37 Burst results for "Stanford"

Fresh update on "stanford" discussed on Eu tava la

Eu tava la

01:43 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "stanford" discussed on Eu tava la

"In the simonova lear. Who who 'cause my so. But i he's podcast. You told the similar new legal brown doubt about the up. Follow super video v. Status gossip is who get a regime. Gouache ilham curricular walk into guestroom winters. Viruses starters david ideally inclusive. We're gonna start a classic as a key. Caro app catava ziprecruiter pull the boy scouts service supplied by pro stars because may contain statistic devices utility either on winter his outdo cozma balloon relation to them a hydrogen wing to import attention out new subaru. Got but not a allowed. There was a concern with squeezing deliver content. Poke so calculus iacomo. Society illiquidity diligent. Adam kaliko popping. Gm has to do with the. Go day calgary sparkle thing. I leaned with l. Help was going esi win to my school. Wouldn't accommodate sake creator of our community. Dead secret von ranelagh alto. Mica sua's not cash prizes for us as a society. Whatever bump la by seen those boy that i could you think that gratuitous damages tomiichi but also stanford the giza is despite. Guess i soon. Why the richard. Prebble see my school to do this program with over. The our program was going over the of augusta. Eddie poisoning budget lead cigarette. Can you opera latin. Yes assume exclusive caused tell me what policy review the you follow so brutal squeeze interest nitsa. Hasn't anthony you'll have to la asiya. The meeting sparkle committed yet bear. It's not meeting league. La comunidad tweet. This was an impetus nagwa. Now come get me viterbo. stench county. Shatti mizdow mucus who is la dong village. Mice divorce it them being. Who's gonna cook dad's skinny jesus do pick. He's saying the non c. n. Web fussy letham winter soviet. The knowledge usa beijing european bear in total got For massimo into mice you him into stoppage propaganda wound-care recode finales zara swat. You brought to. Civil ceo logistic mckinney. Seal nature hedge will sit. obviously siberian. the mass been poised to beijing. Your copay be a sabato meant procure head coach of officialdom winter as video with a main do so clench inclusive in the mysore forage pack. I meant single moment. Daily card cash team way. The pandemic bilas bay told him on those totally. Gotta gotta see when we got through calls you status illiberal contemplating allo.

Adam Kaliko Siberian Richard Tomiichi Caro Von Ranelagh Alto La Dong Village Nitsa Jesus Single Moment Anthony Stanford Eddie L. Help Augusta Subaru Latin David European USA
Fresh "Stanford" from News, Traffic and Weather

News, Traffic and Weather

00:36 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh "Stanford" from News, Traffic and Weather

"Coverage. I'm a coffee being born and raised in the tropics. But let me tell you, I'm loving the cold, mostly because I get to experience it and she eats frozen mochas any size. Any flavor for only 3 99 or less choose from their most popular like the peanut butter frozen mocha made with races frozen Kona mocha or their peanut butter banana frozen mocha made with Reese is So enjoy the frozen fun with me. Order on your sheets up and pick it up curbside at select locations, sheets run and done. Stay connected. Stay informed the Northwest News Station Co. Moh news They've seen more kids with Kobe the past two weeks, and all last year's has a Michigan doctor. ABC is Dorian Shaw on pediatric prevention, A new vaccine trial. Stanford is one of five sites nationwide testing visors vaccine on Children under five years old and Sanford is believed to be one of, if not the first sight an entire country to test in a child as young as three years old ball adults in the U. S. Have received at least one covert shot a quarter of Americans now fully vaccinated. A manhunt in Austin, Texas, for former sheriff's deputy and his shooting at an apartment complex that leaves three people dead. Head of Austin police Joseph Shit, Koen says the search has widened our air support. Canine teams are several SWAT teams have been out here on day, as well as our officers and officers from other departments. The aisles who involved in the search for 41 year old Stephen Broderick, police say they don't think it was a random shooting. Chuck's Iverson. ABC News Comeau News 1000 FM.

Dorian Shaw Stephen Broderick Joseph Shit ABC Three People Austin, Texas Michigan ONE 41 Year Old Three Years Old Last Year Austin U. S. Abc News Stanford First Sight Five Sites 3 99 Sanford Koen
YouTube pulls Florida governor's video, citing misinformation

The News & Why It Matters

01:08 min | Last week

YouTube pulls Florida governor's video, citing misinformation

"Youtube has deleted a video in which Florida governor rhonda's santa's and by the way a bunch of medical experts so actual doctors Questioned the effectiveness of having children wear masks to stop the spread of covid so the video was removed wednesday and there was so scientists was joined by oxford geologist Harvard professor Dr scott lists and another doctor from stanford and because they were contributing to covid. Nineteen medical misinformation. They had the they had the the whole video removed. So by the way to santa's at one point in the video asked if it was necessary for kids to wear masks in school and dr one of the doctors in response said children should not wear face masks. They don't need it for their own production and they don't need it for protecting other people either. Another doctor said it is developmentally in appropriate. It doesn't help on disease spread. And of course doctor said there's no scientific rationale or logic to have children wear masks in

Rhonda's Santa Oxford Geologist Harvard Dr Scott Youtube Florida Stanford Santa
Land of the Giants: The Google Empire

The Vergecast

01:46 min | Last week

Land of the Giants: The Google Empire

"In nineteen nine hundred. Nine marissa mayer was sitting in the most important interview of her life. It was at a startup called google. That needing was at their conference table in the main conference room at one six five university which also happened to be a ping pong table. Meyer would go on to become one of the most prominent executives and silicon valley from two thousand twelve to two thousand seventeen. she was. ceo of yahoo. The back in the late nineties. She was still a student at stanford about to graduate with a master's in computer science and google's cofounders. Sergei brin was not going easy on her sergei did all the talking and quiz mutants. We allow different computer. Science topics had me draw out. Like the graphing of k means clustering and and centuries and how to find the differences in the centers. And things like that. Meyer was a star student so she answered those questions problem. But there was another interviewer in the room and she noticed something was a little off with him. Larry seemed quiet and truthfully obviously somewhat distracted. Larry page the other founder of google. The pair wrapped the interview utterly. They had something else on their minds and the the door opens like you kind of hear. What's going on her side. Then i heard the call and say okay like who's going with us for the kleiner. Pitch kleiner is kleiner perkins the legendary venture capital firm. And i heard a lot of foot traffic heading out the door and then heather horns. The office manager reappeared and said i'm sorry. Larry and sergei had an important venture capitalist pitch this afternoon and they have taken the the majority of the company with thumb. So i think you're going to have to come back tomorrow.

Sergei Brin Marissa Mayer Meyer Google Stanford Yahoo Larry Page Pitch Kleiner Kleiner Perkins Larry Heather Horns Sergei
Julie Lythcott-Haims on Her Book 'How To Be an Adult'

Ask Lisa: The Psychology of Parenting?

02:05 min | Last week

Julie Lythcott-Haims on Her Book 'How To Be an Adult'

"Julius cut hames is joining us today. She's a new york times bestselling author of how to raise an adult which led to her. Ted talk now. Viewed more than five million times or second book is an award-winning prose. Poetry memoir real american. It illustrates her experience as a black biracial person in white spaces but her latest book out. Just this week is called your turn how to be an adult. She was also in a previous life. A corporate lawyer and at stanford the dna freshman. Hey julie welcome thank you so much. It's great to be with you. We are thrilled to have you with us so actually. Let's talk for a minute about your new book. What a great topic tell us about. This book is a response to the pleas. Coming out of the millennial generation. I don't know how to adult. I don't want to adult. I'm scared to adult. I have been rooting. For this batch. Of young folks to make their way confidently down the path of their choosing for a long long time. And this book is me. Trying to simulate what it's like to be in a safe cozy conversational space with a trusted person who's just older a little bit farther down the path of life than you so it's a compassionate to generation of young folks who. I'm who. i'm totally rooting. For and who. You've worked very closely with you know in stanford and you know this population well and you're also a mom. Rachel i am. I have a twenty one year old son and a nineteen year old daughter. Very much in the throes of to hashtag adult. I'm just so. We say the title. Because i love the title is your turn how to be an adult. That's right. I mean it's it's crafted. I suppose by the publishing folks as a sequel. The first book was how to raise an adult on the harm of helicopter. Parenting on the impact on children of an overall parenting style. This isn't some ways at back to that if you will. It's four young people. You're turn how to be an adult.

Julius Cut Hames Stanford New York Times TED Julie Rachel
Stanford wins first national title since 1992

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

00:47 sec | Last week

Stanford wins first national title since 1992

"And final four or national championship game history member. Its final four or championship game. Not sweet sixteen not vinyl eight none of that just in the final four for so jay. Take it away okay. Phones the start with number five number five smart. Take the three seconds. Whole wants sermon douglas. Tv thompson dirk coleman thank you. Wow thank you. And what a i smart by the way junior college transfer that junior college transfer so all these kids these days with the transfer

Thompson Dirk Coleman JAY Douglas
Where does Gonzaga-UCLA rank among greatest college games?

ESPN Daily

01:52 min | Last week

Where does Gonzaga-UCLA rank among greatest college games?

"What time did you get to bed on saturday night. Three thirty three. I was done working at like one thirty. I just i. I watched the jalen sug shot fifty times. I just i couldn't get over it and i woke up this morning. Still kind of buzzing about it jeff. Porcello is a college basketball insider for espn and he's been covering the tournament from indianapolis us a prisoner of the moment. Jeff that's the phrase that gets thrown around but there are not many moments in sports history like what happened with gonzaga in the final four. You were there just broad historical analysis year. What did we witness. I mean it was the best game i've ever seen in person or on tv and it wasn't a game where the ending masked a you know sloppy but close game. This was just just unbelievable. Basketball for forty. Five minutes. Both teams making shots. No team led by more than seven points the the tension and the butterflies ahead throughout the game. It was just unlike anything. I've witnessed the shot at the end. Just just kind of cap it all off just mentioned that that shot by suggs. Walk us through it from your perspective. What you're seeing. I knew we were good because there was in jalen hands. He's got that magical or he just. He makes them in practice all the time. It's been craziest. Your many's maiden practice where last second shot so. I felt pretty good staring right at it and i was like that's in so it was. It was the best game you know in my you know since i started covering the sport and people compare it to the nineteen ninety-two duke kentucky game. I did not see that. In person. And i was six years old five years old but i i can't imagine there are too many games in the history of the sport. There were better than this.

Porcello Basketball Gonzaga Espn Indianapolis Jeff Suggs Jalen Kentucky
Stanford holds off Arizona 54-53 to win women's NCAA title

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 weeks ago

Stanford holds off Arizona 54-53 to win women's NCAA title

"Haley Haley Jones Jones scored scored seventeen seventeen points points as as the the cardinal cardinal held held off off pac pac twelve twelve rival rival Arizona Arizona fifty fifty four four fifty fifty three three Stanford Stanford built built a a nine nine point point lead lead in in the the fourth fourth quarter quarter before before Arizona Arizona cut cut it it to to fifty fifty one one fifty fifty OnStar OnStar guard guard Arie Arie McDonald's McDonald's three three pointer pointer following following the the time time out out Jones Jones instead instead with with a a three three point point play play with with two two twenty twenty four four left left to to close close the the cardinals cardinals scoring scoring you you to to really really be be here here right right now now I I don't don't think think it's it's still still honestly honestly even even hit hit me me a a even even standing standing up up but but nothing nothing of of any any issues issues I'm I'm still still waiting waiting for for it it to to really really kick kick in in but but Donald Donald had had a a game game high high twenty twenty two two points points for for the the Wildcats Wildcats who who were were trying trying to to become become the the fourth fourth team team to to win win the the title title game game after after trailing trailing by by double double digits digits the the cardinal cardinal we're we're national national champions champions for for the the third third time time and and first first in in twenty twenty nine nine years years I'm I'm Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie

Arizona Haley Haley Jones Jones Stanford Stanford Arie Arie Mcdonald Jones Jones Cardinals Donald Donald Mcdonald Wildcats Cardinal Cardinal Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie
Arizona reaches NCAA title game with 69-59 win over UConn

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 weeks ago

Arizona reaches NCAA title game with 69-59 win over UConn

"Harry Harry McDonald McDonald fourteen fourteen twenty twenty six six points points and and third third seed seed Arizona Arizona reached reached the the title title game game for for the the first first time time by by stifling stifling the the Huskies Huskies sixty sixty nine nine fifty fifty nine nine we we were were the the underdog underdog I I mean mean we we kind kind of of felt felt that that way way all all season season I I mean mean that that kind kind of of business business are are companies companies and and makes makes us us play play harder harder than than the the one one you you think think you you know know we we can can beat beat you you know know these these top top teams teams are are even even does does accomplish accomplish the the things things we we have have accomplished accomplished the the Wildcats Wildcats held held UConn UConn to to thirty thirty six six percent percent shooting shooting overall overall and and allowed allowed just just twenty twenty two two first first half half points points St St Thomas Thomas finished finished with with twelve twelve points points and and Cate Cate Reese Reese had had a a letter letter for for Arizona Arizona which which takes takes on on Stanford Stanford Sunday Sunday Haley Haley John John scored scored twenty twenty four four points points including including the the go go ahead ahead jumper jumper with with thirty thirty two two seconds seconds left left to to lead lead the the cardinal cardinal to to a a sixty sixty six six sixty sixty five five win win over over South South Carolina Carolina the the victory victory put put Stanford Stanford in in the the title title game game for for the the first first time time since since two two thousand thousand ten ten I'm I'm Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie

Harry Harry Mcdonald Mcdonald Arizona Huskies Wildcats Stanford Stanford Cate Cate Reese Reese Haley Haley Thomas Thomas Uconn John John South South Carolina Carolina Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie
NFTs and the music business

Talking Tech

01:41 min | 2 weeks ago

NFTs and the music business

"Listeners. Mike snyder here. And i'm brett molina. Welcome back to talking tech. Recently you may have heard us talk about. Nfc's and they are still going strong bread. I think in a ps are here to stay as you reported two weeks ago. We've had all kinds of teas after you just hearing about them enough. Tease stanford non fungible tokens. That's a fancy way of saying something that is unique and irreplaceable digital ledgers. Or blockchain are used to authenticate whatever the nf is or whatever the collectible it is time to now. Some of the wild things we've seen purchased are nba video. Highlights jack door. She's i tweet. A piece of digital art for seventy million dollars and the rock band kings of leon did an nf t special vinyl copies of its latest album now other artists are getting into into the to lindsay lohan. Who i have to admit i forgot. She had put out some pretty popular music in the past is oxygen in often. New single called lullaby snoop dogg in the weekend of tweeted up there looking at music in peace but i just did a story on an artist named shantelle. She hails from barbados. She might remember her. R&b pop hits impossible t shirt while she's making a comeback after her record label contract expired and she's hoping us enough t as a way to maintain some power and control over her music. For her new single has party she's auctioning off the ability to have your name included in a special recording of the song and you could be one of three bidders to have your likeness included in special versions of the cover art of the single which will be signed an authenticated in

