35 Burst results for "Stan"

A highlight from "Solana Is DEAD..."

Crypto Banter

10:03 min | Last month

A highlight from "Solana Is DEAD..."

"They told me Solana was dead. Before I went to the conference, that's what they said. They said, don't bother going to the conference because Solana is absolutely dead. So what I decided to do was to go there and see for myself. And I want to show you guys today what I saw at the Solana conference today here in Amsterdam. This is pretty much the scenes from the dead chain of Solana. 4500 people in a room. We're going to talk about what's going on in Solana and whether Solana is, of course, a dead chain. Then I need to talk to you about something very important because we are entering a new era in Bitcoin. We have exited or we are exiting the old era. In the old era, we could front run the institutions. We were the ones who were front running the institutions. But now, we are entering a new era where we won't be able to front run the institutions anymore. The early adopter phase is drawing to a close. And soon, we won't be able to front run the institutions anymore. So we're going to talk about what that means. And I'm going to show you how the institutions are actually getting a huge type of FOMO. And when the institutions get FOMO, it's much, much, much bigger than the FOMO that we get when we're retail trading. I'm actually going to show you stats. I'm going to show you numbers. I'm going to show you everything else. A couple other things. I'm going to show you another token that's going to pump. I'm going to talk a lot about altcoins today because we do need to talk about the altcoins which are taking a break from their, if you want to call it, I'm not going to say all -time highs, but certainly of their high levels, the altcoins are taking some kind of break. And then, I think what we need to talk about is we need to talk about the Unibot hack and see whether or not we should actually be buying Unibot or not. So with all that, we've got a massive show. I'm here in Amsterdam, not the normal time as you can see. And the reason why is because I've been at the Solana conference all day, but I am here and I am bringing you crypto love and I am bringing you crypto wisdom. And I think we've got a lot to go. So let's get started. I know some of you are saying clickbait masters, but you know the truth is everyone did say Solana was a dead chain and they said Solana is dead. And today I'm going to show you exactly whether or not Solana is dead. You guys are going to help me make a decision as to whether or not Solana is dead because you need to get the information firsthand. And I don't know any other channel that brings you information like this firsthand from Amsterdam on the day of the conference. I'm going to bring you live things and I'm going to show you exactly what's happening at the Solana conference. I've got big, big, big updates for you on Bitcoin as well today because we are entering a new phase. We are entering a phase of institutional FOMO and the institutions are causing a new type of flippening. And we have to talk about this flippening and what the new type of flippening means for us. Usually the flippening is when the price of ETH refers to when the price of ETH or the market cap of ETH grows above the market cap of Bitcoin. But today I'm going to show you a new flippening, which is actually caused by the institutions and the FOMO that the institutions are getting. Then I'm going to show you a token that is going to run in the next week, just like I told you Solana was going to run and I was 100 % right. I'm going to show you the next Solana. So there's lots to do. If you want to know what the token is that's going to run, we need 1 ,500 likes. Otherwise I'm not releasing that token for you guys here today. So if you're new to the channel, smash that subscribe button, obliterate the subscribe button. There is no other channel that brings you this kind of access each and every day. And you can see the work ethic that we have around here. Even though I was out late last night, I was up early this morning. I went to a conference all day today. Right now it's seven o 'clock here and I'm bringing you crypto love and crypto wisdom, sharing everything with you. And also smash a like, subscribe to the channel. Let's quickly just go into the banter bubbles and see what's happening on the bubbles. There we go. We are in the bubbles right now. It's a mixed day. I wouldn't worry too much about this. I wouldn't worry too much about the mixed day. Let's quickly just toggle to the hourly. So it's a mixed hour. It's a mixed day. You can see Rune is at 5 .91%. But I think what's happening here is we're getting the RSI's starting to take a bit of a breather because if you look at the RSI's for the four hour, you see that they're starting to come down and they're starting to come down because the market did get a little bit overheated on the short timeframe. Not too worried because if you look at it on the one week timeframe, we're not overheated on any of the RSI's. Just