35 Burst results for "Stanford"

Can California Win the Water War?

The Officer Tatum Show

02:48 min | 17 hrs ago

Can California Win the Water War?

"What is the future for Californians? If Gavin Newsom continues the way he's going, these Democrats are still running the government in California. Is there going to be a significant drought in California that the Californians should be worried about or is it the government is incompetent and we will resolve this as a people in California, you know, where do we stand with this? Well, it's hard to know where it's going to go. I mean, what we're doing is we're state officials through inaction are putting us at the mercy of mother nature, right? So we're just so if we get some rainy years, we'll be fine. And if the drought becomes intense and that the state has had droughts and floods and droughts and floods throughout its entire history, when Leland Stanford went to the inaugurated year to take a boat to the capital, there were we've had massive floods before before we damned all the rivers. There were massive flood events and we've always had drought event. Long-standing drought. So it's really just really just largely an infrastructure issue. And we have the state has a $97.5 billion budget surplus, which is that's pretty unbelievable, which certainly just means the government is collecting more money from people. It's taking too much money. But certainly, if you look at this in context, if we used a lot of some of that money towards building some of these infrastructure projects, we could solve it because you saw you store more water in the rainy year. So you have it in the dry years. I mean, there's a reason Southern California gets a third of the states rainfall, and it has, it's a better shape than the Northern California, which gets two thirds, obviously, two thirds of the rainfall, because Southern California, the metropolitan water district and the water district of San Diego have built more storage facilities and they plan to head. Now, there are some things that everyone likes, like Orange County, is the master of water recycling, and that's a good thing. There are a lot of things like that. We can do. I advocate doing all sorts of things. We store more water, build diesel, recycle water, conserve, do everything, but we're losing California has been overdrawing from the Colorado River. So we're having to pull back. So yeah, we're looking at a future of scarcity and if the state that's just going to be higher prices, rationing, it's going to be bad for poor people for everyone. It's going to be bad for business development and fewer people are going to want to come here.

California Gavin Newsom Leland Stanford Southern California Northern California San Diego Orange County Colorado River
Stanford's Ram Rajagopal: Today's Grid Wouldn't Support All EV Society

Mark Levin

00:58 sec | 5 d ago

Stanford's Ram Rajagopal: Today's Grid Wouldn't Support All EV Society

"Let's say we were to have a substantial number of electric vehicles charging at home as everybody dreams Says ram Raja Paul and associate Professor of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford Co authored a recent study looking at the strain electrical vehicle adoption is expected to place when the peregrine He told Yahoo finance today's grid may not be able to support it all boils down to Are you charging during the time solar powers on In Sacramento officials said California great could face a potential shortfall of roughly 1700 megawatts Which would affect the power supply between one and 4 million people this summer That number would likely be exacerbated by an additional short for fall of 5000 megawatts In the case of extreme heat and further fire damage to existing power lines

Ram Raja Paul Stanford Co Yahoo Sacramento California
"stanford" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:43 min | Last week

"stanford" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"But as you know, I've been very obsessed with languages lately. And so it's on my mind constantly, so I hope that you're doing well. And do help us by supporting the people that support the podcast here and check out the Dr. Drew TV site as well where we're doing regular streaming shows. And I might love to have the corolla faithful over at Instagram DR drew pinsky and of course TikTok at Dr. Drew. Today the guest is Jason gray Stanford, the podcast is the Randy disher podcast, of course, the best known for playing lieutenant Randy disher in the Golden Globe winning TV program monk. And of course he voiced the role of raditz raditz. You're going all the way back. So there you go. We'll get into what Jason's all about, but you know him, of course, from monk. And you can follow him on Twitter at jazz GAS or jazz jazz. Gray Stanford. And Instagram at Jason gray. Stanford. Welcome. Thank you very much for having me. Dr. Drew. So talk about the podcast for a minute. Why should people go listen? Oh, well, I tell you what, if you're a monk fan, which there are many of them out there, the monk faithful, the monca holics, as we call them. Mongol files, whatever you want. Whatever you might want to say. What it's really kind of, I started it. When we'll get into it later, but I had some health issues. And I started it during that time. And it was really therapeutic for me. And I realized that, you know, during the pandemic, you know, a show like monk really kind of caught on again, having been off the air for a little bit of interesting. And it was really kind of my love letter, my thank you. Well, I think him over at maisel reinvigorated interest in Tony Shalhoub. You know what I mean? And I met him, could not be a nicer guy, right? Absolutely. He's kind of one of those like when you talk about Hollywood and people, you're like, he's one of the good guys. He could not be more just easy to talk to and welcoming and stuff. And I was always a monk fan, but I think I got more, I don't know, something about misses maisel connected me to him. And I think that's what sending people back to me. And a lot of people did exactly that. You know, obviously I think Tony has numerous Emmys now. He's got a handful for monk a couple for maisel. And it's one of those things, it's like timing is everything, right? And monk had this kind of real resurgence during the pandemic. And obviously with streaming and everything, you know, it kind of is so much easier to reach. Well, and you add to that, the pandemic of anxiety that we're having. And a lot of people's anxiety has an OCD flavor to it. 100%. And so it's perfect character. Yeah, it's absolutely, it's easy to revisit that, that's for sure. And it's actually funny that we're talking about this right now 'cause I can't give away too many details, but the monk fans might be very excited with some news coming up soon. Oh, good for you. So we shall see. That's very exciting. You'll have to stay tuned. He has not told me anything, but I know, I know what that well, I won't say anymore. But given where it is in the evolution of that series, I think I know what he means. So good luck, that'll be great. And I think we can back into your condition through all that because thank God you're here and well. Thank you very much to participate in this thing. What a pleasure to be fantastic, right? Let's stay with Tony Shalhoub and say, how did he respond when you got sick? And we'll talk about what that sounds like. What's very, very funny is this kind of all originally started for me kind of at the end of 2017 that beginning of 2018. That's when you realize that's what I started kind of feeling getting short of. When you went up the stairs. In fact, not so much. It kind of like, for me, it literally felt like fatigue. I just wasn't performing well at the gym. And I was like, and I was working. And you kind of put those two together and you're like, oh, it's a long hours. I'm tired. Whenever somebody complains about fatigue, I worry about this. Yeah. It's in the back of my mind all the time. That's the two dreaded things when people complain about fatigue is cancer and those are the big boys. And it can be coronary disease sometimes, too, to be fair. And I'm assuming yours was more viral or something. Mine was at the end of the, obviously it was idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, but at the end of the day basically what that means is we're not sure. We don't know. And they virus was kind of the final. As we say, idiopathic is the doctors and idiot and the patient's pathetic. You know what? All my time going through this, that's the first time I've heard that and I love it. I'm stealing stealing it now. But yeah, I mean, basically that's it. And I kind of brushed it off. When you were first diagnosed. When you started getting these symptoms, I mean, I'm very in tune with my body with my health with my diet and in retrospect. I'm like, wow, buddy. You miss this? Oh, it's easy. It's easy. Listen, you're not, I don't know if you had any medical training, but you're not thinking that way when you get fatigued. Yeah, no, it's one thing when you come into a doctor, we have to think about all that stuff. It's the last thing you want to think about when you're the patient. And you know what else also is funny to any kind of inkling of those things, you kind of, you're like, oh no, I don't want to be sick. I don't want to be suspicious of male. You want to push these men do that notoriously. 100% and I am guilty of it. Yeah, me too. And it's crazy because in retrospect, as I say, when I look back on all of it now and I kind of replay those moments, I'm like, holy smokes. The holy smokes is you now know the condition. And you know you can drop dead suddenly from. That's the holy smokes part. Yeah. So it's pretty shocking, but you know, so anyway, so I get so Tony. So basically, I kept it from everybody. I didn't say anything. Did he pick up that you were not well? No, not at all. That's an interesting topic by itself. Being a performer and having a serious illness. I deal with this all the time. The fear is I won't be insurable. There won't hire me. Fire me. Yeah, why would they take a risk on me? It's already so high risk to do a production that's so expensive. Yeah. That all that stuff goes through your head. And it's realistic. That's the horrible part. Absolutely. There were times where I was like, I'm never working again. This is not, I don't know what's happening. And not only was I getting sick and sicker and sicker as trying to time was going on. And obviously, you know, with heart failure, it's a very kind of slippery slope. It's a fickle beast, really..

Randy disher Dr. Drew maisel DR drew pinsky Jason gray Stanford raditz raditz Gray Stanford Jason gray Tony Shalhoub Golden Globe Emmys Stanford idiopathic dilated cardiomyopa Jason Tony Twitter Hollywood coronary disease cancer
Josh Hammer Reflects on Sen. Amy Klobuchar's Abortion Comments

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:42 min | 2 weeks ago

Josh Hammer Reflects on Sen. Amy Klobuchar's Abortion Comments

"Yeah, I want to play a clip for you here from senator Klobuchar. That I think, you know, when we talk about the constitutionality of roe V wade and obviously Casey sort of, in my opinion, obviously I think you would agree that it's unconstitutional. I think Alito's opinion was a skewered the original road decision. But let's play senator Klobuchar here, and I want to get your take on what she says because actually what she's saying from a sitting U.S. senator is something. I mean, this is not mazie hirono here talking here. I mean, which we just assume is she's going to say the most Atlantic, you know, far left out to see kind of the type of things. Is it senator Klobuchar, who many think is sort of moderate or left of center, but not far left. Listen to cut 6. Why should a woman in Texas have different rights and a different future and a different ability to make decisions about her body and her reproductive choices than a woman in Minnesota? How can that be in this country that we'd have a patchwork of laws? Your response. So senator Klobuchar and I actually went to the same law school and, you know, I would like to think that when she was in common law back in her law school day, she knew better about the actual constitutional law underpinning the roe versus wade and its murderous successor, of course, Planned Parenthood versus Casey 92. Now, look, I mean, John Hart Eli, okay? There are so many liberals who have criticized roe versus wade's fallacious reasoning or beers. But John Hart Eli, who is a longtime constitutional law professor at Harvard Law School, he was the dean of Stanford law school as well. He was personally liberal progressive he supported abortion rights, but he famously said in 1982 that roe versus wade was not constitutional law and barely even gave a semblance of purporting to be constitutional law. It was literally no less a feminist leftist progressive icon than the late justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg herself. We said the roe versus wade overstepped that the court should not have acted there when it did. They should have stayed cool, let it play out democratically in the states. So, you know, what I hear from senator Klobuchar there is, you know, it's constitutional illiteracy. It's also moral illiteracy, of course. We can't forget we're talking about it. You are talking about the wanton murder of now 63 million unborn children since roe versus wade came down in 1973. 63 million. I mean, it's really just difficult to kind of wrap your mind around around that kind of number. But you know, there's something about you said there, Andrew, that I think there's a modicum. There's a small, small sliver of correctness. Where I think she's correct, is that it ultimately is unsustainable for in the long term. My personal perspective in the long term for this to actually be a state

Senator Klobuchar John Hart Eli Roe V Wade Mazie Hirono Wade Casey Alito Atlantic Stanford Law School Harvard Law School Minnesota U.S. Texas Ruth Bader Ginsburg ROE Roe Versus Wade Andrew
The Association of Winning With Happiness

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:34 min | 2 weeks ago

The Association of Winning With Happiness

"Why else did they drop valedictorians in so many schools? Because it'll make the non valedictorian unhappy. I told you fools teach your children as a general rule. Truly foolish foolish human beings. People devoid of wisdom. I wasn't valedictorian of my high school class. So what? So what? It's one of the happier kids in my high school class. I was even president of the high school class. So yeah, that sense I won. Meant more to me to be elected by my peers than it would have been a valedictorian. But it doesn't matter. If I were in president of the class, wouldn't have mattered. The association of winning with happiness, my kid has to get into the best possible college. So then the kid gets an acceptance into some Ivy League school and the kid is so happy. So I'm curious, here's an interesting question. I don't know the answer, but it's an interesting question. Is the average graduate of an Ivy League school Harvard Yale Princeton or non Ivy League Stanford Berkeley, ten years later, 30 years later, are they on average happier than those who went to Michigan state? Now, by the way, I know

Association Of Winning With Ha Ivy League School Ivy League School Harvard Yale Michigan
Cheers, fear as judge strikes down U.S. transit mask mandate

AP News Radio

01:03 min | Last month

Cheers, fear as judge strikes down U.S. transit mask mandate

"Airlines airlines airlines airlines and and and and airports airports airports airports begin begin begin begin dropping dropping dropping dropping mask mask mask mask requirements requirements requirements requirements after after after after a a a a federal federal federal federal judge judge judge judge voided voided voided voided the the the the by by by by did did did did administration administration administration administration mass mass mass mass transit transit transit transit mask mask mask mask mandate mandate mandate mandate Monday Monday Monday Monday but but but but not not not not all all all all transportation transportation transportation transportation is is is is on on on on board board board board please please please do do do your your your cars cars cars at at at a a a Brooklyn Brooklyn Brooklyn subway subway subway station station station are are are massed massed massed up up up because because because the the the mandate mandate mandate for for for public public public transportation transportation transportation here here here still still still stands stands stands and and and that's that's that's just just just fine fine fine with with with Cooper Cooper Cooper cling cling cling is is is wearing wearing wearing a a a mask mask mask is is is a a a community community community event event event not not not individual individual individual so so so you you you feel feel feel like like like you you you have have have to to to wear wear wear I I I I I I I I I I I I feel feel feel like like like it's it's it's my my my responsibility responsibility responsibility where where where those those those calls calls calls as as as dropping dropping dropping the the the plane plane plane mass mass mass mandate mandate mandate is is is not not not something something something she's she's she's happy happy happy about about about I'm I'm I'm going going going to to to Stanford Stanford Stanford but but but with with with my my my master master master and and and double double double up up up to to to I I I was was was wrapped wrapped wrapped up up up in in in a a a lord lord lord DS DS DS sums sums sums up up up what what what many many many may may may be be be feeling feeling feeling I I I think think think it it it was was was exhausted exhausted exhausted and and and maybe maybe maybe every every every six six six weeks weeks weeks eight eight eight weeks weeks weeks we we we always always always have have have something something something new new new unfolding unfolding unfolding with with with as as as far far far as as as mandates mandates mandates are are are stable stable stable state state state mandates mandates mandates that that that a a a separate separate separate and and and then then then just just just walking walking walking around around around and and and seeing seeing seeing different different different ways ways ways that that that it's it's it's handled handled handled so so so I I I think think think everybody's everybody's everybody's just just just trying trying trying to to to look look look at at at them them them at at at the the the Prospect Prospect Prospect Park Park Park subway subway subway station station station in in in Brooklyn Brooklyn Brooklyn New New New York York York I'm I'm I'm Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker

