17 Burst results for "Stan alcorn"

"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:49 min | Last month

"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Investigative Reporting and P R X. This is reveal I'm al letzten monuments that activists targeted in the wake of the murder of George Floyd last year. They weren't all of confederates. Some of Spaniards who first colonized North America hundreds of years before the civil War in 2018 reveals Stan Alcorn reported on some of these monuments in New Mexico. We're going to bring you that story. Then tell you what happened since here, Stan. Nor in your own home, Morris got the call to help make what would become the most controversial monument in New Mexico history. She was in the place. She's most comfortable studio where she makes her art. I mean, who would want to be here? Right in the studio with a fireplace in the green? It was 1997 and the director of public art for the city of Albuquerque was on the phone asking if she wanted to be part of a tri cultural collaboration. There'd be a Hispanic artist, an Anglo artist. And he hoped Nora Teyla Indian artist from Santa Clara Pueblo, the call was so out of the blue. This was a public art project. I'd never done public art. Really. This was with other people. I had been working solo. And did you say Yes. Right then. Or do you remember how the phone call? Yes. I said yes, right away, because, um, I opened my mouth and I said yes. And then afterwards, I thought, Oh, I wonder what this is going to be like. The assignment was to create a memorial for the Quarto Centenario celebration of the 4/100 anniversary of the state's first Spanish colony. And of its founder, Juan de Onate out there. Yeah, Nice store the other day. Get on. Send your Nora knew of an printing company she driven down on the attic street. There's an equestrian statue of own yacht in full armor on the side of a highway near her house, But she remembers actually learning about Sonia to the historical figure from her middle school social studies. Teacher was just that He was a kind of Spanish founding father. And by the time I was in junior high, and I was seeing this stuff, I thought it was okay to ask questions. What was the question? You asked. Well, where? The Indians? Yes, and he got sort of beet red. And he told me to be quiet and sit down. I never forgot. It was one of those seminal moments where I realized Oh, I can't ask these questions because they'll make somebody in a place of authority uncomfortable..

Stan Alcorn New Mexico 1997 Juan de Onate North America Nora Teyla George Floyd Morris last year Sonia Nora Albuquerque Stan Anglo Santa Clara Pueblo Quarto Centenario first civil War one 2018
"stan alcorn" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"stan alcorn" Discussed on Reveal

"True. Botanical Garden Com slash reveal. From, the Center for investigative reporting NPR x this is reveal I'm alison. The FBI and academic researchers say there's no such thing as a terrorist profile. You can't tell who's going to become terrorists with a personality tests or demographic checklist. But the young white men who attacked the synagogues of Pittsburgh and Powei and the Walmart. No Paso. They had a lot in common, not only were they motivated by the same conspiracy theory about why people being replaced, they developed those ideas in some of the same spaces online to them, even posted their manifestos to the same website. Now. You can't blame today's white supremacist terrorism on the Internet, but you also can't understand it without talking about the way. The White Supremacist Movement uses the Internet and how that's changed over the last decade. Reveals. Stan alcorn is going to tell that story through the eyes of a man who lived it here, stand. Josh Bates Decade as a white supremacist started in his mid twenty s with a youtube video about the presidential candidate. He says he supported at the time Iraq, Obama. I was scrolling through the comments section. You know he's a Muslim. He wasn't or year. Things of that nature at somebody said you guys sound like those storm front assholes. The world's storm from. Storm Front is a message board that a former KKK leader set up in the nineties. Josh says he went there at first because he was curious than to argue. But then the middle aged message board neo. Started winning him over. How could they be convincing in these arguments like? Can you help me understand that? I wish I can answer that question. Is still ask myself that allow I ended up falling for something like that, but I guess. Similar to how we look at people who fall into calls, you know it's a conditioning process. It's a grooming process and I. Let Myself Fall into that. The experts I talked to say that first step is more about the person than what they're stepping into. Josh had.