remember guys, if you are in the banter bubbles, just click on this win a Bitcoin link. And then what I want you guys to do is I want you guys to go in there and I want you guys to obliterate the predictions. How it works is very simple. If you want to win a full Bitcoin, this is a real promotion. Okay. This is a real promotion. What you need to do, you need to open an exchange account with any of our exchange partners, preferably open it on Bybit because you get $30 ,000 in bonuses. Just click this button here. You'll then be taken to the sign up page. Sign up, you get five predictions. If you can predict the price of Bitcoin on the first of the first 2024 at 0001 EST on Coinbase, then you can win a half a Bitcoin. And if you've traded 10 times in your account and trading 10 times now is so, so, so easy, you will get another half of a Bitcoin. So you'll actually win a full Bitcoin. Now, if my prediction is right, by the end of the year, that'll be worth $50 ,000. So here's the chance for you to really win $50 ,000. Go to Banter Bubbles, click on the win a Bitcoin link, make your predictions. I see Novovich predicted a few seconds ago. He says 39, 40, 80. He doesn't know what he's talking about. He's way too conservative. Albert Flipsen, he was on 11 minutes ago. He said 43 ,652. He's wrong too. Let me know what you think. Let me know what you think in the comments. Anyway, let's move on to the alpha of today because I have to get from here. I need to go for dinner, and I need to go and do what you do when you're in Amsterdam. And if you've been in Amsterdam, you'll know exactly, exactly, exactly what I'm talking about. So let's get into the alpha of today's show. And I think what we should do is we should start off by looking at the Bitcoin price. Bitcoin, of course, is fighting this resistance. I told you this resistance is not going to just go away. This is the flip into the bullish territory that would give us this whole bull thing, this whole bull trend for the whole year. As it comes to the monthly, today is the last day of the monthly close. Now, I said at the beginning of October, I said that Bitcoin would close the month 23 .5 % up. It looks like I'm going to be proven wrong. Bitcoin is going to close the month 27 .5 % up. So 27 .5 % up instead of 23 .5 % up. Now, the good news is, so here's some really, really, really, real good news for you guys. The good news is that in any previous cycle, first of all, the good news is that November, as you can see over here, is the best month for Bitcoin across all months. If you take Bitcoin across all months since the inception of Bitcoin, and by the way, the inception of Bitcoin, the white paper was exactly 15 years ago. So exactly 15 years ago, we had the Bitcoin white paper written. And you can see Gary Gensler, even Gary Gensler writes this very, very, very weird message. He says, if Satoshi Nakamoto wrote it for Halloween, would we be able to tell? Happy 15th anniversary to Satoshi's famous white paper that started crypto. Any crypto companies that are tricking investors should be treating them to compliance with securities laws. This is the head of the SEC. I mean, Gary Gensler has gone absolutely crazy. Anyway, so where are we? In November is generally the best month for Bitcoin. But in this November, specifically, it's a pre -harving year. And the previous pre -harving year, we had a 21 .44 % increase in November. I think that this November is going to be different. I think it's going to be even harder. And I'll tell you why. First of all, as I said, we are moving into range 4. Range 4 takes us into all -time highs, all -time high, or previous high territory. But more importantly, we are tracking similar to all the other cycles. So if you look at all the other cycles, the Bitcoin is 113 % up since the cycle low, which aligns with the two cycles, 15 % and 18%. The first one was 116%. The other one was 164%. So far, we are tracking exactly like all the other previous cycles. But this time, we have another force at play. And that other force at play is exactly what you're seeing on the screen. It is the institutional FOMO, which is about to hit the market. Because right now, the institutions are getting a very, very, very big FOMO, a very unique FOMO. They're sitting here like we sit at the slot machines and go, come on, come on, come on. We want to buy, and we want to buy, and we want to buy. And the latest indicator of this FOMO, the latest indicator of this FOMO is Stan Druckenmiller. Now, Stan Druckenmiller is one of the world's most renowned investors. And yesterday, he was interviewed with Paul Tudor Jones. And I want you to hear what he said about Bitcoin. Because this just shows the type of FOMO that the institutions are trying to get. We're living through a marketing exercise that has been done. Since Larry Fink went up and said that Bitcoin is a safe haven and a store of value, we're moving into this new era of institutional FOMO. We've had many other institutions come out. And the latest of these is Stan Druckenmiller. Listen to what he said.