Airlines Airlines Airlines Air Administration Administration Brooklyn Brooklyn Brooklyn Sub Cooper Cooper Cooper Stanford Stanford Stanford Prospect Prospect Prospect Par Brooklyn New New New York York York Julie Julie Julie Walker Walke
Study Suggests Double-Vaxxed U.K. Seniors Showed Negative Efficacy

The Dan Bongino Show

01:57 min | 2 months ago

Study Suggests Double-Vaxxed U.K. Seniors Showed Negative Efficacy

"Here's what I'm talking about I bet this is another story you haven't heard about It's in my newsletter today Please read it bongino dot com slash newsletter It's a story from the blaze by Dan Horowitz Record infections in super vaccinated UK seniors as double vacs show negative efficacy against COVID death Folks again I believe in science I don't put all my all my weight behind one specific study There may be counter data that emerges with follow-up studies in the future but this is the kind of thing I would think would be really interesting no If you're double boosted you should be showing a considering that you've gotten the vaccine a booster and then another booster strong efficacy against death not negative efficacy Here let me read this By the way the studies from an institution you may have heard of It's called Stanford Heard of it Jim small college community like place Yeah he's heard of it Yeah Jim served Yeah they do yeah tree for a mascot Good call Very good A recent study from Stanford published in cell might shed light on this phenomenon Talking about negative efficacy Of boosters Researchers observed a decreased immune response to new variants among those vaccinated for the original strain because the shots are teaching the body to respond in properly Now listen I could read to you all the science but I'll note that they said this That the Wuhan HU one specific imprinting manifesting is relatively decreased responses to the variant virus epitopes epitopes excuse me compared with unvaccinated patients infected with those variant viruses will be an important topic of ongoing study Kind of an important thing to note

Dan Horowitz Jim Small College Stanford UK JIM Wuhan
Where Are 'The Elites' Coming From?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:51 min | 2 months ago

Where Are 'The Elites' Coming From?

"Between the people of our country, the muscular class, the welders, the police officers, the pastors, the moms, the dads, the people that do their job and the elites. Now, we rail against the elites for good reason on this program. We need better elites. And by the way, we're not saying get rid of the idea of elites, we believe in hierarchies, you're always going to have some people that are going to rule your society. This idea that you can get rid of the ruling class completely is a Marxist utopian egalitarian wish list. It's never going to happen. Utopia literally means nowhere. If you go back to Thomas more's book and kind of the creation of the term utopia, so we need better elites, not the eradication of them, not the not the disappearance of all of our elites. But when you start to rail against the elites, we should take a step back and ask ourselves the question, where are the elites coming from? Where are the training ground for the people who are now running our country? So for example, what does Hillary Clinton, a Meryl Streep? Anderson Cooper, John Kerry, Dershowitz, Paul krugman, Cory Booker, what do all those people have in common? Well, just on that list, they all went to Yale. According to U.S. news dot com, Yale law is the number one law school in the world. Number one, Stanford is number two Harvard is number three Columbia's number four to actually Columbia is tied to the University of Chicago number four. Yale is the best law school. You can get into. Number one,

Thomas Yale Law Cory Booker Anderson Cooper Meryl Streep Dershowitz Paul Krugman Hillary Clinton John Kerry Yale Columbia Stanford U.S. Harvard University Of Chicago
SF Mayor Blames Rise in Crime on 'Right Wing Media'

The Larry Elder Show

01:00 min | 2 months ago

SF Mayor Blames Rise in Crime on 'Right Wing Media'

"Another denial of reality is the mayor of San Francisco. Hit which he attributes the perception that crime is rising in that city of San Francisco. You know, there's a lot of noise about what's happening in our city. You see it in the headlines, often in the right wing media. They love to talk about San Francisco, don't they? You see it on social media. You see one video, take off, as if it's telling the whole truth about who we are. I know it's challenging with all that noise to really understand what's happening. Right, wing media. This is a news report from ABC channel 7, not exactly right wing. Tourists are starting to come back to Stanford Cisco and crime in some popular tourist areas, is also now ticking up. Neighbors near San Francisco's palace of fine arts say car break ins right now, maybe worse than they've ever seen.

San Francisco Abc Channel Stanford Cisco Palace Of Fine Arts
Who Is Dr. Andrei Illarionov, Former Adviser to Vladimir Putin?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:44 min | 2 months ago

Who Is Dr. Andrei Illarionov, Former Adviser to Vladimir Putin?

"He is a former economic adviser to Russia's acting prime minister jago gadar, chief economic adviser to Russian prime minister Viktor Chen midin and chief economic adviser to Vladimir Putin, doctor Andre il lardo hilaria. Welcome to America first. Thank you very much. Sebastian for inviting me. You are very, very welcome. You have an illustrious resume. I have three pages worth of your qualifications in front of me. We do not have many people with your prior access inside the Kremlin speaking out on American media regarding the events occurring in Ukraine. So let's start at the beginning. Will you walk us through our millions of listeners and viewers across the country, your background before you came to the United States, your qualifications, you've studied in the UK and Austria at Stanford University. So may I ask you just to introduce yourself to our listeners? I'm going to buy my training and I spent most of my time at The Economist and studying economic policy inviting on economic policy. You mentioned some of the people whom I advise to. For almost a TSI was economic adviser to current Russian president. And that time Russia was able to have a pretty remarkable economic growth that double GDP of the country and GDP per CAPiTA was in ten years. It was a little economic miracle for the Russian economy. But it was everything in the past. Since 2008, after three years after my departure, a Russian economy went into stagnation and seeing them economic growth of Russia was not more than 1% per year on average. So instead of doubling GDP within ten years, it's a kind of 10% growth. So 7 to 8% per year country was growing about 1%. It wasn't 1% per year. Now definitely it's a crisis and the intentions of the Russian leadership and first of all of mister Putin right now is very opposite to what you have demonstrated in your initial slight when Putin was talking about a little bit about democracy, freedom or whatever. It's definitely wrong. It's Putin does not pursue this goals anymore. He's intentions are imperialistic. His intentions are conquering the neighboring country, establishing a new world

Jago Gadar Russian Prime Minister Viktor Andre Il Lardo Hilaria Russia Vladimir Putin America Sebastian Ukraine Stanford University Austria UK Mister Putin Putin
Dr. Peter McCullough: Spike Proteins by Vaccines Could Be an Issue

The Dan Bongino Show

01:58 min | 3 months ago

Dr. Peter McCullough: Spike Proteins by Vaccines Could Be an Issue

"For a guy like me who's recently hopefully recovered from lymphoma I'm in remission now And my wife was an autoimmune disorder herself and lupus If that turns out to be the case and I understand some preliminary study you know you were very cautious in your approach to it as well But if it turns out that we are producing spike proteins long term What could that mean for people with autoimmune difficulties and people with various types of cancers blood cancers and immune system cancers I think it's going to be a matter of degree If it's one or two shots and it's echo cells and there isn't much passage to daughter cells this thing can in a sense burn itself out or be cleared out over time Bruce Patterson who leaves a company called Intel DX doing terrific work is formally professor at northwestern and Stanford He's actually shown in the respiratory illness that the spike protein is in the body a long time to end but up to 15 months in CD 16 positive monocytes And I did have him on my show and I asked him about what has he seen in vaccinated people And in fact he does have samples He's seen both the S one and the S two segment of the spike protein in humans after vaccination as long as he's observed them So for a month I asked him I said can you predict how long it's in the body He said probably over a year SARS CoV-2 the virus And then the spike protein installed in the body with vaccination It has a persistence in the body That's the reason why people feel bad There's a long COVID syndrome And I estimate is there any other infection that's similar to this He said yeah there is I said what is it He said Lyme disease Lyme disease does an install of the organism called borrelia bardia It takes forever to clear out lime That's the reason why people get this post lime syndrome So I think people who are immune deficient people with lymphoma they've had chemotherapy or radiation or they have other autoimmune illnesses This could be a

Cancers Blood Cancers Bruce Patterson Lymphoma Cancers Stanford Intel Sars Lyme Disease Lyme Disease
Dr. Sam Pappas: We've Learned Natural Immunity & New Treatments Work

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:48 min | 3 months ago

Dr. Sam Pappas: We've Learned Natural Immunity & New Treatments Work

"So now we have multiple vaccines. Now we have France's Collins and others saying, yes, there are issues of heart inflammation, myocarditis. We have gone much further than what you helped me with originally, which is hydroxychloroquine, the Z pack, then Ivermectin came along now. We have the new nova, the new vaccine that's still under testing. Novavax. So tell us about what we have learned in just the last few months about COVID and the way to treat it. Well, we've learned that natural immunity is fantastic. We kind of knew that already, but it's been proven now multiple multiple times, but still not acknowledged, so we know natural immunity is a great place to be in a safety net. We know that many, many more treatments are out there and as the variants have gotten weaker and the new variant omicron and I want to listeners to know that's how you pronounce it. It's omicron. Yeah, not Omni cron. So you know, I had a trachea. I actually found that the British, I went and I checked with the 83 year old Professor of anatomy at Stanford from the UK and it is tricky and not in America. But in the original, real English, it's tricky. That's an intro from the last excellent. You do your homework. So we've learned that with the new variants that the treatments are much more effective that less people are getting hospitalized and having serious complications. It's a milder version. And attacking mostly the upper, which is less dangerous. Once it goes into the lower into the alveoli, that's really dangerous, especially for the elderly. Exactly. But I'm a little different than a lot of my peers who are for early treatment. Many of them say, well, only if you're 50 or above, and my take is, this can have a chronic component to it,

Heart Inflammation Novavax Myocarditis Omni Cron Collins France Stanford UK America
What Does Charlie Think About the Government's Suppression of Speech?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:03 min | 3 months ago

What Does Charlie Think About the Government's Suppression of Speech?

"Charlie, what do you think about the government's continued suppression of freedom of speech? In other countries, also in coordination with Silicon Valley. Thank you so much, Edward from Louisiana. Thank you, Edward. So this is something that is increasingly dangerous and something that we must be vigilant about, which is the government working hand in hand, the government working in harmony, with the tech companies to try to demand censorship. We saw this from the Biden regime back last summer where they even targeted turning point USA and turning point action because a text message that we were sending out where they want to restrict our text messages because we were quote unquote spreading COVID misinformation, which is now actually stuff that is now considered to be the science because the science has changed. We were talking about natural immunity. You're talking about all sorts of different things. Now, YouTube CEO recommends governments pass laws to gain more control over online speech and elsewhere, play cut 66. For our recommendation to governments want to have more control over online speech is to pass laws to have that be very cleanly and clearly defined such that we can implement it. There are times that we see the laws being implemented or being suggested that they are not necessarily clean or possible for us to cleanly interpret them. And we've also seen sometimes there's laws past just for the Internet, as opposed to for all speech. And I do think that's a dangerous area when we start to get in and say, oh, sure, you could say something like this in a magazine or on TV, but you can't say it on the Internet. So why would Google want regulation to shut people up? The reason is, of course, that they have an employee revolt happening at Google every single day because they have staffed their entire company with computer engineers that go to Caltech and Berkeley and Stanford and their incredibly liberal, and there are the censorship wars that happen at Google every single day. And they would love nothing more. The people of Google would love nothing more than the ability to be able to suppress speech and say oh, it's the government that's doing it and we just have to carry it out.

Edward Silicon Valley Charlie Biden Louisiana Government USA Youtube Google Caltech Berkeley Stanford
Who Is Dr. Scott Atlas?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:42 min | 4 months ago

Who Is Dr. Scott Atlas?

"He is senior fellow in health policy at the Hoover institution and author, most recently of a fabulous fabulous book, a plague upon a house, my fight at the Trump White House to stop COVID from destroying America. Welcome, doctor Scott Atlas to America first. Oh, thanks for having me. I appreciate that. So we've been tried for the longest time to get you on the show, your buddy Victor Davis Hansen constantly said, yes, you gotta get him on, you gotta get him on. We're delighted to have you on. I've got a multi page multi page resume CV bio for you, so you clearly have the cres for those of our millions of listers who may not have watched you at those press conferences. Please if you would just start as we do with all of our one on one guess, give us a potted summary of who you are, your qualifications and what you are focused on as we speak. Sure. So I am a senior fellow in health policy at a policy institute at Stanford University called the Hoover institution. Where I research and work on healthcare policy solutions, I've been doing that for more than a decade full time before that I had about a 25 year history, a career in academic medicine as a professor in the school of medicine for the last 14 years before the ten years as a professor in chief of neuro radiology at Stanford University school of medicine. And I had a previous experience and the medical science that various top level medical centers in the U.S., including iterative mania, graduated from University of Chicago with my MD degree.