Josh Bates White Supremacist Movement Obama Storm Front FBI NPR Stan alcorn Walmart youtube Iraq Pittsburgh Powei
"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In five California police officers convicted of a crime are still working in law enforcement today that's according to an investigation by a state wide coalition of news organizations that uncovered the cases of more than six hundred officers convicted of a crime in the last decade including here in the bay area the charges range from manslaughter to animal cruelty and domestic violence but the investigation found the California often does nothing to stop these officers from continuing to work in law enforcement Stan Alcorn is reporter with reveal from the center for investigative reporting and stand can you lay out what these officers were accused of and where they work yes everything from DIY is driving offenses those were the most common offense but all the way up to manslaughter and you know even murder in some of these officers according your reporting are ending up staying on the force I mean how does that happen we found that more than he officers who convicted of crimes are still on the job today basically it's up to the individual police chief or the individual sheriff unless the crimes a felony so if someone commits a felony and if convicted they will not be able to work as a police officer in the state of California but more than a third of the case we looked at they were charging more serious crimes were able to plead down to crimes the lesser nonviolent offenses that would allow them to keep carrying a gun so to give one example there's an officer the doll contrary sack works at the current county sheriff's office he according to the police reports he handcuffed his girlfriend at the time she says that he pushed her face into a door frame and the police photograph her swollen I afterwards and he was charged with battery a serious violent offence that if he was convicted of it would have meant that he would no longer be able to carry a gun and very likely not be able to be a police officer but he was able to put it down to disturbing other person by loud and unreasonable noise how does California compared to other states on this is this something that is happening in other places well so California is one of only five states in the country where the state oversight agency the kind of licenses police officers doesn't have the power to decertify officers to basically take away their license if you've committed a crime such the you're not able to carry a gun there are things that can kind of render you unemployable but California is yeah in terms of not having oversight they can go beyond that it does stand out compared to some other states I'm assuming you've spoken to you know different police departments are police unions about all of this what are they say about it there I would say there were varying approaches there were some law enforcement agencies that wouldn't talk to us wouldn't answer questions about why they've continued to employ a certain officers have been convicted of serious crimes the California police chiefs association pointed out that it's only a small proportion of the number of officers in California who've been convicted of a crime so we found that six hundred thirty officers have been convicted of a crime in the last decade well there are almost eighty thousand police officers in California so it is a small percentage of officers that we're talking about not something that the California police chiefs association wanted to emphasize it's also a fact that is in the newspaper stories Stan Alcorn is reporter with reveal from the center for investigative reporting standing so much for your time thank you there's more to come on this topic KQED has been working with journalists around the state to compile and analyze police misconduct files read what they found so far.

California
"stan alcorn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"stan alcorn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is revealed. I'm outlets before the break. We heard about back to back terrorist incidents in Oregon in an FBI sting operation. A nineteen year old Somali American name. Muhammad Oestmann Mohamoud got thirty years in prison for trying to set off a fake bomb the night after the bomb plot there was an arson. Muhammad's. Mosque reveals STAN Alcorn has been looking into the arsonist story. So who did what happened to him? Well, he was a white Christian twenty four year olds named Cody Seth Crawford. He pleaded no contest in two thousand sixteen and David nine word of the investigative fund was in the courtroom for the sentencing, and it was really strikingly different from what you see in a typical terrorism case, he says, even though Cody insisted he was innocent and didn't show any remorse. The judge was smiling at him as she imposed her verdict. Five years probation. No prison time. So Bahama gets prison time for fake bomb. But Cody got no prison time for real fire. Has that happened it fits with the larger pattern we know from that domestic terrorism database? We put together with the investigative fund prison. Terms for terrorists who target Muslims tend to be about half as long as for terrorists targeting, the general public in this arson case, I called the prosecutor, and he told me Cody got off so lightly because at the time of the sentencing, he was in Oregon state hospital the mental hospital where one floor of the cuckoo's nest was filmed. What happened was after the arson Cody had a series of episodes involving alcohol and what a psychiatrist diagnosed as brief reactive psychosis. One founded medic gas station ranting at the customers that he was a Christian warrior and telling a police officer. You are going to burn in hell like the other Muslims the one that landed him in the mental hospital started at his mom's house. Here's my mother. He videotaped himself holding up a giant wrench in front of a little upright, piano. And then smashing it down. A video he shot later that night.

