23 Burst results for "Stanford Medical"

"stanford medical" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

07:13 min | 5 months ago

"stanford medical" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"I'm Scott Tetreault. And I'm Rachel Martin. Good morning. What a year. It has been 12 months of lockdowns and loss now, though, There is hope on the horizon For the first time since the pandemic up ended life in the United States, many public health experts say the worst could finally be over. NPR health correspondent Rob Stein has been talking to infectious disease experts, epidemiologist, public health officials, medical historians. And there are caveats to this good news, Rob, but it's it's at least a moment to mark, isn't it? Yeah. Rachel E think it really is, You know, like millions of other Americans. I've been hiding in my house for a year now doing one gloomy story after another from this makeshift studio in my attic, you know? And it just got worse and worse, So it is almost hard to even imagine that this awful nightmare could finally be starting to end. Now, not everyone is ready to say the worst could be over. But I checked in with more than 20 leading experts I've been talking with throughout the pandemic, and it's been pretty striking. Most are. Here's one example doctors. She's job, the dean of the Brown School of Public Health. I'm optimistic that the worst may in fact be behind us. And so to be able to say, I think cautiously optimistic that the worst may be behind us. Boy that does feel really good. Now, you know, Rachel, Nearly 60,000. People are still getting infected every day, hundreds or so dying every day, so thousands of people are probably still going to get very sick and died before this is all over. And that hope as you said, it comes with some big caveats. If everyone doesn't let down their guard too fast. If those dangerous variants don't mess things up again before enough people could get vaccinated, and if the vaccination campaign doesn't stumble badly. What if none of those it's come true? That could piece that elusive light at the end of the tunnel? What does that light encompass? What does that exactly mean? Yes. So what it means is that the number of people getting infected sick and dying. Well, hopefully slowly but pretty steadily continued. Dropping from here on out in life would slowly but steadily return to something much more normal. Our new normal is finally in sight. People tell me That's because of the vaccines. The fact that they're chunk of the country already has some immunity in the weather is getting warmer, which slows down the virus. So even if there is yet another wave, chances are it'll be more like you know, like a ripple than another surge. Here's what Dr Anthony Fauci told me about this the other day. If all goes well. If we stick by the public health measures if we effectively vaccinate, I think we are looking at a brighter future over the next several months. That's entirely conceivable and probably likely. We're talking about more people heading back to stores, Restaurants work more more kids going back to school. Small groups of fully evacuated people getting together for dinner parties indoors without masks. The CDC is already saying vaccinated, people can start getting together that way again. So I mean, that's such good news. What about if we protect into the summer like summer camps for kids vacations? Can we do any of that? Yeah. You know, people are telling me that the summers looking you could be pretty good. You know, it won't be like the summer of 2019. But I'll hopefully be way better than the sum of 2020. Here's Ali Mokdad at the University of Washington. We'll see more grand parents visiting and hugging their grandchildren. More restaurant will open We would see sports events, weddings, church and religious events to will have summer camp for kids even like It's just staying and they same bunk. People will travel more, including myself. I will get on a plane and see my mom. Life will go back to normal. Now. Hot spots could flare up again because of the variance. You know, people getting careless people who haven't gotten vaccinated, But the trajectory of the pandemic could mostly keep going in the right direction. I mean, that is such good news. What about a lot of parents are concerned about what the fall looks like for kids and school? What do we know? Yet, you know, count kids won't be vaccinated, but their teachers hopefully will be so the vote with the virus down. Schools should be pretty safe, You know, probably wearing masks, but you know, no more slogging through school on laptops into kitchen table for most kids. I talked about this with Jennifer Nuzzo at Johns Hopkins. She's got a seven year old son. Seven year old aren't meant to spend their entire days on the computer, and it's really hard to cover the subjects that they're supposed discover on a Google hangout. They need to interact with their classmates. They need to learn how to, you know, not talk when the teacher is talking, and not just because the mute buttons on I think it'll be really beneficial for them to be back in the classroom. I suppose I'm taking through the seasons here, But I do have to ask about winter when things potentially. I mean, we could get in trouble there. Yeah, you know, there's a possible storm cloud on the horizon for the winner of the virus could surge again in the winter. If the coronavirus follows two seasons like the flu, but hopefully shouldn't be anything like the horrific victor. We just went through. And Dr Fauci is hopeful that life could still continue getting better and better does conceivable and probably likely by the time we get to the full late full early winter by the end of this year. That we will have a gradual but very noticeable and important return to some form of normality. Maybe almost exactly like we were before you know, some worry. It may take longer than that, because of the variance and even in the best scenario, the virus won't be gone. New variants could evolve will probably need new versions of the vaccines for the variance and, you know, booster shots. So that's kind of the view of the next 12 months say, But you've also been talking with historians about what this means for us in the long term, right? I mean the trauma. We've all collectively gone through. Yes, so the aftereffects could ripple for decades. I've talked about this with several medical of stories, including Keith Way, Lou at Princeton, he said. This pandemic is a world changing event that has already reshaped, it told generation. It has already been the case that the pandemic has had a profound impact on Society on basic questions like the nature of our social interactions. You know, the pandemic revealed some pretty deep problems and how society treats the elderly, poor people. People of color. It could change so many parts of our lives. You know, our homes are worked out how we travel how we touch each other, you know? Well, the elbow bump were placed a handshake for could You know, Looking back, the black death led to the Renaissance. The 1918 19 flu pandemic gave way to the roaring twenties. We've just begun the new twenties. It's impossible to know what world will emerge as the virus recedes. But it seems pretty clear that we'll be hearing the echoes of this pandemic for a really long time. Yeah. NPR health correspondent Rob Stein. Thank you so much, right? We appreciate it. You bet, Rachel.

Jennifer Nuzzo Rachel Martin Ali Mokdad United States Scott Tetreault Rob Stein Rachel Rachel E Rob Keith Way 2020 Brown School of Public Health 12 months Anthony Fauci Johns Hopkins CDC NPR Seven year more than 20 leading experts seven year
Tiger Woods' legendary career may be over after Los Angeles car crash

AP 24 Hour News

00:54 sec | 5 months ago

Tiger Woods' legendary career may be over after Los Angeles car crash

"Legend Tiger Woods remains hospitalized following surgery on his right leg broken in several places in a rollover crash that he had yesterday on a steep road in suburban Los Angeles. The AP, said. Dottie, who reports Woods Pro career may be over L. A county Sheriff Alex Villanueva says they will look into whether speed was a factor. But there were no indications of drugs or alcohol. What it is an accident would shattered bones in his lower leg. Some of the fractures went through the skin doctor Michael Gardner it, Stanford Medical says. Unfortunately, it's very, very unlikely that he returns to be a professional golfer, Fellow golfer Rory McIlroy says for Tiger Woods, golf shouldn't be on a map right now he's alive. He's not Superman. What I mean. It's not like, you know, he's a human being at the end of the day, and he's already been through so much Tiger Woods was rehabbing from back surgery before the crash.