Trump White House Scott Atlas Hoover Institution Victor Davis Hansen America Stanford University Neuro Radiology School Of Medicine Stanford University School Of U.S. University Of Chicago
Washington DC 'Defeat the Mandates' March Calls for End to 'Draconian' COVID-19 Vaccine Requirements

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:09 min | 4 months ago

Washington DC 'Defeat the Mandates' March Calls for End to 'Draconian' COVID-19 Vaccine Requirements

"This last weekend something incredible happened. There were two marches in Washington, D.C., the march for life, which happens every single year. But then an unexpected march that happened. Anyway, over the weekend. And it was incredible. It was the march defeat mandates. Well over 35,000 people descended on Washington D.C. and what's been incredible is the media blackout I meant to get to the story yesterday we just couldn't do it justice, but it's actually better that we're doing it today because we got to keep the momentum going, we have to keep this story alive as it's truly remarkable with the organizers and the planners of this event were able to pull off they were Republicans. They were Democrats. There were vaccinated people unvaccinated people. It was all about ending the mandates, something we've talked about on the show for quite some time, something we've talked about at turning point USA for quite some time and with us is one of the organizers. Someone who I believe we had on the show last summer, while we actually know, it was a year and a half ago. It's doctor Richard erso, who is a medical doctor in a scientist with the highest honors from the University of Texas and he is from the global COVID summit, doctor, welcome to the Charlie Kirk show. Welcome. Thanks, Charlie. Appreciate you having me on there. So tell us what happened this last weekend. It looked extraordinary. I was a lot of good energy. You know, we pulled it together over just a couple of months. We had fantastic attendance. I think we had a lot of energy. We've been working on this the entire time. We took basically a group of doctors that basically the core from Hopkins Harvard Stanford and we took these guys and we created a group called the international alliance of physician scientists. And we recognize that we're used in medicine as the tip of the spear to basically change our society, create a tyranny and a mandate that didn't make any sense. So one of the goals was we wanted to show that this has been a scientific fraud. So the civil liberty side of it, of course, is one thing, but it's actually been a scientific fraud. And so a lot of what's going on with these mandates actually makes no scientific

Washington, D.C. Washington D.C. Richard Erso Charlie Kirk Hopkins Harvard Stanford University Of Texas International Alliance Of Phys USA Charlie
Senator Rand Paul on Fauci's Abuse of Power

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:53 min | 4 months ago

Senator Rand Paul on Fauci's Abuse of Power

"And with us right now, is someone who I think has been so courageous more so than any other member of Congress and definitely in the Senate, someone who is actually a medical doctor and has been exposing the independent regulatory agencies of the deep medical state, doctor Rand Paul or senator ram Paul senator, welcome back to the Charlie Kirk show. Hey, Charlie. Thanks for having me. So senator walk us through kind of your latest kind of bout with Fauci, if you will. You went back and forth in the committee or one of the only ones willing to do so. Seems as if he's getting a little bit uneasy that you might be on his case. You know, I think it's in a appalling abuse of power. He makes over $420,000 a year, but he then uses his salary and his office and his minions to take down an enemy's list. So his enemies list includes other doctors and other scientists and three of them are imminent epidemiologists that work for Stanford Oxford and Harvard, but he and doctor Collins conspired by email that we know of because we have a record of this. And they said in the email, let's do a published takedown of these people. And immediately Fauci responded to Collins and said, I'm on it and sent him two or three things that got up in the lay press at the nation a left wing progressive outlet and then also at spike. So the thing is they're putting these nodes at wired. So they're putting these things out. But I think it's an abuse of office to go after other scientists and use your government position to try to take down people who disagree with you. And what these scientists were putting forward was the great Barrington declaration that simply acknowledged that we learned very early on that COVID affects different age groups wildly differently to 80 year old has a thousand times greater chance of dying than a ten year old. And if we don't account for that, I think it's basically

Senator Ram Paul Charlie Kirk Fauci Stanford Oxford Rand Paul Collins Senate Congress Charlie Harvard Barrington
Would MLK Support Things Like Affirmative Action?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:09 min | 4 months ago

Would MLK Support Things Like Affirmative Action?

"Today is Martin Luther King day and we're going to be treated or perhaps subjected to the usual over the top tributes to king. Now I do admire Martin Luther King. I admire what he stood for. And I admire especially what he stood for in the critical part of his career. Early in his life, Martin Luther King was involved in some scandals, he was he had a plagiarism, scandal, for example, and he was in many ways a flawed man. I don't really need to go into that. He also became sort of radical toward the end of his life. He wanted a massive redistribution of income, he became a sort of, well, he became very close to a socialist, if not a socialist. But the one thing he never did was he never deviated from his central idea was that we as a country should be judged on our merits as individuals. In other words, in his own words, by the content of our character not the not the color of our skin. This was Martin Luther King's famous dream. This is why we have Martin Luther King day. That's what defined king. And the left now tries to imply that somehow king gave up that idea became an advocate of affirmative action, supported race based preferences. And none of this is true. In fact, I had to debate years ago with the reverend Jesse Jackson and you know this was at Stanford University. And I challenged the reverend Jackson. I said, 'cause he was like, I knew Martin Luther King, you see, he would have definitely been on board with affirmative action, and I said, well, quite apart from this kind of appeal to personal familiarity, can you point to a particular example where king does not support compensatory justice in a particular case, but a system wide nationwide system of race and ethnic preferences. Let's just say in college admissions or in job hiring or in government contracts. Absent a showing of actual discrimination show me where king advocated that. And of course he couldn't do it so he resorted to his usual deflections. Iambic pentameter, you know, those famous clearing of his throat and

Martin Luther King Jesse Jackson Stanford University Jackson King
AP SportsMinute-Wednesday Sports Vcr

AP News Radio

00:59 sec | 4 months ago

AP SportsMinute-Wednesday Sports Vcr

"AP AP sports sports I'm I'm time time Merriam Merriam college college basketball's basketball's last last two two unbeaten unbeaten teams teams are are undefeated undefeated no no more more defending defending champion champion and and top top ranked ranked Baylor Baylor lost lost the the number number nineteen nineteen Texas Texas tech tech sixty sixty five five sixty sixty two two well well number number five five USC USC was was taken taken down down by by Stanford Stanford seventy seventy five five sixty sixty nine nine in in the the NBA NBA the the Memphis Memphis Grizzlies Grizzlies are are now now unbeaten unbeaten in in ten ten straight straight after after knocking knocking off off the the team team with with the the NBA's NBA's best best record record going going into into the the night night the the Golden Golden State State Warriors Warriors one one sixteen sixteen one one oh oh eight eight the the bulls bulls maybe maybe ten ten of of eleven eleven routing routing the the pistons pistons by by forty forty six six points points while while the the sons sons now now have have the the league's league's top top record record after after edging edging the the raptors raptors and and HL HL Florida's Florida's two two teams teams the the lightning lightning at at Panthers Panthers remain remain tied tied for for the the most most points points in in the the league league after after one one sided sided victories victories in in football football the the New New York York Giants Giants fired fired head head coach coach Joe Joe judge judge one one day day after after general general manager manager Dave Dave Gettleman Gettleman retired retired Major Major League League Baseball Baseball Players Players Association Association is is scheduled scheduled to to meet meet Thursday Thursday and and the the first first to to go go she she Asians Asians between between the the parties parties since since labor labor talks talks broke broke off off December December first first resulting resulting in in the the current current lockout lockout I'm I'm Tom Tom Mariam Mariam AP AP sports sports

NBA Ap Ap Merriam Merriam College Colleg Baylor Baylor Texas Texas Tech Stanford Stanford Memphis Memphis Grizzlies USC Basketball Golden Golden State State Warr Pistons Raptors Panthers Panthers Grizzlies League League New New York York Giants Florida Bulls Dave Dave Gettleman Gettleman Football
AP SportsWatch-Wednesday Sports Wrap

AP News Radio

01:59 min | 4 months ago

AP SportsWatch-Wednesday Sports Wrap

"AP AP sports sports on on time time area area the the NBA's NBA's hottest hottest team team matched matched up up against against the the team team with with the the NBA's NBA's best best record record Tuesday Tuesday night night here's here's a a piece piece Bruce Bruce Morton Morton the the Grizzlies Grizzlies continued continued to to sizzle sizzle topping topping Golden Golden State State one one sixteen sixteen one one await await after after defeating defeating the the team team that that began began the the night night tied tied for for the the league's league's best best record record Memphis Memphis has has won won ten ten straight straight job job Marantz Marantz sparkled sparkled with with a a game game high high twenty twenty nine nine points points you you know know we we one one of of the the best best teams teams in in the the league league five five no no that's that's number number one one and and number number two two out out the the like like you you know know we we shorten shorten the the bylaws bylaws the the bulls bulls are are also also hot hot winning winning for for the the tenth tenth time time in in their their last last eleven eleven games games running running the the pistons pistons by by forty forty six six points points other other NBA NBA winners winners the the son's son's wishes wishes pelicans pelicans and and clippers clippers college college basketball basketball no no more more undefeated undefeated teams teams number number five five USC USC lost lost for for the the first first time time to to Stanford Stanford seventy seventy five five sixty sixty nine nine defending defending champion champion and and top top ranked ranked Baylor Baylor had had a a twenty twenty one one game game winning winning streak streak snapped snapped as as Texas Texas tech tech beat beat Scott Scott drew's drew's team team sixty sixty five five sixty sixty two two tech tech stocks stocks a a great great team team they're they're up up to to it it I I was was state state they they very very easily easily could could have have won won that that game game to to be be Kansas Kansas so so I I mean mean there's there's a a reason reason they're they're top top twenty twenty the the New New York York Giants Giants fired fired head head coach coach Joe Joe judge judge after after two two seasons seasons in in which which he he won won just just ten ten of of his his thirty thirty three three games games judges judges the the fifth fifth NFL NFL coach coach to to be be fired fired since since the the conclusion conclusion of of the the regular regular season season NHL NHL the the Florida Florida Panthers Panthers and and Tampa Tampa Bay Bay Lightning Lightning started started the the night night tied tied for for the the most most points points in in the the league league both both added added two two more more Tuesday Tuesday with with one one sided sided wins wins the the lightning lightning struck struck down down the the saber saber six six to to one one the the key key to to Kucherov Kucherov scored scored a a hattrick hattrick impressing impressing Steven Steven Stamkos Stamkos who who added added a a goal goal and and two two assists assists we we all all know know how how good good is is we we see see it it every every day day so so it's it's in in a a given given time time and and space space that's that's what what he's he's gonna gonna do do that's that's why why is is one one of of the the best best known known in in the the world world Florida Florida swamp swamp Vancouver Vancouver five five two two as as Aaron Aaron Ekblad Ekblad scored scored early early and and added added two two assists assists making making simple simple plays plays early early getting getting a a good good forecheck forecheck really really puts puts team team under under deals deals and and versus versus going going out out for for sports sports you you other other NHL NHL victors victors included included Nashville Nashville in in Chicago Chicago on on time time Merriam Merriam AP AP sports sports

NBA Ap Ap Grizzlies Bruce Bruce Morton Morton Memphis Memphis Marantz Marantz Pistons Clippers College College Bulls Stanford Stanford Baylor Baylor USC Texas Texas Tech Tech Scott Scott Drew Basketball New New York York Giants Florida Florida Panthers Kansas Tampa Tampa Bay Bay Lightning NHL
"stanford" Discussed on 20/20

20/20

03:52 min | 8 months ago

"stanford" Discussed on 20/20

"In bed. He had stalled detectives out the door trying to serve him with a warrant by saying he needed to get dressed. It comes with great honor to announce we solved the year cold-case when we did for the forensic examination on his computers. Stephen crawford had hundreds of thousands thousands and thousands of images and videos of chelpanov affi floppy disks after floppy disks floppy disk of images and videos depicting murder and torture of women teenagers and young children. Some of the videos. That i watched things being done are things that are going to help me the rest of my life crawford is the biggest cowered in the world. He's lived this life knowing that he murdered her. And i wanna make sure that we look at other cases that he could have been responsible for this type of murder in my experience. It's not just one person. So i hope that we continue to look at. What else did he do. Investigators wondered was stephen crawford also responsible for the other stanford murders that began in nineteen seventy three with the murder of twenty one year old. Leslie para lawf- leslie pearl off. Her body was discovered in the foothills behind the campus on stanford land. She parked her orrin chevy nova to the side of the road and then just walked off to take a picture. She wanted to commission an artist. She knew to paint a watercolour landscape. For my mother's birthday. Leslie was a stanford grad that was going to be going to law school. She'd gone up to the hills to take photographs. I believe and was strangled and murdered. Leslie and i looked a lot alike. I mean we looked like twins. Leslie was my mentor and my protector. And i always felt safe around leslie. My name is diane love. And i'm leslie prologues younger sister. We were separated by about fourteen months. Leslie was my best friend and she was a wonderful sister. Leslie was very bright and she was raised to not be ashamed of being smart as a young girl. Leslie was one of the brightest students in our class. She was going to go to the best universities. She wanted to be president of the united states. She went through high school in three years. She went through college in three years. Stanford was the college to go to. My uncle went to stanford and then my mom went to stanford and then leslie went to stanford she wanted to learn about the world. She wanted to find out what was out there and experience it and make it a better place. Leslie was always very interested in justice shoes interested in helping the underdog she was in love and she was hoping to be married and she was ready to make the difference that she could in the world. I just can't imagine for her her dear heart and her brilliant gentle self to have the horror of that experience. I still can't imagine. I did a year abroad in ghana west africa and probably got a phone call was marine from the us embassy and he said i had a telegram. You wanna come and get it. It's a no we'd it to me. Read it to me and he goes. Are you sure you want me to read this to you and your read it read it.

