like I think I'll. . Getting. . The bare minimum that we need for school and now it's finally like being I was able to get them whatever they wanted. . Is there a story from childhood that captures who you were as a kid. . I think one story though <unk> remembering like me, , my mom and my sister was. . Going to do this activity called Battle of the books where there's a selection link. . Eight books that read it's handling a quiz bowl style where you just like recall parts of the book and I've always loved reading and so we were remembering that I read all the books like my sister was on my team even though she was two years younger than me in the elementary school and she was like, , yeah, , you just carry the team and you like because remembered everything and I think that that was super emblematic of just who I was of like my love for reading my. . Or. . Competitive data. . Just like a real enjoyment for school and like why The promise of my mom always wanted to go to school didn't get the chance to and so. . She was always telling me and my siblings like, , Oh, , you go to school a you do all in school. . It's GonNa take you to a Lotta places in. . So I guess those just carry me through life

Stanford Medical School Washington Oregon Yana. Nino Yooglie Eastern Jeddah California Palo Alto Saigo peron Bonnie Seattle
Why Gianna Nino-Tapias Embodies Labor Rights

Latina to Latina

04:48 min | 1 year ago

Why Gianna Nino-Tapias Embodies Labor Rights

"Yana. Nino thought BS planned to spend the summer before her first year at Stanford Medical School doing contact tracing working retail. But when her job search a dead end, she went back to seasonal fruit picking work. She's been doing since she was fourteen. At the end of one long day she tweeted about farm workers like her being paid seven dollars for two gallons of blueberries. She then asked how much do you pay for your blue various? I had talked to her I did and learn so much about her path to medicine as a first gen college student indigenous rights farm worker's Rights on. We'll consumers need to know about the people who make their food possible. Jeddah. Where are you right now? I'm Linden from California Palo Alto our new you're back at school ivax going out here. I always remember those summers during college going home in it's. It's so strange because you have all this independence when you're at school and then you come home and your parents. Treat, you like you're still in high school, right? Right and every time I go home. It's just there's just a large expectation fairly for my mom is my own expectation that I should be like helping my mom in linked doing some chores and like lightening her load guy at school it's like you're right like complete freedom I do whatever I want whenever I want. Do you perceive your mom to have a heavy load Yeah absolutely. I think she's our only period and. I think that you know we go to work and she has to come home and make them some meals for everyone. There's five of us and she kind of like cleaned for Yooglie of she loves house being cleaned. So I help out with all those things whenever I can. To Lot Yeah You're born you're born in Eastern, Oregon, you grew up in eastern Washington state. Told me about where you grew up. So Eastern. Washington is very different from Seattle. I think that's why. Like columnists conception that I. Get is that the thing it's just like satellite super rainy it's actually not. So eastern Washington Eastern Oregon both desert in the rain shadow of. E mountain range. So we get like very little rain, it's very conservative. There's very little diversity out there I think the main communities of color that live out there my farmer communities in the needle in communities I think it was a great place ago by the you grow up because it is so rural. There's so much nature around there so much like the outdoor activities to do Saigo peron alarm really enjoyed around a lot of fields. So my working in the field I love Eastern Oregon eastern Washington I would love to go back someday is that the plan to go back? Yeah. Absolutely. How old were you when you started working in the fields? I was fourteen years old. What was your first day of work like? I. Think I was super excited for my first year. We're ten years ago. And they all super excited because I would get to contribute. Tie Household I, think the causes for me was like, okay I can use this money to go to my mom to make your life easier and then she would let me keep some of it so that I could spend it on what I wanted to nature's like take my siblings than I on a shopping spree for for school. So he went to buy school supplies in. We were very excited like Bonnie backpacks unlike brand name markers and stuff like that. I have three younger siblings. So they were all little and they were excited because we had never done that like I think I'll. Getting. The bare minimum that we need for school and now it's finally like being I was able to get them whatever they wanted. Is there a story from childhood that captures who you were as a kid. I think one story though remembering like me, my mom and my sister was. Going to do this activity called Battle of the books where there's a selection link. Eight books that read it's handling a quiz bowl style where you just like recall parts of the book and I've always loved reading and so we were remembering that I read all the books like my sister was on my team even though she was two years younger than me in the elementary school and she was like, yeah, you just carry the team and you like because remembered everything and I think that that was super emblematic of just who I was of like my love for reading my. Or. Competitive data. Just like a real enjoyment for school and like why The promise of my mom always wanted to go to school didn't get the chance to and so. She was always telling me and my siblings like, Oh, you go to school a you do all in school. It's GonNa take you to a Lotta places in. So I guess those just carry me through life

Stanford Medical School Washington Oregon Yana. Nino Yooglie Eastern Jeddah Saigo Peron California Palo Alto Seattle Bonnie
Lori Gottlieb, psychotherapist and author: "The uncomfortable is a great place to be."

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:05 min | 1 year ago

Lori Gottlieb, psychotherapist and author: "The uncomfortable is a great place to be."

"Hey everyone the show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches. The scam is still working from home for the time being because of covid nineteen today Lori gottlieb joins us on skin from the couch. She is a psychotherapist and an author. She writes the Dr Therapist Column in the Atlantic and She's also the author of the bestselling novel maybe you should talk to someone which I read I loved and then recommended to every member of my family Lori. Thank you for joining US welcome to skin from the couch. Thanks so much for having me Lori we're very excited I. Feel like we're about to have therapy. We're going start though putting you on the on the hot feet, which just can you skim your resume for us? Yeah. Sure. After graduating from college I worked in the entertainment business. I. I worked on the film side and then I moved over to NBC, and you're I there to. You May for premiering when was called Er and the other was called breads heard of them. When I was working on Er, we had a consultant who is an emergency room physician at and he would do research with us and help us to choreograph the scenes and make sure that everything's accurate and I spent a lot of time in the ER, and he said to me I, think you like it better here than you like your day job because I was spending a lot of time in the ER and and I was like I'm lacking to go to medical school. Like I like in my late twenties late that I went to medical school. So went to Stanford I went to medical school when I got there, it was the middle of the DOT com the first sort of DOT com bill before i. And a lot of people were saying you know managed care it was coming into the healthcare system and would be able to do the kinds of work that I wanted to do with my patients. I worked at a DOT COM for a little bit in the summer between first year second year of medical school and ultimately assert writing and I left to become a journalist and. I felt like as a journalist I could really help to tell people stories the way that I wanted to, and it was about ten years later after being a journalist for wile still a journalist but I had a baby and I was desperate for adult interaction and ups guy would come ons I would lose him in conversation at he hated that nearly describing me in corn to. Like that and so he would always try to avoid the at eventually start telling to my door putting the APP just down very gently. So I would not open the door, engage him in conversation, and so I called Dean at Stanford and I said, maybe I should come back Andrew Psychiatry and she said, you know you always wanted these deeper interactions with people welcome to come back. But if you do psychiatry probably doing a lot of medication management, it's not what you WANNA do. Why don't you get a graduate degree in clinical psychology and do the work want to do it was really this is a moment it sounds obvious. In, retrospect which I think a lot of career things do where you know something that is right in front of you you had thought of, and so I did that and I, have this hybrid career where I'm a psychotherapist I have clinical practice here Los Angeles I'm still a writer I write books I writes the weekly called the Atlantic Avenue podcast coming out therapy. So I see like what I do is I look at story of the human condition and I just express it different means what something that is not on your Lincoln profiler bio that people would be surprised to know about you maybe that I was competitive chess player. You have another fallback career. I. Wasn't good never for career but I was really serious about it and I think I use that a lot in my career. So I think with chests there's a lot of strategy. There's a lot of anticipating the consequences of your moves and you can't plan everything out but I think that people look at my career they think I made these very impulsive decisions like you're working in Hollywood and boom you're going to go to medical school you're working on e. r. and then boom you want to. Tell stories in different ways to you're GonNa go Ri- and then you're GonNa go the therapist and you go from telling people stories, changing people's stories, right? All of that is true but I think I very much ought ahead about why was I doing reflecting on why was doing so many people said to me you are crazy. You don't leave medical school when you get into Stanford Medical School right? You don't leave Hollywood when you're at NBC and you have this job you're successful journalists would you mean you're going to go back and do therapy and why would you leave? And so I think it's really about I. Think in chests you have to kind of really be reflected about what you're doing. When I think about being reflective as an adult I think that means being reflective and going inside to that place of knowing and not listening to all the noise out there that the reflection is an inside job and not an outside job.