Sheriff Alex Villanueva Tiger Woods Michael Gardner Dottie Stanford Medical AP Woods Los Angeles Rory Mcilroy Golf
Tiger Woods’ return to elite golf will be ‘very challenging’

AP 24 Hour News

00:54 sec | 5 months ago

Tiger Woods’ return to elite golf will be ‘very challenging’

"AP News I'm to McGuire golf legend Tiger Woods remains hospitalized following surgery on his right leg broken in several places. In a rollover crash that he had yesterday on a steep road in suburban Los Angeles. The AP, said Dottie, who reports Woods Pro career may be over L. A county Sheriff Alex Villanueva says they will look into whether speed was a factor. But there were no indications of drugs or alcohol. What it is an accident would shattered bones in his lower leg. Some of the fractures went through the skin doctor Michael Gardner it, Stanford Medical says. Unfortunately, it's very, very unlikely that he returns to be a professional golfer, Fellow golfer Rory McIlroy says for Tiger Woods, golf shouldn't be on the map. Right now. He's alive. He's not Superman. What I mean. It's not like, you know, he's a human being at the end of the day, and he's already been through so much Tiger Woods

Sheriff Alex Villanueva Ap News Tiger Woods Dottie Michael Gardner Stanford Medical Golf AP Woods Los Angeles Rory Mcilroy
Lucky to be alive, Woods faces difficult recovery

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 5 months ago

Lucky to be alive, Woods faces difficult recovery

"LA county sheriff Alex villain to wave a says they will look into whether speed was a factor but there were no indications of drugs or alcohol this is what it is an accident would shattered bones in his lower leg some of the fractures went through the skin Dr Michael Gardner at Stanford medical says unfortunately it's very very unlikely that he returns to be a professional golfer fellow golfer Rory McElroy says for Tiger Woods golf shouldn't be on the map right now he's alive he's not Superman you know I mean it's not like you know he's he's a human being at the end of the day and you know he's already been through so much Tiger Woods was rehabbing from back surgery before the crash I met Donahue

La County Sheriff Alex Villain Dr Michael Gardner Stanford Medical Rory Mcelroy Golf Tiger Woods Donahue
"stanford medical" Discussed on Latina to Latina

Latina to Latina

04:48 min | 11 months ago

"stanford medical" Discussed on Latina to Latina

"Yana. . Nino thought BS planned to spend the summer before her first year at Stanford Medical School doing contact tracing working retail. . But when her job search a dead end, , she went back to seasonal fruit picking work. . She's been doing since she was fourteen. . At the end of one long day she tweeted about farm workers like her being paid seven dollars for two gallons of blueberries. . She then asked how much do you pay for your blue various? ? I had talked to her I did and learn so much about her path to medicine as a first gen college student indigenous rights farm worker's Rights on. . We'll consumers need to know about the people who make their food possible. . Jeddah. . Where are you right now? ? I'm Linden from California Palo Alto our new you're back at school ivax going out here. . I always remember those summers during college going home in it's. . It's so strange because you have all this independence when you're at school and then you come home and your parents. . Treat, , you like you're still in high school, , right? ? Right and every time I go home. . It's just there's just a large expectation fairly for my mom is my own expectation that I should be like helping my mom in linked doing some chores and like lightening her load guy at school it's like you're right like complete freedom I do whatever I want whenever I want. . Do you perceive your mom to have a heavy load Yeah absolutely. . I think she's our only period and. . I think that you know we go to work and she has to come home and make them some meals for everyone. . There's five of us and she kind of like cleaned for Yooglie <unk> of she loves house being cleaned. So . I help out with all those things whenever I can. . To Lot Yeah You're born you're born in Eastern, , Oregon, , you grew up in eastern Washington state. . Told me about where you grew up. . So Eastern. . Washington is very different from Seattle. . I think that's why. . Like columnists conception that I. . Get is that the thing it's just like satellite super rainy it's actually not. . So eastern Washington Eastern Oregon both desert in the rain shadow of. . E mountain range. . So we get like very little rain, , it's very conservative. . There's very little diversity out there I think the main communities of color that live out there my farmer communities in the needle in communities I think it was a great place ago by the you grow up because it is so rural. . There's so much nature around there so much like the outdoor activities to do Saigo peron alarm really enjoyed around a lot of fields. . So my working in the field I love Eastern Oregon eastern Washington I would love to go back someday is that the plan to go back? ? Yeah. . Absolutely. . How old were you when you started working in the fields? ? I was fourteen years old. . What was your first day of work like? ? I. . Think I was super excited for my first year. . We're ten years ago. . And they all super excited because I would get to contribute. . Tie Household I, , think the causes for me was like, , okay I can use this money to go to my mom to make your life easier and then she would let me keep some of it so that I could spend it on what I wanted to nature's like take my siblings than I on a shopping spree for for school. . So he went to buy school supplies in. We . were very excited like Bonnie backpacks unlike brand name markers and stuff like that. . I have three younger siblings. . So they were all little and they were excited because we had never done that like I think I'll. . Getting. . The bare minimum that we need for school and now it's finally like being I was able to get them whatever they wanted. . Is there a story from childhood that captures who you were as a kid. . I think one story though <unk> remembering like me, , my mom and my sister was. . Going to do this activity called Battle of the books where there's a selection link. . Eight books that read it's handling a quiz bowl style where you just like recall parts of the book and I've always loved reading and so we were remembering that I read all the books like my sister was on my team even though she was two years younger than me in the elementary school and she was like, , yeah, , you just carry the team and you like because remembered everything and I think that that was super emblematic of just who I was of like my love for reading my. . Or. . Competitive data. . Just like a real enjoyment for school and like why The promise of my mom always wanted to go to school didn't get the chance to and so. . She was always telling me and my siblings like, , Oh, , you go to school a you do all in school. . It's GonNa take you to a Lotta places in. . So I guess those just carry me through life

Stanford Medical School Washington Oregon Yana. Nino Yooglie Eastern Jeddah California Palo Alto Saigo peron Bonnie Seattle
Why Gianna Nino-Tapias Embodies Labor Rights

Latina to Latina

04:48 min | 11 months ago

Why Gianna Nino-Tapias Embodies Labor Rights

"Yana. Nino thought BS planned to spend the summer before her first year at Stanford Medical School doing contact tracing working retail. But when her job search a dead end, she went back to seasonal fruit picking work. She's been doing since she was fourteen. At the end of one long day she tweeted about farm workers like her being paid seven dollars for two gallons of blueberries. She then asked how much do you pay for your blue various? I had talked to her I did and learn so much about her path to medicine as a first gen college student indigenous rights farm worker's Rights on. We'll consumers need to know about the people who make their food possible. Jeddah. Where are you right now? I'm Linden from California Palo Alto our new you're back at school ivax going out here. I always remember those summers during college going home in it's. It's so strange because you have all this independence when you're at school and then you come home and your parents. Treat, you like you're still in high school, right? Right and every time I go home. It's just there's just a large expectation fairly for my mom is my own expectation that I should be like helping my mom in linked doing some chores and like lightening her load guy at school it's like you're right like complete freedom I do whatever I want whenever I want. Do you perceive your mom to have a heavy load Yeah absolutely. I think she's our only period and. I think that you know we go to work and she has to come home and make them some meals for everyone. There's five of us and she kind of like cleaned for Yooglie of she loves house being cleaned. So I help out with all those things whenever I can. To Lot Yeah You're born you're born in Eastern, Oregon, you grew up in eastern Washington state. Told me about where you grew up. So Eastern. Washington is very different from Seattle. I think that's why. Like columnists conception that I. Get is that the thing it's just like satellite super rainy it's actually not. So eastern Washington Eastern Oregon both desert in the rain shadow of. E mountain range. So we get like very little rain, it's very conservative. There's very little diversity out there I think the main communities of color that live out there my farmer communities in the needle in communities I think it was a great place ago by the you grow up because it is so rural. There's so much nature around there so much like the outdoor activities to do Saigo peron alarm really enjoyed around a lot of fields. So my working in the field I love Eastern Oregon eastern Washington I would love to go back someday is that the plan to go back? Yeah. Absolutely. How old were you when you started working in the fields? I was fourteen years old. What was your first day of work like? I. Think I was super excited for my first year. We're ten years ago. And they all super excited because I would get to contribute. Tie Household I, think the causes for me was like, okay I can use this money to go to my mom to make your life easier and then she would let me keep some of it so that I could spend it on what I wanted to nature's like take my siblings than I on a shopping spree for for school. So he went to buy school supplies in. We were very excited like Bonnie backpacks unlike brand name markers and stuff like that. I have three younger siblings. So they were all little and they were excited because we had never done that like I think I'll. Getting. The bare minimum that we need for school and now it's finally like being I was able to get them whatever they wanted. Is there a story from childhood that captures who you were as a kid. I think one story though remembering like me, my mom and my sister was. Going to do this activity called Battle of the books where there's a selection link. Eight books that read it's handling a quiz bowl style where you just like recall parts of the book and I've always loved reading and so we were remembering that I read all the books like my sister was on my team even though she was two years younger than me in the elementary school and she was like, yeah, you just carry the team and you like because remembered everything and I think that that was super emblematic of just who I was of like my love for reading my. Or. Competitive data. Just like a real enjoyment for school and like why The promise of my mom always wanted to go to school didn't get the chance to and so. She was always telling me and my siblings like, Oh, you go to school a you do all in school. It's GonNa take you to a Lotta places in. So I guess those just carry me through life

Stanford Medical School Washington Oregon Yana. Nino Yooglie Eastern Jeddah Saigo Peron California Palo Alto Seattle Bonnie
Lori Gottlieb, psychotherapist and author: "The uncomfortable is a great place to be."