Mike Snyder Brett Molina Jack Door NFC Shantelle NBA Lindsay Lohan Barbados
1st-timer Arizona joins mainstays in women's NCAA Final Four

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 weeks ago

1st-timer Arizona joins mainstays in women's NCAA Final Four

"Desire cook scored sixteen points in the game **** used their stifling defense to advance to the final four for the third time shutting down Texas sixty two thirty four is very surreal for me I was out there and I was just there and like wow I'm really here like we're really going to the final four but I feel like our work isn't done yet South Carolina blocked fourteen shots held the sixth seeded Longhorns to twenty three percent shooting and outscored them ten nothing in the fourth quarter Lexie hull scored twenty one points in Stanford reach the final four by rallying for a seventy eight sixty three victory over Louisville Stanford trailed by twelve midway through the third quarter before scoring thirteen consecutive points to take its first lead since early in the game I'm Dave Ferrie

Lexie Hull Cook Longhorns Texas South Carolina Louisville Stanford Stanford Dave Ferrie
Can Language Models Be Too Big  With Emily Bender And Margaret Mitchell

The TWIML AI Podcast

02:21 min | 3 weeks ago

Can Language Models Be Too Big With Emily Bender And Margaret Mitchell

"Are at everyone. I am here with meg. Mitchell and a researcher and emily bender professor at the university of washington. And we are here to talk about their recent paper on the dangers of casting. Parents can language models. Be too big meghan emily. Welcome to this podcast. Thank you welcome. Thank super excited to jump into this conversation. Let's start out like we always do with. Having you share a little bit about your background meg. We'll have you go first. yeah. I basically studied as a computational linguists like emily i got my phd in computer science. And then i've worked at johns hopkins microsoft research And most recently. Google research worked on computer vision as well. As natural language processing computational linguistics and more recently issues of bias unfairness Awesome and emily. You are on the show too long ago when we talked about is linguistics missing from alpine research. Give us a little bit of your background. And maybe a catch up on what you've been doing for the past year so like you said. I'm a linguist. Studying linguistics at uc berkeley and then stanford and then. I got to come to washington and start the professional. Master's program in computational linguistics. Where meg was a student many years ago. Now i got over then. So i work in a largely in linguistics and competition linguistics but since about twenty sixteen have also been working in the space of. I've tried to avoid the phrase. Actually ethics sends people down these paths into philosophy that i find somewhat less helpful but societal impact of nlp and in that context a lot of the same discussions are relevant that relevant to other things that fall under the umbrella. What it's called a. And yet in the past year. I have continued that work and had this great opportunity to work with megan other members of her team and in particular dr timmy brew and a phd student of mine. engine mcmillan major on a paper looking at the impact of large language models. And we started this in september and submitted in october. And it's the first paper i've ever written. That has been far more work after it was finished than writing it in the first

Emily Bender Meghan Emily MEG Uc Berkeley University Of Washington Mitchell Johns Hopkins Emily Microsoft Stanford Google Washington Dr Timmy Brew Engine Mcmillan Megan
Karpathy Talks Deep Learning, Elon Musk, FSD Beta, & Waymo Competition

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

05:41 min | 3 weeks ago

Karpathy Talks Deep Learning, Elon Musk, FSD Beta, & Waymo Competition

"Our here and today we're going to be mostly talking about some takeaways from a recent interview of tesla's director of artificial intelligence. Enrique are happy on a podcast called the robot brains podcast which i willing to in the show notes. The whole conversation is about an hour and five minutes. I would highly recommend listening to all of it. I thought it was very approachable. And hopefully it helps set the stage for a conversation. We're going to have later this week. Quick look at the stock tesla today finished down one point two percent to six hundred and sixty two dollars sixteen cents not a bad day overall. Considering the nasdaq itself finished down. One point one percent are going into the carpet. The interview again great interview. I think it's super interesting in terms of timing right now because this is so current tesla's obviously working on the fasd beta right now. Andre did share some thoughts on that which we will get to you. I do wanna give a little bit of background though for people that aren't familiar with andres background so he has a history and education research again. A lot of notoriety in the field of artificial intelligence and specifically in deep learning. Because of his course at stanford about deep learning which was really the first of its kind and those lectures were also shared on youtube. Gained a ton of traction. There so andre was teaching that class at stanford got his phd. There after that he joined open. A i search scientist spent a couple of years there but at that point in his life he had been doing research for about a decade reading papers writing papers so he talks about that period of time in this interview and joining tesla saying quote. I was definitely getting a little bit restless. At that time i felt like these algorithms are extremely and can really move the needle on some very incredibly important problems in society. I wanted to take a more active role in doing that. So i was getting a bit restless. I was looking at different opportunities and say startups and things like that and then one thing that kind of happened on the side is because open at the time under the umbrella of ulan organizations few times we were interacting with people at tesla and i was kind of consulting a little. Bit for some of the problems and autopilot. I kind of realized that they were dealing with fundamentally a deep learning computer vision and this was the fundamental constraint to whether or not this product were work so i was kind of intrigued by that but it was just a few consulting opportunities here and there. I sorta spoke to the team. But at this time when i was getting really wrestles to apply this technology in the industry actually ilan reached out and asked me. Hey you've been sort of consulting for the team. Do you actually want to join and lead the computer vision team here and help get this car to drive. And so he taught me a very kind of correct time. When i was really getting restless and i feel like this is perfect and i think i can do this. I think i have the skill to contribute here. This is an incredibly impactful opportunity. And i love the company and of course i love yuan and everything that he's doing and so i would say that again was a moment stars align for me and i felt very strongly that this is the right thing to do at this time and quote so long quote there but i appreciated having that background. I've always kind of wondered if andres heart was really in the research realm and if you lon had kind of convinced him and pulled him away from that but that doesn't sound like the case from how hundred describes. He said that at that time when he made that decision to go to tesla he and his colleagues at opening i had joked around that he'd probably only make it about six months. And here we are four years later. I'm really happy about that. Because i think under just a perfect fit for this role. Not only does he have an incredible understanding of the technical challenges that tesla's facing but he also seems to have the right personality for it. He talked about working with yuan. Then also get into some of the technical stuff here in a second but he said quote. He's a double edged sword in terms of working with him because he wants the future yesterday and he will push people and he will inject a lot of energy and he wants to happen quickly. And you have to be of a certain. I think attitude to really tolerate that over long periods of time. But he's around some self with people who get energy out of that and also on the future to happen quicker. Those people really thrive at tesla. And so i happen to. Also i think be like that and so i don't personally mind it. I actually thrive on it and the energy of getting this to work faster and quote. I think this anecdote probably serves as a good reminder. That high turnover isn't necessarily a bad thing just by default you'll often see articles without a lot of data honestly being critical of tesla for having high turnover especially in management. But from the outside. It seems like they go through these cycles where they have a lot of turnover in short periods of time and then they find the person that's right for the role and also vice versa that the role is right for them and seems like those people tend to stick for a long long time better to have high turnover work through a number of different people and find the right person than to stick with the wrong person for too long anyway. The other salient point. That andre made about you on came about from a discussion on tussles hardware in the vertical integration. Andre said quote. I think to a large extent yulon sees ai as just a fundamental pillar of a lot of this technology and wants to invest in internal teams that develop a lot of this technology and co design. Everything tesla is definitely about vertical integration and squeezing a lot of juice from the benefits of that and quote. He continued on with that line of thought and mentioned co design. Three or four times. I think which is really one of the most important and special elements of tesla. This co design idea particularly how the organization is structured around that idea. Tesla's purpose built hardware chips for full self. Driving is obviously a great example of that structural batteries a great example of that before that you had super bottle than the octo valve the list just goes on and on and overtime continues to grow so pay very very close attention to that when andre says that you on sees a i as a fundamental pillar of a lot of their technologies we're still in the very early innings of that actually showing up in tesla's business are at so getting into some of his more technical comments than this is going to be a really long quote. I apologize for that. But i think it's a good primer. So he was asked. How would you describe deep learning to your parents. Andre says quote. Let's use a specific example. Because i think it's useful so let's talk about image recognition we have images images are made up to a computer of a large number of pixels and each pixel just tells you the brightness of the red green and blue channel at that point

Tesla Andres Stanford Enrique Andre Ulan Ilan Youtube LON Yulon
Where's the value in NFTs

Motley Fool Answers

05:13 min | 3 weeks ago

Where's the value in NFTs

"You first saw the acronym ft show up in your tweets you got as far as not at four. And then you realize you're quickly going down the wrong path and trying to decipher it. Nfc stanford non fungible tokens now from there. If you're like me you thought it had to do with mushrooms. Maybe mario brothers. I don't know so then you read a paragraph of an article got bored or confused and moved on with the knowledge that all of your assumptions were wrong. But then you didn't actually replace it with any real knowledge okay. And so that was fine until you started seeing f. T. everywhere and you realize that maybe you should learn what it means and also you have a podcast taping coming up so here we are. And it's not that ludicrous bro. Stay with me all right. Mitchell mitchell clarke wrote a delightful article on the verge explaining t so i'm largely relying on that also wired new york times and a few other places. Let's go all right. Non fungible tokens are essentially a way that you can claim ownership of a digital thing. So think music art tweets yes. These are all reproducible. But so is a postcard of the mona lisa. So non fungible tokens exists on a blockchain at this point. Mostly a theory but others are getting on board and there are online marketplaces like open sea bull and fifty gateway where you can buy and sell the official ownership of the digital thing again. We're talking music video. Art animated gifts for artists provides a new way to sell your work and you can also set it up. So that you get a little kickback. Every time the nfc changes hands with a new owner. Lots nice so right now. You're like bro. Why would someone pay millions of dollars for an animated gif when you can just download it for free again. Why would someone bhai a monet painting for millions when you can get it on a mug from the gift shop for fifteen dollars so it all comes down to the basic tautology that some things have value just because someone decides it has value now for some people the value might be bragging rights to that end. You get to buy an nf t fred digital drawing of a cat because you are looking for a new way to show people. You are wealthy for others. Value might be about your phantom or support of an artist or musician. Kings of leon grimes dead mouse and many others have released. And fte's for music and art and for others. The value might be purely speculative. You're buying the nf t for digital drawing up a cat because you think it will rise in value as many other people agree. They want that authentic digital drawing a cat. And you're like seriously digital yes. Ten years ago. A guy named chris torres created the animated. Meam niane cat. You know it as the flying cat with a pop tart for a body and it's leaving a rainbow trail behind as soon as you google. It you're going to be like. Oh cat i totally know what you're talking about. So in february torres created an nf t version and put it up for auction and it sold for nearly six hundred thousand dollars following a last minute bidding frenzy other f- tease out there. William shatner is dental x ray digital baseball cards photos of lindsay lohan. And the first tweet. By jack dorsey just sold for two point. Nine million. don't feel too bad because the proceeds argos support a charity. So there's that and if t. Are definitely booming right now with probably more speculators than collectors and fans driving up prices but experts looking beyond the boom. See a great opportunity for a new way to guarantee authenticity. So for example nike already has a patent to create. Nfc's attached to shoes to guarantee their authenticity. Called crypto. kicks so when you consider that. A pair of air jordan twelve flu games are worth more than one hundred thousand dollars. Yeah i think. I want an fte with that purchase. Please and maybe you're still skeptical like a bunch of people in the comments of the articles. I read but seriously. How is this all that new and different. It's not like people buy sneakers art or baseball cards for the value of the materials themselves. They buy them for the aesthetics. The design the rarity as the new york times quoted. Marc andreessen. ben. Horowitz a two hundred dollar pair of sneakers is like five dollars in plastic. You're buying a feeling and right now the feeling that. Fte's is similar to one a stamp collector or baseball card collector or art collector or fashion. Or even a speculator might feel. It's that feeling that you are special because you own something someone else wants.

NFC Mitchell Mitchell Clarke Wired New York Times Leon Grimes Chris Torres Mona Lisa Mario Bhai Jack Dorsey William Shatner Torres Baseball Lindsay Lohan Google Nike FLU
Yaa Gyasi Discusses Her Latest Book, Transcendent Kingdom

Little Atoms

06:03 min | 3 weeks ago

Yaa Gyasi Discusses Her Latest Book, Transcendent Kingdom

"Was born in ghana amazed in huntsville alabama process novel. Going was a sunday times bestseller. The national book critics circle award for best first novel and was shortlisted for the pen. Robert w bingham prize for fiction. Twenty seventeen she was selected as one of granta's best young american novelists and in two thousand nineteen the bbc's elected her debut is one of the hundred novels that shape. Our world and latest novel is transcendent kingdom. And that's what we're going to talk about today. Y'all welcome to little atoms. Thank you thanks for having me. Tell me festival how you would describe this novel. So transcendent kingdom is about a woman named gifty who is completing a phd At stanford and neuroscience and she studies phenomenon called neural circuitry of reward seeking behavior which for lay people just means that she said he's things like addiction and depression and it's at a time in her life when her own mother who is quite depressed has come to stay with her so she finds herself taking care of her mother while also doing this research while also reflecting on her childhood particularly the circumstances that led up to her beloved older brothers passing from an opioid overdose and sets a book about Family about mother daughter relationships about immigration about religion and about science knows your debut. Homegoing was a a historical epic a sprawling multigenerational story. This one. obviously as you've just described it covers some big issues big ideas in it but it's focused down on a one single family and indeed a family. That's getting smaller not getting larger year. It never it didn't really feel like a conscious choice and from the beginning of transcendent kingdom. It just seemed like a more intimate story like a smaller canvas. In that way. I wanted to focus on the way that trauma works in a family Which is a theme homegoing as well But in this case it was a much smaller and lay. It just felt natural. I think so much of transcendent. Them is about the ways that isolation has affected this one woman gifted life and in order to kind of capture that isolation loneliness a needed the i needed the smaller scale Gifted just isn't a character. Who has this kind of abundant family life. Her family moves to the states before she's born and once they get here they're kind of cut off from the larger extended family ongoing obviously had characters who were also cut off from family. But i feel like the point of that book was to kind of showed this broader family to show the family tree in its fullness to see the way that these cutoffs impact the individual Transcendent kingdom were just starting with the single branch and that set so gifty as you said. She's a nervous scientist. He's on on a day carrying out a particular experiments and this is a real thing. Tell us what it is. She's doing and where where this came for. You used it in the book share and so years conducting this experiment. While i think i call it in the book like a behavioral testing chamber Basically she puts mice into this chamber that she's created and she trains the mice to press a lever for a word in this case. It's like a chocolate milk drink when they pressed the lever the milk floods into the straw. They're all excited. And then after some time she changes conditions so sometimes when they press the lever they get the drink and other times when they pressed the lever. They get a mild foot shock instead. And there's no pattern to it. So the mice never figure out when or why beat shocks happening And what she discovers is that some of the mice stop pressing leper but others. Don't stop those mice. The who are effectively addicted to drink are the ones that she uses to study the neural pathways that are involved in addiction. in a a came to this Research via my own best friend. Her name is tina ken. She is a a neuroscientist herself. And when i started writing this book we were both living in california as she was finishing up her. Phd at stanford. I should mention. She's a friend from childhood so just kind of random that she ended up at stanford which is my my own alma mater But at any rate she was finishing her. Phd bear and around that time she had a major paper published that i wanted to read I thought that i understood what she did. But while i tried and failed to read the paper. I realized that i had no idea what she did And so. I just kind of asked if she would allow me to shadow her and her lab at that point. I didn't really know that. I was writing a book just kind of wanted to get a better understanding of research And thankfully and graciously she said yes. And so i spent the day with her and The day i went she was performing this surgery on her mice. That detail in the opening pages transcendent kingdom. And i just found it. So fascinating. Counter research fascinating. The whole process was unlike anything. Obviously that i ever spend my day thinking about. And i found that those places where your own curiosity is sparks places that feel incredibly different but also for tile are the best places to lean into for for creative worth so it felt natural to want to know more. It felt natural to to try to think about it to fiction so