Cody Seth Crawford arson STAN Alcorn Muhammad Oestmann Mohamoud Cody FBI Oregon state hospital Oregon psychosis Bahama officer David prosecutor twenty four year nineteen year thirty years Five years
"stan alcorn" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"stan alcorn" Discussed on KCRW

"And before the break, we heard about back to back terrorist incidents in Oregon in an FBI sting operation. A nineteen year old Somali American name Mohammed Oestmann Mohamoud got thirty years in prison for trying to set off a fake bomb the night after the bomb plot there was an arson. Muhammad's. Mosque reveals STAN Alcorn has been looking into the arsonist story. So who did what happened to him while he was a white Christian twenty four year olds named Cody Seth Crawford. He pleaded no contest in twenty sixteen and David nine word of the investigative fund was in the courtroom for the sentencing, and it was really strikingly different from what you use CNN typical terrorism case, he says, even though Cody insisted he was innocent and didn't show any remorse. The judge was smiling at him as she imposed her verdict. Five years probation. No prison time. So Muhammad gets prison time for fake bomb. But Cody God, no prison time for real fire. How does that happen it fits with a larger pattern we know from that domestic terrorism database? We put together with the investigative fund prison. Terms for terrorists who target Muslims tend to be about half as long as for terrorists targeting, the general public in this arson case, I called the prosecutor, and he told me Cody got off so lightly because at the time of the sentencing, he was in Oregon state hospital the mental hospital where one floor of the cuckoo's nest was filmed. What happened was after the arson Cody had a series of episodes involving alcohol and what a psychiatrist diagnosed as brief reactive psychosis. One found him at a gas station ranting at the customers that he was a Christian warrior and telling a police officer. You are going to burn in hell like the other Muslims the.

Cody Cody Seth Crawford STAN Alcorn arson Cody God Muhammad Mohammed Oestmann Mohamoud FBI Oregon Oregon state hospital psychosis CNN officer David prosecutor twenty four year nineteen year thirty years Five years
"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From the center for investigative reporting in pr x this is reveal i'm outlets in in nineteen sixty six president lyndon baines johnson stepped into the rose garden and said it was time to face a shocking problem for years now we've tolerated a raging epidemic an epidemic that killed nearly three times as many people as all america's wars and yet at a national level was basically unstudied and unregulated we are going to cut down this senseless loss of lives he was talking not about guns but about car crashes what he called highway disease we're going to find out more about highway disease and we're going to find out how to cure highway deceased fifty years later we may not have found the cure but we've made progress the car crash death rate is down nearly eighty percent gun deaths on the other hand have gone up a bit which is why when you hear about gun control on say a cnn panel uc santa barbara sandy hook virginia tech columbine the list grows somebody brings it up it's an interesting analogy and it's actually quite telling in this case legal expert michael walden affected who could drive we've lifted the drinking age to twenty one so people wouldn't drive recklessly we put an air bags we changed car design in other words we changed cars and made them safer and you know the question is are there ways to do that also with guns to answer that question his reveals stan alcorn every time someone dies by gun or car visit group of people who rushed to the scene to figure out exactly how they died is there any accidents working right now.