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:05 min | 1 year ago

Lori Gottlieb, psychotherapist and author: "The uncomfortable is a great place to be."

"Hey everyone the show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches. The scam is still working from home for the time being because of covid nineteen today Lori gottlieb joins us on skin from the couch. She is a psychotherapist and an author. She writes the Dr Therapist Column in the Atlantic and She's also the author of the bestselling novel maybe you should talk to someone which I read I loved and then recommended to every member of my family Lori. Thank you for joining US welcome to skin from the couch. Thanks so much for having me Lori we're very excited I. Feel like we're about to have therapy. We're going start though putting you on the on the hot feet, which just can you skim your resume for us? Yeah. Sure. After graduating from college I worked in the entertainment business. I. I worked on the film side and then I moved over to NBC, and you're I there to. You May for premiering when was called Er and the other was called breads heard of them. When I was working on Er, we had a consultant who is an emergency room physician at and he would do research with us and help us to choreograph the scenes and make sure that everything's accurate and I spent a lot of time in the ER, and he said to me I, think you like it better here than you like your day job because I was spending a lot of time in the ER and and I was like I'm lacking to go to medical school. Like I like in my late twenties late that I went to medical school. So went to Stanford I went to medical school when I got there, it was the middle of the DOT com the first sort of DOT com bill before i. And a lot of people were saying you know managed care it was coming into the healthcare system and would be able to do the kinds of work that I wanted to do with my patients. I worked at a DOT COM for a little bit in the summer between first year second year of medical school and ultimately assert writing and I left to become a journalist and. I felt like as a journalist I could really help to tell people stories the way that I wanted to, and it was about ten years later after being a journalist for wile still a journalist but I had a baby and I was desperate for adult interaction and ups guy would come ons I would lose him in conversation at he hated that nearly describing me in corn to. Like that and so he would always try to avoid the at eventually start telling to my door putting the APP just down very gently. So I would not open the door, engage him in conversation, and so I called Dean at Stanford and I said, maybe I should come back Andrew Psychiatry and she said, you know you always wanted these deeper interactions with people welcome to come back. But if you do psychiatry probably doing a lot of medication management, it's not what you WANNA do. Why don't you get a graduate degree in clinical psychology and do the work want to do it was really this is a moment it sounds obvious. In, retrospect which I think a lot of career things do where you know something that is right in front of you you had thought of, and so I did that and I, have this hybrid career where I'm a psychotherapist I have clinical practice here Los Angeles I'm still a writer I write books I writes the weekly called the Atlantic Avenue podcast coming out therapy. So I see like what I do is I look at story of the human condition and I just express it different means what something that is not on your Lincoln profiler bio that people would be surprised to know about you maybe that I was competitive chess player. You have another fallback career. I. Wasn't good never for career but I was really serious about it and I think I use that a lot in my career. So I think with chests there's a lot of strategy. There's a lot of anticipating the consequences of your moves and you can't plan everything out but I think that people look at my career they think I made these very impulsive decisions like you're working in Hollywood and boom you're going to go to medical school you're working on e. r. and then boom you want to. Tell stories in different ways to you're GonNa go Ri- and then you're GonNa go the therapist and you go from telling people stories, changing people's stories, right? All of that is true but I think I very much ought ahead about why was I doing reflecting on why was doing so many people said to me you are crazy. You don't leave medical school when you get into Stanford Medical School right? You don't leave Hollywood when you're at NBC and you have this job you're successful journalists would you mean you're going to go back and do therapy and why would you leave? And so I think it's really about I. Think in chests you have to kind of really be reflected about what you're doing. When I think about being reflective as an adult I think that means being reflective and going inside to that place of knowing and not listening to all the noise out there that the reflection is an inside job and not an outside job.

Lori Gottlieb Dot Com Stanford Medical School NBC Stanford United States Dr Therapist Column Hollywood Atlantic DOT Wile Consultant Andrew Psychiatry RI Los Angeles Lincoln Chess Writer
"stanford medical" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