Stephen crawford Leslie Leslie para leslie pearl stanford leslie crawford diane us west africa ghana
"stanford" Discussed on Talking Kotlin

Talking Kotlin

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"stanford" Discussed on Talking Kotlin

"So i always <Speech_Male> point people to that <Speech_Male> and then <Speech_Male> within the stanford <Speech_Male> curriculum. I <Speech_Male> think it depends on what you want. <Speech_Male> A lot of people are <Speech_Male> just there to learn how <Speech_Male> to build things. so we <Speech_Male> have <Speech_Male> One three p. <Speech_Male> That i think you mentioned <Speech_Male> taken <Speech_Male> about iphone development <Speech_Male> we have a web <Speech_Male> class <Speech_Male> Kind <Speech_Male> of depending on how people <Speech_Male> want to <Speech_Male> to to structure <Speech_Male> their. They're learning <Speech_Male> they. Can they oftentimes <Speech_Male> will go out and <Speech_Male> do the other app <SpeakerChange> development <Silence> classes as well <Speech_Male> are you. <Speech_Male> Are you working at altogether <Speech_Male> with any <Speech_Male> kind of silicon <Speech_Male> valley companies <Speech_Male> or something that <Speech_Male> the bring <Speech_Male> at an <Speech_Male> task or something <Speech_Male> to the to the classroom <Speech_Male> or <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the that are interested <Speech_Male> in people <Speech_Male> who <Speech_Male> graduate from <Speech_Male> your class. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Anything like that <Speech_Male> yet. Now <Speech_Male> right now. I feel like <Speech_Male> i would love to <Speech_Male> explore that. What <Speech_Male> what i found. Is that typically <Speech_Male> like if you actually <Speech_Male> give students <Speech_Male> a real world <Speech_Male> at like a real world <Speech_Male> bug and a real <Speech_Male> out there. 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It's <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> we're running out of time. <Speech_Male> It <SpeakerChange> was great <Speech_Male> to have you <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> as a guest on this <Speech_Male> show <Speech_Male> Thank you <Speech_Male> for your efforts <Speech_Male> in promoting <Speech_Male> in <Silence> teaching kotlin <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> and was <Speech_Male> great having you <Speech_Male> know thanks for having. I'm <Speech_Male> a big fan of paul <Speech_Male> and a big fan of teaching. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> feel like You <Speech_Male> know it's <Speech_Male> been really fun to <Speech_Male> kind of dive <Speech_Male> into the world of <Speech_Male> teaching at stanford <Speech_Male> and marianne <Speech_Male> android and colin <Speech_Male> so. It's something <Speech_Male> that i've really enjoyed <Speech_Male> in. And <SpeakerChange> thanks for <Speech_Male> having me on <Speech_Male> the show. now we <Speech_Male> just need to all <Speech_Male> places all <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> everywhere <Speech_Male> kotlin everywhere. <Speech_Male> I'll <Speech_Male> i still remember <Speech_Male> that. <Speech_Male> That was that <Speech_Male> was great. Do you still <Speech_Male> want to shout anything <Speech_Male> out <Speech_Male> before we wrap <Speech_Male> up. <Speech_Male> I think we alluded <Silence> that you have a youtube <SpeakerChange> channel. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yeah i mean. I <Speech_Male> if people are interested. <Speech_Male> I'd love for people <Speech_Male> to check out. My youtube channel <Speech_Male> primarily content <Speech_Male> about kotlin <Speech_Male> or android. <Speech_Male> And then if you're interested <Speech_Male> about the <Speech_Male> class and <Speech_Male> a lot of the content <Speech_Male> is available <Speech_Male> <Silence> on my website <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> for a dot stanford. <Speech_Male> Edu and i'm happy <Speech_Male> to you. Know connect with people <Speech_Male> are answering questions <Speech_Male> that they have <Speech_Male> some of them will <Speech_Male> host the show notes <Speech_Male> the <Silence> links in the show nuts <Speech_Male> perfect. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks again <SpeakerChange> call. <Silence> <Advertisement> Thanks a lot <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> bye-bye by <Silence> <Advertisement> my <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> cool <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> do we do. We still need to do <Speech_Male> the ultra with <Speech_Male> the whole <SpeakerChange> liking subscribe. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Yeah <Speech_Music_Male> like <Speech_Music_Male> subscribe. <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks so <Speech_Music_Male> much for tuning <SpeakerChange> in <Music> seeing the next one <Music> by.

youtube iphone android marianne stanford
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

09:56 min | 3 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"You. I'm thinking of Sarah Corbett. Yeah. You explain it by the main, okay? So we're massive fans of woman named Sarah Corbett who is a craft avast. And which we for when we first heard about his where I work we were a bit skeptical, but she was working to she had been invited by an organization to try to change board's perspective on whether they should pay a living wage or not. And so in about this work. She said, of course, you know, what we wanted to do is make Rudolph and throw them at the invasive angry, but we quickly recognized that that wouldn't make a difference. So what they did. Instead. That they looked at each of the board members who they were hoping to get on board with this idea and became obsessive in learning everything they could about what they cared about. And then they went to the store the that the board was the advisory group for and they what handkerchiefs from that store to demonstrate that they were customers, and they created a custom embroidered handkerchief for each of these board members as and wrapped it beautifully as this beautiful gift. And they wrote a note with that said you have an incredible amount of power. You have an influential job and an important one. We are your customers, and we love your employees. And we want you to pay them a living wage, we ask this humbly as your customers who care about the people who work in your stores, and she did this was such love. Of all the board members continue to carry the hacker Chaves they met with them over a series of months and actually did agree to raise the minimum wage that they were paying their employees. And I think what is inspiring to me about that story is that she approached it with incredible love and humility and ask them to be a better version of themselves rather than calling them out for not being the best version of themselves. So I think anytime we're trying to get somebody to do something that they're not doing. We have to show them. How this is going to help them be the person that they hope to be. I told you she sells it way better than I do. Hi, I'm from Los Angeles. And we. Over the last couple of years have done a big public campaign around homelessness and really quick shout out. One of the things that was really has been helpful for us is that there is the storytelling sort of curriculum that folks who live in supportive housing Goto. And then they are there to talk to the board of supervisors or fill in the blank stakeholder. And it's been it's been good. We successfully put together this campaign to put together a quarter sales tax generates about three hundred thirty five million dollars a year as well. As a a sister piece of legislation at the city level to make a thousand new sport of housing units per year. So that was really great. But now we can't say any projects and one of the things that are researchers are telling us is that some of the messaging that we use to get legislation passed is like backfiring because have certain images in their mind. When these support of how? Housing sites are gonna come to their. Their neighborhoods. And so you you mentioned in your definition that it's like this word of transcendence. I love it. If you had any more like thoughts about how to like, we did focus we focus on like, we should not have folks. Leaping on our streets. And we got a short term win. That's really really important. But it feels like it's not getting us over the finish line. So do you have other questions that you should be asking? When you start to develop that strategy. I think the reason that we want your strategic communications plan to live on the back of an envelope. Is that you have to constantly right it, and so the communications plan that you had worked for the system in which we're working, which was policy changed. Now, you're working in a new system, which has culture change. And so you need to answer the questions differently. And so I think it's really important when you go through these questions that you've versed as answering question number one that you really think about which system we're working in who is influential or a decision maker within that system. And what are we going to do to get them on board? So I think that that communication strategy solve that challenge. Now, you need to go through the process again. Hi, my name is Diane I work with the youth ally into and. You might have just answered that question for me. But. We work with young people and. Working with specific issues that. Regarding public school safety community safety and one of the issues that has been coming up, especially I mean nationally as you mentioned with parkland is the issues of law enforcement on school campuses. And what that means to young person for being really truly safe and that interaction when we've had issues with law enforcement and the families have come come to us. We've spoken with young people and they've shared those stories. The immediate responses while that was in one particular instance, that's not how it happens all the time or we'll have administrators rushed to the defense of the law enforcement. We've had police chief say. Well, it's those kids it's those families. So every time we try to bring up a story. It seems to get shot down with rationalization or well, how presenting it well enough and one of the context contextual factors of our community. That is probably important is that we live in a suburban community rural suburban community that means low housing costs. And so we fifty percent of our population at any given time probably has. It has a lot of law enforcement that lives there retired law enforcement and law enforcement that lives there. So it's been a very difficult thing for us to figure out how to craft the narrative or the communication strategy that doesn't say what's those kids? It's not an issue all the time. And so that doesn't get shot down. So I just want to help think through that strategy of the culture shift or the communication strategy. What is it that we need to think about differently and have the young people share differently in order to get that across? Yeah. I would go back to the process and really figure out what it is. It's like you're not completely while you understand us. Use your clear that you we all want there to be zero shootings in school. And we never wanna lose another child. But I think in terms of answering the first question, you've got more work to do to think about what is the system that's in place that you're really trying to change. And what are some of the things that are going to make a difference there? So I would be trust the process there. But it's interesting to me because I'm hearing you describe the psychological phenomenon that we talked about which was when we see people who are not in the in group, we ascribe to them the most extreme perspective. So it seems like maybe some contact theory would be really helpful here as well and really getting people in the same room. Yeah. I also think that it would do us some service to take some time to study the worldviews identities values of your target community that you're trying to influence. We recently worked with organization and they're trying to persuade mothers in Appalachia to think differently about higher education for their daughters. And we used a lot of the academic research around worldview in values and identity to sort of evaluate where do they fall on that continuum? Do you have an individualistic worldview or an egalitarian world? Do what are the underlying values of those five that we mentioned, and we found that they have a mix of individualistic worldview, pull yourself up by your bootstrap, but very strong communal worldview, and they have a fear that if you say higher education that means my daughter's going to think she's better than the community, and she's not gonna come back, and they don't. I want them to leave the community because they have such strong ties. So now that they have that insight about what's happening on unconscious. The gut intuition that shaping their judgments they can think about stories they can tell that override those assumptions, but also resonate with them. So they're connected to how they see the world what they value, but they also assure them that those perceptions and perceptions of harm are unfounded. Thank you. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating social change. Please. Visit our website at dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Sarah Corbett Stanford University Rudolph Los Angeles Chaves Twitter Facebook Eric ni Diane I Appalachia three hundred thirty five mill fifty percent
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

11:54 min | 3 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"And decisions moving forward. And stories are really powerful for reducing our inclinations to counter argue because we don't see intent to persuade it just seems like a great story. This is particularly true as we try to tell stories about systemic inequalities. So stories are really great at letting us do the work and put the pieces together. So by the end of it, we understand systemic issues inside and out. I love this example, from the New York Times, it's a story about an off a vet from Afghanistan who could not find work when he got back. He had PTSD he got into some trouble with the law, and he just couldn't find work. But the story wasn't really necessarily just about that. It was told through the eyes of Ashley they were high school sweethearts they have loved each other since they were kids and they just wanted to get married so badly, but they couldn't they couldn't afford. It actually was working tirelessly to provide for him as he looked for work. And they just couldn't get the money together to get married. Until they met a man a judge who had lost a nephew in the Afghanistan war and heard his story and connected him with a group that got him a job as a carpenter and on Halloween. They got married. And this story was published in the proposal section of the New York Times. And what I love about this story is we enter the world of people like Sam through something that is unexpected like love, something, we all have experienced thing, we can imagine. And we listen to their read their love story, and we just want to figure out. How can we help Sam find a job? So they can finally get married. We put the pieces together what we need our programs that help that find work when they get back and help rehabilitate them. They don't give us for we need to help our vets they give us two plus two through a compelling story about love that helps a whole group of people who might never think about this issue. Think about it differently. In have an opinion on this issue. Stories are also really powerful because they make the new familiar often when we're trying to explain the issues that we're working on through story. It's really hard. How do you begin to tell somebody who doesn't think in systems about social determinants of health? Right. That's might be completely new to them. But if we could wrap our our work in plot structures that are familiar like Cinderella story. Science tells us that that helps orient our audience to how they should feel whose the whose Cinderella who's the evil stepmother, who's the prince charming? How should I feel about this? I'm gonna use existing schema that I already have to make sense of the thing that I'm reading right now. It's also true that when we are trying to moat motivate audiences that might be very familiar with our audience. They might have story from fatigue from hearing the same story over and over and over again, so we could play with plot structures and may help make something that's very familiar new. We see this a lot in some of the work that we do the humanitarian sector around refugees. If you look at the research, it tells us that the master narrative, the news media that refugees pose a threat or a burden to their host communities. The humanitarian sector is trying to counter that master narrative with the narrative that refugees are just like you and me, but they lost everything. And they just need. Our help problem is now they're telling that story over and over again, and we have a new master narrative that situates refugees as having a lack of agency. So we're working with organizations to really think about how we use different structures to tell counter narratives that make us think differently about the issue and bring. People in who might have been tired of hearing the same story over and over again or change the master narrative that people might have in their mind about the issue. So the other thing that we need to do in our stories is navigate the full an empty spaces of the stories strategically when you took your composition classes in elementary school. Your teachers told you to write with lots of vivid detail into ten clued everything into really complete. But the reality is the most powerful parts of your stories can be the parts that you leave out. They can be the parts that you leave out details. So that people can imagine their own experience in that. So if I was telling a story and wanted to leave space for you to insert your own experience, I would simply say school and allow you to insert what is familiar to you? But if I anticipated the have some bias or prejudice about school, I might fill that up with the kind of detail that Anthony and Stephanie just gave us because that would allow me to rewrite what's in your mind with vivid image. So you can start to see how you can strategically navigate those empty and full spaces the story than any just told us about the couple in the Val section of the New York Times, the empty space is the love empty spaces wanting so much to get married. Many of us have felt that craving that ached that desire to be with the person that we love so much before face is understanding the challenge of their personal journey to get there. So thinking very carefully about where you have empty space in your stories, and where you have full spaces in restores allows you to leverage them completely. But it's also true. And this is one of the areas that we have to really careful about we hear people constantly saying, we just need more data. For my birthday. I wanted t shirt that says sT data one more time. Because one of the things that we've seen from psychology. Researchers here at Stanford is that when we just share data without sharing the context of a story, we can reinforce stereotypes people start to engage in some of the moral reasoning any was talking about earlier. So we have to be really careful about letting the data speak for itself and by the way data's a crummy advocate for anything. It's also true that. Emerging body of research in psychology starting to suggest that when we're left to our own devices where likely to presume the most extreme positions among others who are not in our group. So if we don't provide that context about somebody who is not in the in group. So the person who's listening is going to ascribe to them and extreme perspective. So it's really important that we include that nuance in that context, and I loved this study this came out of some recycle Aji research in Germany recently. They did this study where they put this image in front of people. And then they showed it in such a way that when they closed when I they could only see one of the images, so as you can see the image on the left doesn't have the set of parallel lines. There's a piece of information missing from the image as the person the image on the right is complete. However, they would position this. So that you would see the image on the left and the blank spot in the center would be. In their blind spot. Here's the crazy part about this study when they asked people which image, they trusted more to be a set of solid lines. It was the one on the left. Doesn't that terrify you? So that the what they believe is that are we trust more the images and beliefs that we have in our own brains rather than the information that we get from outside of our brains. So it's really important that we tell these complete and ho stories that are filled with context in new ones if we want to overwrite judice. I loved how over Winfrey did this in her acceptance speech earlier this year the way that she navigates the full spaces of the story in her experience in nineteen sixty four watching Sidney Poitier. Win the award that she was winning that night. You see these vivid details, I was a little girl sitting on the linoleum not the floor the linoleum when I hear linoleum like. Oh, yeah. I remember exactly what linoleum looks like she says. She talks about how Sidney Poitier was so elegant she talks about the whiteness of his tire against the darkness of his skin are brings loving contrast. Our brains are a tune to contrast. And she talks about what it meant to be a little girl watching this from the cheap seats. I love that image and her mother coming in as all of this is happening exhausted from cleaning other people's houses in this incredibly short phrase, she captured so much he navigates so much space in empty space. She brings us into her story, we feel what she felt. And we also use that empty space to a magin without her saying it, she says she alludes to it much later, but we feel it here we feel her thinking about what her winning this award means other little girls. So this is such a brilliant use of full space and empty space. The other thing that we think a lot about in storytelling is the fact that the most affected are the most effective. Think about that. For a moment. I come from a foundation background, and it was my job to tell people's stories. And as I reflect on that, I wish I could go back and undo some of that telling other people's stories that I did. And I wish I could have gotten out of the way and made more room for them to tell their own stories as we look at the incredible successes that have been achieved by the coalition of Moccoli workers in getting grocery stores to pay a few cents more for every bucket of tomatoes. That's picked to ensure that they can have fair housing and a fair wage. It's extraordinarily, but they're telling their own story, they're telling their own experience and watching this. Dairy farmers in Vermont have achieved similar successes. They took on Ben and Jerry's. They took on Unilever and said, we should not be working twelve hour days as dairy farmers. We should be able to have a break we should be able as working as hard as we are to be able to live in a home with our families. We shouldn't be virtually homeless. And so in their protests in telling that story in front of Ben and Jerry stores all over the country. They took on Unilever, and they won and are now getting a minimum wage of fifteen dollars an hour. And couldn't give them more powerful example of this than. Park Lane students in Florida taking on one of the most profound issues of our time an issue that so many people have tried to talk about for so long and failed. And yet these students are so eloquent, and so powerful and speech on the National Mall in which she was silent for six minutes. Allowing us to imagine the horror that she and her fellow students endured was such a brilliant use of empty space and allowed us to imagine. Without her even saying what that experience was like, there's a reason that these young people are so affective it is because they are the most effective, and they are authentic and powerful. And we believe everything that we say, and we want to support them because we empathize with their experience. They are the story they tell their own story, and we are experiencing all of the dynamics that Melanie green talks about in her research when you're thinking