Robert W Bingham Gifty National Book Critics Circle A Stanford Huntsville Ghana Alabama BBC Depression Tina Ken California
NCAA Announces Seedings for Women's Basketball Tournament

AP 24 Hour News

00:58 sec | Last month

NCAA Announces Seedings for Women's Basketball Tournament

"State, Stanford, South Carolina and Connecticut had the regional brackets in San Antonio. One legend will be missing at least the first of the tournament. The University of Connecticut announced long time Huskies women's coach, Gino Auriemma, is isolating at home after testing positive for the coronavirus without experiencing any symptoms. The team's lead doctor says Auriemma did not have close contact with any Tier one team member since Friday, and they've all tested negative. Since the top ranked Huskies have earned one of four number one seeds in the tournament. They'll play high point on Sunday. They're set to leave for San Antonio, but Auriemma has to stay behind for a least 10 days. The nearly 67 year old coach just received a second dose of the Corona virus vaccine before testing positive. I'm Jackie Quinn. I'm Tim McGuire. AP News Coronavirus Update. I'm to McGuire with an AP News MINUTE President Biden Vice

Auriemma Gino Auriemma Huskies San Antonio University Of Connecticut Stanford South Carolina Connecticut Jackie Quinn Tim Mcguire Mcguire Biden Vice
Facing Pressure, Biden Administration Scrambles to Shelter Migrant Children

Hugh Hewitt

01:20 min | Last month

Facing Pressure, Biden Administration Scrambles to Shelter Migrant Children

"By the administration scramble to shelter migrant Children. This is in the New York Times this morning, and in fact, the border crisis is real. It is metastasizing it is getting larger every day. Facility don't exist. It's worse than it was under Donald Trump at any time because Joe Biden and his team want illegal immigration, they do not want it to stop. They wanted to continue. And that is because they're making a calculation. I heard it yesterday and my long seminar for Stanford Students with Ron Brownstein, Ashley Parker, Lonnie Chan, Ron Kane and Ben Ginsberg. Democrats do not want to close the border. It's a long game. I think they've made a mistake. It turns out in Florida that the refugees of violence and the refugees of socialism turn into pretty good Republican voters. So that doesn't worry me. The fate of these Children worries me. The fate of these young adults worries me the fate of America's reputation in the world because there is no way we can do other than Release people were going to be so we're gonna be overwhelmed because you need to build the wall and you have to keep people in Mexico and then they stop coming. When you open the wall and you said, Come on in, and we'll wave everything and you can claim immunity and we'll teach you how to do it. They come Who wouldn't When you

Ron Brownstein Ashley Parker Lonnie Chan Ron Kane Ben Ginsberg Donald Trump Joe Biden New York Times Stanford Florida America Mexico
Elon Musk - The Man Behind Tesla and SpaceX

Talk, Tales and Trivia

07:44 min | 2 months ago

Elon Musk - The Man Behind Tesla and SpaceX

"Well who's elon. Musk well if you don't know you're gonna find out right now. There is so much news internet entertainment on ilan mosque. And i want to tell you that this is only the basics of aeon. Musk who he is. There is plenty to find out about him. I will leave some of the links and the show notes. So don't forget to look but who is elon. Musk and how does he lawns story began. Well he is a visionary entrepreneur and the co founder of paypal and tesla motors as well as the founder of the new space x program which is very popular to day his astounding success has given rise to comparisons to the uniqueness of howard hughes and the tenacity of a henry ford but he did have an often difficult childhood like most of us kids his own age made fun of him from his own descriptions the years were lonely and brutal alon is quoted as saying they got my best friend to lure me out of hiding so they could beat me up and that hurt. That's when i realized that they were going to go after me non stop. That's what made growing up difficult for a number of years. There was no respite. You get chased around by gangs. These gangs tried to beat the insert. Swearword here out of me. And then i'd come home and it would just be awful there as well but not all was wasted. This difficulty cultivated itself into a relentless work ethic a never ending tenacious vision of the future. You see enron was born and raised in south africa and he spent some time in canada before finally moving to the united states thin and the united states. He was educated at the university of pennsylvania. A very good school majoring in physics. That's when ilan started to excel and experiment to soon. Become a serial tech entrepreneur with early successes like zip to an x dot com. He took on two majors at the university of pennsylvania but his time there wasn't all work with a fellow student. He bought a tin bedroom fraternity house which they used as an ad hoc nightclub will. Musk graduated with a bachelor of science and physics at all as a bachelor of arts in economics from the wharton school for ilan. Physics made the deepest impression. He is again quoted as saying and somewhat giving directions to boiling things down to their fundamental truths and reason up from their. Musk was twenty four years old when he moved to california to pursue at phd in applied physics at stanford university with the internet. Exploding in silicon valley booming. Musk had entrepreneurial visions on his mind and dropped out of the physics program just after two days but in two thousand and four. Musk joined to engineers to help. Run tesla motors. You've all heard of tesla motors right. Well this is where. Musk was integral and designing the first electric car. There's no doubt the electric car is the car of the future. But his first car the he designed was the tesla roadster as we are all aware of the tesla has become one of the world's most popular and coveted car brands and is still growing in popularity in the united states and in many different countries tesla and the electric car are taking over but we must never forget about musk's early interest in reading philosophy science fiction and fantasy novels and how that played a big role. I mean a huge role in the inventor that he is today. It is reflected in his sense of idealism and concern with human progress. He aims to work in the areas he has identified as crucial to our future specifically the internet. The transition to renewable energy sources and space colonization and. Ilan has been all over the media. Making three podcast episodes on the joe rogan experience while the first one in which he smoked. Marijuana was pretty funny but in a maximum article. I found this elon. Musk's third appearance on the joe rogan. Experience podcast the genius. Tesla and spacex. Ceo did reveal intriguing plans for a floating tesla. Musk revealed that the long awaited second generation tesla roadster could have a space x package that would allow it to hover at a limited altitude above the ground. Something that we have never seen before with all these new inventions floating around. Is it any wonder why everyone is watching. And curious about ilan's next big thing. Well at tesla fans are awaiting the cyber truck which will make an appearance at the end of twenty twenty one and the exciting numbers are in for ilan's wealth elon. Musk started twenty twenty with a worth of about twenty seven billion dollars and was barely in the top fifty richest people then in july of twenty twenty. Musk past warren buffett. The great billionaire to become the seventh richest person in november. Musk raced past bill gates to become the second richest person. Musk has gained more wealth over the past twelve months then gates his entire net worth of one hundred and thirty two billion dollars and according to cnbc elon. Musk just became the richest person in the world. With a net worth of more than one hundred and eighty five billion dollars alone recently had a new marker for his wealth and that is so cool because of all his inventions and his time spent caring and wanting the united states and the world to move ahead has made a name for himself. There is no doubt an increase in tesla's share price pushed. Musk past jeff bezos of amazon. Who had been the richest person since two thousand seventeen. You see musk's wealth surge over. The past year marks the fastest rise to the top of the rich list and history but why because he is investing in the future. It marks a dramatic financial turnaround for the famed entrepreneur. Because he cares about what happens in our future so with all his wealth experimentation and knowledge elon. Musk is our future and for those. That are young enough to dream about being an elon. Musk it must start with your curiosity with reading and learning more and more about new and different things and that i want for you and your children now and in the future.

Musk Tesla Ilan Mosque University Of Pennsylvania Wharton School For Ilan United States Ilan Elon Howard Hughes Alon Joe Rogan Henry Ford Enron Paypal Stanford University South Africa Silicon Valley Roadster
It's A Wonderful Life With Gigi

Recovery Happy Hour

05:00 min | 3 months ago

It's A Wonderful Life With Gigi

"Hygiene. How are you. I am great. I'm so glad to be here. And yeah i'm so excited to be having recovery. Happy hour with you today. Thank you for taking the time to to share your story of recovery. I'm going to start this interview. The same way i start every interview and that is what is your name and your sobriety date and would you have described yourself as a high or low functioning drinker when you were drinking langer smy name and my sobriety date is february. Eleventh nineteen eighty six. And i was still a high functioning. I except in the area of romance in the area romance. I was extremely low functioning. I mean are we ever high functioning their love and logic those two things. Just don't mix well well. Why don't we just say that to other people. It looked like i was high functioning dairy cow. Mary go. I think i'll i think all of the above is super relatable before we get into your story. Tell me real quick just about what you're doing right now where you live. How old you are what you do for a living family hobbies anything like that. I'm retired. And i'm a little over seventy and i live in southwest florida. I grew up outside of chicago area and then travelled all over in my rambunctious years twenties and thirties. And most of my time. I've lived in michigan for the last several years just this summer. My husband and i moved down to florida. We have a little condo here. We have our kitty with us. And i don't have any children. Because i couldn't stay married long enough and snow grandchildren. So yeah life is good. I don't know what else you asked me. I think that hobbies. What do you like to do for fun right now. In south florida. Play a little golf You know. I have a blog and a lot of service work and a a nonprofit. I'm on that helps. Connect women in sobriety and i do a newsletter and i'm working on another a workbook for how to worry less and my husband and i play we. We just have a good time yeah. I'm very grateful that is fantastic. We'll let's get into your story and in five ten minutes or less. Tell us how long you drink. Tell us how long it was a problem and why you decided to stop you know. It really wasn't a problem for a long time in high school. I got drunk really drunk once and got deathly ill and had a blackout and everybody said how fun. I was a couple of times in college. I got drunk and did not stupid things. And and then i got married and started a teaching career and and he didn't really drink so i drank very little toward the end of that that it. It's kind of a long story about that marriage. But anyway i was very desperate at the end and i discovered marijuana so in my you know. Twenty three or so. I discovered that marijuana killed the emotional pain that i was going through. I really preferred marijuana. I could drink about six. Or seven beers. You know and i got through grad school by getting high and at night to ease the stress and it was really when i was around thirty four years. Old let's see. I had already been divorced twice. I was finishing my doctorate. I had gotten through that with the aid of drugs and alcohol just to calm anxiety and And i lived with two other guys long term. And so i met this guy who was different from all the other guys and i thought. Oh this is. The john and i moved to michigan and we got married very fast and within nine months of marrying him. I went to a bar picked up a stranger and he had marijuana and i started having this affair. You know with this guy. And and i went out to bars a couple of more times when my husband was traveling. My third house but my new you know went home with strangers. Finally i went running to a psychologist. I said what is wrong. With this problem. I have a brand new phd from stanford. And i have this private cd life and my professional life is looking better and better in my private life was worse and

Florida Michigan South Florida Mary Chicago Golf John Stanford
Stanford's Dick Gould on College Tennis

Beyond The Baseline

03:03 min | 4 months ago

Stanford's Dick Gould on College Tennis

"Indulge. My my pet peeve with college tennis and stanford steer clear of this so You're not to be implicated but you look at some of these rosters and you look at where look players come from. And i always say if you're the iowa the minnesota indiana athletic director and you've got to make some cuts and you see one of your teams has eight guys from out of the country and nobody from in state. You're making my job a lot easier when the the budget ax falls on the other hand. You know we're globalist internationalists and we want to be beyond. Yeah that's a great question. Where where do you come down. You know it's really interesting. Because we'll go. For junior goal before it came to stanford and i never had a foreigner at stanford way gave a scholarship to not for any reason but i was able to get the top americans and as long as i can do that. Knew the families and everything. It was a safer bet for me. But i wasn't above a foreigner. I mean we had some foreigners our team. We came on their own. When i was in junior college we went a couple of state championships with a german player on a mexican davis cup's player on the other. And so i'm not above it So everyone thought. I wasn't but i was able to get the top american soy stuck with that that'd be also served on the advocacy committee for the integrated ten association for a long period of time. And and the first thing. I would do when when school is going to drop a program Debate one two or three two women did matter is to the roster and call it up online and see how what percentage of the team was four. If the team had more than two foreigners who appeared to be starting team in good faith. I do not feel like write a letter to a state institution and who's paying taxes. So these kids go to school and good. Faith advocate for it if they had a couple of foreigners. Okay but if they had a team of four four or five four hundred starting. I couldn't do it. And i was on a committee with the understanding. I would not write letters that circumstance. So i think that's a hard thing and i think Sometimes you cut her own throat doing that and on the other hand john we forget we were off sometime. We all we all we all forget that we all came from somewhere a we're all immigrants and and all of us essentially and and so we have been told her that we have to appreciate that and i in all my years a coaching i never saw a foreigner a foreign player abuse the system i they were turned out to be solid students. They appreciate it. Opportunity had and so many of them stadium states became citizens. Citizens are coaches in our call and our coaches were call indeed college teams today. So you can't fold it Because we all started that way. But the way i think it's a republican student institution particular and our tax payer. I think you'd be could be cutting your view to be that way.