Lori Gottlieb Dot Com Stanford Medical School NBC Stanford United States Dr Therapist Column Hollywood Atlantic DOT Wile Consultant Andrew Psychiatry RI Los Angeles Lincoln Chess Writer
"stanford medical school" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on KOMO

"Today tomorrow highs of about 75 today 80 tomorrow, not beds on Thursday. A little shower activity Friday before we get back to sunshine for the weekend right now. Downtown Seattle Plenty of sunshine going time. 63 at 9 26 Well, the virus cases are spiking in the US The death toll is mounting. President Trump appears to be working to undercut its most trusted Corona virus expert will have a very good relationship with Dr Fancy I've had for A long time right From the beginning. I find to be a very nice person. I don't always agree with him, but the president recently made it clear he's not happy with Dr Fauci is warnings that the pandemic is far from over. I don't think you could say we're doing great. I mean, we're just not doctor found. She is a nice man. But he's made a lot of mistakes after the president said that the White House gave reporters Ah, list of quotes from Dr Fauci from the past several months that the White House said turned out to be wrong. It was an extraordinary move going negative on one of the president's own advisers as if he were a political opponent. The press secretary denied this was opposition research. There's no opposition research being dumped. Two reporters were asked a very specific question by The Washington Post, and the question was President, Trump noted that doctor felt he had made some mistakes and we provided a direct answer to what was a direct question. Dr. Fauci says he hasn't briefed the president and more than two months multiple White House officials tell ABC News He has a nickname in the West Wing doctor gloom and doom in a live stream with Stanford Medical School. Dr Fauci ignored it all focusing on the raging public health crisis. We haven't even begun to see the end of it yet. In another indication, the crisis is far from over over the weekend, the president for the first time in public Went along with CDC guidelines on masks covering his face during a visit to the Walter Reed Medical Center. Joe Biden stepped up to defend Dr Fauci tweeting quote Donald Trump needs to spend less time playing golf and more time listening to experts like Dr Fauci. Biden, by the way, said that if he is elected, he will reach out to Dr Fauci and ask him to continue his service in the government. ABC. Jonathan Karl Coma NEWS Time 9 28 I've been right a motorcycle for 52 years,.

president President Trump Dr. Fauci Dr Fancy White House Joe Biden Seattle ABC Jonathan Karl Coma US Walter Reed Medical Center ABC News press secretary CDC Stanford Medical School The Washington Post
"stanford medical school" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"At the Stanford Medical School for over 20 years. One of the top doctors in America, and he was on Fox last night. They were asking him. Do you agree with the American Academy of Pediatrics, which said yesterday, All of the kids need to be back in school in the classroom five days a week in the fall. And he said he completely agrees with that position. Children have virtually zero risk of getting a serious complication virtually zero risk of dying. We know that it's from the data all over the world, not just in the US, there's no arguing about that data. We also know all over the world Children who only rarely if ever transmit the disease. And so there's really no risk, but there's tremendous harm and not having in person schools. That's Dr Scott Atlas, the Hoover Institute, Stanford Medical School professor, one of America's top doctors, We've brought that up on Mark and Melinda many, many times throughout the pandemic. Iceland, Australia. Other countries with their testing have been finding that kids really don't get infected very often, and rarely, if ever do they transmit it to adults. It doesn't seem that this not wanting to go back to school or do the hybrid learning has anything to do with the kids, which is sad, because that's exactly what education's about. It has more to do with the adults who Have. I don't want to say bought into but I bought into going out of their house is going to equate to them catching this and maybe even dying from this and again. I think that there are probably A population of people in education that should be concerned because they're in the group where they're older, or they have health problems already, and of course, that should be taken into consideration. But the majority of educators are going to be in that age Group of 20 The 50 year olds that yes, they may catch Cove it But there it's not a death sentence for them, and most likely won't even be that horrible of a six in it's for them, and if the data from around the world are accurate, The chances of being infected by one of the kids are extremely low right, so it would be just passing it from Adult to adult there. And if you can go about your life safely, where you're putting in the measures that are supposed to be there to protect you from catching it, it shouldn't be a concern. All right. We've also got an update on the bar owners. They have hired an attorney out of Houston, and he has filed a lawsuit in Travis County challenging Governor Greg Abbott's order on Friday to close all the bars Jared would fill is their attorney. He says. Why does the governor unilaterally act like a king? He says he is sentencing bar owners to bankruptcy in Texas, and they've got a protest starting at the state Capitol very shortly, and just about six minutes And they say anybody that is part of the bar scene, Whether it's bartenders, managers, owners, musicians, DJs, bar backs, et cetera. They invite you to join. They are saying police. Be sure that you wear those mask and maintain social distance. But we're going to be meeting outside of the capital. In the lawsuit filed here in Travis County, the bar owners argue their rights have been trampled by the governor. Thousands of businesses are on the brink of bankruptcy. They say 800,000 workers have lost their jobs since March during the pandemic and the shutdowns and Ah there they are challenging the fact that the governor focused on the bars and didn't go after any other types of businesses. For another level of restrictions. Well, and even in one of the interviews that I caught with him today, he said something about. Well, it's bar like atmosphere that has created this spike in here. So you it did not sound to me like they have that solid proof that you know what 75% of these cases that we see spike have come because people have been at the bars. Which to me is dangerous to just go well, In the end, they were hanging out really close together. We saw some pictures at a bar. So that's what we're going to shut down. Coming up this afternoon when we come back right after Rush Limbaugh among our guests will be Austin Congressman Michael McCaul Live at 2 30 with an update on Russia President Trump The pandemic and much more will be here with that. Clements to toe for Rush Limbaugh coming up next 11 to 2. Thanks a lot for being here on news radio K LBJ. The news.