New York Times Afghanistan Unilever Sidney Poitier Dairy farmers Sam Ashley Ben Stanford Jerry Germany Melanie green National Mall Park Lane Moccoli Winfrey Vermont Anthony
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

04:07 min | 3 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Else? Man. Yeah. This is about an organization. This is about how we make organizations better. And how we help individual companies and organizations not how we change the world and my favorite word in. This entire definition is transcends it transcends, the interests of any organization, and it is certainly true that if we are going to make a difference in the issues that matter most we need a disciplined for communication that allows us to focus on the issues that matter most I'm not suggesting that at the university of Florida, we have invented communications that changes the world people have been doing that. For decades people have been doing that for hundreds of years. All I'm saying is we need to have a discipline that allows people to choose this as a career, and that allows people to use the best of what we know from science and case studies to communicate and make a difference on the issues that matter most to all of us in this room. That are going to help us build the world. We wish existed in that spirit. We've created some tools that we humbly offer in support the work that you're doing and we'd like to share those with you today in the hope that they're helpful to you. And that they help you make a difference on the issues that matter most to you. So being out of university. We have the privilege of being surrounded by some of the greatest minds trying to solve some of our biggest challenges, and we have unlimited access to databases full of really innovative ideas that have been around for twenty years fifty years. Ten years in academic research. We spend a lot of time looking at behavioral science cognitive science social science, the humanities case studies historic and present to really understand. What do we do? How do we design strategy that leads to an actual belief or behavior change, we don't simply raise awareness, but we designed strategy in a way that the outcome results in lasting change on the issues that you're working on. So we hold all of those sites together. And we have created what we call the back of the envelope guide to communication strategy. And this is a. Four question framework that we think is really agile and flexible, and you can pull it out of your pocket next time, you're sitting down and thinking about how are we going to approach this issue, and it will help you get super focused, and if you could take the insights that we know from all of this research as you answer these four questions, we believe that you'll be a completely different place than you might have been before. Or at least help focus your strategy a bit more. So here, they are the magical questions number one. What do you want to be true? That isn't true. Now, this is about figuring out what is your strategic goal. What is the thing? You wish is happening that isn't happening now who has to act or do something different for you to achieve that goal. This is your audience the community that you want to mobilize the policymaker that you want to influence who who do you need to target in order to realize question number one question number three. What would they believe that would motivate? To do that. What could we tell them what messaging or stories could we create and share that would motivate them to do the thing that is so necessary for you to achieve your goal. And lastly, how you get that message in front of them. These are your tactics. How do you get it in front of their eyeballs? How do you capture their attention and keep them engaged? So we're going to go through each of these four questions, and as we do we want you to think about a project, you're currently working on maybe a challenge that you want to take on and think about how you might apply. Some of the insights that we've found in we're excited to share with you to your own work. And and see where you end up at the end. So the first question is what do you want to be true that isn't true right now? So this is about picking a strategic goal and to

university of Florida twenty years fifty years Ten years
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

05:30 min | 3 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Situations. There's another question here. Hi. So there's so much to unpack from everything that you said and connecting to a lot of what we heard yesterday as well. First of all disabilities. You were spot on left completely invisible. A lot of the time yesterday. We heard some gentlemen, speak about funding for mental health another area that is almost completely invisible. And I do believe that it's because makes us nervous. It makes us uncomfortable. It talked a lot about that. In terms of the communication strategy yesterday. What kind of information were willing to receive in what turns us away? So I really appreciate that. And would love to know more about how to identify and and connect with disabled populations because in my community. I will tell you. They are invisible. I don't see disabled people on a regular basis in my world. But certainly they're they're twenty percent. I absolutely believe that that is true. And so I would like to know more about that. And then the other thing in terms of how we deal with intersection -ality the last keynote yesterday talked about the strategy of dividing and conquering, and I think sometimes we are almost enemies in that sense. It's our issue. That's most important. And so you talked about some efforts that you made to diversify the crowd, and you talked about board. It's so my question is I feel like one of the things that we all have to challenge. Ourselves to do is to make ourselves Volna Rable. So if you're invited to be on a board, if your first response is my just checking off a box. Well, maybe it's okay to check that box off because we need to be vulnerable. And so I wonder how you feel about that. Like if you were to take the risk if we were all to just take the risk to be vulnerable and try to educate and build release. Ships as we go does is it necessary for the relationship to be built first. Because then I feel like we're just continuing to be stuck where we are in. Now. It's really good. I just think that for for myself. There are some groups. That's like, yes, I would love to be on your board. I can. And I know what I want to add myself. But if I don't know that organization, I don't have a relationship if if someone asked me to be on a health service board, and I'm an arts person. I would have no clue why they would ask me. So yes, we do need to be vulnerable and say, yes, and I have done that where I felt if I didn't do it who else would. So I cannot complain when something happens and the oh look at them. They just did something that they should have known not to do. So I know that's my responsibility. Either one of you should of question for you. Well, that that is a really good question. Where are you located? Dayton, ohio. There are disabled people in Dayton. I probably have some Facebook prince. But I think starting with just Google, you know, we're so lucky that we have that resource because, you know, Google disability organisations, Dayton, Ohio and see what you can come up with. You know, I'm professionally interrupted able still even though I'm retired Judy and access stance dot org, and I'm also always really happy to try to connect people with resources or answer questions. But I think he'd just have to start with the research part. And I think ticking boxes is fine. But if you you know, you go and you find the disabled person to be on your board. But you're not doing anything that really engages them or their community or reflects them, then it's not going to be successful. And I think that's where we have to really take responsibility. You know as organizations to get. Training on race to get training on disability to you know, break down our own our own 'isms. You know? And and that's something that I wish I had done more of when I was at access, but I also understand that we're all like, you know, forty hour weeks or a joke. You know, let's just say sixty. So I know that we're all really overburdened. But you know, and that you know, you've got to be prepared to make the investment of time. And I want to thank all three of you for your incredible generosity and your experience and your your time here. Thank you for the full trajectory of your work. And for everything you've done to make our field, and our our lives actually, much more better by your efforts. So I appreciate you taking the time to talk with all of us, and thank you so much. Thank you everyone for being a. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating for social change. Please visit our website at SSI dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Volna Rable Dayton Facebook ohio Stanford University Google Twitter Eric ni Judy twenty percent forty hour
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

05:48 min | 3 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Is. Still really it's feared it's overlooked. I would say that we are the most diverse. Under served under represented community because we cross every line of everything class race, ethnicity sexual preference. You name it. So I think that that you know, I didn't expect I was injured when I was seventeen and I did not expect to spend my life as a disabled person that was not in my plan and disability can happen to anybody at any time. So I think one of the things that I want to reference is did anyone happened to see Darren walkers letter his annual letter to the field in September of twenty sixteen because he's the CEO of Ford Foundation. He wrote a mini manifesto and on how he had missed the boat on including disability and the Ford equity platform, and he got called out by disability leaders. And I would say one of the great things that happened. Was that Darren really owned up to it and Ford is addressing it and Judy human who is. The mother of the independent living and civil rights of for people with disabilities are movement. She is disability fellow and Ford is really looking at how they are integrating including and putting disability into all of their equity initiatives. I think the wonderful thing about the arts is we don't do pieces about disability. We did early on. And then when I took over the artistic leadership of the company in nineteen ninety seven I decided I didn't want to do pieces about disability because I felt like what we did together would say could speak for itself. This is remarkable. I'm struck actually by how much of. Your own origin stories for your work and for where you began to where where things are. Now, how much of a fight it's been I pick up on some of that around how much of a fight it's been to actually advocate for our communities for visibility for representation for for actually a stake in being seen in being understood as as vital creative and worthy for all of the reasons that you've shared too, and I wondered if if you could all speak to what some are some of the problems are the challenges are today that you're really struggling with in terms of equity and inclusion in your work and also whether or not the the growth of the diversification of our fields and Dan's in theater in music and more has actually been as as good as you hoped. Or if there's challenges still. Well, I'll start with that early on. We just had to convince people that what we were doing with actually art and not therapy. We had to convince funders that people at disabilities had a place in the performing arts, and when we used to type up grand prix pope proposals. This anybody remember doing that typing them up, and well, I would. Put a big box in the demographics. And I do it in red. And I'd put a big X in nine bright disabled because none of the foundations were measuring disability metrics, and that's still not happening. And I got an Email from I'm on board source. Some of you, probably get their emails, and I got an Email. About this work that they were doing around equity, and I wrote to them, and I said, well, what are you doing around disability? And I got an Email back from an wall stabbed the CEO really quickly, which I was really impressed by referencing a study that they had done leading with leading. What was that leading with? Yes. And she referenced it, and she said that you know, people at disabilities were included. And so I did I downloaded the PDF and I did a search for disability and people with disabilities. And we came up in to survey respondents demographics. But we did not come up in the demographics that they were measuring about the profile of boards and executives. And there are disabled leaders in this country, and I wrote her back and pointed that out, and I did not hear back from her after that. So I think that in a lot of ways it, it's not changed. You know, we have the Americans with Disabilities Act that the National Endowment for the arts has an ADA clause that if you are not accessible, you don't get funding. It's not enforced. You know, there are still danced theaters in San Francisco that are up a flight of stairs. So disabled people can't go there. And this particular dance organization would never hold a performance class where people of color couldn't come where immigrant immigrants weren't welcome where Jewish people weren't welcome. So that's why I say I and some ways I haven't seen much of his shift, and that's one of the battles. That were still fighting is just basic acknowledgement and. Just having a seat at the table. I would say and well

CEO Ford Darren Ford Foundation Dan Judy San Francisco National Endowment
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

06:02 min | 3 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric ni. Managing editor of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI are dot org. What practices made the arts more or less impulsive? At our two thousand eighteen nonprofit management is to conference leaders from the San Francisco Bay area art world discussed how they run their organizations and shape the performances to be more diverse and welcoming to all panelists Tim Seelig artistic director of the San Francisco game ends chorus says that's the next big shift. If we are to survive to go under the community knocked down those norms and be something that is accessible leak was joined by non Tara San manager of cultural strategies with race forward. Judith Smith, founder and director of access dance company and Sherry young executive director and founder of the African American Shakespeare Company. We're delighted to be here. And I'm certainly just thrilled to be joined by my illustrious co-panelists over here. I'm your moderator for the day. I'm going to take a just a quick second to introduce myself for more fully. And then we'll actually have everyone say a bit about their work. So you have a sense of who you are. And what we do and what we've done and also just a note that more full bios are are certainly near program, and you can take a look. So my name is Nancy says, and I'm the manager of cultural strategies at race forward the center for racial Justice innovation I'm recovering arts administrator and artists and a large portion of my work is running innovation labs for racial equity in the arts. I currently do. So in New York City where we have sixty different arts organizations of all types, everything for museums to theaters to small community based groups going through. Offensive racial equity boot counts, and my job also involves organizing in the arts and culture sector in the nonprofit arts and culture sector for increased racial equity and really delighted to be here to have a pretty expensive conversation about diversity inclusion and equity the arts, and I wondered actually Tim if you would introduce yourself, and then Sherry and Judith a little bit as well. Sure. The artistic director of the San Francisco gay men's chorus, and as a that, I am a cat herder of the gays and. So it's a challenge I actually have two hundred seventy five gays that get together every Monday night, and that is about a thousand opinions on any given topic. So I find myself as both conductor and coordinator, I've been the executive director and the chief operating officer. I've been conducting gay choirs for thirty one years, and it's been a joy, and and also rocky road in many ways. And I know you're excited to hear about the rocks. That's it. My name is Sherry young. I'm the founder and executive director of the African American Shakespeare Company, we were just voted the best life gator in San Francisco for two thousand eighteen thank you. I started the company when I was about five years old. So. We do Shakespeare in a different cultural vein that connects to a diverse community specifically, the African American community has always been my targeted goal, and we kind of branched out into doing American classics, which includes not only August Wilson and George wolf, but Tennessee Williams, and I don't know some others, but we do that. And we're now opening up for colored girls with into sake. Sean gay tomorrow night in San Francisco. So if you are in town, please drop by but we only have about thirty tickets left, literally. And we look forward to our twenty fifth anniversary coming up next season. Thank you. My name is Judah Smith, and I am the founder and director America. I'm also a recovering arts administrator. I just retired in February. I started the company when I was ten. Seriously. It was thirty one years ago. Access started. Listen group of us. They got together really with the idea of just saying what would happen when you brought people with and without disabilities together to explore movement. What we didn't realize that there was a whole really important, social and political implication that what we were doing right away access started alongside artistic program engagement work teaching because people would come say where do I go do this? And we had nowhere else to send them. We also realize that because it's virtually impossible then and still today for disabled dancers to get training that we were going to have to train dancers, and alongside that advocacy became a really important part. So access mission. As I exited was to change the face of dance and disability through artistry, engagement, and advocacy. And I'm thrilled to say that the company is continuing they replaced me with two people an executive director and artistic director, and you can find out more about access on the website, a D A N C E dot org.