Stanford Minnesota Indiana Athletic Advocacy Committee For The Int Tennis Iowa John
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

11:15 min | 1 year ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Are still really young. So you know you have choices in those moments and again I love having a good team around me you that will not be cowed that we always go back to our values. What are your values? What are the things? Is that you as a human being value for me. It's love it's grace. It's compassion its integrity and so when I focus on my values that always helps me know what to do next. And I I feel good about coming mean through those moments without hopefully parodying the vitriol and name colleen that this president does yes but to be very clear an unapologetic about the values that I hold and that I believe the vast majority of my residents hold.

colleen
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

13:23 min | 1 year ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Giving me the chance to myself. When is Michael Tubs The mayor of Stockton California much like Mayor Chef Stockton is who I am. A big part of Hoya royal was born and raised. Its home. I spent four years here and my master's and bachelor's and soon as I could while complete my senior year I went back on the Stockton Radford City Council for for four years I've been married for the last half. I think much like Oakland. The things that I love best about stock north things are how I live my life. So Stockton's doctors resilient city. It's a working class. City is a city on. That's used to people are expecting big things. From surprise people is to see that leads from the heart is it's a CSI afraid to fight to see that understands. That seems like ours are really kind of where the rubber meets the road row in terms of our values of social justice or inclusion and equity arm and then I think personally nothing much like the mayor of great appreciation for the work. You all do. Is that growing up. I was often the beneficiary services. Group like yours provide my among them as a teenager. My father incarcerates so when we have conversations about poverty or mass incarceration or gun violence. Those aren't things I've learned about that Stanford or say yes Stanford. Because of the things I lived I came to Stanford they learn about structures and policies the road that policy and programs can have and changing those. So that's what motivates my work. That's what makes me up every morning as mayor and more importantly I'm soon to be a father in six weeks and.

Mayor Chef Stockton Stockton Radford City Council Stanford Stockton California Hoya Michael Tubs Oakland
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

09:56 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"You. I'm thinking of Sarah Corbett. Yeah. You explain it by the main, okay? So we're massive fans of woman named Sarah Corbett who is a craft avast. And which we for when we first heard about his where I work we were a bit skeptical, but she was working to she had been invited by an organization to try to change board's perspective on whether they should pay a living wage or not. And so in about this work. She said, of course, you know, what we wanted to do is make Rudolph and throw them at the invasive angry, but we quickly recognized that that wouldn't make a difference. So what they did. Instead. That they looked at each of the board members who they were hoping to get on board with this idea and became obsessive in learning everything they could about what they cared about. And then they went to the store the that the board was the advisory group for and they what handkerchiefs from that store to demonstrate that they were customers, and they created a custom embroidered handkerchief for each of these board members as and wrapped it beautifully as this beautiful gift. And they wrote a note with that said you have an incredible amount of power. You have an influential job and an important one. We are your customers, and we love your employees. And we want you to pay them a living wage, we ask this humbly as your customers who care about the people who work in your stores, and she did this was such love. Of all the board members continue to carry the hacker Chaves they met with them over a series of months and actually did agree to raise the minimum wage that they were paying their employees. And I think what is inspiring to me about that story is that she approached it with incredible love and humility and ask them to be a better version of themselves rather than calling them out for not being the best version of themselves. So I think anytime we're trying to get somebody to do something that they're not doing. We have to show them. How this is going to help them be the person that they hope to be. I told you she sells it way better than I do. Hi, I'm from Los Angeles. And we. Over the last couple of years have done a big public campaign around homelessness and really quick shout out. One of the things that was really has been helpful for us is that there is the storytelling sort of curriculum that folks who live in supportive housing Goto. And then they are there to talk to the board of supervisors or fill in the blank stakeholder. And it's been it's been good. We successfully put together this campaign to put together a quarter sales tax generates about three hundred thirty five million dollars a year as well. As a a sister piece of legislation at the city level to make a thousand new sport of housing units per year. So that was really great. But now we can't say any projects and one of the things that are researchers are telling us is that some of the messaging that we use to get legislation passed is like backfiring because have certain images in their mind. When these support of how? Housing sites are gonna come to their. Their neighborhoods. And so you you mentioned in your definition that it's like this word of transcendence. I love it. If you had any more like thoughts about how to like, we did focus we focus on like, we should not have folks. Leaping on our streets. And we got a short term win. That's really really important. But it feels like it's not getting us over the finish line. So do you have other questions that you should be asking? When you start to develop that strategy. I think the reason that we want your strategic communications plan to live on the back of an envelope. Is that you have to constantly right it, and so the communications plan that you had worked for the system in which we're working, which was policy changed. Now, you're working in a new system, which has culture change. And so you need to answer the questions differently. And so I think it's really important when you go through these questions that you've versed as answering question number one that you really think about which system we're working in who is influential or a decision maker within that system. And what are we going to do to get them on board? So I think that that communication strategy solve that challenge. Now, you need to go through the process again. Hi, my name is Diane I work with the youth ally into and. You might have just answered that question for me. But. We work with young people and. Working with specific issues that. Regarding public school safety community safety and one of the issues that has been coming up, especially I mean nationally as you mentioned with parkland is the issues of law enforcement on school campuses. And what that means to young person for being really truly safe and that interaction when we've had issues with law enforcement and the families have come come to us. We've spoken with young people and they've shared those stories. The immediate responses while that was in one particular instance, that's not how it happens all the time or we'll have administrators rushed to the defense of the law enforcement. We've had police chief say. Well, it's those kids it's those families. So every time we try to bring up a story. It seems to get shot down with rationalization or well, how presenting it well enough and one of the context contextual factors of our community. That is probably important is that we live in a suburban community rural suburban community that means low housing costs. And so we fifty percent of our population at any given time probably has. It has a lot of law enforcement that lives there retired law enforcement and law enforcement that lives there. So it's been a very difficult thing for us to figure out how to craft the narrative or the communication strategy that doesn't say what's those kids? It's not an issue all the time. And so that doesn't get shot down. So I just want to help think through that strategy of the culture shift or the communication strategy. What is it that we need to think about differently and have the young people share differently in order to get that across? Yeah. I would go back to the process and really figure out what it is. It's like you're not completely while you understand us. Use your clear that you we all want there to be zero shootings in school. And we never wanna lose another child. But I think in terms of answering the first question, you've got more work to do to think about what is the system that's in place that you're really trying to change. And what are some of the things that are going to make a difference there? So I would be trust the process there. But it's interesting to me because I'm hearing you describe the psychological phenomenon that we talked about which was when we see people who are not in the in group, we ascribe to them the most extreme perspective. So it seems like maybe some contact theory would be really helpful here as well and really getting people in the same room. Yeah. I also think that it would do us some service to take some time to study the worldviews identities values of your target community that you're trying to influence. We recently worked with organization and they're trying to persuade mothers in Appalachia to think differently about higher education for their daughters. And we used a lot of the academic research around worldview in values and identity to sort of evaluate where do they fall on that continuum? Do you have an individualistic worldview or an egalitarian world? Do what are the underlying values of those five that we mentioned, and we found that they have a mix of individualistic worldview, pull yourself up by your bootstrap, but very strong communal worldview, and they have a fear that if you say higher education that means my daughter's going to think she's better than the community, and she's not gonna come back, and they don't. I want them to leave the community because they have such strong ties. So now that they have that insight about what's happening on unconscious. The gut intuition that shaping their judgments they can think about stories they can tell that override those assumptions, but also resonate with them. So they're connected to how they see the world what they value, but they also assure them that those perceptions and perceptions of harm are unfounded. Thank you. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating social change. Please. Visit our website at dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Sarah Corbett Stanford University Rudolph Los Angeles Chaves Twitter Facebook Eric ni Diane I Appalachia three hundred thirty five mill fifty percent
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

05:30 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Situations. There's another question here. Hi. So there's so much to unpack from everything that you said and connecting to a lot of what we heard yesterday as well. First of all disabilities. You were spot on left completely invisible. A lot of the time yesterday. We heard some gentlemen, speak about funding for mental health another area that is almost completely invisible. And I do believe that it's because makes us nervous. It makes us uncomfortable. It talked a lot about that. In terms of the communication strategy yesterday. What kind of information were willing to receive in what turns us away? So I really appreciate that. And would love to know more about how to identify and and connect with disabled populations because in my community. I will tell you. They are invisible. I don't see disabled people on a regular basis in my world. But certainly they're they're twenty percent. I absolutely believe that that is true. And so I would like to know more about that. And then the other thing in terms of how we deal with intersection -ality the last keynote yesterday talked about the strategy of dividing and conquering, and I think sometimes we are almost enemies in that sense. It's our issue. That's most important. And so you talked about some efforts that you made to diversify the crowd, and you talked about board. It's so my question is I feel like one of the things that we all have to challenge. Ourselves to do is to make ourselves Volna Rable. So if you're invited to be on a board, if your first response is my just checking off a box. Well, maybe it's okay to check that box off because we need to be vulnerable. And so I wonder how you feel about that. Like if you were to take the risk if we were all to just take the risk to be vulnerable and try to educate and build release. Ships as we go does is it necessary for the relationship to be built first. Because then I feel like we're just continuing to be stuck where we are in. Now. It's really good. I just think that for for myself. There are some groups. That's like, yes, I would love to be on your board. I can. And I know what I want to add myself. But if I don't know that organization, I don't have a relationship if if someone asked me to be on a health service board, and I'm an arts person. I would have no clue why they would ask me. So yes, we do need to be vulnerable and say, yes, and I have done that where I felt if I didn't do it who else would. So I cannot complain when something happens and the oh look at them. They just did something that they should have known not to do. So I know that's my responsibility. Either one of you should of question for you. Well, that that is a really good question. Where are you located? Dayton, ohio. There are disabled people in Dayton. I probably have some Facebook prince. But I think starting with just Google, you know, we're so lucky that we have that resource because, you know, Google disability organisations, Dayton, Ohio and see what you can come up with. You know, I'm professionally interrupted able still even though I'm retired Judy and access stance dot org, and I'm also always really happy to try to connect people with resources or answer questions. But I think he'd just have to start with the research part. And I think ticking boxes is fine. But if you you know, you go and you find the disabled person to be on your board. But you're not doing anything that really engages them or their community or reflects them, then it's not going to be successful. And I think that's where we have to really take responsibility. You know as organizations to get. Training on race to get training on disability to you know, break down our own our own 'isms. You know? And and that's something that I wish I had done more of when I was at access, but I also understand that we're all like, you know, forty hour weeks or a joke. You know, let's just say sixty. So I know that we're all really overburdened. But you know, and that you know, you've got to be prepared to make the investment of time. And I want to thank all three of you for your incredible generosity and your experience and your your time here. Thank you for the full trajectory of your work. And for everything you've done to make our field, and our our lives actually, much more better by your efforts. So I appreciate you taking the time to talk with all of us, and thank you so much. Thank you everyone for being a. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating for social change. Please visit our website at SSI dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Volna Rable Dayton Facebook ohio Stanford University Google Twitter Eric ni Judy twenty percent forty hour
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

06:02 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric ni. Managing editor of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI are dot org. What practices made the arts more or less impulsive? At our two thousand eighteen nonprofit management is to conference leaders from the San Francisco Bay area art world discussed how they run their organizations and shape the performances to be more diverse and welcoming to all panelists Tim Seelig artistic director of the San Francisco game ends chorus says that's the next big shift. If we are to survive to go under the community knocked down those norms and be something that is accessible leak was joined by non Tara San manager of cultural strategies with race forward. Judith Smith, founder and director of access dance company and Sherry young executive director and founder of the African American Shakespeare Company. We're delighted to be here. And I'm certainly just thrilled to be joined by my illustrious co-panelists over here. I'm your moderator for the day. I'm going to take a just a quick second to introduce myself for more fully. And then we'll actually have everyone say a bit about their work. So you have a sense of who you are. And what we do and what we've done and also just a note that more full bios are are certainly near program, and you can take a look. So my name is Nancy says, and I'm the manager of cultural strategies at race forward the center for racial Justice innovation I'm recovering arts administrator and artists and a large portion of my work is running innovation labs for racial equity in the arts. I currently do. So in New York City where we have sixty different arts organizations of all types, everything for museums to theaters to small community based groups going through. Offensive racial equity boot counts, and my job also involves organizing in the arts and culture sector in the nonprofit arts and culture sector for increased racial equity and really delighted to be here to have a pretty expensive conversation about diversity inclusion and equity the arts, and I wondered actually Tim if you would introduce yourself, and then Sherry and Judith a little bit as well. Sure. The artistic director of the San Francisco gay men's chorus, and as a that, I am a cat herder of the gays and. So it's a challenge I actually have two hundred seventy five gays that get together every Monday night, and that is about a thousand opinions on any given topic. So I find myself as both conductor and coordinator, I've been the executive director and the chief operating officer. I've been conducting gay choirs for thirty one years, and it's been a joy, and and also rocky road in many ways. And I know you're excited to hear about the rocks. That's it. My name is Sherry young. I'm the founder and executive director of the African American Shakespeare Company, we were just voted the best life gator in San Francisco for two thousand eighteen thank you. I started the company when I was about five years old. So. We do Shakespeare in a different cultural vein that connects to a diverse community specifically, the African American community has always been my targeted goal, and we kind of branched out into doing American classics, which includes not only August Wilson and George wolf, but Tennessee Williams, and I don't know some others, but we do that. And we're now opening up for colored girls with into sake. Sean gay tomorrow night in San Francisco. So if you are in town, please drop by but we only have about thirty tickets left, literally. And we look forward to our twenty fifth anniversary coming up next season. Thank you. My name is Judah Smith, and I am the founder and director America. I'm also a recovering arts administrator. I just retired in February. I started the company when I was ten. Seriously. It was thirty one years ago. Access started. Listen group of us. They got together really with the idea of just saying what would happen when you brought people with and without disabilities together to explore movement. What we didn't realize that there was a whole really important, social and political implication that what we were doing right away access started alongside artistic program engagement work teaching because people would come say where do I go do this? And we had nowhere else to send them. We also realize that because it's virtually impossible then and still today for disabled dancers to get training that we were going to have to train dancers, and alongside that advocacy became a really important part. So access mission. As I exited was to change the face of dance and disability through artistry, engagement, and advocacy. And I'm thrilled to say that the company is continuing they replaced me with two people an executive director and artistic director, and you can find out more about access on the website, a D A N C E dot org.