12:41 min | 1 year ago

"stanford medical" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Stanford Medical Center Dr Alice thanks so much for joining the show again sure thanks so as we look at these increased model numbers suggesting anywhere from a hundred and thirty four thousand deaths to two hundred thousand deaths by the end of August yeah I'm I'm frankly a little bit surprised at the amount of press is getting given the fact that eventually these lockdowns were going to and everybody understands that as the lockdowns and more people will go out in it the risks from cover nineteen have not been mitigated I'm wondering exactly which sectors do you think are lacking when it comes to releasing people from walk down a gradual fashion yeah I'd like if I can clarify something about the models first those figures that were just I received from the I. age I mean model have nothing to do with blocked on being released those figures are just simply updates based upon data coming in that we are already seeing so the the fact here is that these hypothetical projections shouldn't be obsessed over all they do when they change every three or four days is point out the inaccuracies of their own projection this is not based on changing policy that's point number one now the quicker your question was what you what should be done on re entry is that is that what your question is yes sorry about that so I mean the basic points here are using what we know it which is the the real realistic approximation of fidelity rate and who's vulnerable we need to focus point number one very strange and access to the most vulnerable people the tender box of people that are living in a nursing home and senior is nursing homes and senior care centers and what I mean by stringent requirements in there already regulated environment because you can't just walk into a nursing home anyway that should be done things like actually requiring testing okay you can have somebody who's coming in there and cleaning the floors who might be infected or who's touching these patients are working with them this is sort of obvious point number one targeted strict control point number two is people who have mild disease who are sick and have some kind of flu symptoms respiratory they have to assume they have the disease and self isolate you don't need a test for them well you urgently need is to protect the vulnerable in the way you do that is to let people know that if they're sick they have to self isolate assume they have the disease the other things to be done really hard to make sure that you have not incited fear in the public and instill rational trust in in their experience in self isolating and what I mean by that is they know who's vulnerable they know their elderly family members for instance people with underlying conditions particularly diabetes and obesity are vulnerable use the standards of hygiene we now know no one knew about social isolation before we know what social distancing it but that doesn't mean confining people into their homes it makes no sense there's no real evidence it's better to be strictly confined inside your home or is it we should keep K. through twelve schools open and I I I can talk about that in detail but young children the people in the case through twelve eight your we know overwhelming amount of evidence that these people have very little if any risk of serious illness from this virus and essentially zero risk of dying you don't have to keep them confined in their homes or even have six foot spacing between them if you keep them confined in their homes not only are you missing education but you're locking up the ability of their parents to go to work there's a massive really harmful nature to some of these restrictive policies similarly there's no evidence to keep people inside and walked down parks and beaches and outdoor facilities that was done to prevent this kind of very close proximity mingling but even when we we know even if you wanted to have that for some reason the clothes a park I mean that's just really there's no evidence for that and what these policies have done them is they have done something very harmful not just walking down medical care and people are dying because of that and the massive harm from the economic isolation but they have instilled fear and panic in people and you're seeing probably where you live certainly where I live in California I see people who are driving around inside their own cars with no one else in them wearing masks and believe me I'm not I'm not implying something wrong with these people all orders are underestimating their fear I'm saying it it is an indication of the fear from very poor leadership and very blue really lack of consideration of science and using logic to use appropriate policy so Dr Alice that I've I've been in the last couple days considering a question and it was actually raised by a column that you wrote for the hill in in sort of contradiction to an article that was written by a dining terrace over the New York times and this is with regard to social distancing itself what are the goals that we are attempting to achieve here the reason I'm asking this question is because it seems like basically we are now trying to figure out what to do based on future projections on the one hand you have folks who say okay well vaccine will come it will be imminent it will happen quickly or there will be a therapeutic don't happen quickly which would suggest Billington lockdowns you create lots of social distancing so as to flatten the curve until we get to some sort of day sex Machenaud that radically changes the math on the other hand there's a possibility that nothing changes that were two years out we still don't have a vaccine there's been no serious therapeutic that's been developed a radically lowers the death rate and then the question is why wouldn't we have preserved herd immunity among the non violent vulnerable populations in other words you make sure that the people who are most vulnerable are protected you make sure that the nursing homes are really well protected to make sure the people who are obese or who have pre diabetes are staying home as much as possible isolated from other people and you actually encourage the sixty to seventy percent of the population that does not have any of these conditions to go out and you actually want the the call they to move through the population and create herd immunity that's sort of the Swedish strategy it seems like we sort of split the baby here where we are on the one hand suggesting that we are not pursuing herd immunity and on the other end and that there will be some radical change that will happen in the in the very near future at the same time we want people to sort of go back to work and sort of isolate and sort of not isolate what is our goal here should our goal here should be assuming that there's some sort of radical change to the system in the form of therapeutic or vaccine and thus we should really mitigate the amount of social contact we have with one another or should we be assuming that none of that may be forthcoming and so we should actually pursue her pursue her community because every month we don't pursue herd immunity is another month of of that length in time where the economy is dead and where his percentage of the population have to stay home okay so you're pointing out really one of the major flaws of logic and common sense honestly that's being used by people including very smart people the point here is that there is no reason to do some of these sort of illogical isolation policies regardless of if there is a vaccine and I want to put come back to the vaccine point but the goal of the of the policy this is your first question the goal of policy was stated and it has been two fold stop the people from dying who are the most vulnerable which that called hi Leslie there's a problem with how they are was it sort of ignored in a sense but took flatten the Kurds what does that mean curve is nothing to do with number of cases the curse to be flattened there have been slapping our curse on hospitalizations per day and that's per day to prevent overwhelming of the hospitals and to understand that you sort of have controlled the progress of death there's a nuance to this this sort of a bore your audience but the reality is flattening the curve has nothing to do with changing the area under the curve this is very early on the point was to pro long and slow down and somehow reduce the overwhelming of the medical system and sort of in and out of control way so that we could administer care in control that kind of you know how to control sort of overwhelming issues but it was not really honestly to reduce the desk the reduction of deaths should be it should be this targeted policy of protecting the vulnerable we know who they are now the idea I want to mention something about the idea of vaccines there's just sort of naive interpretation of what a vaccine does and when it will come out okay and and this is not really I'm not trying to criticize people but you get that the general populace and even at people in this debate I've been very naive about this vaccines are not magic wands typically speaking you know it's very common that vaccine vertically for respiratory virus that has some evolution in changing that occurs like let's talk about influenza forty to sixty percent effective and we've been working on vaccines for influenza for many many years and have a lot of experience that's point number one there's no magic wands here that all of a sudden it's a hundred percent effective we don't know we have no idea about that but we know from other infections that it it it it may not be the second point is that despite the vaccines in influenza four hundred thousand to six hundred fifty thousand people die in the world every year from seasonal flu with the vaccine okay so you know the vaccine is not a magic wand B. about the vaccine is that vaccines are not ready tomorrow Texans are not going to be ready in a month the vaccine technology has dramatically improved and things are done with a massive amount of intention and rapidity in an incredible effort by the private sector and in the US in the academic sector as well as in the UK and and elsewhere lots of vaccines are being looked at probably a hundred roughly in a couple who have a significant amount of promise when will they be ready when will they be ready for production when will they be ready for implementation we're talking many many months so we don't know exactly when it's it's highly unlikely in my view and and it's impossible to predict because I predict I'll be I'll be way off but it's not going to be happening before twenty twenty one I mean almost certainly and you know even with the best case scenarios I really have to realize vaccines are not magic wands meantime there said Matt we can't ignore this massive harms from the current policy extending total isolation is killing people on the basis of the medical care and a catastrophic economic problem which converts into health care in poverty and death all over the world to the likes of which really people have not really calculated so final question for you Dr Alice so there's been people have been pushing it some Israeli scientists something called controlled avalanche which is basically make sure that everybody who is vulnerable is protected and then actually encourage people who are younger too not social distancing you sort of mentioned something like this in your article for the hill so in so is that something that we should be seriously considering just saying if you are under the age of forty and you're healthy you should go out you should go to ball games and if you get corona virus and then you get over it then you've actually added to the health of the country man this is really hitting the nail on the head sort of with the basic premise of immunology and decades of knowledge about about viruses it's actually a negative to interfere by total isolation with herd immunity herd immunity is necessary and it is the most immediately available way to break the connections towards the vulnerable in this contagious sort of disease so it's it's actually detrimental to lock everybody up and it prevents the low risk groups like you're saying to get the disease fifty percent of people are zero symptoms over ninety five percent of people probably ninety nine percent of people have very mild disease there's nothing wrong with that in the low risk groups the focus should be preventing the people who are the vulnerable we know who they are it's harmful to prevent mingling by other people well doctor Scott atlas Hoover Institution really appreciate your time Sir and I look for to speak with you again soon.

Stanford Medical Center Dr Alice
"stanford medical" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"stanford medical" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"Haven't furnished information about fell in an actual way to people in ways that we ship nation about anything's going on in our lives and I think that's one thing that technology was benefit technology offers every time you fly on a plane. Jet Engines are being monitored hundreds thousands of times a minute We're beaming mentioned back. Down to Earth and routine maintenance of engines is done based on that information being the city now most of that's completely out of the awareness of the pilots. And there's a problem in which case the pilots aren't aware we should be able to have comparable types of information available in an ongoing basis about our health so that we can intervene before. It's a big disaster. So that we know what our propensity for certain diseases And they were able to take the competitive measures based on those risk factors. And we're only starting to see that really into our environment. Today I think the next five to ten years we're GONNA see rapid acceleration in the pace of that information becomes available to into me. I'm so glad you brought up that analogy because I highlighted it. Be The the idea that you know. Forty years ago an airplane would be inspected every few months Whereas now like the the. The health of the plane is being monitored while it's in the air that's a perfect analogy for what in theory we should be able to achieve soon With the sort of monitoring technology exactly it's within our grasp It's not trivial but it was definitely within our class. Can I ask about There's been some discussion recently about you. Know there's a lot of concern by people about their data and and handing over their data and especially now their health data People are worried about the control of their own data. But you write that. In the current healthcare system there are these weird perverse incentives to sort of hoard information and not share. It so again how. How should I square this? People's fears of their data not being under their control verses. Maybe data isn't being shared enough and thus the healthcare system is not as efficient as it could be. Here are some legitimate concerns about data sharing board ensure the security data and we want to make sure that patients have control over where their in. How the data's been news that being said these perverse incentives that I I write about in. The book are related to the fact that for healthcare delivery systems once a patient is enrolled in a delivery system. It's in the business interests of that system to keep the patient in the system And one of the ways doing that of course the best way being that. It's making sure that assistance offering outstanding care in patient centered way with monitoring patient satisfaction. And all the things that other used to make sure we consumer stay engaged with their services and their products. But it other way to keep people in a system is to make it really difficult for their information to be transferred from one place. Someone system to the next is a lot of federal legislation that has been devoted to addressing those problems and making sure that their regulatory guidelines that require systems to Make data transportable and to really placed the patient data in the hands in control of the patient when patients want to have that sort of access control over. Their data are not commissioning here for that. The data will be more portable in the future Certainly we now have. The technology needed some nights data interchangeable in ways. That wasn't in the past. So it's not per se a technological barrier that's committing data from one health system to be transferred to the other even on different the HR systems technology barriers are being lowered because of Sophistication Technology. But there still are some economic and and business related barriers. That I think the federal regulatory space is helping to address. Finally you write about This precision health vision that you have is one of a high touch environment not just a high tech environment like precision. Health should be about strengthening the doctor patient relationship not replacing it not taking the the doctors the humans out of the equation right exactly. That's that's absolutely essential. We'd gone through a period for the past to twenty years where I fear that. Technology has done more to separate healthcare providers from consumers from patients than it has been able to bring people together to bring patients and providers together. We we have to overcome that I and that's why I do talk about high pick enabling high touch. There's nothing more disappointing For patients for frankly healthcare provider than when. You're as a patient you know. Sitting in the exam room. The healthcare provider walks in and the first thing they do is go to the terminal and start typing. Maybe they say hello. Maybe they make eye contact briefly again. They're looking at the screen and they're typing and maybe they're listening. Fli or maybe. They're concentrating on what they have to type in order to complete documentation requirements. That just has to change. No one goes to a healthcare provider To be looking back of their head while they're talking into a computer terminal and and we can change that and just push forward and make sure that we did. The book again is discovering precision. Health predict prevent and cure to advance health and wellbeing. Dr Minor. Thank you so much for coming on the show to talk about this. Thank you very much. It's a privilege.