San Francisco African American Shakespeare C executive director director founder and director founder and executive director Sherry young San Francisco Bay Tim Seelig Judith Smith administrator Tara San Eric ni Stanford Managing editor African American community New York City director America Judah Smith Nancy
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

12:55 min | 3 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"One. Okay, girls. Yeah. It was. Giggles. Couple of guys. So are think that shouts intersection -ality. I think intersection -ality is it is feels new and it feels like a buzzword that everybody is using before. Intersection -ality hit triple jeopardy. Triple doubles. Combine he interlocking oppressions out of interlocking oppressions came triple jeopardy out of that came intersection -ality, so and we should be clear. These are these jargon terms, right? But to your point that these were practices that were lived out in our communities far before you have to play terms on top. Absolutely. So like, it's not new at feels new people are saying intersectional feminism that to me means vague feminist. I don't know. I honestly like when you say intersectional feminist like would be me. What do you mean that your commitment to because the values when people say that that they say they're committed to our values that I understand is black values, and that's important. And so the people that organized to build one hundred were come out of a black feminist tradition and understand that we actually have to push that tradition forward. And when we say queer, one of the things that you'll hear people a hundred people say is blackness as a heretic queer, we say that because black folks have always when we understand is queer is the trans transcending the norms and traditions of society's institutions structures, and what society. What western colonialism has culture society to believe are the ways that which we should do things we say fuck that to LA to intimate romantic contracts. That's that's usually what people are talking about. When they're talking about quickness as sexuality. But quickness as politics is we need to build freedom dreams that lie outside of the current traditions structures society. That's why black quit feminist lens is a hearing the abolitionist is inherently anti police not meaning not not solely. Meaning we wanna tear all those systems down. But we want to actually dream of new systems and new structures for count ability for providing safety for communities that don't look like police and prisons and so Richard hand. If you've read the calm river collective statement. Joe Google it. You really can Google it. And you absolutely should Google the coma. He river collective statement. Every single one of you. If you work within a nonprofit, if you manage on profit, and if you want your values to align with the contemporary understanding of what our values need to be it to be working for marginalized communities. You absolutely need to understand truly and not be just using it as a buzzword. What intersection -ality means? So you get a good understanding of what Qurna sneeze, Kathy. Coa wrote essays called punks bull baggers and welfare queens is talking about the history of identities that transcend just sexuality that have been uttered. And what that means. And what that means to be in a space of other. And how if you use that as a list of fight for Justice, how we can liberate everyone one thing that we also say when talking about intersection -ality is that if we can if we can design a solution if we can design liberation for the most marginalized for the most marginalized identities among us, we intern destroyed the systems necessary to necessary to be destroyed to liberate everybody in turn. So we can fight through a black quirkiness Lynn's and fight for the most marginalized people. If we Charlene gives an example on a route video if we figure out economic Justice, anti police pro feminist solution to liberate the black trans woman sex worker, all of the systems that we have to destroy and all of the safety product precautions that we have to build an import in place to protect that identity. We live right. So many people in turn. We have to create economic Justice platform for communities. We have to create stable housing processes for communities. We have to we have to create some type of accountability models for interactions between folks across genders interacting romantically like domestic violence accountability procedures and processes that would lie outside of the prison industrial complex like we could go on and on about all the things that need to be created and all of the systems, we have to fight against to create the liberation and it touches every hopefully it touches every single one of you in the room, at least one of those fights that we'll have to fight. And so. We truly believe in like, I was saying earlier identifying marginalized marginalized identities, and creating a liberation that frees everybody that is next in line. Thank you. Thank you for your work. I want to give the audience and opportunity to ask you questions. Hello good afternoon. My name's Jenny. I wanna just highlight. It's gonna take me a second to the question just bear. With me. I feel like all the work that we're trying to do. And nonprofits, I've spent twenty five years in the work. The structure of the system is only furthering oppression and change lack of change and that is tied inherently to the way that money flows into solution. And so somebody who spends a lot of time in networks now and thinking about the building of networks that can create change it feels like we need a revolution the structure of how we're going to fund solution. And my wondering is what are your thoughts about that? And I say that with great respect to the members of the philanthropic community that are here today. I know that they see in our our part of working on that particular challenge. I also feel like. There's been a lot of managing of stuff for a really long time without the solving of stuff for a really long time. And that's inherently frustrating since this is been my career and work as well. And I think all of you for your work and you're sharing today. This is my what I think about that. And this is not a popular opinion. But I don't think it's a it's not one that other people don't say, I don't know if you Fhimah bend from Cisco mullebeck with elderly Q funders he has his whole time line right that he presents on. But basically he talks about how in the nineteen twenties. Wealth was building to such a great inequality. The philanthropic sector was set up to be a release valve to stop poor people from overthrowing the country rate. So part of me is always believed that philanthropy is not actually bent to get to a solution. I think of it more as a harm reduction model, right? And within it. We can try to shape it to be a little bliss. Rigid and more flexible. But I think that to me is kind of the bigger issue is that we're living in a particular kind of structure that actually isn't meant for us to get to solutions. So I think that that's why. The nitty that are doing organizing work and community centered solutions is actually going to be the place where you find real change. Right because people get real creative when they don't have a lot. And you talk about that a little so I would say that part of the work for the full topic sector is to figure out ways to have less barriers unless control over the money that they do give. Right. But they're like, you know, how do you get from a structure where you have a twenty page application that takes you for days and half of your staff's time where you get no money, right? Versus like, how can we move to things that are more simplified? Why can't we use like a one page two page thing? I don't like let people know that they can't they shouldn't waste their time in this particular area. So I think there has to be more honesty and accountability on the phone product sector. She said is part of philanthropy. So you know, and that's part of. What I advocate for on the inside, which again goes back to that conscious choice of where do we decide to do our work? But I think philanthropy needs way more people of color needs way. More people from activists backgrounds who've been part of these organizing struggles, but because it is inherently very Whitefield, and it's very. It's a very well educated field, but not from people who've done organizing work. So you have folks who are trying to interpret the work of others who have never really been a part of it. So I think that I just want to put that out there. So for me, it's been forty. It's been like forty years of work. And I do think it's going to take a bit of a revolution. So, you know, my sister after we moved up from Mexico. My sister ended up getting pregnant by this guy, and he would beat her up and wouldn't let her graduate or get a job that paid more than him. So he could keep control over her. And and in those periods for with her three kids, she ran away she needed welfare and she needed services, and she needed counseling, the dilemma she had is that within a week or two she'd get herself together on she was very smart and very determined. And so they she'd go out and try to get a job, which of course, she couldn't get a very high paying job, and and she couldn't actually than support her three kids. And so she was left with his choice of either going back on welfare to take care of her kids or go back to this guy who again would promise not to beat her up again, and whatever and one way or another she cared about her kids lot and. What was difficult for her? And for my mother is that there was no other system except this needs based system because when my sister got a job, they would take away or childcare they would take away or housing, you know, that she then was no longer partly eligibility criteria, and she would change the name from Rochelle to Rachel. So she wouldn't look Mexican, you know, so they have to play this game. And there is no alternative to the need space system. And what you know. So I finished a call the alternative, which is basically calling for an entirely other system to be there as a choice for people if they want to stay on welfare fine. But I can tell you most people that I grew up with do not want to be there. But there is no alternative recognizes my mother's talents. My sister's talents, you know, what she was able to do how hard she works. We'll give rich people all kinds of discounts and tax breaks and prime interest rates and whatever. But there was nothing like that for my sister to support her three because we. Don't look for talent in the communities. I came from. And what we need is another system to be built. This is not trying to throw out the old system. But as long as you only have the old needs based system people in society feel like well with the Civil Rights Act, and with all these nonprofits we've taken care of the problem. So what's wrong with them? What's wrong with those people because they're not getting ahead. And so what basically I have the same frustration, and we can't do it with the current system, but we can build an entirely different system that mimics what we give to rich people when we give the people the privilege. That's what my mother did not want a separate system. She wanted to be part of the United States in part of contributing. And so that I think can be built. And that's what really I go around talking about. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for podcasts articles and other content about innovating for social change. Please visit our website. Dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Google Stanford University Richard hand Joe Google LA intern United States Twitter Coa Charlene Kathy Facebook Lynn Eric ni Cisco Rochelle Mexico
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

05:45 min | 3 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric ni editor and chief of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI are dot org. How can nonprofits treat the people? They're trying to help like partners and not like patients, it may sound simple. But remains a challenge for so many organizations at our two thousand eighteen nonprofit management institute conference Darnell more head of US strategy and programs for the human rights organization breakthrough. TV led a discussion with co white hat artichoke, founder of the first nations to spirits, collective and the community health and health equity program manager at bluecross blueshield of Minnesota, Marie CEO, limb Miller, founder of family independence, initiative, and Frisco stays the minister of training and culture black youth project. One hundred more says we have to be thinking about the ways our work moves us from the cozy spaces where we work in out into the communities that we serve for a lot of us. That hasn't been the case. Hi, everybody. I'm really really honored to be here in conversation with these three change makers community changes folk who are dreaming transformative Justice, visions for all of us. You see their names and titles on the screen? You'll hear more about their work as we talk. But our goal today is to talk literally about what it means to do the work to do our work within communities, particularly those folk who are existing on the edges of the edges of the margins. And this is a point of context for how we might approach this conversation. We want to have a conversation, that's informal. So I do have about reframing questions for our panelists. We will invite you to engage with us at some points. But I just want to offer three sort of thoughts. I was recently asked to participate on a jury of a pretty prestigious prize, I won't say the borough in New York City, which is where I from. Where the prize was centered. But it was a prize that is annually given out to nonprofit organizations who are doing work within this particular burrow in New York City, one of the questions that's don't me on every one of the responses of the very applications had to do. With folk make an argument that their projects were serving folk within communities of color. People who had experienced various forms of economic disenfranchisement. And then they were too at to demonstrate that the board and staff reflected. The constituency our catchment areas in which they served. You probably won't be surprised to know that a lot of the applicants that landed in front of me got scored very low because on the one hand they talked about serving diverse because this is a catch word that we love to use communities. They went on to wax poetic about missions. That were centered on black and Latin necks Asian communities with the New York City, but when I looked at the board mak-, which were mostly white and male and since gender it struck me that there was some dissonance between the missions that have been existing guiding so many of these organizations for several years and decades some and actuality of what it means to ensure that one's practices actually make real the mission. The second point I'll make and let me be clear and say, you know, I get it. I know how boards set up train boys and been part of a lot of. Nations, and sometimes a certain type of person we like to go after to put on our boards. But it behooved me that we're going to use. Words and frames like diversity as a means to get a prize. Then certainly we should should have actualize that when in our work every day, the second thing, I'll say is in a moment when we're under sort of neoliberal principles where the I are the expert becomes more prominent than the we the us the collective. It's clear that we have to be thinking about ways that our work moves us from the very cozy spaces that we tend to exist in and out into the communities into the streets into the places with the people that we serve. And it's easy for me. Someone of that to get caught up in my office. I worked behind a computer, and I'm in a lot of meetings and on a phone and often have to remind myself that's not where the work happens. And I don't know how many of us in this room can say that we've actually spent more than seventy percent of our time outside of the of closest bases that were in in the presence of the people who want to serve, but that hasn't been the case for a lot of us off to because the sort of not made a priority. The third thing I'll say is dollar historian whose name is Robyn Kelly's from California. We should rerun Kelly's work who talks about freedom dreams and a black radical immagination. And I just wanna borrow the first part of that freedom dreams. So many of us are in this room, and in this work because of dreams that we have for freedom a future where so many of us all of us can collectively be free. But I often ask in our work who's alive

New York City Robyn Kelly US bluecross blueshield founder Eric ni Darnell Stanford editor Minnesota California Frisco Marie CEO program manager limb Miller seventy percent one hand
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