Fox Stanford Medical School Travis County America Rush Limbaugh American Academy of Pediatrics US Jared Congressman Michael McCaul attorney Dr Scott Atlas Texas Hoover Institute Iceland Austin Clements Australia Greg Abbott
"stanford medical school" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"At the Stanford Medical School for over 20 years. One of the top doctors in America, and he was on Fox last night. They were asking him. Do you agree with the American Academy of Pediatrics, which said yesterday, All of the kids need to be back in school in the classroom five days a week in the fall. And he said he completely agrees with that position. Children have virtually zero risk of getting a serious complication virtually zero risk of dying. We know that it's from the data all over the world, not just in the US, there's no arguing about that data. We also know all over the world that Children only rarely, if ever transmit the disease. And so there's really no risk, but there's tremendous harm and not having in person schools. That's Dr Scott Atlas, the Hoover Institute, Stanford Medical School professor, one of America's top doctors, We've brought that up on Mark and Melinda many, many times throughout the pandemic. Iceland, Australia. Other countries with their testing have been finding that kids really don't get infected very often, and rarely, if ever do they transmit it to adults. It doesn't seem that this not wanting to go back to school or do the Khyber learning has anything to do with the kids, which is sad, because that's exactly what education's about. It has more to do with the adults who Have I don't want to say bought into but have bought into going out of their house is going to equate to them catching this and maybe even dying from this and again. I think that there are probably A population of people in education that should be concerned because they're in the group were their older or they have health problems already, and of course, that should be taken into consideration. But the majority of educators are going to be in that age Group of 20 The 50 year olds that yes, they may catch Cove it But there it's not a death sentence for them, and most likely won't even be that horrible of 1/6 sense for them, And if the data from around the world are accurate, The chances of being infected by one of the kids are extremely low, right, so it would be just passing it from adult to adult there. And if you can go about your life safely, where you're putting in the measures that are supposed to be there to protect you from catching it, it shouldn't be a concern. All right. We've also got an update on the bar owners. They have hired an attorney out of Houston, and he has filed a lawsuit in Travis County challenging Governor Greg Abbott's order on Friday to close all the bars Jared would fill is their attorney. He says. Why does the governor unilaterally act like a king? He says he is sentencing bar owners to bankruptcy in Texas, and they've got a protest starting at the state Capitol very shortly, and just about six minutes And they say anybody that is part of the bar scene, Whether it's bartenders, managers, owners, musicians, DJs, bar backs, et cetera. They invite you to join. They are saying police. Be sure that you wear those mask and maintain social distance, but we're going to be meeting outside the capital. In the lawsuit filed here in Travis County, the bar owners argue their rights have been trampled by the governor. Thousands of businesses are on the brink of bankruptcy. They say 800,000 workers have lost their jobs since March. During the pandemic and the shutdowns and Ah there they are challenging the fact that the governor focused on the bars and didn't go after any other types of businesses. For another level of restrictions. Well, and even in one of the interviews that I caught with him today, he said something about. Well, it's bar like atmosphere that has created this spike in here. So you it did not sound to me like they have that solid proof that you know what 75% of these cases that we see spite have come because people have been at the bars. Which to me is dangerous to just go well, In the end, they were hanging out really close together. We saw some pictures at a bar. So that's what we're going to shut down. Coming up this afternoon when we come back right after Rush Limbaugh among our guests will be Austin Congressman Michael McCaul Live at 2 30 with an update on Russia President Trump the pandemic and much more will be here with Ted Clements 2 to 4 Rush Limbaugh coming up next 11 to 2. Thanks a lot for being here on news radio K. LBJ. The news is Coming.

Stanford Medical School Fox Travis County America Rush Limbaugh American Academy of Pediatrics US Jared Congressman Michael McCaul attorney Dr Scott Atlas K. LBJ Texas Hoover Institute Iceland Austin Ted Clements Australia
"stanford medical school" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

10:43 min | 1 year ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"You the latest numbers which is worldwide two hundred and sixty seven thousand nine hundred twenty eleven thousand one hundred and eighty seven deaths a full third fully recovered expected that the vast overwhelming majority will recover and I I just it has to be some perspective with these numbers because numbers are scary and you're just like oh my gosh what affects percent today what more testing is happening that's the whole idea of this fifteen day period and when you look at for example there were let's go back to two thousand nine and ten H. one N. one we had sixty point eight million Americans the contracted that that was a worldwide pandemic we had a year twelve thousand and what we have for nine sixty seven of sixty nine Americans die hundreds of Americans were hospitalized as a result and so what even you're seeing in in China South Korea is this dramatic increase than a precipitous drop off the big reason that Italy and Europe has had a bigger problem is they had direct flights from Wuhan province into Italy direct and apparently there's like a hundred thousand people go back and forth in the textile industry on the correlating our industries associated with this that that is part of the reason they have had the greater struggle here obviously you know we're looking at this in the United States and this is what makes this travel ban so okay this is what we're not overloading the hospital systems thanks to the public private partnership in the and now we're beginning to put out drive up testing I think that's important the FDA rule changes that is important and I think as we go further we can see that all these you know American companies are just rising to the occasion in ways we've never seen before again the clerk when I first I've I was getting words from some of my sources FDA looking into different things and then I I Google that I found Clark went two days ago I read it on air this does one study in consultation with Stanford medical school Saturday night wow but we're now seeing in this is congressman mark green he's pointing out but again this is preliminary but it certainly is the hope that I think Americans should have rightly so International Studies China Australia France like Laura Quinn with is it from my S. and is a hundred percent effective in treating corona especially if it's not even in pill form but if it is on a night V. it's even working better then of course I've been discussing a great detail after yesterday the convalescent plasma does that get corona and they get well and you take the blood plasma and it has the antibodies for corona and those that are even very sick the early signs are that once they get an IV that dramatic shifts and changes are are helping those that are even the sickest on the economic side we have all these companies now saying the in the pharmaceutical industry Hey we're we're upping our production of of Clark when you got its name is going to be familiar with so get used to it we have Amazon dot com Walmart and other companies now now so they're gonna be hiring hundreds of thousands of people how cool is that that's awesome doctor found G. a member took years to get the the virus sequences in the past what we already have within months a corona virus trial has begun in the U. S. that is a really positive update for everybody and they have volunteers in the experimental test program that's that's an update as well and it was been shortages of pure rail we now know distilleries around America but bureau has to be for it to work sixty percent alcohol now we have distilleries they're now making their own hand sanitizers and given away for free that's a great Americans are unbelievable Johns Hopkins researchers saying that the any bodies that are recovered this is an update to the plasma issue that I've been telling you about but the vaccine being tested in Seattle isn't the only potential treatment Johns Hopkins as has been removed fiving a century old blood derived treatment for use in the US and the hopes of the still slowing the spread and keep helping to get people well and that's using the antibodies from the blood plasma up or the serum of people that are recovered that is now happening south Korea's outbreak is finally turned the corner and abating according to news reports that I read earlier today and Reuters among them that the new infections the recovery cases no infections on Hey let me read it because South Korea recorded more culvert nineteen recovery cases on March six the new infections for the first time since it began and that has been now happening on a more dramatic scale well I'm not gonna talk about China so angry with them Australian researchers attesting to other drugs as potential chores for the virus all good news university Queensland center clinical research they found two different medications both of which are registered in available in Australia and apparently in their early studies of completely wiped out traces of the disease and test tubes now they're going to begin I think the process of human trials in that case you wanna know about another great American business what about uber eats when I first ask you to download on my phone uber eats when there were like two months ago I'm so stupid I'm behind the curve anyway and I've only used it like once or twice but they're now supporting the restaurant industry by waving all delivery fees for a hundred thousand restaurants pretty awesome we have Dutch and Canadian researchers reporting additional breakthrough research on this why we call it facts without fear we're trying to give the information that is helpful and keep it in perspective I mean when you have penned them when you have tens of thousands of Americans die from the flu every year is that we like that of course not and when you when you have information that gives some perspective that's important too so that people understand okay we lost up to five hundred seventy five thousand people in the last pandemic other pandemics we've lost a lot more and then you see all of this is good that is now coming to fruition and and frankly I think we're really we're rewriting the entire book some pandemic's going forward right now you're watching history unfold the president is not going to order a nationwide corona shut down I know there's been a lot of stuff on the internet about this resident also praising governors in Washington state California New York and Florida Midwest that and and places that are having more of a break up places that are not and he said he's not considering it now should national lockdown okay take it from him and not some dope you know keyboard warrior in his underwear trying to fuel fear Anthony Fauci said that as it relates to California governor Newsom made some very important difficult decisions for him and governor Cuomo did today and he'll join us at the top of the next hour for New York forty percent of the cases are in this state where I am right now all all the masks have been ordered all the ventilators are even are now getting in place the house navy hospital ships now one to the east coast one going to the west coast I don't think Medicare for all is acting particularly well now there's a lot of questions out there for example what we do if you think you were exposed to the virus there's different points of view on that I saw and read in one particular place according to a doctor Jana's emergency position Matt mass general in Boston Massachusetts General it could take as long as fourteen days for the symptoms to emerge in other words if you think you're exposed you're really on pay close attention but even if you got the test early on if it might not be the accurate test you gotta go through the fourteen day he had before you would know for sure if whether you have it because if all of a sudden say it you get it on day two the test if you think it might have been exposed you gonna have to get it again fourteen days later I've talked to people that have the test they said it is brutal they take a swab they shove it deep into your nose takes a hard right turn your eye socket and it hurts I talked to one guy said man I was tearing up it was so hard to get just you know just giving your facts without fear it's not the worst thing in our life I should tell the story about what Dr Coburn said to me that one day when the thing I don't think people would like that yeah there's no fear that was lovely what you just installed no no there's no fear there no you know the one I'm talking about thirteen eight of thirteen because I don't know has said that he does that style that's not blood I'm like oh okay I don't know why some people are ignoring social distancing advice and not listening to the task force I don't even know what to say about them there's an interesting A. P. story about quarantine shaming I you know I'm just telling you for the for the interest if you're young and healthy and even though now we're discovering for the first time that yeah young people can now get this we did not know that up until this British guy comes out and says we're not paying attention to this look here and now the CDC is confirmed at this week you should pay attention to it but if nothing else what do you do for grandma and grandpa that might be sick underlying conditions or compromised immune systems do it for them anyway all overseas travels obviously stopped I'll let the psychiatrist deal with you know people that are emotionally are very distraught fearing the virus more than anything else you know I just I live a life that is you know I honestly I just you cannot live your life in fear but live your life smartly make smart decisions be strategic listen you know if you wear gloves and a mask guess what if you put if you touch your nose you might remind you something I don't like the feel like love stuff like that to smart things you can do fear is not going to help you realistic strategic listening being smart that's going to help you I'm hearing that truckers are gonna get the help that they need that is critical because they are our first responders and all of our groceries and all of our medicines come via truck I gotta give a tip of the hat to the grocers around the country because they have all gotten on board they've been talking to the president and they are they're moving heaven and earth to keep the shelves filled that's all good news for those now I know for a lot of you and I'm talking about some of my best friends in this life that okay restaurants are closed now I mentioned some of my favorite restaurants and my favorite pizza place Mario's and everything in between and my favorite Chinese place now here's the thing a lot of these stores are offering service we can drive a pick it up and get out and use it there have or the setting up delivery services for the first time if.