Sophistication Technology Dr Minor
"stanford medical" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"stanford medical" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"Their care and with their providers. in more informative ways those issues that come together to create an environment which technology has not had the same sort of transformative effects that it's had in virtually every aspect of our lives. You know other than healthcare for example today the way you and I or the goods and services waypoint thin- financial transactions. That's radically different than it was a decade ago yet today most of us still pick up the phone and place a call to an office of the doctor or other health care provider for make an appointment and we still bring paper records with us or we have the facts to the doctor's office in advance we haven't seen that same sort of disruption occurred in every other sector of the economy. It does seem though I mean I. It seems like every day. I'm doing another story about a a a new health tech startup or somebody that's raised around or whatever and in the book actually you you have the actual data you pointed out then in two thousand eighteen eight point. One Billion Dollars was invested in digital health startups. That's up from the five point. Seven billion the year before and up from just one point one billion about a decade ago. I'm curious What do you think is changed? That has suddenly made healthcare a fertile ground for investment and new companies. I think several things have changed. What is that was soon? Some really bright energetic entrepreneurs.

"stanford medical" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"stanford medical" Discussed on KOMO

"This murky Mrs we had through the morning commute it's gonna take a little extra time as a result eventually it brightens for a few hours but then there's a system waiting on shore that will start moving in that was throw some rain into western Washington late Thursday night Friday morning the good weather center I'm meteorologist Shannon o'donnell Tyler Lockett spend a couple nights at the Stanford Medical Center was full of like after suffering an injury in Monday night's slugfest with the Niners like a return to Seattle Wednesday and stylish team owner Joe the Allen center private jet to get locked at all he is expected to recover and there's a good chance he plays next week against the eagles the group still need two wins in their last three games become bowl eligible WSU's favored by ten this weekend when they host Stanford and its husky men's basketball Saturday against Tennessee they play in Toronto for game one thirty here on tolo arts Sanders at your home of the Huskies komo news she's a hiker biker loves driving her Mustang the fastest way home afternoon traffic every ten minutes on the force como news one thousand FM ninety seven seven and your smart speaker she loves festivals farmers markets and especially road trips except for when my sixteen year olds driving Keira Jordan with the fastest way to work morning traffic every ten minutes on the force Coleman whose one thousand FM ninety seven seven and your smart speaker what is your fixed income truly fixed income does it provide diversification income and risk management for your clients and I'm a fast we help advisors delivered this week calling essential fixed income find out more at Amazon com slash fixed income what are your status updates say what every ounce of your being help update the status of a person and in turn they did the same for you life is calling how far will you go to school interactivity peace corps dot com slash game.

Sanders Amazon Coleman Allen center Joe Tyler Lockett Shannon o'donnell Keira Jordan Washington Toronto Tennessee Stanford WSU eagles Seattle Stanford Medical Center ten minutes sixteen year
Climate change and mental health