San Francisco African American Shakespeare C executive director director founder and director founder and executive director Sherry young San Francisco Bay Tim Seelig Judith Smith administrator Tara San Eric ni Stanford Managing editor African American community New York City director America Judah Smith Nancy
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

06:49 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Most people go to work for a foundation as as as PM mentioned, you know, people kind of like us who came from the outside born with the name gates or buffet, right? And they go there to try and do good and do. Well, the argument about how bad things are from my community. Is not as powerful as this is the vision we have for serving our power. This is what we want to see. I mean, especially since you election of November twenty sixteen. We're really knowledgeable. What would we don't like? But what what's what's the shared vision of narrative for promoting forward? I mean, if you know, Cheryl, I wonder probably a conversation or bottle of wine, but if how many fellows, you support now, we've got a global community of over eight hundred and so if you went to if you went to ten thousand what would be different. To what research the foundation research the program officer, you're engaging. Those are real live. Human beings are not green green. Shape accounts. Find out what that foundation is looking for in terms of defining success kind of build a relationship from that. And then you can teach him something to where you're in there. So I just I just I just want to. You know, maybe again, maybe I've been in for three too long. Maybe what I'm saying. Now tells me it's time for me to go. But most Sunday Sion's wanna do well and want to do the right thing. Well, and to sort of want to be accountable for it. And so you just have to sort of show up like that. And I can't I can't walk into a boardroom status that you said, and that turns into a grand strategy or grant program got to be sort of a positive vision or outcome of something that we can assert and just wanna 'cause we hear a lot of that you should fund our community because we're only getting point zero one five percent of all foundation of lengthy funny. Well agree with that. And yeah that sucks, but I'm not giving you a grant. Because you told me that I'm just want to be honest and candid about that. And that I think we need to assert the positive shared vision of missing Linda this. This is why I love the young people. They're much more naturally sort of intersectional and bridge builders, then then certainly my generation, right? They'll go to a black lives matter of into on Saturday and LGBT event on Monday and metoo event on Thursday, and they're down with all of right? And we saw it after the shooting and parkland right member before minute, it was just a bunch of white kids talking about it and young people, wait a minute. What about us and by the time to March on Washington showed up do- young people of color at the podium. I don't know how that happened. But it wasn't because we gave them a grant. There's something I want to interrogate in their doctor Ross grow, and then we have to because. Got to get in a fight with a pregnant woman. We strong. I'd agree with you. No. I mean, just like in because in the spirit of listening as someone who also was on the non-profit side for a long time. This idea that we're supposed to research every opportunity and then research like the personality. Oh, she's Philipino. She's pregnant maybe I'll bring up that. I have kids that kind of stuff. It sounds again like the onus is on the applicant who has less time in his looking for money. So I want to say, yes. And like I do believe that a positive vision for what we wanted to chief. That's not just resistance is really powerful. And I also want to say what is the accountability? And responsibility of our of our sector to both stop operating in a silo way ourselves. So we have no idea like what other people fund or why right? We don't fund collaboratively most of the time we have all these super individualistic processes. So I think both of the vision you just put forth, I think that that vision that demand or that request can be made of Flint as well. Like, I think we can operate more as a collaborative ecosystem and less like how many foundations exist? Now. It's way more than two thousand hours and Plum, k sixty thousand individual mountains castles on top that people have to figure out how to get to the top of. And then ask their, you know, ask their ask. I think that there's a different a different constellation with which if we operated collaboratively in differently, and I just wanna say one hopeful thing because I I've level some critique of my sector, which is. I started this job for years ago with the mandate from our great partners to get other funders to behave better. Right. Act right medicine or something. I was I was pretty skeptical, but you know, over time, and because actually the Trump election has lit a fire under the feet of many of our friends who maybe didn't feel like they had to do anything differently. I think there's been like a migration towards asking about what edible practice looks like in real in real life like embodied, practices and approaches, and we went from like, a, you know, this tiny little you've never heard of us the Whitman institute. Now, you know, this tiny little foundation the bay area to there's eight or nine foundations that of all different scales and sizes that have signed up to not just model these practices, but advocate for them, widely invasive FRA sleep our sector, so that's just one of the many initiatives influence that actually does exist. That is pretty parallel values aligned with the conversation. We've been having this remote. So while we can be very critical of both the nonprofit sector and the philanthropic sector. I really wanna. To say that I feel more hopeful than I thought I would feel for years into this job of like try to change Flannery. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating social change. Please. Visit our website at dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Stanford University program officer Washington Twitter Cheryl Sion Facebook Eric ni Flannery Linda Ross Flint Plum Whitman institute zero one five percent two thousand hours
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

06:45 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric ni editor and chief of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI dot org. Research shows that wind talented social innovators lack invisible capital the so-called, right pedigree, right passport, right skin, color, right gender. They may fail to get the attention and vestment they need to succeed. How can leaders in philanthropy improve access to capital? What tools can help nonprofit leaders overcome these barriers and get the support they need at her two thousand eighteen nonprofit management institute conference social entrepreneur author and Stanford University lecturer Kathleen Kelly, Janice lead, a panel discussion with echoing green president Cheryl Dorsey Whitman institute, co executive director Pia in Fonte and Californian dominancy EEO Robert Ross as we heard from a lot of the questions throughout the day. It's impossible to have a conversation about diversity equity and inclusion without interrogating. Some of the invisible barriers that prevent capital from getting into the hands of so many people who are fighting on social Justice issues on the frontlines. I I became really passionate about this issue myself as doing research where my book social startup success of elible on Amazon. And so for the book, I went out and interviewed hundreds of organizations. They're leaders are staff their boards to try and understand how organizations scale, and as I was writing at my interviews and writing them for the book, I realized that so many of these stories sounded very similar that someone would graduate from and Ivy league university they would get capital from someone who took a chance on them. They looked a certain way talk to certain language had a certain pitch deck. And it occurred to me that although talent and good ideas can come from anywhere that we have a funding system that preferences, things like social innovation and certain degrees often at the expense of so many community based leaders or people with lived experience or people who are connected to the communities that they are serving and arguably a much better position to solve so many of the issues that we care about. So I became really curious well who got left off of the pages of social startup success. What are we leaving on the table because they never get funded, and I started to research this question of invisible barriers to capital and learned that divers leaders are significantly underrepresented in the social sector today. Well, thirty percent. Of the population is black or Latin necks only ten percent of organizations are led by black black and Latin x individuals. We also know that diverse leaders are under invested and the social sector today. Just four percent of grants and contributions, go to diverse led organizations and forty one percent of leaders of color struggled to find access to funding. Sources I think that that number is probably very low. There's also new research from digital undivided that talks about the challenges of being a black female leader lack women led organizations and companies raised just thirty six thousand dollars angel funding versus a three million dollar national average. They have statistically received only zero point zero zero six percent of venture funding, which I think we can only infer that similar disparities exist, and the nonprofit sector if you look at who is distributing the capital the picture becomes very clear. Eighty five percent of foundation. Trustees are white ninety four percent of foundation presidents or weight and seventy six percent of foundation stuff are wait. And then we also we think about despair this invisible barriers. To capitol have to talk about the wealth gap and this country to set an important barrier for represented leaders. The average white household has a total worth one hundred sixteen thousand dollars. While the Jeff can American household is just eleven thousand and this is problematic. When organizations are so often relying on friends and family for Sabe capital. I learned yesterday that the seed capital is sixty billion dollars annually in this country. And if you want to access that capital, you have to have family and friends who have money to get. Divers meters were to be capitalized at levels commensurate with their presentation the sector, we would need twenty two billion dollars in additional grant funding. So that's where we are. Flan therapy is reinforcing many of the very forms of inequality that we are all working so hard to solve. I'm really excited to talk about new approaches today with our incredible panelists who are addressing these and many issues in their work as funders, and I wanna start by giving them an opportunity to introduce themselves. And then we'll dive a little bit more into teasing out some of these challenges and barriers that exist, and then we'll talk a little bit more on a positive note as well. Cheryl, even a certain sure, thanks Kathleen. Hi, everybody. My name is Cheryl Dorsey. I'm president of echoing green echoing green is a leading angel investor. In emerging social entrepreneurs we provide a startup capital and wraparound support to amazing social entrepreneurs

Cheryl Dorsey Kathleen Kelly president Stanford Eric ni Amazon Stanford University Fonte editor Ivy league university Whitman institute Sabe Pia Robert Ross executive director lecturer Jeff Janice lead one hundred sixteen thousand d
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

09:52 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Where culture plays out a little differently. So whole truly because I work with means stream organizations chamber of commerce community foundations the powerbrokers community that culturally I have to look a certain way in dress a certain way in order to be heard in that room at the same time. I'm being brought in because there is a disconnect between their work and what they're trying to achieve in their greater region. And so it's an interesting kind of dynamic to have to show up as one of my friends would say suited in booted. So that you can hear the words that I'm saying at the same time the words that I'm saying are going to make you uncomfortable because it requires to do work that you're not. Already doing or else? You would not bring me in the room. And so the cultural thing is like way bigger than like, you said just a simple, pedigree or school or things like that. But it is are you creating an environment that allows people to have those type of conversations that get you to better place at the same time being aware of the cultural identifiers that you're putting out there that folks like me have to recognize in order to be able to have. My message heard something that's a good point that culture is more broad than to say like organizational, and when you're working in communities having lived in New Orleans for a number of years, which was a big adjustment from Chicago. It's like community takes on different manifestations in means different things from ward to ward neighborhood to neighborhood. I guess my final question is. I recently read broadened the Angelo's book white for Jilin. Why why people have a hard time talking about racism and having grown up in New Hampshire? Like, I'm I'm surrounded by whiteness. I'm you know, I was like one of two kids and elements school it was black. So that being said the way that she lays out the book, she talks about how we have this false idea about like racism and racist just being like, independent individual actors like bad people, but not thinking about the overall structure, and like the history of our country founded on white supremacy, etc. Etc. That really is like in the air, we breathe. And so I'm wondering given that there is the like the personal work like adding onto your point like the individuals that you're going to have those conversations with need to do some soul-searching and really like interrogate their assumptions their ideas their values etcetera before they can necessarily maybe engaged with what you're recommending as far as them changing. So there's like this personal level of change that needs to have. Open. And then there's an interpersonal dynamic because you know, we're in community with people, but then institutionally and organisationally there's another structure, and then there's like the the medicine doctors. And so recognizing the complexity I guess of like how to affect change and really make D I not just like a bumper sticker, which I feel like it has become in the last five years like everyone's talking about yet. There's a whole lot of sizzle. But not a lot of state with the concept. And so my question for you is what like across those four areas whether personal or interpersonal structural institutional like where do you think the first domino? Is that people could like consider if they want to start making more actionable in real? That was loaded. It was very loaded like big old baked potato with sour. He's all on there. I don't know. There is a one domino. So I don't expect when I enter into community to do the work that I do for people to have done the interpersonal work or the inner work. It's great when I start using talking about systemic racism and policies like redlining and the GI Bill and all of that where there's a foundational understanding. That's great. But that's not my expectation. I brought into communities because they do not wanna Ferguson. That's why broaden I'm not brought in because there's been a mass of Piff une- by the powerbrokers that this is a necessary transformative moment in order for their city to have resiliency. Those are really cute words. But the reality is no one wants to be a ticker. Tape on CNN saying their streets are on fire because another black man has been shot. And so for me, I want all of those dominoes to fall. But I don't know if we're going to get there. And so my work is to hit it wherever I can and hope that there's so much somebody else on this day j- or who who's been on this day or in this room, that's working on the other Domino's at the same time because all are needed. But I think it's a it's a little I don't know. I'm just not that idealistic to believe that all of those Domino's can happen at the same time. My initial thought to your question Mckee was leadership. Like, I wholeheartedly believe. And if you want to see change, it has to start with the leader pick, your nexus of what that is is is that the organization is at the person is a department is a something bigger than that. But it has to start with the leadership and the leadership has to decide what's important to him or her and authentically in the in the context of d I really what's important. Like, do you believe diversity is important because at least a better outcomes? Okay start there. Right. That's a value. If you don't believe what you are spouses it will come through. It will fall short it. Oh, hit a wall. Pick your pick your metaphor. Right. It won't go far. But it starts with the leadership's asking a team the individual what's important to me with important to us. And how are we going to? Carry that out that I think is the first step in the start of that. And then similar to crystals point it is really about deciding where you want to star and thinking about the organization's assessment or again, whatever that unit is like what can I what can I take on? What are we willing to take on? Where do I think the organization is? So do you want to tackle representation? Okay. Go for it. Maybe you don't wanna start with representation because you want to start with the culture of equity and inclusiveness. Like, let's not bring more folks into our stuff. Right because she'll just send them right out the door. It'll be a revolving door maybe work on both of those because you have capacity as an organization to change the same thing at the individual level. Do you have relationships with people that you're willing to go deeper and take risk and go farther? Once you get to that. What do I value is this really important to me? And where do I want to start? I used to teach training program called personally fishing at Kraft Foods, and what always say when you have this really big task. They set us the salami approach. Right. You never eat the whole salami at one time you actually slice off pieces of it. So when I think about this domino. It really is thinking about where you it's a whole lot of work that we have to do that we are trying to achieve socially if you think about where those couple of things I want to slice off. And then eventually will be ready to go back and. Slice additional pieces. I just wanna just second everything that you will said. And I the one thing I'll say is that she crystals point I watching to Dr king as a quote or how to quote, it's since been like, I don't need a man to love me. I just need him not to Lynch me. And so I kind of take philosophy which I'm not as interested in sort of getting into whether you believe in you don't believe, and I do think that behavior comes first then belief this idea of like, I need you to really believe in. It's like some of the organizations with the longest versity statements and inclusion statements and this and that and the beautiful color Benneton ads on their big like they're actually engaged in some of the most Rick systemic practices along so many different dimensions. Like, that's actually where your commitment shows up in terms of actual systems so much more interested into your point just taking one system at a time and saying, okay, what are the str? Pictures we can put in place here that will allow us to achieve a different result as opposed to focusing on the inter- the personal belief systems. I I think that actually comes after people have certain seats have seen certain results. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social nation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating for social change. Please visit our website at dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Domino New Hampshire Angelo New Orleans Stanford University CNN Stanford social nation review Twitter Chicago Kraft Foods Facebook Eric ni Jilin Lynch Dr king Ferguson Mckee five years
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