"stanford medical school" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

11:20 min | 1 year ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Hour eight hundred nine four one Sean if you want to be a part of the program so giving you the latest numbers which is worldwide two hundred and sixty seven thousand nine hundred twenty eleven thousand one hundred and eighty seven deaths are a full third fully recovered expected that the vast overwhelming majority will recover and I I just there has to be some perspective with these numbers because numbers are scary just like all my gosh we went up X. percent today well more testing is happening that's the whole idea of this fifteen day period and when you look at for example there were but we go back to two thousand nine and ten H. one N. one we had sixty point eight million Americans the contracted that that was a worldwide pandemic we had a year twelve thousand and what we have four hundred and sixty seven hundred sixty nine Americans die hundreds of Americans were hospitalized as a result and so what even you're seeing in in China South Korea is this dramatic increase that a precipitous drop off the big reason that Italy and Europe has had a bigger problem is they have direct flights from Wuhan province into Italy direct and apparently there's like a hundred thousand people go back and forth in the textile industry to fund the correlating our industries associated with this that that is part of the reason they have had the greater struggle here obviously you know we're looking at this in the United States and this is what makes this travel ban so okay this is what we're not overloading the hospital systems thanks to the public private partnership in the and now we're beginning to put out drive up testing I think that's important the FDA rule changes that is important and I think as we go further we can see that all these you know American companies are just rising to the occasion in ways we've never seen before again the the clerk when I first I've I was getting words from some of my sources FDA looking into different things and then I I Google that I found Clark went two days ago I read it on air with is the one study in consultation with Stanford medical schools etcetera my wow but we're now seeing in this is congressman mark green he's pointing out but again this is preliminary but it certainly is the hope that I think Americans should have rightly so International Studies China Australia France like Laura Quinn with visit from my is in is a hundred percent effective in treating corona especially if it's not even in pill form but if it is on a night V. it's even working better then of course I've been discussing a great detail after yesterday the convalescent plasma does that get corona and they get well and you take the blood plasma and it has the antibodies for corona and those that are even very sick the early signs are that once they get an IV that dramatic shifts and changes are are helping those that are even the sickest on the economic side we have all these companies now saying that in the pharmaceutical industry Hey we're we're upping our production of of Clark when you got to name is going to be familiar with so get used to it we have Amazon dot com Walmart and other companies now announcing they're gonna be hiring hundreds of thousands of people how cool is that that's awesome Dr Fauci a member took years to get the the virus sequences in the past what we already have within months a coronavirus trial has begun in the U. S. that is a really positive update for everybody and they have all volunteers in the experimental test program that's that's an update as well I was been shortages of pure rail we now know distilleries around America but bureau has to be for it to work sixty percent alcohol now we have distilleries they are now making their own hand sanitizers and given away for free that's a great Americans are unbelievable Johns Hopkins researchers saying that the any bodies that are recovered this is an update to the plasma issue that I've been telling you about but the vaccine being tested in Seattle isn't the only potential treatment Johns Hopkins as has been reviving a century old blood derived treatment for use in the US and the hopes of still slowing the spread and keep helping to get people well and that's using the antibodies from the blood plasma or the sheer amount of people that are recovered that is now happening south Korea's outbreak is finally turned the corner and abating according to news reports that I read earlier today and Reuters among them that the new infections the recovery cases new infections on Hey let me read it because South Korea recorded more Colbert nineteen recovery cases on March six the new infections for the first time since it began and that has been now happening on a more dramatic scale well I'm not gonna talk about China was so angry with them or strategy and researchers attesting to other drugs as potential chores for the virus all good news university of Queensland center clinical research they found two different medications both of which are registered and available in Australia and apparently in their early studies of completely wiped out traces of the disease and test tubes now they're going to begin I think the process of human trials in that case are you wanna know about another great American business what about uber eats when I first ask you to download on my phone uber eats when the what like two months ago I'm so stupid I'm behind the curve anyway and I've only used it like once or twice but they're now supporting the restaurant industry by waving all delivery fees for a hundred thousand restaurants pretty awesome we have Dutch and Canadian researchers reporting additional breakthrough research on that is why we call it facts without fear we're trying to give the information that is helpful and to keep it in perspective I mean when you have penned them when you have tens of thousands of Americans have died from the flu every year aids do we like that of course not and when you when you have information that gives some perspective that's important too so that people understand okay we lost up to five hundred seventy five thousand people in the last pandemic other pandemics we've lost a lot more and then you see all of this is good that is now coming to fruition and and frankly I think we're really we're rewriting the entire books on pandemics going forward right now you're watching history unfold the president is not going to order a nationwide corona shut down I know there's been a lot of stuff on the internet about this president also praising our governors in Washington state California New York and Florida Midwest that and and places that are having more of a break up places that are not and he said he's not considering it now should national lockdown okay take it from him and not some dope you know keyboard warrior in his underwear trying to fuel fear Anthony Fauci said that as it relates to California governor Newsom made some very important difficult decisions for Hammond governor Cuomo did today he'll join us at the top of the next hour for New York forty percent of the cases are in this state where I am right now all all the masks have been ordered all the ventilators are even are now getting in place the house navy hospital ships now one to the east coast one going to the west coast I don't think Medicare for all's acting particularly well now there's a lot of questions out there for example what do we do if you think you were exposed to the virus there's different points of view on that I saw and read in one particular place according to a doctor Jana's emergency physician Matt mass general in Boston Massachusetts General it could take as long as fourteen days for the symptoms to emerge in other words if you think you're exposed you really got to pay close attention but even if you got the test early on if it might not be the accurate test you gotta go through the fourteen day before you would know for sure if whether you have it because if all of a sudden say it you get it on day two the test if you think you might have been exposed you gonna have to get it again fourteen days later I've talked to people that have the test they said it is brutal they take a swab they shove it deep into your nose takes a hard right turn your eye socket and it hurts I talked to one guy said mass tear it up it was so hard to get just you know just giving your facts without fear of the worst thing in our life I should tell the story about what Dr Coburn did to me that one day Linda I don't think people would like that yeah there's no fear that was lovely what you just as hard no no there's no fear there no you know the one I'm talking about thirteen eight of thirteen it was not an office of the eagles that's die that's not blood I'm like oh okay I don't know why some people are ignoring social distancing advice and not listening to the task force I don't even know what to say about them there's an interesting A. P. story about quarantine shaming are you know I'm just telling you for the for the interest if you're young and healthy and even though now we're discovering for the first time that yeah young people can now get this we did not know that up until this British guy comes out and says we're not paying attention to this look here and now the CDC is confirmed at this week you should pay attention to it but if nothing else what are you doing for grandma and grandpa that might be sick underlying conditions or compromised immune systems do it for them anyway fall overseas travels obviously stopped I'll let the psychiatrist deal with you know people that a motion league are very distraught fearing the virus more than anything else you know I just I live a life that is you know what honestly I just you cannot live your life in fear live your life smartly make smart decisions be strategic listen you know if you wear gloves and a mask guess what if you put if you touch your nose you might remind yourself yeah I don't like the feel like love stuff like that to smart things you can do fear is not going to help you realistic strategic listening being smart that's going to help you I'm hearing that truckers are gonna get the help that they need that is critical because they are our first responders and all of our groceries and all of our medicines come via truck I gotta give a tip of the hat to the grocers around the country because they have all gotten on board they've been talking to the president and they are they're moving heaven and earth to keep the shelves filled that's all good news for those now I know for a lot of you and I'm talking about some of my best friends in this life that okay restaurants are closed now I've mentioned some of my favorite restaurants and my favorite pizza place Mario's and everything in between and my favorite Chinese place now here's the thing a lot of these stores are offering service we can drive a pick it up and get out and use it there have or the setting up delivery services for the first time.