Forum

16:58 min | 1 year ago

Climate change and mental health

"Joining us to discuss the toll climate change could take on our mental physical health is Paul R. Bucky's professor emeritus of emergency medicine Stanford at the university Medical Center and also co author of enviro medics the impact of climate change on human health welcome professor about good to have you with us good morning Michael thank you good morning to you and we also want to welcome robin Cooper who's here with us in studio psychiatrist in private practice in San Francisco and co founder of climate psychiatry alliance welcome to the program thank you I'm glad to be here glad to have you with us here and Tucker about let me begin with you and let's begin by just talking about what we know generally at this point we know certainly that the extreme weather and sea level rise or really affecting all kinds of illnesses and creating all kinds of problems in our physical health sketch that out for us if you could the list of health related effects from climate change our is is enormous there are the obvious that you mentioned the heat waves the heat stress the extreme weather events floods hurricanes nine it cetera but there are many others that haven't come to the forefront yet like the migration of factors like mosquitoes and other creatures that cause communicable diseases that will move as the planet warms you have a superb mental health expert on the show with this which is terrific because there are profound mental health the facts and then all the issues related to lack of access to clean water migration of people food security the issue of increased allergic exposures the harmful algal blooms that we're seeing from microorganisms that are proliferating in the ocean and then the broader range of problems that will relate eventually to lack of bio diversity to the erosion of ecosystem services all the inter relationships and how it all winds in so it's quite an impressive list and an overwhelming listen anyway so we wanna staggered add just all the things that can result or they can be consequential from climate change and you mention mental health let's bring robin Cooper this one of the main things you find that you really need services to be aware of in terms of the affected impact on mental health problems well let me start first with just kind of alerting people climate change is a health emergency it's a mental health emergency and a health emergency and I think in regards to the mental health impacts people tend to think about the good that kind of things that you can easily relate to how traumatic the posttraumatic stress syndromes and depression when people lose huge amounts of things in their lives due to the enormous weather related to disasters so what we know about the wild fires what we know about floods what we know about the impact from hurricanes it some are the posttraumatic stress is enormous what I think is much much less understood are that there are profound behavioral thinking problem psychiatric problems that are specifically related just to heat extremes themselves to air pollution that people tend to think about air pollution as affecting their as my lung disease but it actually has a very specific attacks on the on the brain and pervasive this affects throughout the lifecycle so I think it's important just as our previous speakers spoke on that the mental health impacts are very diverse and very expensive and very serious one ought to add because they also include things like more aggression and violence you kind of alluded to this your intimated about it but it's definitely cause and effect were talking about that absolutely he extremes we all kind and this went in our colloquial language hot under the collar I am so angry my blood is boiling or the admonition Hey be cool man when we're really angry she actually but our scientific evidence supports this we really know that heat extreme heat impact aggression anger and make it much more difficult for people who are vulnerable to not being able to control their behavior to act on their aggression and anger that has very specific impacts for domestic violence for impacts on women and children and I'm very concerned about that robin cook again as a psychologist in private practice in San Francisco co founder of climate psychiatry alliance Paul about his professor emeritus of emergency medicine Stanford Medical Center and co author of enviro medics the impact of climate change on human health only go back to professor are back and just talk about since this was alluded to by robin Cooper the vulnerable populations who turned out to be well the most vulnerable as one would expect the greatest impact in fact on health and physical health is on poor people and on the youngest and the oldest but also on minority communities in on immigrants and homeless and disabled absolutely and that's been well studied and before I address that I'd just like to go back for second and just add to what robin said because there's a whole nother large overlay on this mental health issue which relates to socially disadvantaged populations which is this general increase in cultural anxiety all are feeling somewhat helpless in the face of this and having been a disaster respond or in the past you walk into really nasty situations and it can seem overwhelming and you can you can question your ability to do anything and I think we're facing that now a little bit and part of this because it's not necessarily a happy talk is to be real but to say there are absolutely things that we can do that might not have immediate effect but if we all pull together in unprecedented ways based on modern times and the political situation we can make progress and we can start to turn things around I don't want people to give up hope but what specifically you're talking about here because we need that help I think you're absolutely right bring it up here because you can get really down just thinking about what we're talking about well this is a this is a problem we can solve for if we have the will to solve for it it's not a zero sum game I think we have to start looking at the fact that we're going to need to make changes just with regard to the climate in how we approach our economic system some of the industries that we support and the changes that will have to make in the way that people live their lives in order to protect their men to reverse the degradation that were imposing on the planet and that takes a collective will it takes functional governments it takes citizen response it takes upon ourselves up now and realizing that we're in the biggest battle that we've ever faced this is uncharted territory so I'm not laying blame anywhere I'm saying okay we've got a problem now let's bring the best and brightest minds together and let's deal with it and as you said it affects disproportionately people who can't take care of themselves it's it's hard to argue with someone not to burn fuel in a kerosene stove when they need to do that to survive so we have to give people alternatives we have to be able to present people that are displaced with places to live in health care and hope and respect and all the social determinants of health that go into having a functioning properly oriented society in a big company and I think from you Dr Cooper's don't panic don't panic the chronicle put out a piece this weekend about panic let me just address and I can't agree more fully with the the comments that have already been made but let me go back to some of these distress and drums that I think we're all kind of preoccupied with now this kind of umbrella term it's a shorthand climate on the eco eggs ID climb in anxiety that's a shorthand term for lots and lots of big feelings and it is absolutely appropriate for us to have anxiety worry our brains are wired for us they have intense feelings when there are threats and this is a real threat in fact I learned a new term thanks to your research cell steadier this helps in certain terms about existential grief and psychic distress of people feel over well this concern over their homeland and environmental changes that have to do also with the child's psychological development those kind right this call without you it's a fancy word and it kind it relates to that intense distress but from this Dow Jones looking back on what used to be that intense grief when we experience the lack of ability to soothe ourselves from our environment in those soothing places that we use to get on a soulless from that's only one component and I think we're spear seem much more now people who are in a cute states of worry and anxiety as I said those are the feelings that alert us to do something when we're in danger the trouble is when the when the emotions are so big so into ends so overwhelming that we can't contain them into manageable ways to respond we also have brains that that can be planned full and strategic and that's really important to in gender that sense that there are things we can do and that we can make a difference in important ways both then sue the in these very very big feelings but I'm not also in the game of just let's feel good I want us to translate that big energy from big feelings factual effective action no I'm with you there is a good doctor about his many of our listeners are but he's from a mental health standpoint this can be overwhelming when you think about really what you're fit with what we're all facing here I mean in particular when you're thinking about well children in the future and when young people are thinking about their future and so forth it can be downright depressing and is for many people as you discover no doubt your practice absolutely I saw I'm sorry I see this in my practice I see this in my practice mostly when there's an intrusion from some awful event has that has just happened parents who came in a mom after the solutions to what you tell your patients and I want to go to professor about because I know he wants it here I mean some specific tools of people can have other than you know I can exercise my will I can do something and maybe compel yourself in that fashion toward action it's not what I tell my patients it's not that I tell my patients that's not my job as a psychotherapist my pet my job with a psychotherapist is to listen understand validate and help to them to contain their feelings so that they can translate that into effective ways to make a difference in behaviors in their lives and then the world's they live in we have the same okay it's the scope of psychotherapy we can help but psychotherapy isn't the place has since then has to come from them I understand that you are what you wanted in here well I'm I'm with that a hundred percent because I think I'm going to say it just a slightly different way and that is in my experience action is the is the overwhelming solution to the inner behaviors that we see when people get depressed it's getting about bad bad it's getting them to begin to engage in the activities of daily living and it's to find solutions through self help and through empowerment so this all comes to how do we begin to relate to each other and less polarizing fashion how do we get climate change to be a problem that we all are going to face through whatever means we have through our expertise through our government's it cetera the medical profession is starting to step up big time to support this we certainly need are governments to step up and begin to put aside their relentless differences and start to act in a functioning way to support the people that they were elected to support we need to integrate environmental responsibility into our own lives granted that won't have the same impact is reforming the fossil fuel industry but it gets everybody on the same page about the importance of it and I would say that the single most important factor is to take a personal responsibility for your fellow human beings it's really easy to step back and say it's not my problem but it is our problem no I think those are very good and an important and valuable sentiments the fact is so there's so much to we have no control over when we're talking about extreme events like hurricanes and floods and the effect that they have on people psychologically or the destruction that it causes and wreaks in people's lives these are things that the along with pollution and along with some of the other things we've touched upon here that we we don't have many things in our tool kits to to fight against a I think that's where it becomes so frustrating for many people and your thoughts doctor Cooper I actually don't see it that way I actually think will more stuck in it is so big all of the things that you've outlined that promotes a kind of psychological defensive retreat there's nothing I can do I might as well back off I actually don't think that's true I think that there are many many ways and I strongly I think they're both for managing our own feelings but also for the active involvement in the many many ways that collaboratively add up there is an incredible importance to fend off the kind of hopelessness you've outlined the offender and hurricane the psychological no but you can act and you can act in ways that are collaborative with other people the worst thing to do is to retreat into personal isolation the most healing thing to do is to engage with others in shared action I want to be brilliant a psychological intervention from our leader Nancy Pelosi don't agonize organize and there is a place for everyone to move with groups of people outside of that isolation in many ways to have contributions I think it's like viewing a puzzle and there are pieces of the puzzle that all add up together and they can go across the board Paul are back with the vice we're getting and I think it's on advice from robin Cooper about for example we have to worry about our nutrition because food is being affected by climate

Paul R. Bucky Stanford University Medical Center Professor Michael Robin Cooper Private Practice San Francisco Co Founder Hundred Percent
"stanford medical" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"stanford medical" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks for having me pre right off the bat. Let me just ask you this. How disappointed where you're South Asian parents that you do not become a doctor? It's it's it's actually a bit of a sore point. My mom will we made a couple of medical videos, and actually we had partnered with Stanford medical school to do them. I'm forty three. Now. This was I was probably this is when Khan Academy had already become a real thing. I I must have been about thirty six thirty seven when my mom found out about those videos. She literally asked me whether I could now get a little credit for Mets faster. Did you make joking? Did you make? I know when we talk about our parents were never joking. Did you do that in part to appease them in part? Maybe. Did nothing it just it. Just amplified the disappointment. How'd you how'd you pick the name? So so interesting the name Khan Academy. How did you? How did you come up with that? You know, hey, I'm actually quite sensitive about that. Because I fun of I used to make fun of people who would name things after themselves. I thought it was a very narcissistic thing to do. But in the early days of Khan Academy before it was even called kind of kademi when I was working with family members. I was writing software for them. And I wanted to call it something this was before I'd even made YouTube videos, and a lot of domain names were already taken up, and the one thing that was available was was kinda kademi. And the reason why I picked academy. I was almost a joke. It was me. And my family members my last name, and then my the kademi I thought it would be nice if it had an air of being something that could turn into an institution, and that's something that eventually I I do want it to turn into another dimension of it, even when we incorporated as a nonprofit that actually was a reason in a pseudo strategic way while so wanted Convair because an for profit. I don't own any shares. There's no formal. Lover of control. But I thought, hey, you know, at least if my name's on it. They would only fire me in an extreme circumstance that would have to find another con or they would have to change the name. Although, you know, pecan academies. It sounds cool and it works if your name if I'd done this. I'm not sure Berar academy would have worked. It's too many syllables. I think he's got a ring to it. But if you had if you had a podcast, you might call it. Stay tuned with pre. So I put my name in it also. So I so I also can't be judgment. So a lot of people may not be familiar with the amazing story of how Khan Academy started. So you disappointed your parents by not going to medical school? Maybe made them feel a little bit better by going to a hedge fund, and you're a hedge fund guy and explain what happened. Yeah. My real training and background was in tech..