09:48 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric. Knee managing editor of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI dot org. And I'm Mike publisher of Stanford social innovation review. This podcast is part of our power of feedback series produced for SSI are with the support of the William and flora Hewlett foundation. It might be an exaggeration to say that Paul John is a citizen of the world. I often and different parts little bit them fiddle Teela, but a seal Columbia Ecuador, my father used to travel very much. Okay. Maybe Paul is just a citizen of the part of the world between Guatemala and tear. Del Fuego except that are traveling father. Who was an engineer was born in Mexico and Paula currently lives in Texas. She enjoyed the travelling as a child she learned Spanish as well as Portuguese than English. But at twenty two during a visit to family friends in Houston polo began to think that the only way to achieve independence from her father was to get married, and I said to him the first person who pass I wanna marry. I mean, that's what I say. And they he say you will. Not do that. And I say, yes, I will. And I did it. I I should it did the marriage lasted twenty five years and in the fullness of time Paula had a son and a daughter. She took advantage of the opportunity to become a different sort of parent from the ones she'd known high believe, I'm more flexible. I listen to my kids I like to laugh with them because my father, he really it was not a talk in. He was just a person who say do these do these these. Because Paul and not only laughed with her children. But listen to them and paid attention to how they were responding to her. She could use their feedback to inform her parody unhappily in the fullness of time Paulo began having some physical problems, including arthritis serious enough to keep her off her feet. She learned that she could get some assistance with their medical expenses in Harris County, Texas where she was living. If she applied for a card, which gave her access to the healthcare system. It was called a gold card. Eventually Paula her that she could get help with the form she needed to fill out at a piffling community health outreach services echoes for short Paul is first visit to echoes was about as frustrating as it could have been the FBI wait the full Bod while about four hours, maybe more when they're closed they find I find out that I cannot do not thin. I don't get the paperwork. I don't got nothing. Right. So I. Got frustrated I wing home died to cry so much because I was in pain, and I didn't know what to do more visits resulted in more frustration the staff at echoes was perhaps almost as frustrated as the clients were. Fortunately, they decided to ask people like Paula, John how they could better serve their needs. Like it. When you come to give you paper, and that paper, they ask you how we can do better what we do wrong. And you know, they don't ask for you to put your name scientists like that. So you feel free to say, well, what you feel you know, fuller wrote that she felt members of the echoes staff should be more friendly. First of all, I believe, you know, he's the more important things is going to say Hello that's very important because when you come to a place the matter what place it is. Anyone? You are welcome. I believed you know, that open door polo also wondered if the process of applying for health care could be streamlined and made more consistent. So that clients weren't constantly getting different advice from different people. She wrote that the office felt cramped could they arrange it. So that people had more space than perhaps more privacy. Cathy, more the executive director at echoes was listening, and she and her colleagues began responding to the suggestions of people like Bala, some of the things she actually said to you were some of the things we focused on the most one of them was creating order here is how she put it. But the truth is we became more organized in our morning routine, which then trickled down to the clients every morning, we do what we call the morning meeting with clients and that morning, meaning informs clients as to what they can expect that day. It's also a welcoming meeting is you'll remember pallet talked about putting a smile on our faces and being more, frankly, more customer service oriented, and that's part of that morning meeting of the welcoming of of everyone thanking them for their patients telling them where they can go for questions, and and directing them to who they to me, frankly in case they have complaints. These were all keys of what Palo shared with us customer service. More order and not making people wait as long within the limitations of the space available Kathy more enter colleagues who are known as navigators have tried to address conditions that might have seemed impossible to improve. When Paula enter fellow clients mentioned the well first of all the privacy part. She's right on target. It about. And so we've tried to make some privacy by putting up those dividers in the waiting area. So the navigators have a private place, but the navigators are still next to another navigator so Powis, right? We need more space. So that we can space people out or get people offices. But we don't were not able to do that yet. It's hard dream. Okay. Echoes is not exactly a dream. Come true. But the organization has seen an helped nearly three times as many people this year as it saw in twenty seventeen and Kathy more feels that responding to the suggestions of clients. Like, Paula, John is at least partly responsible for that Paula. Thanks kathy's. Right. Because every time I come here. This my say Hello. You know, like, I'm part of the family. You know, when you come to edges, you know, United's change it when you come United strange that treats you like family, you become family when you come over and over you become a family. So yes, I believe so the mission of a Pitney community health outreach services is to help people access health, educational and social services bureaucracy language issues the difficulty many of the clients face in just getting to the office all these challenges can be frustrating. But by asking their clients how they can improve delivery of their services and by listening to their responses echoes has built a better system. The proof is in the way, those served have told their friends and neighbors about how well it is gone echoes. And that the people there will listen to suggestions. And sometimes those suggestions have come in for. Normally as complaints, Kathy. More recalls have clients used to all get the same bag of groceries. It included five cans of salmon or five cans of tuna or five cans of chicken. I remember one day someone came and said, I don't like chicken. I really like salmon can't I have salmon. So it was feedback. But it wasn't necessarily on this survey. Okay. But it was clear feedback clear enough. So that the folks packing, the groceries got clued into the fact that they were dealing with individuals with food preferences and the preferences of some of those individuals led to an expansion of the pantry there was feedback from our clients and volunteers to by the way who wanted to have a food fair here at echoes where we could provide fresh fruit. So on the first Saturday of the month. We have this mood fair. The food truck comes we have things like corn dairy. We've had meat. All sorts of fruits and vegetables, and we hand out almost fifty to sixty pounds of two two hundred families on a Saturday morning all because somebody or perhaps several somebody's wondered if all that good stuff might be added to the menu more evidence that if you're in the business of trying to help people it's a good idea to ask those people what they need. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for podcasts articles and other content about innovating for social change. Please visit our website at 'Society dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Paula Paul John Kathy William and flora Hewlett foun Eric ni Stanford Texas Stanford University Del Fuego Columbia Ecuador managing editor publisher Guatemala Twitter Harris County Houston Paulo Pitney Facebook
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

07:56 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric ni. Managing editor of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI dot org. And I'm might Voss publisher of Stanford social innovation review. This podcast is part of our power of feedback series produced for SSI are with the support of the William and flora Hewlett foundation. Levels essay and Oland Artie visa victory. LS? revels thirty eight from Oakland, California. He's been out of prison since may twenty seventeen he spent almost all of the previous fifteen years, incarcerated and California. Arizona and Mississippi he did not commit crimes in all three states. Never know what the administration's thinking at the time, but I will say they don't want you to become too comfortable in one spot. And so a gospel twenty years at one prison, we're going to allow you to speak five six years here. Time to move on Shannon, characterizes his younger self as an angry man, some of the anger perhaps resulted from his apprehension and conviction. The first time for causing quote, great bodily injury the second for second degree robbery though. He was moved from prison to prison state to state, Shannon, manage to remake himself he earned three assoc-. Hits degrees and learned enough about computers to graduate from student status and become a teaching assistant while still incarcerated in that role. He began learning about how important it was for a teacher to consult with his or her students regarding the best ways to learn. My teacher always always asked us for what we could do to make this program better took suggestions. And we'll make a whole new program in a prison that might sound like a subversive idea ask the inmates. You're trying to help for suggestions about how to help them more effectively. Shannon was fortunate to have an instructor who saw the benefits of including his students in the process of designing and reforming the curriculum. Shannon himself was encouraged to identify the most challenging parts of the computer courses and design ways to help the inmates less students having trouble a lot of other mates that I was dealing with wherever senior population. And so they kind of didn't really know. Stable was going on. And so I was able to say, hey, let's break it down into much simpler time, and so they were really appreciate that Shannon, became increasingly convinced that feedback from the folks he was helping had multiple benefits and having learned how well cooperative partnership can work in. The course he was helping to teach while he was incarcerated Shannon brought that approach home. I was released made two thousand seventeen where their particular obstacles that you faced when you return to Oakland. I started doing my job research. I started doing all myself. I had a couple of us. But every time I got into an interview we got to a certain question, and there was always a temperature trying and I assume that question is to you have a criminal record. Correct. Shannon sought help at the center for employment opportunity. He told the counselors there. He'd take anything they had he just wanted to be able to support himself and as he put it. Not be a hindrance on others. So the CEO the center for point opportunities found me a job in San Francisco. I community housing partnership, which is a nonprofit organization in which I still work to this day. So I started off as genuine too much to the job. I received a text from CEO, and they asked me a couple of general questions Channa knew from experience that inmates often came out of prison with expired driver's licenses. You wanna help them he thought show them how to get a new license? So they can drive to the job. You're going to help them find at the time. Shannon. Didn't immediately realize how powerful that particular bit of feedback would be I didn't know that. It was a big deal there. I did find that out to one of the workers by the name of Nate called me one day and wanted to speak with regards to the feedback. He explained to me how quick six words turn into this big thing he said that he couldn't keep them on the shelf. It was like every time a new class came in all the handbooks and practice tests relieving, maybe somebody at the center should have thought of providing help to clients who'd require a licensed. But the fact that the suggestion came from somebody who knew firsthand what the centers clients needed emphasizes that power of feedback. The lesson wasn't lost on Shannon rebels. It allowed me to be I witness at the actual power of it for my little suggested to where it's at now. Shannon has advanced from janitor resident service counselor for community housing partnership building and San Francisco with fifty residents who are transitioning from homelessness to independence. He says he's leveled up and he carries with him the lessons about feedback that he began learning as a teachers assistant when he was still incarcerated and so often quoted reading listening and ex my residents that I worked for to provide me feed that what do you guys like to do or what can I do improve the program for you? And I came up with the flyer that I gave. And just told them. Hey, take two to three minutes. Jot down a few suggestions, and I'm going to incorporate your suggestions to better overall program for you guys one of the benefits of that process was ice cream Sundays on Sundays. Another one was better grooming at the suggestion of one of the residents, Shannon found barber who'd come by their place set a generator and provide outdoor haircuts. I was staying for the fact that they finally had someone listening to their ideas and equipment money what they want Shannon has built the process of seeking feedback and implementing the resident suggestions into the routine of his job, he hosts regular meetings dedicated to collecting those suggestions, and then he brings them up stairs. And I'm able to open up with my supervisor and manager. Like, hey, this is what I did. This is what my residents are asking for this is what I can do right now according to policies, but I would like to be able to do more. So kind of wakes up to upper management. It's a good thing. That's happening to my position. It's a good thing. That's happening to the positions of everybody involved and part of the explanation for this. Good thing is that Shannon RAV for victory. E LS has continued to seek feedback from the people he's helping and to provide it to the people supervising him. The theory is simple. Don't assume, you know, what's best for people. Even if you've been in the position, they're in give them the opportunity to let you know how to help them and trust their suggestions. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating for social change. Please visit our website at SSI dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Shannon RAV William and flora Hewlett foun Eric ni Oakland California Stanford San Francisco Oland Artie Stanford University Managing editor publisher robbery teaching assistant Arizona CEO E LS Twitter Stable Mississippi Nate
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

13:05 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric ni. Managing editor of Stanford. Social innovation view which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI are dot org. The non-profit color change was formed after Hurricane Katrina use online resources in the fight for the rights of black communities in America since then color of change has grown into the nation's largest online, racial Justice organization with more than one point four million. Members were shod Robinson, president of color of change spoke at our two thousand eighteen nonprofit management institute conference about the nature of political and cultural power and the importance of continually assessing the nonprofit sector's efforts to bring about change Robinson says we have to continue to challenge and ask ourselves. What are we winning? How are we doing? It is fantastic to be with you are I want to start off with a story about social movements. It was two thousand and ten and I was the senior director of programs and advocacy at glad the game lesbian alliance. You can Steph ommission as they were known at the time and glad I oversaw all of the organizations programmatic work from the work in Hollywood to shift perceptions about LGBT people to the work in the news industry to challenging what types of words and terminology the AP style guide would allow so much of that work so much of that work around advancing LGBT equality, particularly the culture change were is oftentimes talked about as a model, and we oftentimes hear these conversations and the nonprofit space about models. Something was disrupted for me back in two thousand and ten when I was asked by the State Department to take on a contract and go to Serbia and to work with LGBT activists who were at the time trying to. Have a pride celebration. There was a whole lot of political context behind the scenes around the e EU in the United States wanting Serbia to be part of the EU, and that they needed to prove that folks could have freedom of assembly, whether they be ethnic minorities women LGBT folks in part of this pride celebration was proving that that folks could sort of gather and celebrate in the face of attacks and violence, and that the government would protect in allow for freedom of assembly, and I decided I'd never been to Serbia, and my mom was like why are you going to Serbia? This doesn't make any sense. Like just because someone asked you to go someplace. But you know, it was like a trip, and so I went and I packed up. And did as much studying as I could about Serbia. I was not an expert, but I wasn't expert on the context of LGBT advocacy changed. So I packed all the information about how we were engaging in the media how we were training spokespeople. How we were dealing with issues of religious acidy, and culture, and and and went off to Serbia and that night after got there and took a nap and went and met with some a set of activists, and I sat down, and I could see that they were instantly disappointed when I walked in the door. And I wasn't sure why they were disappointed at first. I wasn't like I was like is it because I'm black is it because I'm laid if I missed some sort of like interaction and they were disappointed by my age. But I I started talking about the work that we were doing at glad and I also. Talked about some of the work that our colleague organizations were doing at the time in LGBT movement in about ten fifteen minutes in after they lab me to politely, so talk, they stopped me. And they said this is all interesting, but we weren't really interested in stories of the LGBT movement. We've been reading stories about Ella Baker and buyer rust in and we're actually very interested in the black civil rights movement as a model for how we do our work. We're interested in whether or not we have enough buses or enough bathrooms. We're interested if we have the right sort of political and cultural ask that's what we've been studying and that is. What we would like to know more about. My understanding of that is academic. It is based off of stories and lots of conversation with people I've gotten to know through my work. But it was certainly not a personal journey is someone that was born in the late seventies. I say all that to say that how we model what we think about models. What we think about advocacy, not just here in the United States. But around the world is incredibly complicated. But as we've grown, this nonprofit infrastructure in our country as we've grown philanthropic, infrastructure and our country. I think we have to continue to challenge ask ourselves about. What are we winning? What are we advancing are the structures that we've set up truly allowing us to translate the hopes aspirations and dreams of the people that we serve into the real world change that they actually deserve. Or are we setting? Institutions for perpetuity. Are we setting up institutions because we don't believe we can win. Are we setting up structures in needs that rely on themselves over and over again metrics over and over again, hiring new staff over and over again, growing our institutions for the sake of growing over and over again, these are complicated questions, and I'm not here to answer them for you. I just believe that these are the questions we have to be asking ourselves when the folks were marching and Selma. When the folks were sitting in at lunch counters, they weren't thinking about the ten year strategic plan of their organizations, and whether or not they're going to have funding for the next capital campaign. They were thinking about how do we make Justice real for the people that are that we actually serve the how do we in a very concrete way advance the idea that democracy should work for all of us. And so I wanted to start off with that story because as I go through and talk about some of the work. We're doing at color of change. What does it mean to grow a twenty first century civil rights organization rooted in not trying to be a model based off of something else? But thinking about innovation very, clearly I love palm trees, and if you can kind of tell from my accent. I I'm a New Yorker, and I love central park and just because I love palm trees, and there's a lot of trees in central park. Does not mean that a palm tree will grow and central park. And so even as I talk about some of our work. I am not trying to say that it is a direct model that you can overlay on every other problem or every other community with all of these problems in all these challenges. We have to be thinking about both technical and adaptive measures to be able to innovate and move our agenda. About thirteen years ago right around this time in the aftermath of flood Hurricane Katrina. That was caused by bad decision makers that turned into a life altering disaster. By those same bad decision makers color of change with founded how many people remember those images of black people on their roofs begging for the government to do something and literally left to die. For so many of us Katrina illustrated things that we already knew about geographic segregation generational poverty. The impacts of so many ways that we've underinvested in education and systems like Justice and quality. But at the heart of Katrina. No one was nervous about disappointing. Black people government corporations media were not nervous government was attacking maligning and in criminalising, those who are most vulnerable corporations where fleecing and figuring out how they could carve up the Gulf Gulf Coast and media was telling a story that literally talked about people who had built the city of New Orleans as descendants of slaves as refugees because no one was nervous. And in those moments while I fundamentally love research, and we do research color of change a research report that illustrates all the facts in the figures alone that has all the data points that we had to the people is not going to solve a problem. Like that often times what we do in the courtrooms. Won't solve that problem. If we have an issue of power because we don't have what it takes to actually implement even if we win. Our friends out here in the valley might be able to create incredible technology that in those moments do not actually change the fact that folks are not nervous research in law and technology are all important, and I'm not undermining that, but we can't research our way or legal our way or or code our way or even nonprofit executive direct our way out of problems like that. And so a color of change we have built that infrastructure in the beginning of our time it color of change. We were really just a response vehicle through online technology and really taking a lot of cues from organizations that were using emails and using petitions, and in that moment, we were giving people the ability to make a collective voice together. Every single day were hit with all sorts of information from the radio to the television to the newspaper. And the internet and that information can inspire activate make us annoyed upset, but if we don't do something in that moment, we oftentimes go back to doing what we were doing before. And so it color of change in these early days, we were responsible fighting for voting rights for Katrina survivors, who have been displaced making sure they could vote channeling energy and frustrations of everyday people whether they were in Seattle or Kalamazoo or Austin or Miami and giving people a collective way to engage. So that while people were watching what was happening or watching challenging situations. They weren't just giving to the Red Cross, but they were also working for systemic change as well. And while we were doing that we recognize that we had to do more. And so we started to build what we thought about was countable accountability vehicle not just sort of building the energy over that time to channel those voices. But starting to think more strategically about who are targets recognizing that some of the stuff that we were dealing with with part of the larger culture, and if we were going to challenge, folks like Glenn Beck, and Lou Dobbs and an advocate and push against what they were doing on the air. Air. Maybe direct target was in a media company that could care less about black, folks. But maybe it was the corporations that were sponsoring those shows, and maybe we could develop a strategy by using the internet, recognizing the models that came before us around holding institutions accountable in leveraging buying power, but leveraging the new technology and the new tools to think differently about how we could supercharge that. So we had a strategy of respond and then building that energy. And then over time we started to think very clearly about what does it mean to actually move that energy to systemic change? So that we're not just in response mode or build mode, but we're finding those systemic pivots along the way. So we're responding to moments and we're building energy. And then we're finding those pivots where we can translate that energy translate that power to actually start shifting laws or longer term practices. Maybe not just getting someone fired but changing. Standards and practices. Maybe not getting someone to apologize but changing systems of how how things work inside of places of power. And that was really part of how we start to think about developing a twenty first century model that could be leveraged to create real change that could be leveraged to create Justice right now color of change is a movement of one point four million black