Sean
"stanford medical school" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

09:47 min | 1 year ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"This is the worst public health crisis for regeneration. Some people compare it to seasonal flu. Alas that he's not right owing to the lack of ood immunity. This disease is more dangerous. And it's going to spread further and I must level with you level with the British public. More families. Many more families are going to lose loved ones before that time. British Prime Minister Johnson. He did not close. Schools are banned gatherings of more than five hundred people. Britain's chief medical officer said in a worst case scenario more than eighty percent of Britain would contract the virus with one percent mortality rate that equates to more than half a billion deaths five hundred thousand half a million deaths half a million here in the United States during his press conference in Vermont Thursday Senator Sanders said the federal government would prioritize the care of communities. Who are that. They should prioritize the care of communities. Most vulnerable during the corona virus pandemic the elderly people with disabilities in house. People low income people. Those who are uninsured an unemployed we need also in this economic crisis to place an immediate moratorium on evictions on Foreclosures and on Utility shut offs. So that no one loses their home during this crisis and that everyone has access to clean water electricity heat and air conditioning. We need to construct emergency homeless shelters to make sure that the homeless survivors of domestic violence and college students quarantined off. Campus are able to receive the shelter the health care and the nutrition they need Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden. We'll debating in Washington D. C. as opposed to Arizona where they were going to debate and there will not be an audience because of the Corona Virus Dr Steve Goodman Dan Dean at Stanford Medical School and Justin Leisler professor at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health or with us from Baltimore and from Stanford California Dr Steve Goodman this issue of the poor in the United States and people who are working poor who are without insurance people who are unemployed while everyone says that the corona virus hits everyone which is clearly true there are communities that are particularly vulnerable right now how they be protected well this is an issue for public health officials. Obviously they have to be able to take the same measures that anybody would take to to reduce the spread. The ones we've already talked about however the ability for less wealthy or poor individuals to take time off from work to sequester themselves in their homes To Take care of their children May Be quite different than than others. So we we have to think about it. I think Bernie has it about right. We have to think about this as a social responsibility. Not just a an issue for individual action because people's ability to protect themselves are constrained by their own economic circumstances in their own living circumstances if they're living in very very tight quarters with many people in in in in in communities where other people might be sick it is very very difficult for them to take care of themselves and needless to say if they don't have access to medical care or they're afraid to seek it because of Because they're afraid of the bills. That's another huge problem. Easy for people to get tested and to access care and if they're undocumented and afraid to seek and afraid to seek testing as well absolutely justin less slur if you could also address this issue and then. I'd like to ask you how you're talking to your children so I agree. It's absolutely critical to find ways to protect those populations that are not going to be able to take social distancing measures have more trouble with that potentially have food insecurity if they don't go to school or go to places where there might be mass gatherings and I think you know it's one of those things where we do have an individual responsibility not to just you know. Keep ourselves out of the community but do things to help others. Keep themselves out of the community. You know the government is going to be overwhelmed by this and you know we're not as a country set up to provide services in a crisis the way is maybe needed now and now there's a bill being weighed. The Democrat led. House set to vote on a bill that would grant workers fourteen days of paid sick. Leave up to three months of paid family and medical leave. Unemployment Insurance to furloughed workers includes additional five hundred million dollars to help feed low income pregnant women or mothers with young children who lose their jobs or laid off because of the virus outbreak President Trump said. He did not support the bill. But because we're coming to the end of this conversation as people push hard for the entire community to be protected the that sits individuals but it also brings out the importance of people around the world as a community. Can you talk about what you're saying to your kids professor less ler? Yeah I mean my son is six and his school just got cancelled so I'm trying to explain to them that there's the disease out there. It's scary It's wondering why his dad's working so much but the I'm trying to explain to him that it's important to wash his hands that it's important to you know. Think about what he's doing out there in the community and that maybe he won't be able to go to school do the same things that is that he is usually able to do for fun. I can talk more explicitly to my mother who is in their seventies in high risk who I had to sort of say this is real. Stay home self isolate. Don't don't go out and this is why is that. The children don't tend to children. This is not as fatal for as it is for older people especially over seventy and eighty right. I mean and Wuhan at last report I saw from Honda was in detail out of out of thousand deaths over a thousand deaths. Only one was in people somebody under twenty years of age so it's pretty mild and children do not seem to be at risk even more so than the flu where we see children get sick and potentially die occasionally in the youngest age. That doesn't seem to be happening right now for the current virus and but we do not know we know they can get infected and we do not know whether or not they can pass it on so you know keeping children Critical part of our more imperilled presumably. We don't know for sure And Steve What you tell your kids my nieces and nephew who are bit older but also as so many people in this country afraid right now. So what's interesting is that my kids are both in college actually here at Stanford and they're more worried for us. I don't have to tell them everything anything they read. They're smart and they're much more concerned about their threat to us than Than than anything else. So they're taking the steps they need to take to prevent us from getting sick. And it's a very interesting reversal of generational roles. Perhaps a premonition of the future but I think this is a responsibility that many young people feel not just protect themselves because they themselves are not that worried but they are definitely worried about the older generation the same way that Justin is concerned about his mom and of course Gerald Starter just had a baby here in New York in the midst of this pandemic indeed. Yes and she is Naturally self isolating but Is is being extremely careful about her own exposure and needless say their new child. Well I WANNA thank you both for being with us Dr Steven Goodman Associate Dean at Stanford Medical School where he's also professor epidemiology and public health and medicine and also my brother and just in less ler says she professor Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. We also want to welcome to the world. Andre Sorry Marino Camarena congratulations to eagerly and Drian. That does it for our show. Everyone wash your hands be safe. I'm Amy Goodman an enormous. Thank you to the whole team. That may democracy now happened today..