president america lyndon baines johnson cnn michael walden stan alcorn eighty percent fifty years
"stan alcorn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"stan alcorn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From the center for investigative reporting in pr x this is reveal i'm outlets in nineteen sixty six president lyndon baines johnson stepped into the rose garden and said it was time to face a shocking problem for years now we've tolerated a raging epidemic and that pedantic that killed nearly three times as many people as all america's wars and yet at a national level was basically unstudied and unregulated we are going to cut down this senseless loss of lives he was talking not about guns but about car crashes what he called highway disease we're going to find out more about highway disease and we're going to find out how to cure highway disease fifty years later we may not have found the cure but we've made progress the car crash death rate is down nearly eighty percent gun deaths on the other hand have gone up a bit which is why when you hear about gun control on say a cnn panel uc santa barbara sandy hook virginia tech columbine the list grows somebody brings it up it's an interesting analogy and it's actually quite telling in this case legal expert michael walden we affected who could drive we've lifted the drinking age to twenty one so people wouldn't drive recklessly we put an air bags we changed car design in other words we changed cars and made them safer and you know the question is are there ways to do that also with guns to answer that question his reveals stan alcorn every time someone dies by gun or car this group of people who rushed to the scene to figure out exactly how they died is there any accidents working right now talk about reports that maybe we can go right out something going on a road along with new york state trooper frank bandido in this is something else i want to show you mostly to see the paperwork accident reporters right here because one reason for the fall in that's starts with filling in the boxes on that form these mysterious boxes you see over here i mean nothing to you they need a lot to us the boxes are where he writes down the weather where he draws a bird'seye cartoon of iraq where he identifies the accidents primary cause you've got like a whole list of possible i don't know if you could read those little things but there's a million i mean try to.

president america frank bandido iraq lyndon baines johnson cnn michael walden stan alcorn new york eighty percent fifty years
"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dot org rodney roberts didn't go to trial he took a pleabargain like most people who end up in prison to get a deeper sense of why that is called of angela j davis law professor at washington college of law at american university in editor of the recently published book policing the black man is davis thanks for joining me thank you for having a me so the sixth amendment gives all americans the right to a fair trial but as we heard and rodney story almost nobody exercise that right they take plea bargains why is that well the reason for that is prosecutors are by far the most powerful officials in our criminal justice system because they decide whether a person is going to be charged with a crime and what that charge are those charges will be so what prosecutors will often do is they will charge a person with multiple offenses because they can even sometimes when they know they don't have enough proof to ultimately convict them at try now and when a person is faced with multiple charges each of which may carry long prison terms you can see how even an innocent person would be compelled to plead guilty because going to trial is a risky business you never know what i watched jury is going to do but if a prosecutor says how did drop all but one of the charges if you plead guilty to one person facing the possibility of being convicted of lots of offenses might just take the plea don't the defendants have some power to that they can accept or reject the police sure they can reject the plea of course they can but if you're a poor defendant with overworked public defender who's got tons of cases no resources to investigate the case and even if he or she did have resources is not given.

rodney roberts professor american university editor prosecutor angela j davis washington college of law
"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:21 min | 4 years ago

"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The time to to do the investigation i don't see that as a position of power what would happen tomorrow of every criminal defendants said no i'm not taken of pleabargain i'm going to trial while of every criminal offenders that i'm i'm going to trial the system would crash for sure i mean there would not be sufficient resources to have all those trial so how how do we fix plea bargains if we had a fair system where prosecutors only charged the pence is that they knew they could prove beyond a reasonable doubt if they gave full and open discovery to defense attorneys by that i mean show the the defense attorney all of your evidence one of the main causes of wrongful convictions in this country is because prosecutors don't comply with that if they would give the defense attorneys time to fully investigate the cases before they decide whether to take the plea bargain if all of those things were done then it would be a fairer system but that's not the way it's done mean you have some jurisdictions where prosecutors on day one the day the defence of train meets his or her her clients saying i tell you what i'll give you a guy deal but he's gotta take the deal today or its off the table when the position that they pose the defense attorney and of course the defendant in an and it's just sad that this is what is passing his justice in our in our criminal justice system today the vast majority of prosecutors are locally elected officials we need to hold them accountable we need to ask them the heart questions we need to educate ourselves as a community about how these issues work prosecutors don't talk about their pleabargaining policies when they run for office all they talk about is being tough on crime most of them run unopposed in when they have an opponent the upon it talks about how he or she is tougher on crime but they're they're they're in there's change i mean i think reform is coming about slowly but surely and i think prosecutors are now having to you know there's i won't call it a wave of new prosecutors but i think sufficient prosecutors out there who are changed during the way they're doing business and i'm feeling hopeful about that and hoping there there the numbers will increase.