Albert Flipsen Stan Druckenmiller Gary Gensler 10 Times $30 ,000 21 .44 % Larry Fink 27 .5 % $50 ,000 100 % Amsterdam Yesterday 23 .5 % Today 15 % Satoshi Two Cycles 1 ,500 Likes Satoshi Nakamoto 113 %
A highlight from BULLISH SIGNAL ON BITCOIN RAISED BY PAUL TUDOR JONES & JIM CRAMER! CAROLINE ELLISON SBF TESTIMONY

Thinking Crypto News & Interviews

04:14 min | Last month

A highlight from BULLISH SIGNAL ON BITCOIN RAISED BY PAUL TUDOR JONES & JIM CRAMER! CAROLINE ELLISON SBF TESTIMONY

"Welcome back to the Thinking Crypto podcast, your home for cryptocurrency news and interviews. If you are new here, please hit that subscribe button as well as the thumbs up button and leave a comment below. If you're listening on a podcast platform such as Spotify, Apple or Google, please leave a five -star rating and review. It supports the podcast and it doesn't cost you anything. Well, folks, we got some very bullish news coming from billionaire investor Paul Tudor Jones and Jim Cramer. Yes, Jim Cramer. Let's start with Paul Tudor Jones first, because he stated today on CNBC that he is bullish on Bitcoin and gold. Here's the headline. Paul Tudor Jones doubles down on Bitcoin as recession looms. Now Paul Tudor Jones, if you recall, those of you who were here back in 2020, remember the smoke signal he put up, remember the flag he raised, and then all the institutional investors followed him. He went on CNBC after the whole COVID crash and much more, and he said, Bitcoin is the fastest horse in this environment. It's the fastest horse in the race, right? This was a big time signal from one of the largest institutional investors and well -known, and then you saw Stan Druckenmiller and Bill Miller and all these guys started coming out and everybody was making the rounds, and of course the market pumped, right? Pumped in 2020, pumped in 2021, and we know the rest is history. So Paul Tudor Jones, once again, is putting up the signal, folks, and as you can imagine, I've said it many times, when these guys go on TV and they make statements, they are putting out a narrative, whether they're long or short. I think we can clearly see that Paul Tudor Jones is long and it makes sense. The Bitcoin spot ETFs could get approved within the next six months in addition to Bitcoin having his next year, so Paul knows the bull markets are going to come back. We just have to be patient. He's of course putting out a narrative out there and includes both gold and Bitcoin. Let me give you some of his statements. I would love gold and Bitcoin together, Tudor Jones said. I think they probably take on a larger percentage of your portfolio than they would historically because we're going to go through a challenging political time here in the United States, and we've obviously got a geopolitical situation. So he's highlighting the US's fiscal situation, the recession and much more, and he's using gold and Bitcoin as hedge. So very interesting here. And the comments come amid what Tudor Jones said might be the most threatening and challenging geopolitical environment that he's ever seen. He added that the US is probably in its weakest fiscal position since World War Two. Very, very interesting statements, folks. So we could certainly see Bitcoin on the crypto asset class, which is not 100 % tied to equities and businesses and so forth do well. Now, don't get me wrong, Bitcoin we've seen historically has moved with the equities markets, but there have been times it has deviated. So we'll see what happens. You know, maybe the equities do well because the US starts QE again next year, right? How are they going to pay for all the support they're sending overseas with the wars and much more in addition to the Fed almost being at a point where how much higher can you keep raising rates until you really break the economy and cause more damage than the inflation that they're currently fighting, right? So I think the Fed will wrap up raising rates at the end of this year. I think next year they will start QE and start some sort of stimulus. I think we could see that with the recession and once again, world conflict and much more. So Bitcoin, even equities could do well. We'll just have to wait and see. But I think this is a very bullish statement. Now, folks, enter Mr. Mad Money himself, Jim Cramer. On the same day, this man says, I don't like Bitcoin. Mr. Bitcoin is about to go down big. It's interesting that he called it Mr. Bitcoin.

Jim Cramer Paul Tudor Jones Bill Miller Stan Druckenmiller 2020 2021 Five -Star United States World War Two Paul FED Today Next Year 100 % Tudor Jones Both Cnbc End Of This Year First Apple
A highlight from 96 - Token2049 Highlights, Binance's SEC Showdown, Yuga Labs Update & Friend.tech on roids!!

Crypto Curious

13:56 min | 2 months ago

A highlight from 96 - Token2049 Highlights, Binance's SEC Showdown, Yuga Labs Update & Friend.tech on roids!!