professor Justin Leisler Stanford Medical School Senator Sanders Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Dr Steve Goodman United States Amy Goodman Dr Steven Goodman Hopkins Bloomberg School of Pu Britain flu Andre Sorry Marino Camarena Stanford Prime Minister Johnson Bernie federal government
"stanford medical school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Around one twenty over eighty and temperature well that little marker on the old mercury thermometers says it all ninety eight point six except that nearly one hundred seventy years after that was determined to be the norm scientists say it's lower we know our bodies are little engines with cells turning food into energy creating heat and temperature but what does it mean that it's lower the new study from researchers at Stanford medical school is called decreasing human body temperature in the United States since the industrial revolution researcher Cazalet joins us now and doctor lay with what's the new finding ninety eight point six is too high and we think that the average normal human body temperature is closer to ninety seven point five if the let's back up how do we determine that the temperature for a well functioning engine should be ninety eight point six I was determined in eighteen fifty one a German physician called Carl Wunderlich measured millions of temperature measurements from a twenty five thousand patients and that's how we came up with a ninety eight point six so that population in an era where people were really quite different there was a lot of infection in the population like tuberculosis and syphilis and periodontitis lots of chronic inflammation that may well if we think influence that the normal body temperature of that era meaning what people were having to fight off more infections they might have just run a little hotter yes well we know that since then our standard of living has increased dramatically economic development changes and hygiene and we've taken all sorts of infections away now well and we've also made it easier for us to fight them we have heating we have air conditioning the body doesn't have to do as much that's absolutely right we know that we spend a lot of time.

Stanford medical school United States Cazalet Carl Wunderlich researcher syphilis periodontitis
"stanford medical school" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

06:17 min | 2 years ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Just have a few minutes left, and I want to hear more about the raising of the dead. I'm sure there are people tuned in there. Like, what the heck are you talking about? Oh, I know this is a problem with telling these stories you kinda destroy your credibility, telling them straight credibility. The fact is it either happened or didn't there were witnesses. There were many witnesses. And this only happened two years ago this didn't happen in eighteen eighty eight. Under better. So, you know this this day, it's better than the woman being raised from the dead. Okay. She wasn't yet try to tap that this python. I'm not dead yet. Oh, you know what? I'm sorry. I you're, you're right. I totally forgot she was genuinely on the verge of Daffy. It it, okay. So this bolt of power is going through your body. She like this on the bed has he, she shaking. Yeah. The ICU team runs in they see what's going on. And they run out and the monitors. Like this. And all sudden it's like somebody had thrown a circuit breaker to turn it on and someone through the circuit breaker to turn it off. And all sudden, the power ends and she's just lying there on the bed, and now the heart monitor looks perfectly normal, and it's got a normal. You know that curve the in its beep. About a normal heart rate and she's breathing. And she opens her eyes and she goes. Wow, thank you. She discharged that night from the hospital because they didn't want that spooky stuff around their hospital and get out the next day. She came to the meeting. I was leading in that town last year when I was back there she came to the meeting. And when I was there two and a half weeks ago, she came to the meeting again, came up and gave me a hug, and said, thank you so much for coming into my hospital room two years ago. Now, I have this other problem. Can you pray for me to be healed of that? But can I mean you know? It's so hard to. And by the way, a lot of these really dramatic healings like this one, I have a doctor who is a faculty member at Baylor University in Texas. He is a professor of medicine, and he's a practicing physician and I refer all of these class of cases to him for investigation to make sure they would withstand forensic scrutiny. But are you building a record of this because I think it's that's what we're doing. This is dynamite, and we had a doctor on. And by the way, he went to Stanford medical school, just in case anyone's wondering if he's legit. Alvin? And I we had a guest on, I can't remember he talked about the death of Jesus on the cross. And we were trying to connect him. We can you did. Can we did connect? I can't remember his name right now. But magnificently bright brilliant, man. And he was talking about wanting to, to help because that's always my frustration. Right. Is that, you know, I can say I believe in these things. But people say, where's the proof where's the proof? And I think look, I get it. If, if it's possible what a wonderful thing to get as much proof in clarity, as we get now there's certain people that you, can you can do anything, and you can show many proof, and they just don't care. But there are people who will care. And so, I think it is important to try, as we can we just got got a few minutes. So I think the takeaway from all these stories we've been telling really at the at the end of the day is that God loves his people so much. And he cares about the intimate. Details of their lives that he would reveal something of guys condition known only to his wife human is Dr God cares about a woman who's dying in a hospital bed. God cares about a woman who's already dead. God cares about people because he loves them. And all of these things are expressions of him. Breaking in as it were to show off. And so I'm back to where we started at the start of all of these recordings. Isaiah forty verse nine say into the cities of well, we'll change it saying to the cities of Judah Santa, the cities of America, and of the whole western world. Saito London say of Frankfurt in New York say to Los Angeles, Chicago Dallas Nashville, behold. This is your God, you may not have known your God, but we're going to show him to you. That's really, what God's on in the business of doing I believe this is part and parcel of this, great, resurgence. Of faith. We could call it a sweeping revival. But this resurgence of faith that God wants to bring about in our civilization. Well, I also I think that where two particular time in culture where people need to see this to believe, but I think our brains get so muddied up by the mixed messages of the culture, it's very confusing. But when you see something like this, it gets tough to argue with it, and I think people are hungry to, to see these things. And you know, it's that's why it just gives me such joy that you're in New York because I think that we are particularly in need in a place like New York of seeing this kind of thing, and I still dream of, you know, going to central park and just praying for random people, and, you know, to see what God will do we just need to make it happen. One of these days doing all land, and go for it. What are you doing five o'clock? Now, I can't I gotta work out, but seriously, it is. It's very important. I think can in its why one have you on the program because I want, I know that they're folks that are challenged by some of what we say here, but, you know, just because people abuse things I mean we've all seen phony this and phony that, well that doesn't mean the real thing, isn't real. And I think sometimes in our culture, there's so much making fun of it. I mean, every movie about faith healing, or anything is about a charlatan, right? And the fact is that, you know, know, this stuff is real well, we're out of time my friend can fish. Thank you. Thank you for having. I want people to go to kingdom fire ministries dot org. If you're interested in way, more this kingdom, ministries dot org, and then kingdom convergence dot com.