attorney the deal
"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 4 years ago

"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Before his arrest rodney had been at paralegal and at the maximum security prison in raw we new jersey he put his legal skills to work trying to undo his guilty plea he spent so much time in the law library he says the prison gave him his own desk but nothing he tried work he served all seven years of his sentence last day was a spring sunday in two thousand four rodney and the other prisoners scheduled for release waited by the gates while the guards called their names and let them out onebyone they call me if fairly well official day for gusts over the other game they leave in there and i'll still fail later you'll forgotten me with a match out of the they got a hold on we all know what it is assumed that you go and this is where rodney story leaves the black and white worlds of crime and punishment and enters a grey zone prison guards put shackles around rodney's waste ankles and wrists put him in a van and drove him three hours to what looked like another prison after one this place they told him he was at new jersey's special treatment unit really oh you a blood is fisher treatment we the special treatment unit is a prison building staffed by prison staff at the state doesn't considered a prison it holds man against their will but it calls them residents not inmates because like rodney they've already served their sentences they're being held now in what's called civil commitment it's more commonly used hospitalized people with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder but twenty states use civil commitment to hold sex offenders that psychiatrists have deemed mentally abnormal and likely to commit sexual violence again leave they will we go hold you because we you have a chart this short term and if you go to commit a crime in the future i am i love yuka choiseul defeat in the future while we should move the chart turns a criminal history into a score one point for a sex offence another point up the victim as a stranger and so on rodney's number marked him as a high risk but.

rodney new jersey schizophrenia official seven years three hours
"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Listen to you love to slay the rest of your life in jail but then then his lawyer gave him a way out the prosecutor would throw out the sexual assault charge and the possible life sentence rodney would get just seven years in prison and with luck be out into all he had to do was plead guilty to seconddegree kidnapping legislature we will at a fleet joe utah combo as a either here this is what usually happens despite what you see on tv only a tiny fraction of american criminals are convicted by a jury more than ninety four percent trade their right to a trial for faster lighter punishment as the supreme court put it in a 2012 decision pleabargaining he's not some adjunct to the criminal justice system it is the criminal gene justice system rodney took the plea bargain ooh the shame to have all of the chips in their favorite ashamed i really thought i was dorm us over craig judges were not letting the findlay for the resolution live the aloma autosomal that thought lasted until rodney went before the judge who asked did you hold an individual aged seventeen against her will with the intent to assault her and he said yes ray lecerf in a way to you measured let others life core kromah and kick me play guilty to some slowing two hour show angry at less so a ruling for show low joe blow concur rallied the mother us law of.

prosecutor rodney findlay ray lecerf assault kidnapping joe utah craig ninety four percent seven years two hour
"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:51 min | 4 years ago

"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"No sheesh because it is it was it was the courage of it so older it a frail we would have for the motorcycle rodney says in the midnineties he and his friend each in cash for a black and yellow kawasaki but when i came jaslyn them get lee road by a little were every came possessive they wanna anita character gives you right now luxury he i would rather near you buy this fight over a motorcycle started a chain reaction rodney says he called the police but the title was in his friends name i would i stand as saying this love by schumer i no proof another the police arrested rodney and eventually brought him to a holding cell just outside the courtroom burn rodney thought he'd be charged with theft when i got there they will felony there i have more choice choice i work kidnapping and sexual assault of a 17yearold girl rodney knew exactly how serious these charges were because a decade earlier when he was nineteen rodney was convicted of sexual assault and served seven years in prison he and two other men had stolen a thirty two year old woman's car and raped her even though rodney knew he was innocent of this new crime he thought the moment he walked into that courtroom everyone would assume he was guilty instead he decided to stay in the holding so by refusing to go in the will because i was in a dignified these george will love further into the courtroom instead of physically dragging him in front of the judge rodney says they just open the normal room door and the judge shouted so rodney quinn here honey robber of the fell a it'll they show you name it will these days you shortage you'll charged with his as it is how you flee thus it not guilty colville i was so free by were because i know money shocker lawyer i didn't know what was going on i with full my hair out because of tadic a catastrophe the court gave rodney a public defender but romney says his lawyer had bad news and he was dislodged unless you know that the victim was out in the coral like ariel should cheshire fought the usual off of god he told rodney the victim had picked his mugshot out of a photo lineup ashland from while he i.