06:49 min | 3 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Most people go to work for a foundation as as as PM mentioned, you know, people kind of like us who came from the outside born with the name gates or buffet, right? And they go there to try and do good and do. Well, the argument about how bad things are from my community. Is not as powerful as this is the vision we have for serving our power. This is what we want to see. I mean, especially since you election of November twenty sixteen. We're really knowledgeable. What would we don't like? But what what's what's the shared vision of narrative for promoting forward? I mean, if you know, Cheryl, I wonder probably a conversation or bottle of wine, but if how many fellows, you support now, we've got a global community of over eight hundred and so if you went to if you went to ten thousand what would be different. To what research the foundation research the program officer, you're engaging. Those are real live. Human beings are not green green. Shape accounts. Find out what that foundation is looking for in terms of defining success kind of build a relationship from that. And then you can teach him something to where you're in there. So I just I just I just want to. You know, maybe again, maybe I've been in for three too long. Maybe what I'm saying. Now tells me it's time for me to go. But most Sunday Sion's wanna do well and want to do the right thing. Well, and to sort of want to be accountable for it. And so you just have to sort of show up like that. And I can't I can't walk into a boardroom status that you said, and that turns into a grand strategy or grant program got to be sort of a positive vision or outcome of something that we can assert and just wanna 'cause we hear a lot of that you should fund our community because we're only getting point zero one five percent of all foundation of lengthy funny. Well agree with that. And yeah that sucks, but I'm not giving you a grant. Because you told me that I'm just want to be honest and candid about that. And that I think we need to assert the positive shared vision of missing Linda this. This is why I love the young people. They're much more naturally sort of intersectional and bridge builders, then then certainly my generation, right? They'll go to a black lives matter of into on Saturday and LGBT event on Monday and metoo event on Thursday, and they're down with all of right? And we saw it after the shooting and parkland right member before minute, it was just a bunch of white kids talking about it and young people, wait a minute. What about us and by the time to March on Washington showed up do- young people of color at the podium. I don't know how that happened. But it wasn't because we gave them a grant. There's something I want to interrogate in their doctor Ross grow, and then we have to because. Got to get in a fight with a pregnant woman. We strong. I'd agree with you. No. I mean, just like in because in the spirit of listening as someone who also was on the non-profit side for a long time. This idea that we're supposed to research every opportunity and then research like the personality. Oh, she's Philipino. She's pregnant maybe I'll bring up that. I have kids that kind of stuff. It sounds again like the onus is on the applicant who has less time in his looking for money. So I want to say, yes. And like I do believe that a positive vision for what we wanted to chief. That's not just resistance is really powerful. And I also want to say what is the accountability? And responsibility of our of our sector to both stop operating in a silo way ourselves. So we have no idea like what other people fund or why right? We don't fund collaboratively most of the time we have all these super individualistic processes. So I think both of the vision you just put forth, I think that that vision that demand or that request can be made of Flint as well. Like, I think we can operate more as a collaborative ecosystem and less like how many foundations exist? Now. It's way more than two thousand hours and Plum, k sixty thousand individual mountains castles on top that people have to figure out how to get to the top of. And then ask their, you know, ask their ask. I think that there's a different a different constellation with which if we operated collaboratively in differently, and I just wanna say one hopeful thing because I I've level some critique of my sector, which is. I started this job for years ago with the mandate from our great partners to get other funders to behave better. Right. Act right medicine or something. I was I was pretty skeptical, but you know, over time, and because actually the Trump election has lit a fire under the feet of many of our friends who maybe didn't feel like they had to do anything differently. I think there's been like a migration towards asking about what edible practice looks like in real in real life like embodied, practices and approaches, and we went from like, a, you know, this tiny little you've never heard of us the Whitman institute. Now, you know, this tiny little foundation the bay area to there's eight or nine foundations that of all different scales and sizes that have signed up to not just model these practices, but advocate for them, widely invasive FRA sleep our sector, so that's just one of the many initiatives influence that actually does exist. That is pretty parallel values aligned with the conversation. We've been having this remote. So while we can be very critical of both the nonprofit sector and the philanthropic sector. I really wanna. To say that I feel more hopeful than I thought I would feel for years into this job of like try to change Flannery. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating social change. Please. Visit our website at dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Stanford University program officer Washington Twitter Cheryl Sion Facebook Eric ni Flannery Linda Ross Flint Plum Whitman institute zero one five percent two thousand hours
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

07:07 min | 3 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Program to make sure our fellows are getting more investment ready. So they can get out in front and pitch to follow one investors. All these things. That's one thing. The second thing which is really about sort of distress of what it means to sort of not only walk through the world is a social change leader. But as a person of color, approximate leader, marginalized voice, and we talk about those supports is sort of the three CS one is the idea of community again, we are family. So what does it mean to be connected to one another through values based system of this fellowship? But also through technology like slack. So once you were that group green community you are on that slack channel. And if you show. Up in in a particular city. You are checking in with other echoing green fellows to say. Hey, can we meet, you know, somebody need to talk to and again, it's part of the community building. And then I think the last piece, and I think you talked about this credibility. What does it mean to not be seen as a person of color proximate leader, folks, who are not seen as part of the mainstream definitional approached entrepreneurship, so we go all in. I wanna make sure our incredible fella show up on the Forbes under thirty I wanna make sure they're covered in fast company. So when that potential investor read that article, they're going to call that social entrepreneur and say can I have a meeting so I can invest in you. So all the trappings the cachet to social capital that comes with being in these venues, we're trying to exceleron our fellows access into that. And then the last piece, which is sort of a longer term pieces notion of how fundamentally are we going to increase control of resources and political power the control of resources a fairly new. Conversation for us. I mean, a couple of months ago, we entered into a really interesting pilot. We'll see how it goes with the rise fun with they've agreed to carve out up to fifty million dollars of that fun to do follow on investments in our fellows who meet certain financial and social impact criteria for that fun to agree to up size equity rounds for some of our fellows, which are social impact. I is just incredible. So it is part of the next stage of our work is how do we start to build these strategic relationships when we've got a trusted and highly curated pipeline of talent with those who've got access to resources and start to build a bridge between the two these sorts of partnerships are new for us. But we think it's vital absolutely vital. In terms of that. How do we hack this this resource question for entrepreneurs of color, women, entrepreneurs proximate entrepreneurs, and that sort of the next phase of our journey and feeling so much more inspired. Thanks. Oh my gosh. But it is the work that has to be done. We should fund you more. We should make you president of the Californian. I don't have a job in a few years. Love it very important job going to pick up to. So what you've heard from colleagues lifts up. How are sector when I say are sector. I mean, just specifically for the, but the nonprofit sector read this sort of excess central crisis about who we are what we're about. Right. So right now to nonprofit sector is taxed as Ignatius did nothing that really binds us in some moral crusade, except we have this text designated with with the IRS. And so the two themes that struck by. And feel inspired about the to my colleagues. One is the sector needs to understand all role in our obligation in addressing structural inequality in America, if we have a reason to exist. That's the reason. And so, you know, sort of how you know, how does how does that happen? And it means two things one is which we completely agree about ready. I know which is the sectors. Gotta think charity is a good thing. I mean, the bible says is a good thing. It must be a good thing change structural change. And the second thing, and this is going to be somewhat heretical here at Stanford University. And at the Stanford social innovation review and here in Silicon Valley. Innovation is overrated. Okay. Now, I say that because this is what we're talking about our issues around power. Now, I love innovation when a helps us figure out how communities can exert more power. But other than that, which you heard from Pia, and what you heard from Cheryl. Were not foundations leading with the best incubated idea and dangling that money out there for somebody to today's a puppet streaks. It was what do the folks? At the at the nexus of leadership and providing leadership on solving structural inequality in their communities, what do they need? And what is it looked and part of the report of it is a risk thing. But but the last point on make is it's not sexy to mainstream philanthropy because what you're talking about is infrastructure networks connections access to capital. None of those are real sort of sexy ideas that you feel good making a press release or did you can cut a ribbon on it's not like funding oncology wing at the hospital, and it brings does bring risk. Okay. Wanted a phone. Call Linda in this one of the phone calls. I need to return today is from a county supervisor an unnamed county here in California who called me because one of our grantee in his county work to build a successful coalition to stop funding for police to get in schools. They didn't they didn't want police officers the school they wanted support systems, and this this organization led a coalition to successfully derail that proposal and turn those dollars into community supports at the kids need and the county supervisor is hot at his pet law enforcement program got and he's calling me to rail. How could we fund these communists, socialists, anti police organization? And so that's that's a power gate, and that's discomforting. Those of us who, you know, like the neat press release and the ribbon cutting and isn't as beautiful isn't as innovative this about power. And I think what you heard from and Cheryl is how to dismantle barriers to power voice. And that's that's what the field needs to wake up. That.

Cheryl supervisor Stanford University Forbes Silicon Valley Linda America president Ignatius California Pia IRS fifty million dollars
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

09:01 min | 3 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"That? And they were right. And so that that led me to bring that conversation that question into our board room and a couple years later, you can't pick some of these things overnight, but we fixed it, and so we now have to openly gate a board members. And now it's sort of part of of our recruitment profile. It's sort of it's part of our our defining of inclusion diversity and as recently as six months ago after staff meeting same kind of thing staff, although they didn't pull me aside. And I said it in a staff meeting wondered why I see oh, and we at the foundation we're not saying enough about race that had gone down the path of divorce of diversity inclusion equity, but we're not talking enough about race in how come we're not. So took that conversation aboard room in a we're in a different place. So I just wanna throw out that space between the board and the CEO is pretty cr-. Critical. And that's where the authorizing environment comes from. That's where I mean too many organizations have a hero working on diversity kind of battling. Uphill. But the authorizing culture comes from the boardroom second thing is accountability and measurement. And we have a we do is every other year. We do a audit. We use an independent company they come in. And they look at board makeup management makeup staff makeup grants contracts, investment managers how we doing compared to two years before are things trending in the right direction or the run direction not driven by quotas. But driven by data both qualitative and quantitative. And then we have a conversation about it. We were doing the worst is into question. You just asked me, which is investment managers. That's been the hardest thing to climb and I'll save for the conversation later how we can do better on that doing better on it. But that's the one. That's that's the toughest hill climb. And in the last thing is to lean into into lean into equity and take it on frontally with your with your philanthropic strategy. Right. So for us how to with that looks like is we have a boys men of color strategic program that takes on the issue of race squarely. We have a sisterhood rising a strategic program around girls and women of color. Our health for all campaign was engaged in led by undocumented Californians who helped convince state legislature to have dreamers eligible for Medicare City, California. So real policy change. So taking equity and issues of disparities in a frontal attack with with strategies and making sure that those that are at the affect of the inequity, and at the affect of the spirit these are actually forming and leading the charge and setting the framework correction, but but the the investment manager one more slide so kind of what this is just one slide from what we share with the board every other year part of my performance review. This is how are we doing on contractors? And so this is a part chart of forty five or so contractors, how many are women and minority letter owned, and and what it does is when it goes in the board book, and I make my presentation about how we're doing the board will stop at this lied and ask questions, you know. How can we do better on x y and z why did this happen? What's working when it's not working so level of count ability that structured into my perform. Since and organizational performance and not just leaving it to checks. I want to pick up on what you're saying about funding in collaboration with people who are affected by the problem because I think this this really gets to our conversation this morning with renewed Robinson where I love how us talking about how if foundation said that we we need a color of change. We need we need something like color of change. It definitely never would have happened that it would have been like some sort of contorted, you know, organization that was the vision of some program officer that woulda fizzled out and never really gotten the buy in the community, which is a little bit depressing. And so I guess my question for you is is what are the barriers if that's the case? And we all laugh at it. Because we know it's true. What are the barriers that prevent foundations from working with the we're going to? Nations or the communities to create solutions. We'll speaking for all nations. I I've been in this role for four years before that I was organizational development consultant, I worked in the nonprofit sector, and I was a teacher even longer before that. But my guess is because I have some beginner's mind. I guess is what we should actually said was it took thirty corporations, you know, taking accountable action. Advocated for by color of change before a single foundation gave them funding that was really striking to me. So so the level of proof of concept had to be so high that it was being covered in the New York Times before color of change organization. We heard from this morning and his doing spectacular work holding a corporate targets accountable, especially got a drop of foundation dollars. And so I think part of it is an immense amount of risk aversion. Someone asked about risk earlier. I think it's an immense amount of risk aversion. It's a need for proof of concept. It's wanting to fund the tried and true charismatic leader like the van Jones versus like the the next Reshad Robinson or the next majora Carter or something like that. I think that's why echoing green is. So specific I think about seeking out folks that haven't actually been profiled in the New York Times yet looking for those non traditional leaders that we know we're not are getting only drops and drops and drops of either investing in or or grant dollars. You know, I tend to think of this in terms of grant dollars we've and I'll talk about that insect. But I think those are some of my S's about the we've heard all throughout the day that philanthropy was not particularly created to create an agitate for system change. Right. It was it was created maybe to pacify or to make folks feel a little better a little harm reduction something like that. I mean, I'm more hopeful because of some of the work that we're doing that already. We can go behind beyond charity. And the folks that we are up here. I think are way beyond that. But so I think those are some guesses, and I'm sure we could guess forever. You know about why? Why that story is so typical. But what do you want to start talking about is? 'cause we could spend three hours talking about invisible barriers which I think is an interesting concept invisible. To who like I don't think that the barriers to capital or invisible to echoing green applicant fellows, or to the folks that you're describing here that are at at the point of impact of these issues, I think sometimes invisible to the philanthropic sector itself, they're invisible to folks who are in privileged positions to make decisions about resources, even though they've never experienced that problem. But I wanted to say a little bit about where we're coming from the the focus on equity that we've had is what can we actually do behaviorally and structurally in our grant making processes right that that build in an acknowledgement of the power differential. That's that always going to exist between folks that are asking for funds and folks that get to make decisions, and you know, some of us who are in. Professionalized philanthropy, we weren't born with wealth. Right. We didn't. This is not these are not our money's. But we, you know, we either lucked into or there was a panel before that talked about how folks get selected cherry picked for these kinds of positions. And so what is an approach to grant making that helps to reverse paradigm AmEx? Or at least acknowledged them front that centers and honors the time experience and wisdom of communities as well as nonprofit leaders, and the models listening humility dialogue and feedback over a long term relationships. Right. So what would that look like? Well, we when we decided to spend out in twenty twelve we had the center for philanthropy. Some of you are in here. So we had this. CP conduct a grantee perception report asking our all of our grantee partners. What do you think we should do with our final ten years and what they gave back to us? Was you all are definitely like a unique unicorn in the in the funding space, you do things like you give long-term multi your unrestricted support with no strings attached

New York Times Reshad Robinson CEO California investment manager Medicare City van Jones program officer development consultant majora Carter three hours four years six months ten years two years
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