New York professor of medicine Baylor University Stanford medical school Texas Alvin faculty member Isaiah Saito London Judah Santa America Nashville Frankfurt Los Angeles Chicago two years
"stanford medical school" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

10:32 min | 2 years ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on KGO 810

"Eighty eight ten if there's anything you want to weigh in on we will follow events in the Netherlands were also, of course, following events in New Zealand and across the bay area. There's big news out of labor and lift we're going to get to that. It's one of those gorgeous bay area days and yet so many people struggle with depression. I really am astounded by the epidemic of depression. I say astounded because so many people battle with it who you would think otherwise would have no issue with depression. I mean, those who are doing well and business those who are doing. Well, it would seem in there. In family life. You know that or romance or whatever it in other words, it doesn't seem to correlate to any sort of real life objective reality. Now, this I know I'm making on one level sort of an obvious point. But but an another level we try to treat things superficially. We we go into therapy. You know, how am I change my relationship? How can I understand my life in a different way? But sometimes clinical depression, isn't about understanding your life. It's it's about treating what is a chemical imbalance. And so in that spirit, many things many medications and many different approaches have been instituted to attack this problem, and the perhaps a breakthrough and certainly a controversial way to attack. The problem is this party drug. I mean, this is a party drug from long ago, it's called ketamine, and you may be familiar with. It it now is being used by researchers and it just got approval by the FDA to be used for patients with depression. And so don't take my word for it. Let's get Dr Carolyn Rodriguez here. She's a psychiatrist at Stanford medical school. And she's the associate chair of the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and Dr welcomed okay GIO. Thank you so much for having me. This is a somewhat bizarre story. I mean, first of all in summary ketamine the same drug that was a party drug. This is the drug that's being used to treat depression. That's correct. It's also FDA approved at higher doses. For anesthesia's an anesthetic that's used routinely and hospitals for adults and children. So it's it has a duality and very interesting properties. And this is this is something that's used over the long term. Or is it used to get you over depressive hump or or in? What way is there sort of a strategy about this medication and attacking depression? Definitely. Well, you bring up a good point in terms of the the there's really no not one size fits all right now for the about sixty million Americans experiencing depression every year, and there's patients who receive benefit from therapy and patients that received benefits from Sarah selective. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors either things like Prozac, but for some patients, they continue to be depressed despite not having released from first line treatments. And so ketamine is a drug and s ketamine which has recently had approval that works differently from the traditional treatments that we have and gives us another tool in our armament -tarian. It also extra quickly, which is very different. It expert quickly meaning that he'll attack the depression quickly. Yes. We've seen responses in a matter of hours, people feeling of relief from depression, and the way this new medication that's received approval is s ketamine. It's an it's a nasal spray and it's used a spray twice weekly for about four weeks. And then there's boosters so it's also also administered in a very different way. Wow. It's remarkable. You know, I'm not a big drug guy. I think in general try to stay away from pharmaceuticals unless you need them. But if you're in a situation where you're battling clinical depression that certainly the situation in which you do need medicines. Are you may need all kinds of treatments that you might not have considered prior and this it's remarkable. So the way it's administered with the nasal spray and even the repetitive with which you notice a change. Striking. It is it really is a game changer for our field. And it gives hope to patients who tried first line treatment center still desperate for help their patients who have you know, in the most serious are at risk for the most serious outcome of depression, which is suicide and having help for those individuals is very important at the same time. There's I believe there's need for caution because ketamine effects are transient, and we don't know the long term effects of repeated dosing many of us have suggested having a national registry to monitor side effects. So it's important for individuals who are wanting to get more information to understand more of the side effects of ketamine as well. Yeah. That's a really good point. It's a it's really a brand new way of treatment so much of that has yet to be discovered. We're talking to Dr Caroline Rodriguez. She's the Stanford medical school psychiatrist associate chair department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, this ketamine, which was a party drug is being used to treat depression, and you know, this clinical, depression, I was involved with somebody my ex girlfriend, and we were together for many many years, but she had clinical depression, and if she didn't take the medicines, it was impossible to get her out of the funk, and you when you're involved with someone like that, you think it's about, you know, cheering the person up or, you know, bringing them into some kind of environment in which they are going to be sort of surrounded by happier circumstance. But there as a total disconnect there it has nothing to do with the environment. Well, it's it's different for different people. And you know, as your suggestions on I'm sorry that that was the experience of your girlfriend. It's very tough for individuals. But also very tougher loved ones to see their family members suffering so greatly. And and increasingly we know that depression and other mental illnesses really had their Genesis in brain changes in underlying brain pathology. That's why it's important to continue to research to try and understand what causes depression, and how we can best treat it, and which treatment is best for whom let me ask you about the the ketamine, you know, is a party drug as I mentioned in it. It's sort of if you take too much of it it can it can really do a number on your brain. So this is something that has to be administered with great care as you've said is it only administered in the doctor's office or do people literally walk out of your office with a with a spray bottle of this ketamine? So for the FDA approval it's been approved and one of the requirements is that needs to be administered in a doctor's office and patients need to be observed for two hours in terms of the the long term effects. That's one thing that I'm very mindful of because again, ketamine short-term use is not is not the issue because that's that's been studied. But if because it's transient you need regular repeated use over time, and we don't know the long term effects of repeated dosing. I've look into literature in terms of people who abuse ketamine or special k meaning they use it at much higher doses and more frequently than the FDA approved dosing, and there have been some studies that show the have reported bladder toxicity and cognitive problems. So I believe that it's important for patients to be informed of those. Those potential potential risks as well. Doctor before I let you go. I want to ask you about 'em DNA. That's the I guess they call a molly's. Also, you know, it's a kind of a that's the party thing. Now, you get there. If you go to a rave or you go to a electric. You know what I'm talking about? Dr. I'm not gonna pretend like we don't know what it is these Polly's. Yes. Now are they, but it was mentioned to me that those molly's actually could be used in the psychiatric community as a method of treating certain problems. Yes, yes. I believe we're still at early days. But it does look promising the FTA in fact designated MD AMA breakthrough therapy for post traumatic stress highlighting that these areas. These drugs that have been studied in the past or now having a resurgence in interest, and it really behooves us to study these types of treatments more and understand if they can be helpful for these the for our patients that are suffering and have already tried first line treatments for me as a as a researcher and a clinician I like to see studies replicated. And so I'm I'm waiting to see if these effects can be replicated and also I want to know more about the long term side effects. Well, very well. Very well put Dr Carolyn Rodriguez, our show needs a a Goto psychiatrists more than any other show on the radio, and you are that person. Dr caroline. Has been drafted. Thinking of man. Thank you for informing people in our community. It's important. Take pleasure. We'll talk again, Dr calendar Regas from Stanford from the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences there is that news maybe help for many battling clinical depression. Well, there is other news. It has nothing to do with depression. But as news from the world of medicine. And anybody needed doctor? I'm bored. Sure to cardiothoracic medicine in trauma surgery. Dr sleep disturbance, bleeding disorder.

depression ketamine FDA Dr Carolyn Rodriguez associate chair department of psychiatry Dr Caroline Rodriguez Stanford medical school Netherlands New Zealand Stanford Dr caroline molly Sarah Polly researcher FTA
"stanford medical school" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on KTOK

"Pleasure. Supposed the more interesting stories of the week was news of a controversial startup called Ambrosia that charges eight thousand dollars to fill old people up with the blood of younger people as a way to combat aging. They do accept PayPal for the procedure. This has started off by Dr Jesse Karmazin. He is a graduate of Stanford medical school. And he started this company and set it up in five US cities, so far they recently completed some clinical trials designed to assess the benefits of the procedure. But they haven't published any results yet. We spoke to Aaron Brodmann she's a science and tech reporter with business insider, and we talked about how the procedure works these clinical trials and the murky science of what this treatment is. I've been writing about this company at the start out for a couple of years now, and they are essentially offering infusion of young blood plasma. From donors between ages sixteen to twenty five and if you're thirty over you can go and allegedly can go and get an injection of this young blood, which is supposedly to revitalize you everything from make you smarter to make you more useful appearing and generally revitalize fought huge caveat. There has not been any conclusive scientific study done to prove and yeah, the sciences a little murky on this. Although they have done clinical trials, and they haven't released any of that data yet. But the founder his name is Jesse Karmazin has said that he's very excited about it that it's it's promising you got a chance to speak to about this whole project. Certainly the ethic. He graduated from Stanford as a medical degree. But he is not licensed to practice medicine or a doctor that he is very enthusiastic, and yes, they did one clinical trial, which is registered on clinical trials that go. However, if you visit the website to check it out, there's nothing there results have not been published at Jaffe about some of the findings, and he told me that they will call this. But again, nothing to verify both claims. So that being said, they have I've clinics across the US LA San Francisco, Tampa Omaha and Houston where you can go..