Khan Academy Berar academy Mets Stanford medical school YouTube Convair
"stanford medical" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"stanford medical" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"We're individuals. And yes, you know. It's a horrible thing. Don't think people people who are racist horrible. But you can't let your way. Right. And the overcoming of it is character-building. I, you know, my my son in law is a Jamaican American. My daughter met him at Harvard. No, actually, my son met him at Harvard. And then my daughter met him at Stanford medical school where they both went to medical school. And she will tell you that he worked twice as hard and twice as long as everybody else. Not because he needed to to keep up. But because he's brilliant, and he he deserved to be in those schools competing with everyone else equally. Nobody should come along anytime in question academic credentials NC that was exactly where I was going when he came time for his internship. All of a sudden, he said doors were being sprung open that everybody else was having trouble getting to and he you know, he said I refuse to be used in that manner. I will earn my place and whatever hospital, and by the way, he earned, of course, top fellowships and everything else on his merit. But but he said it's insane. The kind of special access that was given to other students. They went to school with who really had lackluster scholastic records. Yeah. I mean, it's one of the reasons why racial preferences, keeps coming back to the court is society, by the way, this is an eighty twenty. A very big poll last week. Which showed this is an issue which American public is invited eighty twenty eighty percent of the people think that. Support it. So this is this is a clear a clear majority here against.

Stanford medical school Harvard eighty twenty eighty percent
"stanford medical" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"stanford medical" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"And so so there's some of these are just sort of bad habits to get picked up. Again, not deliberate is just kind of the momentum of the field. I think also a lot of this is driven by individuals, young scientists who are trying to make a Mark, a lot of the research that go. That takes places actually done in the hands of a post doctoral scientists. Somebody who's gotten their PHD in his trying to build a career in science. That's a tough road because, oh. Probably about twelve percent of these people in who get these post doc will actually end up on a tenure track job, which is kind of what everybody wants. So it's a, it's a very cutthroat world and even highly talented scientists don't make the cut and and so it sort of comes down to you have a few years in somebody's laboratory, and you've got to get fabulous results, or your career is going to take a very sharp turn. And so that kind of incentive is just is just baked into the process. And it's not that someone says, well, I'm just going to do whatever it takes, but people start seeing what they want to see in their experimental results as opposed to sort of stepping back and and maybe being a little bit more skeptical or so on. And you know, I'm certainly not an expert in laboratory techniques. I'm not going to go out there and say that people are just using, you know, terrible laboratory technique, but I think that it is the case that scientists aren't necessarily thinking through these things as carefully as they can because the incentives are not there for them to do that. This is one of those incredibly thorny subjects and Akkad. -demia thinking through the incentive models for scientists because it pokes at training and tenure and money, and it and status. And so it's deeply intertwined with with history and some external pressures that the university faces. And I, I think one of the things like after working at a university for for decades is that most universities that I've seen are small c, conservative in a lot of nature's, they, they usually don't change big structure elements like this quickly. Is that your survey shin and reporting on this book as well? And do you see hope for change around any of these incentives? Both. I agree with you that universities tend to be very conservative and you know, universities really want their scientists to go out and bring home the federal research dollars. So whatever works if they're researchers are bringing in the dollars, that is how they measure success. Even if the studies that they're producing what those dollars. Turn out not to be that helpful in the long run. So so the incentives for the universities are also a little bit askew, but there is hope in an actually I, I am seeing some changes as a result of this of this sort of soul-searching. One great example is I was talking to Steve Goodman who's at the Stanford University medical school, and he was talking about the fact that he'd been asked to write a letter of recommendation for somebody who is up for tenure, and he started doing the usual thing which was reviewing a bunch of their. Journal articles and talking about how many things hit pub. This person had published and so on and doing sort of the quantitative stuff. And his letter was kicked back and they said, Dr. Goodman, what we really want you to do is focus on, you know, get away from all this quantitative stuff, which is unfortunately far too often how scientists get picked for tenure or whatever. And you know, tell us if this person is doing good science and you know, let's get, let's get beyond the sort of, you know how many papers did they publish in science nature and sell because we're de emphasizing that at the Stanford medical school and and Dr Goodman was thrilled to hear that that his own institution was was starting to change its culture about how it thought about this stuff..

Steve Goodman Stanford medical school Akkad. -demia twelve percent
"stanford medical" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"stanford medical" Discussed on From Scratch

"Studied monkeys and taste to make sure that i wasn't caught off guard by some statistic or something all guy want to talk about his family could the food was he was like the nicest guy was a wonderful meeting and and we've got to know him you know fairly well throughout this talk about the actual meat what did it taste like when you first started off now what does it taste like i think what we got right in the beginning was the underlying texture of meat so that that kind of strike action and that resistance that you get when you bite into piece of meat taste wasn't there but extra was their taste wasn't there the distribution of fat was not there the room was not there the overall pure was not there it's don't out there actually and so again it was like the whole balance parts was missing and so it's interesting we kept working with scientists to try to overcome that but i feel that the real breakthrough that happened for us was when we started to bring in a scientist from other disciplines fellow from from stanford jody puglisi who's the gerald microbiology department at stanford medical that started to make real breakthrough or is there a breakthrough moment technologically now that chemical levitt for the distribution of of fat and water for example so we can take a a a a piece of chicken a chicken breast or or or piece of beef and put it on i like it with your knee and you can be into studied understand exactly how water fat and protein distributed as you gain that more fundamentalist standing you can prove your products and so we didn't have that in the beginning example like that should've six hundred miles six hundred mile was give the flavor and aroma meet right we have a system that allows us to try to denigrate what are the key drivers of the six hundred but it's not only it's not only the presence of malik is how they can binding and reacting under heat read has been harder for you than you thought what in terms of building the business was harder than you thought getting out of the meat alternatives section militarization now where you want to be it's just a penalty box it's a it's a forgotten where would you like to be in the case which is where we are now so we got into the case at whole foods which has been transformational for our business i mean absolutely transformational if you look at that in the frozen section versus what we saw in the freshman be case we tell that thirteen times more in the fresh case because that's where consumers buy meat speaking of whole foods there was a.

scientist jody puglisi levitt malik stanford gerald microbiology stanford medical
"stanford medical" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"stanford medical" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And consultants who raised serious concerns right because for for years they were essentially research and development but then they approached walgreens in it enters a new a new sphere but there were scientists and consultants who raised concerns chicago where where walgreens is headquartered and he started you know asking uncomfortable questions and suggesting that they do a comparison study with stanford which elizabeth refused to do he suggested that his firm collaborate in bed someone at theranos in palo alto for period leading up to the to the pilot going live elizabeth also turned him down on that score the first visit was an august two thousand ten that he made to to their offices in palo alto and one of the things that he was explicitly scheduled to do there was to visit the lab which elizabeth had represented the theranos was commercially ready and and he asked about seeing the lab several times while he was there but she she said that in the end she wasn't ready to show it to them he had also asked that his blood and walgreens executives blood be tested with theranos system that they get their results back and then he was going to go with the walgreens executives to stanford medical school and get retested and compare the results and they wouldn't test their blood either and instead of doing that they took the walgreens executives and hunter to a a sushi place in palo alto and and sort of had this cloak and dagger approach where they may everyone leave their their nose offices at staggered intervals and then once they got to this restaurant in the middle of the afternoon no one could use names and it was supposedly not to attract the attention but meanwhile no one was in the restaurant and sunny elizabeth's boyfriend had brought his lamborghini so if there's anything that was conflictwracked attention it was his lamb very inconspicuous in the parking lot and and hunter was immediately on his guards he thought this stuff was silly and he smelled a rat and he tried to alert walgreens executives to suspicions and amazingly the walgreens executives brushed him brushed him off and the reason they did so after a while is that elizabeth and sunny asked that hunter be excluded from the meetings and from these video conference calls they had remarkable and the walgreens executives amazingly agreed to do.