06:45 min | 3 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric ni editor and chief of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI dot org. Research shows that wind talented social innovators lack invisible capital the so-called, right pedigree, right passport, right skin, color, right gender. They may fail to get the attention and vestment they need to succeed. How can leaders in philanthropy improve access to capital? What tools can help nonprofit leaders overcome these barriers and get the support they need at her two thousand eighteen nonprofit management institute conference social entrepreneur author and Stanford University lecturer Kathleen Kelly, Janice lead, a panel discussion with echoing green president Cheryl Dorsey Whitman institute, co executive director Pia in Fonte and Californian dominancy EEO Robert Ross as we heard from a lot of the questions throughout the day. It's impossible to have a conversation about diversity equity and inclusion without interrogating. Some of the invisible barriers that prevent capital from getting into the hands of so many people who are fighting on social Justice issues on the frontlines. I I became really passionate about this issue myself as doing research where my book social startup success of elible on Amazon. And so for the book, I went out and interviewed hundreds of organizations. They're leaders are staff their boards to try and understand how organizations scale, and as I was writing at my interviews and writing them for the book, I realized that so many of these stories sounded very similar that someone would graduate from and Ivy league university they would get capital from someone who took a chance on them. They looked a certain way talk to certain language had a certain pitch deck. And it occurred to me that although talent and good ideas can come from anywhere that we have a funding system that preferences, things like social innovation and certain degrees often at the expense of so many community based leaders or people with lived experience or people who are connected to the communities that they are serving and arguably a much better position to solve so many of the issues that we care about. So I became really curious well who got left off of the pages of social startup success. What are we leaving on the table because they never get funded, and I started to research this question of invisible barriers to capital and learned that divers leaders are significantly underrepresented in the social sector today. Well, thirty percent. Of the population is black or Latin necks only ten percent of organizations are led by black black and Latin x individuals. We also know that diverse leaders are under invested and the social sector today. Just four percent of grants and contributions, go to diverse led organizations and forty one percent of leaders of color struggled to find access to funding. Sources I think that that number is probably very low. There's also new research from digital undivided that talks about the challenges of being a black female leader lack women led organizations and companies raised just thirty six thousand dollars angel funding versus a three million dollar national average. They have statistically received only zero point zero zero six percent of venture funding, which I think we can only infer that similar disparities exist, and the nonprofit sector if you look at who is distributing the capital the picture becomes very clear. Eighty five percent of foundation. Trustees are white ninety four percent of foundation presidents or weight and seventy six percent of foundation stuff are wait. And then we also we think about despair this invisible barriers. To capitol have to talk about the wealth gap and this country to set an important barrier for represented leaders. The average white household has a total worth one hundred sixteen thousand dollars. While the Jeff can American household is just eleven thousand and this is problematic. When organizations are so often relying on friends and family for Sabe capital. I learned yesterday that the seed capital is sixty billion dollars annually in this country. And if you want to access that capital, you have to have family and friends who have money to get. Divers meters were to be capitalized at levels commensurate with their presentation the sector, we would need twenty two billion dollars in additional grant funding. So that's where we are. Flan therapy is reinforcing many of the very forms of inequality that we are all working so hard to solve. I'm really excited to talk about new approaches today with our incredible panelists who are addressing these and many issues in their work as funders, and I wanna start by giving them an opportunity to introduce themselves. And then we'll dive a little bit more into teasing out some of these challenges and barriers that exist, and then we'll talk a little bit more on a positive note as well. Cheryl, even a certain sure, thanks Kathleen. Hi, everybody. My name is Cheryl Dorsey. I'm president of echoing green echoing green is a leading angel investor. In emerging social entrepreneurs we provide a startup capital and wraparound support to amazing social entrepreneurs

Cheryl Dorsey Kathleen Kelly president Stanford Eric ni Amazon Stanford University Fonte editor Ivy league university Whitman institute Sabe Pia Robert Ross executive director lecturer Jeff Janice lead one hundred sixteen thousand d
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

09:52 min | 3 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Where culture plays out a little differently. So whole truly because I work with means stream organizations chamber of commerce community foundations the powerbrokers community that culturally I have to look a certain way in dress a certain way in order to be heard in that room at the same time. I'm being brought in because there is a disconnect between their work and what they're trying to achieve in their greater region. And so it's an interesting kind of dynamic to have to show up as one of my friends would say suited in booted. So that you can hear the words that I'm saying at the same time the words that I'm saying are going to make you uncomfortable because it requires to do work that you're not. Already doing or else? You would not bring me in the room. And so the cultural thing is like way bigger than like, you said just a simple, pedigree or school or things like that. But it is are you creating an environment that allows people to have those type of conversations that get you to better place at the same time being aware of the cultural identifiers that you're putting out there that folks like me have to recognize in order to be able to have. My message heard something that's a good point that culture is more broad than to say like organizational, and when you're working in communities having lived in New Orleans for a number of years, which was a big adjustment from Chicago. It's like community takes on different manifestations in means different things from ward to ward neighborhood to neighborhood. I guess my final question is. I recently read broadened the Angelo's book white for Jilin. Why why people have a hard time talking about racism and having grown up in New Hampshire? Like, I'm I'm surrounded by whiteness. I'm you know, I was like one of two kids and elements school it was black. So that being said the way that she lays out the book, she talks about how we have this false idea about like racism and racist just being like, independent individual actors like bad people, but not thinking about the overall structure, and like the history of our country founded on white supremacy, etc. Etc. That really is like in the air, we breathe. And so I'm wondering given that there is the like the personal work like adding onto your point like the individuals that you're going to have those conversations with need to do some soul-searching and really like interrogate their assumptions their ideas their values etcetera before they can necessarily maybe engaged with what you're recommending as far as them changing. So there's like this personal level of change that needs to have. Open. And then there's an interpersonal dynamic because you know, we're in community with people, but then institutionally and organisationally there's another structure, and then there's like the the medicine doctors. And so recognizing the complexity I guess of like how to affect change and really make D I not just like a bumper sticker, which I feel like it has become in the last five years like everyone's talking about yet. There's a whole lot of sizzle. But not a lot of state with the concept. And so my question for you is what like across those four areas whether personal or interpersonal structural institutional like where do you think the first domino? Is that people could like consider if they want to start making more actionable in real? That was loaded. It was very loaded like big old baked potato with sour. He's all on there. I don't know. There is a one domino. So I don't expect when I enter into community to do the work that I do for people to have done the interpersonal work or the inner work. It's great when I start using talking about systemic racism and policies like redlining and the GI Bill and all of that where there's a foundational understanding. That's great. But that's not my expectation. I brought into communities because they do not wanna Ferguson. That's why broaden I'm not brought in because there's been a mass of Piff une- by the powerbrokers that this is a necessary transformative moment in order for their city to have resiliency. Those are really cute words. But the reality is no one wants to be a ticker. Tape on CNN saying their streets are on fire because another black man has been shot. And so for me, I want all of those dominoes to fall. But I don't know if we're going to get there. And so my work is to hit it wherever I can and hope that there's so much somebody else on this day j- or who who's been on this day or in this room, that's working on the other Domino's at the same time because all are needed. But I think it's a it's a little I don't know. I'm just not that idealistic to believe that all of those Domino's can happen at the same time. My initial thought to your question Mckee was leadership. Like, I wholeheartedly believe. And if you want to see change, it has to start with the leader pick, your nexus of what that is is is that the organization is at the person is a department is a something bigger than that. But it has to start with the leadership and the leadership has to decide what's important to him or her and authentically in the in the context of d I really what's important. Like, do you believe diversity is important because at least a better outcomes? Okay start there. Right. That's a value. If you don't believe what you are spouses it will come through. It will fall short it. Oh, hit a wall. Pick your pick your metaphor. Right. It won't go far. But it starts with the leadership's asking a team the individual what's important to me with important to us. And how are we going to? Carry that out that I think is the first step in the start of that. And then similar to crystals point it is really about deciding where you want to star and thinking about the organization's assessment or again, whatever that unit is like what can I what can I take on? What are we willing to take on? Where do I think the organization is? So do you want to tackle representation? Okay. Go for it. Maybe you don't wanna start with representation because you want to start with the culture of equity and inclusiveness. Like, let's not bring more folks into our stuff. Right because she'll just send them right out the door. It'll be a revolving door maybe work on both of those because you have capacity as an organization to change the same thing at the individual level. Do you have relationships with people that you're willing to go deeper and take risk and go farther? Once you get to that. What do I value is this really important to me? And where do I want to start? I used to teach training program called personally fishing at Kraft Foods, and what always say when you have this really big task. They set us the salami approach. Right. You never eat the whole salami at one time you actually slice off pieces of it. So when I think about this domino. It really is thinking about where you it's a whole lot of work that we have to do that we are trying to achieve socially if you think about where those couple of things I want to slice off. And then eventually will be ready to go back and. Slice additional pieces. I just wanna just second everything that you will said. And I the one thing I'll say is that she crystals point I watching to Dr king as a quote or how to quote, it's since been like, I don't need a man to love me. I just need him not to Lynch me. And so I kind of take philosophy which I'm not as interested in sort of getting into whether you believe in you don't believe, and I do think that behavior comes first then belief this idea of like, I need you to really believe in. It's like some of the organizations with the longest versity statements and inclusion statements and this and that and the beautiful color Benneton ads on their big like they're actually engaged in some of the most Rick systemic practices along so many different dimensions. Like, that's actually where your commitment shows up in terms of actual systems so much more interested into your point just taking one system at a time and saying, okay, what are the str? Pictures we can put in place here that will allow us to achieve a different result as opposed to focusing on the inter- the personal belief systems. I I think that actually comes after people have certain seats have seen certain results. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social nation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating for social change. Please visit our website at dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Domino New Hampshire Angelo New Orleans Stanford University CNN Stanford social nation review Twitter Chicago Kraft Foods Facebook Eric ni Jilin Lynch Dr king Ferguson Mckee five years
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

09:48 min | 3 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric. Knee managing editor of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI dot org. And I'm Mike publisher of Stanford social innovation review. This podcast is part of our power of feedback series produced for SSI are with the support of the William and flora Hewlett foundation. It might be an exaggeration to say that Paul John is a citizen of the world. I often and different parts little bit them fiddle Teela, but a seal Columbia Ecuador, my father used to travel very much. Okay. Maybe Paul is just a citizen of the part of the world between Guatemala and tear. Del Fuego except that are traveling father. Who was an engineer was born in Mexico and Paula currently lives in Texas. She enjoyed the travelling as a child she learned Spanish as well as Portuguese than English. But at twenty two during a visit to family friends in Houston polo began to think that the only way to achieve independence from her father was to get married, and I said to him the first person who pass I wanna marry. I mean, that's what I say. And they he say you will. Not do that. And I say, yes, I will. And I did it. I I should it did the marriage lasted twenty five years and in the fullness of time Paula had a son and a daughter. She took advantage of the opportunity to become a different sort of parent from the ones she'd known high believe, I'm more flexible. I listen to my kids I like to laugh with them because my father, he really it was not a talk in. He was just a person who say do these do these these. Because Paul and not only laughed with her children. But listen to them and paid attention to how they were responding to her. She could use their feedback to inform her parody unhappily in the fullness of time Paulo began having some physical problems, including arthritis serious enough to keep her off her feet. She learned that she could get some assistance with their medical expenses in Harris County, Texas where she was living. If she applied for a card, which gave her access to the healthcare system. It was called a gold card. Eventually Paula her that she could get help with the form she needed to fill out at a piffling community health outreach services echoes for short Paul is first visit to echoes was about as frustrating as it could have been the FBI wait the full Bod while about four hours, maybe more when they're closed they find I find out that I cannot do not thin. I don't get the paperwork. I don't got nothing. Right. So I. Got frustrated I wing home died to cry so much because I was in pain, and I didn't know what to do more visits resulted in more frustration the staff at echoes was perhaps almost as frustrated as the clients were. Fortunately, they decided to ask people like Paula, John how they could better serve their needs. Like it. When you come to give you paper, and that paper, they ask you how we can do better what we do wrong. And you know, they don't ask for you to put your name scientists like that. So you feel free to say, well, what you feel you know, fuller wrote that she felt members of the echoes staff should be more friendly. First of all, I believe, you know, he's the more important things is going to say Hello that's very important because when you come to a place the matter what place it is. Anyone? You are welcome. I believed you know, that open door polo also wondered if the process of applying for health care could be streamlined and made more consistent. So that clients weren't constantly getting different advice from different people. She wrote that the office felt cramped could they arrange it. So that people had more space than perhaps more privacy. Cathy, more the executive director at echoes was listening, and she and her colleagues began responding to the suggestions of people like Bala, some of the things she actually said to you were some of the things we focused on the most one of them was creating order here is how she put it. But the truth is we became more organized in our morning routine, which then trickled down to the clients every morning, we do what we call the morning meeting with clients and that morning, meaning informs clients as to what they can expect that day. It's also a welcoming meeting is you'll remember pallet talked about putting a smile on our faces and being more, frankly, more customer service oriented, and that's part of that morning meeting of the welcoming of of everyone thanking them for their patients telling them where they can go for questions, and and directing them to who they to me, frankly in case they have complaints. These were all keys of what Palo shared with us customer service. More order and not making people wait as long within the limitations of the space available Kathy more enter colleagues who are known as navigators have tried to address conditions that might have seemed impossible to improve. When Paula enter fellow clients mentioned the well first of all the privacy part. She's right on target. It about. And so we've tried to make some privacy by putting up those dividers in the waiting area. So the navigators have a private place, but the navigators are still next to another navigator so Powis, right? We need more space. So that we can space people out or get people offices. But we don't were not able to do that yet. It's hard dream. Okay. Echoes is not exactly a dream. Come true. But the organization has seen an helped nearly three times as many people this year as it saw in twenty seventeen and Kathy more feels that responding to the suggestions of clients. Like, Paula, John is at least partly responsible for that Paula. Thanks kathy's. Right. Because every time I come here. This my say Hello. You know, like, I'm part of the family. You know, when you come to edges, you know, United's change it when you come United strange that treats you like family, you become family when you come over and over you become a family. So yes, I believe so the mission of a Pitney community health outreach services is to help people access health, educational and social services bureaucracy language issues the difficulty many of the clients face in just getting to the office all these challenges can be frustrating. But by asking their clients how they can improve delivery of their services and by listening to their responses echoes has built a better system. The proof is in the way, those served have told their friends and neighbors about how well it is gone echoes. And that the people there will listen to suggestions. And sometimes those suggestions have come in for. Normally as complaints, Kathy. More recalls have clients used to all get the same bag of groceries. It included five cans of salmon or five cans of tuna or five cans of chicken. I remember one day someone came and said, I don't like chicken. I really like salmon can't I have salmon. So it was feedback. But it wasn't necessarily on this survey. Okay. But it was clear feedback clear enough. So that the folks packing, the groceries got clued into the fact that they were dealing with individuals with food preferences and the preferences of some of those individuals led to an expansion of the pantry there was feedback from our clients and volunteers to by the way who wanted to have a food fair here at echoes where we could provide fresh fruit. So on the first Saturday of the month. We have this mood fair. The food truck comes we have things like corn dairy. We've had meat. All sorts of fruits and vegetables, and we hand out almost fifty to sixty pounds of two two hundred families on a Saturday morning all because somebody or perhaps several somebody's wondered if all that good stuff might be added to the menu more evidence that if you're in the business of trying to help people it's a good idea to ask those people what they need. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for podcasts articles and other content about innovating for social change. Please visit our website at 'Society dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Paula Paul John Kathy William and flora Hewlett foun Eric ni Stanford Texas Stanford University Del Fuego Columbia Ecuador managing editor publisher Guatemala Twitter Harris County Houston Paulo Pitney Facebook