"One of the big questions is - What is money? For practical purposes, it exists in a series of heterogeneous databases, very different databases. Do you believe in crypto? Digital currency may be an answer, but it is a highly respectable disaster. I'd go on Bitcoin. There is no second best. Welcome to the Crypto Curious podcast, proudly brought to you by the Bamboo app. Crypto Curious is your go -to source for all things cryptocurrency. Whether you're a seasoned pro or new to the world of crypto, we've got you covered. Each week, we'll break down the top news stories of the past seven days, giving you the information you need to stay on top of the latest trends and developments. Plus, we'll share quick bites of news and insights that you won't want to miss. If you're new to crypto, we recommend starting in our early episodes, where we break down the basics and give you a solid foundation to understand the crypto world. Join us as we explore the ever -evolving world of cryptocurrency and educate ourselves along the way. On today's episode, we'll give you a complete rundown on the token 2049 event that Blake and I attended in Singapore last week. Sneak peek, it was pretty amazing. Then we'll get into a number of big stories over the past few weeks, including Yuga Labs producing a movie, Binance are in hot water again, the Friend Tech field day, and we can't miss out on more FTX shenanigans. So stay tuned. My name's Tracey, and I'm joined by my pals, Blake and Craig, as we catch up on the crypto news. Hey guys, how are you going? Very well, Trace. Back in the swing of things this week. How are you? Yeah, good. After a week off. Did you miss us, Craig? Yeah, sure. No. That convincing. was I got an extreme FOMO from the group chat photos that you were sending and the talks that you guys went to that looked like a lot of fun, and I wish I went, but maybe next year. Yeah, definitely. Definitely next year. Maybe we should just dive straight in then and talk all about the token 2049 conference, which is the largest annual digital asset events in Asia and Europe. And this year it was bringing together the leading voices and the most sensational projects in Web3. And we did. We had an awesome time. Singapore is amazing. It was my first trip to Singapore. And Blake, give us your initial impressions and what you loved about the event. Yeah, so this is probably the biggest crypto conference in Asia, really. And I think about 10 ,000 people came to the main event itself, but then there were also about 400 side events, more than you could pick, or even too many, too many, really. And really, I think it's an industry focused event. You know, there weren't that many retail investors coming along. Tickets were priced accordingly. And yeah, it was an incredible event. They brought the who's who of the crypto industry to speak, talk about where the other projects are at and what the future looks like, the state of regulation and where we are in the market cycle. And it was fascinating to be there learning and hearing about how everyone else in the industry is thinking. And there was certainly no indication of us being in a bear market. My God, no, it was money, wasn't it? It was out of control. You know, the big exchanges were, were splashing cash around. The Formula One was on at the same time. So lots of people added a bit of excitement, didn't it? Yeah, we're coming over for that. And yeah, we could probably, you know, maybe give us your high level thoughts, Trace, and then we can get into a couple of the interesting things that we learned. Yeah, look, I think it was a really vibrant atmosphere. There were some excellent speakers. I was impressed with the setup. And the event ran really smoothly trying to get 10 ,000 people in over two days. You know, you'd expect a few hiccups, but there wasn't. I thought it was pretty, it was pretty well done. You know, there was a real big emphasis on, on building. And like you said, you certainly didn't feel like you were in a bear market at all. There was just money being splashed everywhere. Lots of giveaways, you know, certainly went trying to get a bit of merch to make Craig feel jealous. Definitely got a few to pop into the chat. What about the talks, guys? Like, which one was your most impressive project, most impressive person that you saw? Yeah, there's a couple that really stood out for me. Firstly, there was a talk on stablecoins, looking at the data and the adoption rate. What was really interesting is that you're even through this bear market, the stablecoin adoption rate has is increasing as you know, the crypto prices go down and less activity happens on chain and on exchanges. And this is really pointing towards the utility of stablecoins and what they're going to mean for the future. And importantly, what was recognised in that talk was that in the US, US -based stablecoins are being used less and less and offshore and algorithmic stablecoins are being used more and more. And this is really because of the regulatory pressure in the US market. People don't want to interact with US businesses, essentially. And, you know, probably the second most interesting talk that I saw was, you know, the founders Yeah, that was my favourite. Yeah, that was interesting. I didn't think I'd love it