Serbia Hurricane Katrina Katrina United States Robinson EU Stanford Eric ni Managing editor America Ella Baker State Department Steph ommission president senior director Red Cross Selma Hollywood
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

05:27 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Now too. Risha? So she can talk about color of change. And when we were coordinating about our conversation here on stage. The idea was to try now to look at a less. Dark conversation because some of the work that she has championed at color of change had enormous success. And what I hope you'll be able to tell us how you've deployed some of these digital tools and opportunities in a way that's contributed to the success. You've had so that we can have a conversation about the upside. And not just the downside. Absolutely. Thank you so much. It's always wonderful to be back at Stanford. How many folks have heard of color of change? Oh my God. Okay. I'm always shocked a little bit so color change was founded about thirteen years ago. And the aftermath of her Hurricane Katrina. We're now the largest online racial Justice organization in the country. With close to one point five million members nationwide. These are folks that take online action mostly sometimes off-line action to achieve real world change for black people. And we measure ourselves by meaningful real world change tangible. We're world change for black people. But back in two thousand five our founders van Jones who's on CNN, occasionally and James Rucker. Who's a Stanford alum were like many people in the country. Watching the television news watching the footage of Hurricane Katrina New Orleans seen black people stranded on their rooftops watching government officials Pat themselves on the back for a job. Well done. And listening to media corporations. Call black people looters as they went to go look for supply survive and what they saw in. That moment was an absence of black political power. What they saw was that. No one was nervous about disappointing. Black people. And that lack of nervousness that lack of fear. Was a direct indication of a lack of real political power. So they're pulling together some ideas, and they decided to send out an Email to about a thousand of their friends and the subject line read Connie was right Konya west had just gone on a national broadcast and said sort of impromptu that George Bush didn't care about black people. And so they sent out this Email to a thousand of their friends with the subject line Connie was right? And in the Email, they went onto a unpack all the ways in which black people had been failed by institutions in this moment. And they asked people to take a simple action by clicking on this petition. They would be joining a twenty-first-century civil rights organization that was focused on building row political power for black folks. They sent out t shirts of the people that sign them with the slogan. Conde was right on them. You can't wear them like anywhere anymore because he's only been right like one maybe two times. Since then. But you could our point they were trying to take political moments that people were engaging with those sort of water cooler talk moments giving people language to unpack the realities of the situation, and hopefully giving people something from to do in that moment. And the realization and asking folks to join color of change was that we needed to build an independent infrastructure for strategic black response. And so that's what we've been doing where a black led organization we exist in the progressive world. I think we exist in an interesting intersection in that we leverage all of the new media tools that we've talked about that create that are dangerous in some respects. And we also worked to hold those companies accountable. And I think there are a couple of examples coming up of that. But we fundamentally believe that no real political change in this country has happened in the absence of black people, and that when black people when all working class people when and so that's the framework that we that we come from an embody. We think about power and a few ways, and we think about leveraging technology NFU ways, the first two steps of model require responding and building we have to build enough pressure to we have to respond to specific moments. We have to build enough pressure to an impact specific situations. We have to build enough pressure to hold decision makers accountable and impact a wide landscape. And so a lot of the work that we've done in our early days at color of change has been around holding media more countable to black people. All of these men once had very successful television shows, they no

Hurricane Katrina Connie Conde Stanford van Jones James Rucker CNN George Bush Pat thirteen years
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric. Knee managing editor of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI dot org. The interaction between digital technology and democracy is complex offering both enormous potential and peril editor two thousand eighteen frontiers of social innovation conference robberies a Marcon, Laura Andriessen faculty co director of Stanford PACS digs into the implications. For the social sector in conversation with Kelly born a program manager at the William and flora Hewlett foundations, Madison initiative and a racial hatch. A managing director of campaigns at color of change. Good morning, everybody. It's a real pleasure to have you here at Stanford University. And I want to introduce the panel that's going to kick off the frontiers conference this year by saying just a few words at the start about how I'd like to orient your attention to something which is obvious. If you just pay attention to the news these days, and that has to do with the way that I like to think about the interaction between digital technology and democracy, or if you prefer digital technology and social innovation the framework, which I think works for me that I want to urge upon you as well is the idea that there is so much about what digital technology digital tools and digital platforms organizing by thinking first digitally offers as promise to those of us working on the frontiers of social change and innovation. There's enormous potential. That these tools and platforms. Afford us in ways that old style organizing old style change innovation were less potent less powerful at the same time, simply by pension taint attention to the news, you know, that there's also great peril in the way that digital tools and flat forms can sometimes bring about ill intentionally or unintentionally through malicious actors or through simply indifferent or unaware actors more. Generally, it's a basic truism that digital technology as a general force is having an enormous enormous impact on so much of our personal private and professional lives. So that's the frame promise and peril that I want to orient you towards the beginning panel. And we've got to fantastic people who are going to serve in discussion to orient us and precious are thinking forward a bit. I want to introduce. Kelly born Kelly is a program manager at the Hewlett foundation, and she's managing the Madison initiative there a set of investments at the Hewlett foundation that are designed to look for the ways that philanthropy can help rejuvenate and restore some of the integrity of democratic institutions. And then Secondly, a Risha hatch who is managing director at color of change and social movement organization here in California and the bay area well Kelly, why don't you come and join me here on stage. So. Here's the promise. This is remarkably just from two thousand sixteen. Collection of essays from technologists and scholars about how machines are reshaping civil society and democracy itself. And then this is the title of an article from a colleague of ours here at Stanford Nate personally presser in the law school last year in the journal democracy. We'll democracy Ken democracy survived the internet. This suggests you the the dual and manichean possibility of technology another way to think about this. This comes from Nate slides the various ways in which we want to try to think about how the internet or digital technology poses a distinctive type of threat something different from the past. There are various things that are merely differences by degree the ways in which digital technology has fragmented or disintermediated the media or informational landscape. Now, of course, that's nothing new, but technology makes all of us producers of speech and content in ways that were much more difficult in the past. The speed of information and the difficulty of correction, you all know that lie travels across the internet at light speed,

Kelly managing director managing editor Stanford Nate Stanford Hewlett foundation Stanford University Ken democracy flora Hewlett foundations program manager Stanford PACS Eric Laura Andriessen editor director Madison California
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

06:35 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Is there another question else? I mean, I've plenty of questions to to ask. But I really want to give you to the opportunity. Hi, thank you so much. My name is Ray smell Lima director of policy for a humanitarian NGO based in Somalia so conflict fragile setting. I'm really glad to some of the early definition of a in terms of replacing some things, and I think there is a at least a setting that. I am in most of my workers most of the colleagues and peers who I work with on the frontline who worked for local NGOs are dying for reasons around going into places where roller people are in. And so if there's one job I could replace it would be their job. So that it doesn't actually cost us. Their lives are young bright people. Sometimes fused future luminaries of a country. That is so needed some some some that needs so much of the leaders of these guys represent. So is there air I for some of the areas where conflict settings or happening where there's protracted crisis where there's less need of a machine that cleans your house, but really need machines that can replace a life that could be lost. Yeah. That's that's a really good question. So again, I'm more a basic science technologist, which means most of our work is a little of quite far into the future rather than current application, but in the field of robotics, and a lot of remote technology. There are people definitely looking at these great example for replacement actually make sense, right? Not disaster relief is another is another area where we want to take human lives out of harm's way. We Stanford robot is a professor who Somma Qatif beauty diver robot. Who that goes deep under the ocean where humans really shouldn't be there because it's too dangerous to to deep into the water. So this whole idea of building technology or rope. Especially robotic send. Enter technology that can insinuations work on dangers and and sit. Context that that is not good for human is there. There is research going on is a deployable today to be a perfect level. I think it's still in the basic science research. Research phase. But. No, please. Keep an eye out on. Potential application. There's also telling medicine, and it's a different case from what you're talking about. But you could see different aspect. People are thinking about these technologies. Is there a question that you? Just linking the sorry. Kelly Hutchinson from university of Melbourne Australia. There's a linking point from the previous session on the female workforce in in informal and voluble labor markets in a stray Leah we've got an aging population. We've got a caring the Caras workforce. There the underpaid workers, the female and they've got precarious employment. But when I work in Victorian government, and we were looking at the future of work and raising this question, how do we make this transition? I'm interested to understand how you know. You're much hotter on the signs day. But that value that the value of work. And the value of paying people a livable wage also connects to that basic income theme that we've seen. How do we as people working in this space, enhance what we can do and bring people along with us because as you say, it's either the distortion view of the world's gonna wind or this utopian view that this is going to solve everything and we're the practitioners and the people trying to bridge days to divides. Yes. So quick question. I I didn't catch your name. But that sentiment is so shared every time. I I traveled globally and talk to people who care about AI. And you're right. I'm I don't pretend I have the answers, especially when it comes to economics policy. I'm not an expert, but what I really want to advocate, and now was part of my New York Times op-ed is that. Governments corporations academia have a collective responsibility to start the research and studies of these policies implications impacts now what I worry about is that if we're not putting resource or put it this way, there's trillions of dollars billions of dollars going to develop technology that makes money, but there's more to that. There should be way more resource going to the studies and research about these critical policy issues human nature's and technologies that related to these issues that can help solve these issues. I really think that. Globally. We need to have more stepping-up of companies, universities and governments putting resource in the tension in this. And again, I don't pretend at all. I have unsearched to those. But banning of you do and with the right resource and dialogue and all this. We can we can crack this problem, or at least put together solutions to crack these problems, but we've got to get our act together globally together to do this. Thank you so much parties. Call for action again address to all of us. Thank you. Thank you. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating for social change. Please visit our website at SSI dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Stanford University Somalia Lima Ray Leah Twitter Somma Qatif New York Times director Facebook Eric ni Kelly Hutchinson professor AI university of Melbourne Austra
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Technologists and thought leaders in the space of diversity and inclusion and I'm happy to talk more about that. But that that Google has been collaborating with us along with other companies as well, that's where I want to have next because I know that deeply care of of making all sorta. Bringing work inclusion to attack careers. How can we think of a I as as something we leverage to? To to bring more inclusion or how can we actually make a I more female or not colorblind? Yes. So that's a great question. So a few years ago literally happened to me one day I woke up and thinking that around the world of a I we have two seemingly disconnected crisis. And I woke up thinking that there's actually a deep connection between these two crisis. So one crisis the talk of terminators coming next door is that I got knows where it's going. But but it's such a powerful technology. What if it turns evil, and you laugh about it? But plenty of people talk like that and the second highs is a crisis. I live day to day is the lack of diversity we already locked versity in stem in. CS is only worse and about four or five years ago. I woke up a realize there's a deep convection between these two prizes potentially which is really worthy people behind technology. That's really the connection. So if we believe that the technology makers and leaders are people that carry the kind of value, we care, we will have less fear about this technology becoming terminators but in order to to bringing the kind of values that we cared into the technology. We should look at the people. We who are developing this technology if that that group of people the technologist represent a narrow slice of humanity. It is a problem, and it will have a much harder time representing who we are collectively and carrying the values. We collectively care. So this is why I started talking to my colleagues, and my students about this as we know I will change the world. The real question is who is going to change. I and with that realization we wanted to experiment a new way of of bringing an education to students high-schoolers because we believe high school is the age where students are thinking for the first time who am I? And what do I mean to the world and world concretely? What's my college? Major and this is the right age to capture their sense of responsibility as was their imagination. So we experimented a Stanford. Summer camp, where we opened a we we took a number of high school girls, ninth grade girls, and we put together an AI curriculum. That's human centered. We won the technology to have a mission. So give them a very rigorous technical curriculum. But their hands on research projects in the summer. Cam is deeply human centered, for example, if they're interested in a particular technology or natural language processing it's looking word documents while then we spend it as a project to look at Twitter data in natural disaster time and to predict the need for for help. If they're interested in comer technology, commit or vision, we spend it in a hospital setting and to. Doctors. Predict