walgreens chicago stanford palo alto elizabeth hunter stanford medical school
"stanford medical" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"stanford medical" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"Talk about in the book interestingly enough and that book come we'll be an amazon in june it's it's it's almost ready but it's it's not out yet but the medical information bureau has information everybody on what they use their insurance for i'm not exactly sure that the medical information bureau i don't necessarily know that they're limited from sharing that kind of information i then there's the credit card companies right so if you go to and get a prescription and there's a way to identify it you know that's entirely possible that way but one thing i would say about facebook than i think is particularly interesting that has come out after the cambria analytics debacle that became known by everybody i don't know if everybody knows as much about the fact that facebook was working with stanford medical school as well as the academy of able to think about it but it is a heart it's a academy that has to do with cardiology and conditions that kademi has ten different databases facebook had approach them in order to get medical information from them so that they could match it up with user data facebook user data facebook put that on pause after they cambria scandal broke and but they only put it on pause they didn't shelve it and because of hip those entities stanford and and that database system they can share that information with facebook as a healthcare operation to try and figure out more information about their own patients so.

amazon facebook stanford medical school cambria analytics cambria stanford
"stanford medical" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

03:29 min | 3 years ago

"stanford medical" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"Talk about the interestingly enough and that become that will be an amazon in june almost ready but it's not yet yet but the amendment information bureau has information everybody on what they use their insurance for sure the medical information bureau like necessarily know their fare limited from sharing that kind of information i then there's the credit card companies right so if you go to and get a prescription rates identify that way but one thing i would say about facebook that i think is particularly interesting that has come out after the cambria debacle became known by everybody i don't know if everybody knows as much about the fact that facebook was working with stanford medical school as well as the me able to think about it but it is hard cardiology conditions academy has ten different database spokane approached them yup information from them so they could match it up user data piece of user data base for that after cambria handle broke and but they only put it on it didn't show for database can share that information healthcare operation trying to figure out more information about their own patients so they know contract no data use agreement according to news report i don't know if facebook will continue to person so have this could work down the road near you have you come in with a heart condition or pipeline pressure scroll through your facebook find it you're doing you have habits that are exacerbating your medical condition what i mean i just think of all the horrible things that can happen they can pull your insurance because you're not compliant i don't know it just it's not there's no safe harbor anyways it's very good i have a quote in the book ud faulkner who is the ceo and founder healthcare information in their system about sixty eight percent of the american population though most americans have been to some hospital that has an epic system so not all the medical records every ethics but some portion of them are in september of twenty twenty seventeen i think the user's group which are people who the epic record come to this conference because they use the epic records and said something on the order of i m paraphrasing but.

amazon facebook stanford medical school spokane cambria ceo and founder sixty eight percent
"stanford medical" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"stanford medical" Discussed on KGO 810

"So elizabeth holmes was a stanford student she dropped out of stanford because she had this great idea based on her own experience according to the narrative the story that she tells she was afraid of neto for she's a known liars we have to take this all with a grain of salt but go on well the story is what's important to get investors to invest so you know the savvy ones they start developing story early on and her story was that she was afraid of needles she had started looking at and taking some courses at stanford and sort of doing her own independent study to figure out a way to draw blood or at least be able to test blood for various things only using a couple of droplets and that was the pitch it would if it was real be revolutionary because it would not only reduce costs but obviously make it really ee much more comfortable and much less painful for people like you know elderly or peep cancer patients for kids children be a game changer for kids well and listen i don't have any particular fear of needles and no more fond of them than anybody else but if somebody says to me oh by the way there's a method to do this that doesn't involve sticking the needle in your vein i'd say yes please everybody would don't even say that anyway what happens next so she got a lot of people at stanford interested and stanford of course it's the hotbed of start up venture capital activity there's always people there who are willing to support mentor in bass there's lots of infrastructure to support people like her but she dropped out and she immediately attracted some very high powered people to invest in her firm you know she ended up with some stellar people like george salts the former secretary of state and some of his colleagues at the hoover institution people from the stanford medical school and one particular guy tim draper from a vc firm called draper fischer interprets and who invested not as like a formal venture capitalists but as a friend.

elizabeth holmes stanford stanford medical school tim draper neto george hoover institution draper fischer
"stanford medical" Discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"stanford medical" Discussed on The Interchange

"And so that was the that the steady the results and we were we were asked by the head of the california senate to to testify on a bill that he wanted to introduce that would make gas price posting mandatory and so we did that and it passed and of course now you take it for granted that as all gas prices are posted but that that was an early success it was something that gave me confidence that policy could be used for for a good purpose and it and it also gave me a me at foreshadowed something that i would do uh over and over my career so the work he did as a student is why we have gas prices posted today well you know it takes a team that doubt we started it yeah and i mean was i was a surprise one day that that that it was actually sadly it was george mosconi was the the who would become the mayor of san francisco and be assassinated but he was before that he was the head of this california senate he was the one that just took it interest in it i mean it's it's just a good story of how you you can with research and um kenner of tapping at something that people really care about you can make a difference and then tell us about the years after stanford what you do next has said the years after stamford i i worked at stanford medical school as a research associate writing a helping to write a book about.

california senate george mosconi san francisco stanford medical school research associate california one day
"stanford medical" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"stanford medical" Discussed on Pod Save America

"Many so i can't work i won't be able to pay rent i can't pay bills i won't be able to work as a nurse in my career the and you're a nurse in like the stanford medical center in what specifically to your work with yeah so initially arapi response there so when i deserve respect emergencies anytime someone's like dying in the hospital icu to show up we don't need wet he well see why are as an american it's like whatever that's fine we don't need anywhere that knows of what you do is critically important the function of society and if daca is repealed you will be able to perform those duties anymore absolutely have friends were engineers reference teachers accountants i mean they're like doing great job some up lotta taxes right so we are also hearing contributing like beyond taxes you're part of society you're part of your community you have friends neighbours and you're you're contributing like as a as a human being too right i'm here for nineteen years the high right right it felt like you're covered any or like robbing banks or whatever kathy you your program the program that you founded has has worked closely with dreamers as somebody who is an ally what have you observed would go away if dhaka was repealed we know i think about as student dame are former student named dylan for process he graduated from chico state university he's now middle school teacher an english teacher in richmond california where he grew up and he called me the day after the election on november ninth and he told me what it was like to stand in front of his classroom on the day after trump was elected and he told me that he broke down and cried because he didn't know what to tell his students about whether or not he would be there till the end of the year and i think we think a lot about like what.

stanford medical center daca dhaka dylan chico state university school teacher california trump english richmond nineteen years
"stanford medical" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

02:35 min | 4 years ago

"stanford medical" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"Time of play on a weekly basis worldwide seven billion hours okay so to my colleagues i would say rather than fight it fight this amazing phenomena joint in the sense the your expertise but this is serious your expertise in our expertise could help all the people in the audience and all the people that the will will interact with understand how to deal with it better rather than banning or i mean it's not going to go away it's just going to grow stronger so ladies and gentlemen i want you to vote yes for the motion i want you to say with us the video games will make a smarter but also that we need to be smarter about videogames thank you thank you actually hear making his closing statement against the motion elias abu shout a professor of psychiatry at stanford medical school best selling the games of 2016 had titles like grand theft ido final fantasy an infinite warfare it's hard to imagine how playing these games hours upon hours has raised our average iq on the other hand these games i think like the internet at large can nurture some rather negative personnel ataman elements aggression narcissism impulsively being some examples and for evidence on how online narcissism an impulsively can lead to offline narcissism and a possibility you can find examples from both sides of the aisle from the last election it's not possible to turn the clock back on technology this is not something that is feasible nor advisable yet some of us are trying to achieve some kind of balance between our online and offline lives but in trying to achieve that balance through faced by two formidable obstacles the first obstacle we can do nothing about and has to do with how our brains are wired and they're not wired mrs certainly in a way that makes us able to resist these technologies and to take them in small doses only but the other obstacle is huge industry interests than huge marketing campaigns are trying to convince as these technologies are actually making a smarter they're good for us we should embrace them even more i'd like to end by bring up a case of a patient i saw a couple of weeks ago or call him jeff a twenty one year old.

stanford medical school professor of psychiatry theft jeff seven billion hours twenty one year