schumer theft kidnapping assault colville romney rodney quinn cheshire thirty two year seven years
"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:25 min | 4 years ago

"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Oklahoma where we're religion and tradition are powerful forces you know we're in the buckle the bible belt and you would think that uh women wouldn't be viewed as property but many times they are so if you wanna look at what would starts all of the things that we're talking about that really leads to the incarceration is she if these massive social issues that are just going to take a dramatic cultural shift in oklahoma susan sharp a retired sociology professor at the university of oklahoma agrees she's were searched the state's high female incarceration rate and wrote a book about it it's called mean lives mean laws i think the all population of the state feel set a woman and particularly a woman who has children who uses drugs violates all the norms in a way that they find unacceptable and they would rather see those children grow up in foster care than to be with a mother who had a drought problem the majority of women and oklahoma's prisons have a child being raised by someone else in some cases women receive more time than men for the same crimes women are spouse fee to caregivers their spouse vive responsible for the children no matter what in the eyes of the general population russian sao men while they're druguse is viewed as bad it doesn't have that same connotation of being a bad mother oh incarceration doesn't affect just one woman when you send a woman to prison it affects generations of hamas you can sometimes i'm fine the department of corrections three generations of a family incarcerated at the same time i can for example a mother a grandmother the daughter said three generations three generations it's like a domino effect on families in oklahoma and robin allen the woman we met earlier fits that pattern thousand herrera picks up the rest of her story it's been a couple of months since i talk to robben she's not several years into her twenty your sense i called her up to see how she's doing hmd global hey crawled hour.

Oklahoma professor hamas herrera susan sharp university of oklahoma robin allen robben
"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:27 min | 4 years ago

"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"There's another program and toss accounting the tries to make sure women don't end up in prison in the first place women and recovery began in two thousand nine when a one pleads guilty the judge can choose to her to the program and set of prison at a ceremony earlier this year more than a dozen women received graduation certificates from women and recovery rhona stone spoke to a crowd of supporters in france she told him how she lost a son to gang violence and was sentenced to the program after years of addiction and selling drugs i have i have in july one five and anyway hung to save their stories were painful but the graduation was a celebration a judge who had sent several of these women handed out the certificates as their families chaired the ladies on the number show women and recovery is having an impact the number of women going to prison from tulsa county is dropping while numbers from other counties continue to rise so have programs like women and recovery works so well why are they use throughout the state to reasons one is a lack of state money women in recovery is funded by oklahoma oilman and billionaire george kaiser foundation another reason is pushback from powerful prosecutors who don't favor reducing charges and rely on a lock them up attitude even district attorneys in urban areas such as david prater from oklahoma city believe in tough prison sentences he invited me into his office a conference table in the middle of the room was strewn with papers and faulders worlds bushy shredding allegations you're here in 2016 oklahomans voted to reduce sentences for drug possession in public forums prater spoke out against the changes he says without the fear of going to prison drug addicts won't change their ways i'll tell you i can't even give you a number of people that are told me david or mr de a or whatever they want to call me um you have no idea but you saved my life when you sent me to prison in a report earlier this year a state task force recommended twelve changes in state law including cutting sentences for drug crimes in half most of the changes never became law prater explains that change comes slowly to.