Google Stanford Twitter Cam five years one day
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

09:41 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"I before I actually go to that hard. Let me ask the question. What is our to fischel about a I? So the word artificial intelligence like I said is coined by professor John McCarthy, and that was to. To really. Trying to understand a very fundamental question for the early pioneers in computer science, which is can machines think can we build intelligent machines, and humans are very good at introspection than looking at ourselves where we think about building machines that are intelligent. We never totally think about who are intelligent beings in the universe and ourselves are intelligent beings. So would night came to stem for virtually professor Jomar because they passed the way. So I never had a chance to ask him in person. Why did you call this field artificial intelligence, but I would have imagined that intelligence is a term for human and even some animals and in order to differentiate that the machine tellers from biological intelligence, the word artificial was put together, but that is. My own hypothesis. I don't know what was his thought process. Thank you human centered approaches to a I they are at the core of your work here at Stanford on campus. But also at Google at tell us a little bit more. What is behind this? This this explicit focus. Let's call it human centered AI rather than just yes. So part of this whole development of human center was summarized in the New York Times op-ed, I published about a month and half ago. And it's kind of accumulation of what I've been thinking about where is going for for the next for the future. Because clearly the past sixty years has as a field we've developed ourselves. We've we've begun to make a big difference in real life. But where? Our next face. So we think about human centered or I advocate to think about was entered the three important. Elements or pillars of however or focus areas. However, we call it the first part of human center AI is actually the core technology itself is as much as there's a lot of euphoria of the credibility of machines machines are in general still pretty dumb compared to Huma. So there's a famous saying in one thousand nine hundred seventy s by expert, laughing that's saying itself still reflects today's state of being a it goes like this the definition of today's is a computer that can make a perfect chest move while the room is on fire. So you can swap the word chest to go or whatever specific task you will do that's data driven. But the bottom line is a lacks the contextual awareness holistic understanding the nuance and the Alon of complexity of human intelligence, and I think that's where the next phase of core. Technology ought to be taking to consideration is human cognition, human psychology, brain size human behavior to really improve. Capability which brings us to the second focus area or pillar of Huber's centered. I is what is this technology four. When we talk about. I today there's a lot of controversy but one important risk. We face is job displacement. You know, as we ultimately machines, how do we grapple with the fact that it's changing the landscape of labor, and I think there is a model of social issues, but from the technology itself there should be that important recognition that instead of the word replacement. We should focus on the word enhancement. There's so much technology can do to augment people and enhance people. I personally at stead for work a lot in healthcare talking about aging society, we have a project with the senior holding in San Francisco, but whether we're talking about healthcare or education or manufacturing agriculture government. Every aspect of where this technology can be applied. I think there is a chance for this technology to be assistive of humans. So we're at Stanford. I like to advocate a human centered approach to application and development of a technology that focus on the word, you Hansman ornament augmentation rather than pure replacement which brings us to the third and last, but at least. Important topic is I- social and human impact. This field is no longer just a niche computer science field. And we need to recognize the from the immediate impact to the future impact of technology as powerful as a fact, we don't have enough understanding in research is social impact whether it's jobs ethics decision making organization laws and education healthcare privacy security, so many aspects aspects of our society in human lives might be impacted by and it's Gordon to recognize that and fund research and studies and efforts addressing these issues. So these are the three pillars of human centered approach. Thank you fake how much of this third, especially the third pillar is we've. In in your work at Google. I mentioned it you are to cease chief scientists for Google cloud and Google has also tried to pioneer the the way they think about being we've in the the work of a foundation directly into what they're doing with two Google dot org to what extent can we think of the word that you were doing there as twenty-first-century version of what we previously called corporate social responsibility. Is there a way to to weave in your third pillar in the work you directly due for Google? So those are good cushion. So first of all I most about co Google evolving been there for a year. And I'm still learn the industry world myself, a not very familiar with that big eighty thousand people company yet. As a technologist. I try as much as I can. So I'm not a major decision maker in many many aspects, as you know, it's a huge gigantic carrier ship, right? So. For example. A lot of our work is to listen to the industry needs in transforming the digital technology, and the gives me a very nice perspective of the pain points of of the traditional industry that are going through transformation. I love healthcare as an example, we listen to the pain point of health care and. Try to deliver technology that helps them to whether it's too short manage their decision making process help to improve decision-making process, or or or help efficiency or whatever it is. That to me is a human centered approach we care about the bias issue machine. Learning Google has not under me, but has a research team working on basic sized research of bias emission earning. My team collaborate with them and try to bring that perspective to any technology. We deliver to customers. I also not wary. My Google week collaborate with Google dot org through my nonprofit organization AI for all which was established a year ago as a. As a nonprofit focusing on education of next generation, AI technologists

Google AI Stanford professor John McCarthy New York Times San Francisco Jomar Huber Gordon sixty years
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

15:00 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric ni. Managing editor of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI dot org. Emerging technologies like biotech and artificial intelligence have the potential to transform so many of the systems that make up the world around us at our two thousand eighteen frontiers of social innovation conference, Catherine Milligan who directs the Schwab foundation for social entrepreneurship spoke with a few savvy social entrepreneurs who are harnessing these tools for social impact right now. Milligan speaks with Keller Rinaldo CEO co-founder of zip line, which is using drones to live or blood and medicines to remote parts of the world. Kristen groups Richmond revolution foods, which is using technology to increase access to fresh healthy food in underserved communities and David Risher CEO and co founder of world reader, a global nonprofit that provides people in the developing world with free access to digital books via e readers and mobile phones. I am. Without further ado, delighted to be joined on stage by three of the social partners in the schwa- foundation's global community, Chris Richmond's of revolution. Foods Keller Rinaldo of zip line and David Risher of world reader, welcome. I thought I would start this panel with a confession. More in the Luddite camp than I am in the tech savvy guru camp. And so when I started preparing for the session, I was momentarily stricken with imposter syndrome. But then I came across something that you said Keller about bringing up Aguirre's mind to an issue and not being afraid to ask questions. And so I thought I would turn that into an advantage by putting all the less tech savvy among us in the audience at ease. You're in very good company. And you don't my goal here with the conversation that we're going to have this morning is to really strip away all of the impenetrable language and intimidating jargon. Just have a really acceptable informal conversation. So the title of the session is shorthand for the fourth industrial revolution. That's a book by professor Klaus, Schwab, the founder and executive chairman of the World Economic Forum and the co founder with his wife Hilda at the foundation for social entrepreneurship in that book just to get folks really quickly on the same page with that term in what we mean, he argues that quote, we face both the opportunities and the challenges of a range of powerful emerging technologies from artificial intelligence to biotechnologies to advance materials and quantum computing that will drive radical shifts in the way, we live fourth industrial revolution technologies are not merely incremental advances on today's digital technologies, but are truly disruptive up ending our existing ways of sensing calculating organizing acting and delivering over time. They will transform the systems we take for granted today from the way. Produce and transport goods and services to the way, we communicate collaborate and experience the world around us, unquote. So we're going to impact that in about fifty seven minutes easy task. So look my first question to all of you. That sounds so big and overwhelming, it's hard to know, how to wrap your mind around that. So let's start with mindsets. And I'm not going to ask you where these technologies will be in five years, and what are your predictions? I think you know, the reality is that. It's impossible, but still as leaders of organizations making major strategic planning decisions, you know. How are you reading interpreting the trend lines of the four I r and how is that informing your decision making so whoever? Yeah, I can. So the way we think about it is that the future is weird. And especially in a in a in a world where technology is moving faster than it has in the past. Like you mentioned like predicting trend lines. We don't even try. Because what I mean by the future is weird. Is that looking five years ahead things seem so strange like we don't even believe certain things are going to work, and then they end up working like, you know, five years ago ten years ago, most people in global public health thought, the idea of cellphones exploding across Africa was outrageous today, it's like universal and today most people think that the idea of artificial intelligence or robotic starting first in Africa. They think that idea is outrageous, and we'll be showing a little bit is that it's not that outrageous. So I guess for us like it's not so much about predicting. But rather understanding that the future is so weird that we can't really predict it, but it will be very different than where we are today. So if if we just view it as like if our actions are predicting that things will generally be the same five years from now, then we will not be successful because we'll be fundamentally wrong. Whereas if we're willing to suspend disbelief and try new things like radical new things and test them and see if they work and understand that doing that. Inherently means we'll be taking risk than some of the things that we do end up working. And that's kind of the whole point of what we do. Well, I'll add I'll try and then as the founder of revolution foods, and I think I would have originally thought I would have fallen in the same camp as you described Catherine, which is how much are we really going to use technology to change a food system and make healthy fresh affordable clean food available throughout the US, primarily and underserved communities and schools to drive health outcomes and academic outcomes. And I think when Kitson I founded red foods a decade over a decade ago. I don't think that we honestly thought about technology as a huge lever to do that. And now we do every day. And we also I think our humble enough to realize that we don't know exactly how that's gonna look in three years five years ten years. But when it comes to designing, and I'll talk more about this but designing our meal, so that they're not just healthy. But kids, love them and. Lethem? So they have a huge impact and technology related to that. When we think about producing and distributing. It comes into play for us in a pretty big way at this point. So I'll talk more about it. But you know, that's it's it's a part of everything we do know and David hoses affecting your strategic decisions. So we have kind of interesting way of thinking about this. I think which is we look a lot at what changes fast and to your point Keller. It's easy to say easy to predict a lot will continue to change. But we also like to look at what isn't going to change, and what's going to be very durable over the long term. And if you look at the kind of friction between those two I think maybe that's where some of the most interesting insight can happen, for example, fairly sure that reading which is our world is not going to become less important over time. And and no one's going to wake up one morning and say, gosh, I wish you know, fewer kids knew how to read or you know, or we would teach kids. To read later in life because that somehow mix it's like that doesn't make any sense at all. So some things you can predict with certainty reading we'll matter eating will matter, by the way. That's another thing. We can predict what. Hi, sir. Socializing connecting people will matter. Those are things that won't change now technology that will change, but even within technology. It will get cheaper. It will get more. Ubiquitous it more get more powerful. It will get more personalized. So I think to a certain extent if you can if you can sort of contrast what, you know won't change versus some other things that will change, but even in some maybe some predictable ways. That's maybe how you can start to form a framework around experimentation, do the most interesting work. Definitely. Well, so now, let's take opportunity to dive into examples and really give everyone in the audience a clear picture of what you're actually doing. And Chris I'd love to start with you. I'm sure many folks here are familiar with revolution foods in your model. But can you explain a little bit about how you are creating systems change with a whole other constellation of actors in the system. So our really key question. We asked ourselves when we were kicking off which was a little over a decade ago. At Berkeley, actually was you know, how do we create systems change in in food? We realize that the quality of food that our students we started in schools and are still really heavily providing healthy food in schools. But we were asking ourselves how do we dramatically change? The quality of food that students are receiving every day. We have a very small amount of money to to work with. But we believe there was a way to do it. And so we really bought built built the company brick by brick and thought about how do we create meals breakfast lunch snack and supper every single day? So it's amazing over you guys may may not know this. But over fifty percent of every family every child in the US eats at least one meal a day at school at this point and many eat two to three particularly in the communities that revolution foods is serving. So there's a tremendous opportunity for impact. But we knew we had a huge challenge ahead of us. And so we really thought about how to make how to create a supply chain from scratch to create the first all-natural clean label supply chain there just wasn't one available for creating these meals that we were serving into schools, and then we thought about. How do we design foods that kids are going to love? And so now, I'm sitting up here not only as an entrepreneur, but as a mom with two little boys, and this is a topic that relates to everyone out there who struggles with that every day. You know, how do I how do I serve my kids healthy food? But also food that's gonna come home eaten from their lunchbox. And that I know is going to that we know is going to nourish them every day. And this is where I think this conversation gets really interesting because working within a tiny. Tiny financial limit to do. This requires really thinking about how to leverage for us now technology in terms of creating these meals at scale at a price point, that's affordable to have the highest level of impact. So the couple of topics. I wanted to hit one is just engagement respecting consumer base design. So we now serve over two and a half million meals a week across thirty cities in two thousand schools, and we take it very very seriously that we are only designing the meals that our students in communities feel is respectful to them, and again, cultural relevance is a huge part of that. So we're out gathering data every single day from our students and processing data and saying, okay. What are those menu options and meal formats that will deliver not only health but also delight right because we want to build a community. We want to be. Lifelong healthy eaters. So that's one area. That's that's really important to us. The other piece that I would say is a. A place where we are thinking hard about what kind of technology. We can utilize is in creating access to fresh in. What would have traditionally been called food desert? So how do we think about packaging technology and shelf-life technology that enables us to bring fresh meals into communities that haven't had fresh food access every day. And that requires less drops more volume, you really have to cost optimize everything you're doing. So that's a big big part of our work and then finally distribution. So thinking about when you're delivering thirty thirty. Southie sufferers day to fifty YMCA's our boys and girls clubs around a community. That has not traditionally been a an economically viable thing to do. So how can we utilize different technologies again too? To help make that kind of delivery financially viable, so that all students and all youth will have access to these meals in after school settings as well. But those are couple of things I wanted to hit quickly. A thank you so much for that. Million meals a week. I'm sliding through these and I can talk more about. As well. I think is such an important element to the Keller in Davos you. It was quite a lying, you know, sort of if if drones can take lives drones and also be used to save lives. So why don't you share with us a little bit about how you and the entire team zip line are doing that. So zip line is building autonomous delivery networks to deliver medicine and two parts of the world did typically don't have access to medicine today. And we as a team design, the the onyx the aircraft the distribution center. And then we operated as a service, you can couldn't think of us like a twenty first century version of ups, and we work directly with governments and ministries of health to basically provide universal access to health care at a national scale. So what that looks like today in Rwanda, we're contracted by the ministry of health to serve twenty one hospitals today in the country. We're delivering about twenty five percent of the national blood supply of Rwanda using Thomas aircr. Raft today, and we'll be at about fifty percent in late June. So it's expanding really really quickly. And and what we're currently undergoing today in two thousand eighteen is actually we just added. So just to give you a sense for what we're actually looking at here the Z in the middle of the map is the distribution center that we're operating from from that distribution center, we can cover about sixty percent of the country. We just finished construction of a second distribution center that you can see now in the eastern half of the country. And that means that by the end of twenty eighteen and we're also expanding from blood to about one hundred and fifty different medical products. So that means that by the end of twenty eighteen Rwanda will be the first country in the world to provide universal access to health care any medical product delivered in fifteen minutes or less to all million of its citizens. I'm just saying

Keller us Catherine Milligan Rwanda Chris Richmond David Risher co founder founder Keller Rinaldo Africa Schwab foundation Keller Rinaldo CEO Richmond Eric ni schwa- foundation Managing editor Schwab David