Dr Jesse Karmazin US Stanford medical school Stanford Jaffe Aaron Brodmann tech reporter San Francisco founder Tampa Houston Omaha eight thousand dollars
"stanford medical school" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Real pleasure. The more interesting stories of the week was news of a controversial startup called Ambrosia charges. Eight thousand dollars to filled old people up with the blood of younger people as a way to combat aging. They do accept PayPal for the procedure. This has started off by Dr Jesse Karmazin. He is a graduate of Stanford medical school. And he started this company and set it up in five US cities, so far they recently completed some clinical trials designed to assess the benefits of the procedure. But they haven't published any results yet, we spoke to Aaron Broadway, and she's a science and tech reporter with business insider, and we talked about how the procedure works these clinical trials and the murky science of what this treatment is. I've been writing about this company. It's a start up for a couple of years now, and they are essentially offering infusion of young blood plasma. Ma from donors between ages sixteen to twenty five and if you're thirty over you can go, and allegedly you can go and get an injection of this young blood, which is supposedly supposed to revitalize you do everything from make you smarter to make you more useful appearing and generally revitalize bought huge caveat. There has not been any conclusive study done to prove and yeah, the sciences a little murky on this. Although they have done clinical trials, and they haven't released any of that data yet. But the founder his name is Jesse Karmazin said that he's very excited about it that it's it's promising you've got a chance to speak to about this whole project. Certainly enthusiastic. He graduated from Stanford with a medical degree. But he is not licensed to practice medicine or a doctor that he is rendered. Yes. And yes, they did one article trial, which is registered on clinical trials that go. However, if you go to check it out, there's nothing there or results have not been published. I asked Jesse about some of the findings, and he told me that they will call again nothing to claim. So that being said they have five clinics across the US LA San Francisco, Tampa.

Dr Jesse Karmazin US Ambrosia Stanford medical school Stanford Aaron Broadway tech reporter Ma San Francisco founder Tampa Eight thousand dollars
"stanford medical school" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"Having me, Oscar, a real pleasure. Of the more interesting stories of the week was news of a controversial startup called Ambrosia charges. Eight thousand dollars to fill old people up with the blood of younger people as a way to combat aging. They do accept pay pal for the procedure. This is started off by Dr Jesse Karmazin. He is a graduate of Stanford medical school. And he started this company and set it up in five US cities, so far they recently completed some clinical trials designed to assess the benefits of the procedure. But they haven't published any results yet, we spoke to Aaron Broadway, and she's a science and tech reporter with business insider, and we talked about how the procedure works these clinical trials and the murky science of what this treatment is. I've been writing about this company at the start up for a couple of years now, and they are essentially offering infusion of young blood plasma. Ma from donors between the ages of sixteen to twenty five and if you're thirty over you can go, and allegedly you can go and get an injection of this young blood, which is supposedly supposed to revitalize you do everything from make you smarter to make you more useful appearin and generally revitalize fought us cabbie out. There has not been any conclusive scientific study done to prove an coins. Yeah. The sciences a little murky on this. Although they have done clinical trials, and they haven't released any of that data yet. But the founder his name is Jesse Karmazin has said that he's very excited about it that it's it's promising you've got a chance to speak to about this whole project. Certainly enthusiastic. He graduated from Stanford medical degree. But he is not licensed to practice medicine or a doctor that he is rendered. Yes. And yes, they did one on trial, which is registered on clinical trials that go. However, if you visit the website data check it out there's nothing there or results have not been published. I asked about some of the findings, and he told me that they will call it. But again nothing to claim. So that being said, they have I've clinics across the US LA San Francisco, Tampa Omaha and Houston where you can go..

Dr Jesse Karmazin us Ambrosia Stanford medical school Oscar Stanford Aaron Broadway tech reporter Ma San Francisco founder Tampa Houston Omaha Eight thousand dollars
"stanford medical school" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"A real pleasure. The more interesting stories of the week was news of a controversial startup called Ambrosia, the charges eight thousand dollars to fill old people up with the blood of younger people as a way to combat aging. They do accept pay pal for the procedure. This has started off by Dr Jesse Karmazin. He is a graduate of Stanford medical school. And he started this company and set it up in five US cities, so far they recently completed some clinical trials designed to assess the benefits of the procedure. But they haven't published any results yet, we spoke to Aaron Broadway, and she's a science and tech reporter with business insider, and we talked about how the procedure works these clinical trials and the murky science of what this treatment is. I've been writing about this company at the start up for a couple of years now, and they are essentially offering infusion of young blood plasma. Ma from donors between ages sixteen to twenty five and if you're thirty over you can go and allegedly you can go and get an injection of this young blood, which is supposedly supposed to revitalize. You you everything from make you smarter to make you more useful appearing and generally revitalize bought huge caveat. There has not been any conclusive scientific study done to prove any of these coins. Yeah. The sciences a little murky on this. Although they have done clinical trials, and they haven't released any of that data yet. But the founder his name is Jesse Carmen has said that he's very excited about it that it's it's promising you've got a chance to speak to about this whole project. Certainly and do the ethic he graduated from Stanford medical degree. But he is not licensed to practice medicine or a doctor, but he is rendered. Yes. And yes, they did one clinical trial, which is registered on clinical trials that go. However, if you visit the website to check it out, there's nothing there or results have not been published. I asked about some of the findings, and he told me that they will call it. But again nothing to claim. So that being said, they have I've clinics across the US LA San Francisco, Tampa Omaha and Houston where you can go..

Dr Jesse Karmazin US Jesse Carmen Stanford medical school Stanford Aaron Broadway tech reporter Ma San Francisco founder Tampa Houston Omaha eight thousand dollars
"stanford medical school" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"stanford medical school" Discussed on KTOK

"Pleasure. The more interesting stories of the week was news of a controversial startup called Ambrosia charges. Eight thousand dollars to fill old people up with the blood of younger people as a way to combat aging. They do accept pay pal for the procedure. This has started off by Dr Jesse Karmazin. He is a graduate of Stanford medical school. And he started this company and set it up in five US cities, so far they recently completed some clinical trials designed to assess the benefits of the procedure. But they haven't published any results yet, we spoke to Aaron Broadway, and she's a science and tech reporter with business insider, and we talked about how the procedure works these clinical trials and the murky science of what this treatment is. I've been writing about this company at the start up for a couple of years now, and they are essentially offering infusion of young blood plasma. From donors between the ages of sixteen to twenty five. And if you're thirty over you can go, and allegedly you can go and get an injection of this young blood, which is supposedly supposed to revitalize you everything from make you smarter to make you more useful appearing and generally revitalize thought huge caveat. There has not been any conclusive scientific study done to prove any of these coins. Yeah. The sciences a little murky on this. Although they have done clinical trials, and they haven't released any of that data yet. But the founder his name is Jesse Karmazin has said that he's very excited about it that it's it's promising you've got a chance to speak to about this whole project. Certainly enthusiastic. He graduated from Stanford with a medical degree. But he is not licensed to practice medicine or a doctor that he is very good. Yeah. And yes, they did one clinical trial, which is registered on clinical trials that go. However, if you visit the website data check it out there's nothing there or results have not been published. I asked Jesse about some of the findings, and he told me that they will call this. But again, nothing to verify bitcoin. So that being said, they have I've clinics across the US LA San Francisco, Tampa Omaha and Houston where you can go..

Dr Jesse Karmazin US Ambrosia Stanford medical school Stanford Aaron Broadway tech reporter San Francisco founder Tampa Houston Omaha Eight thousand dollars