france tulsa county david prater oklahoma city drug possession state law rhona stone oklahoma george kaiser
"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Other states like texas utah georgia and mississippi they're all conservative states like oklahoma but they've chosen to reform their criminal justice systems and reduce their prison populations chris deal runs a nonprofit helping former prisoners find jobs before that he served in the oklahoma legislature for twelve years blast two as house speaker he's a rare breed of republican in this red state because of his support for prison reform when he became speaker he was shocked when he realized how much money of llamas prison system was gobbling up bursting second fastest growing expenditure so stands reason the more money we spend on incarceration the lewis moody we have just been on education on health care on issues those services for kato's nervosa jewish and for people in nursing homes or any other service that would be an important function of government one way to bring down the number of women in prison is to help them get off drugs while they're still behind bars and the state does have some treatment programmes we visited wanted eddie warrior prison in the northeast part of oklahoma a group of women were marching formation around the yard they were in a special camp program aimed at replacing bad habits with discipline and structure i have come a long way i got maria poaching izzo one of the inmates was fifty two year old susan watkins she's from mcallister oklahoma before we hear the rest of her story you.

georgia mississippi oklahoma red state kato maria utah house speaker susan watkins fifty two year twelve years
"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 4 years ago

"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And she says she sold matched to supporter south or daughter and her granddaughter in the end robin undergone a rebulk convicted her daughter got probation robin went to prison robbins has for twenty years sentencing law to she got to prison there is girls on my pod that come from savings county one of them has a two 30year sentences firm stevens county there's another girl there that's got 25 years for trafficking from stevens county robin says she's doing everything she can to stay clean and out of trouble taking bible classes and mentoring other prisoners a couple of years ago she wrote the judge a letter asking him to reduce her sentence she didn't hear back that's reporter thousand herrera she'll have more robin story in a few minutes but how common is it in oklahoma a woman like robyn thank you twenty years in prison for her first felony conviction ziva branstetter spent the past year and a half trying to find out she's now senior editor at revealed but before that she covered criminal justice in oklahoma so zero two months to get the data from the state's prison system what did you find out but we're reveal data team and i analyzed thousands of records going back almost twenty years oklahoma has never done this type of analysis of its own data but we found was that the majority of women being sent to prison we're being sent there for drug offenses and their sentences are getting longer eight out of ten women were locked up for nonviolent crimes and for many of them it was their first a fence so robin stories women we just heard about fits that profile she does and there's another thing we learned i looked at which county sent the most women to prison at the top of the list are mostly world counties stevens county were robin elena's from ranked third and robin was right about our long sense it was nearly twice as long as the average sentence in the state for women convicted of trafficking i went to visit district attorney steve koons wyler at the courthouse in tulsa and he has this theory he says world counties are harder on women because everybody knows everybody's business everybody knows who that lawbreakers and in so there is an expectation some ploy get this person off mush treat because i'm tired of them breaking.

robbins stevens county reporter herrera ziva branstetter oklahoma robin elena tulsa district attorney steve koons wyler twenty years zero two months two 30year 25 years
"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"stan alcorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And was smoking a cigarette when a sheriff pushed in adore her house robin saw her daughter sharise drop to the floor a deputy had a laser sight added rifling data they had a the riot red later on my daughter's orbit ed villages i just gave up ooh robin remembers one of the officers tung her she was quoque just a dirty drug dealer and deserve to go to jail but she says what hurt the most was that her fouryearold granddaughter saw the whole thing they he got this all they took tickets up to the front porch my granddaughter was in the house it if you remember age lebanon ahead ovalles are trying to hear we'd older you know and i could go older because over the eight a robin and her daughter were arrested and hauled off to the county jail it was robbins first and only felony charge she'd had a couple of misdemeanours more than twenty years ago one of them for not returning rentals told local video store and this felony charge was for a non violent crime but of the bond here the judge didn't seem to take that into account were meal at our went to court the judge you with a hundred thousand dollar bond as head could we please have bonn lord he said why he had your minutes to society ooh drugs have been a menacing oklahoma in the early 2000s authorities were busting more than a thousand khomein methamphetamine labs each year the state restricted.

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