as much as I did. But I think me and you both sat there and was like, this is really interesting. Yeah, we had the founder of Polygon, the founder of Arbitrum and the founder of ZK Sync. You can see that the ZK Sync group, probably the most technologically advanced and that's a scaling solution that uses zero knowledge protocols on top of Ethereum. And yeah, definitely the most advanced, you know, scaling solution on top of Ethereum. Secondly, your Arbitrum is very focused on research and creating a really great product that anybody could use. And of course, Polygon's focus is on business development and getting adoption from web two companies. So coming at it from three very different angles there, but all for the same purpose of increasing adoption and scalability of the layer ones. I really like that layer two talk, but much like a music festival, you had to pick who you wanted to see because they're all overlapping. There was, you know, there was a main stage upstairs, another one downstairs. There's a few different talks. I ended up stumbling into the Neo founder, do his chat, which was really interesting. I quite liked that one. And for everyone's information, Neo is a layer one blockchain that was founded in China, very much focused on, you know, being an Eastern kind of competitor to Ethereum or so on. You guys remember the Chinese Ethereum narrative and it pumped Neo like 200X? Been around for a long time. Yeah. So you just kind of, but there was a lot of stans, a lot of people, you know, shilling a lot of different things and, you know, you could kind of get lost there for a while. There was a strong push for mainstream adoption through Web3 and gaming. And I think that was on a lot of panel discussions and a lot of side events were also pushing that. I know Animoca Brands had a lot of big events as well. So I think that was a big focus also. I think we didn't get to see him, but Robbie from Immutable was over there speaking as well. Now, was there one project that you didn't hear of that sort of came across a token at the conference? Like, was there a project that you put into your watch list? Not really. Just the big dogs just reinforcing there. Yeah. Just talking about where the innovation is moving, you know. And one thing that really stood out to me is that, you know, the regulation conversation just isn't that prominent in Asia because the regulation in Asia, the regulation in Asia, there's no issues. And, you know, I think that we can easily have a US -centric point of view sometimes. But in Asia, they're ready to do business there. You know, there's lots of investment happening. There's lots of deals happening. There's lots of growth happening. And some of those stories we'll talk about in today's episode. All in all, the event was memorable one for us and worth attending for our team. And it really did reinforce, you know, our love for the industry and just how far we have all come. And so if anyone's referenced token 2049, the next event will happen in Dubai in early 2024, in April, I believe. So you can check that one out. In April? That's only like six months away. I know. I did say to Blake that I thought that was quite soon. I think they have multiple events. You know, they have them in different regions. There you go. Well, I'll go to that one for the crypto curious community. I'll fly the flag. Cheers. Now, folks, we're going to mix it up a little bit this week, and we're going to cut out our short, sharp news bites at the end, and we're going to go to a few biggest stories because, as you know, we missed our show last week. So we're going to cover off a few biggest stories, starting with Franklin Templeton, a large asset manager who has joined the race for the holy grail, the Spot Bitcoin ETF. As we've previously reported, the aim of many of these leading institutions applying for ETF is to attract large institutional investors, which could potentially bring trillions of dollars into the crypto industry. So Franklin Templeton's ETF will be based on a mix of crypto exchange Bitcoin prices to deter price manipulation. So just another big boy entering the space and solidifying the general thesis that it is inevitable that this Bitcoin Spot ETF will happen. There you go, boys. What else are we going to catch on that's happened in the last few weeks, Craig? Yeah. So last week Vitalik, the Ethereum founder, he had his Twitter or X account hacked, and he shared a malicious link, and it actually led to just under $700 ,000 that was drained from people's wallet. So it was just a scam. People connected their wallet, got drained. But it was coming from his official Twitter. Right. Okay. This was due to a SimSwap attack. Right. These big dogs, even they get hacked. So stay on it. Stay safe, everybody. Yeah, we had that story a couple of weeks ago where your people's private keys were being stolen from their password manager, which had a vulnerability. So even when you're doing best practice activities, you know, sometimes you're still not safe. Can't trust anything. All right. Next up, we have a story that came out on the 13th of September. So received FTX approval from the US bankruptcy court to sell and hedge its crypto holdings valued at $3 .4 billion. That's a lot of bloody crypto. This is when everyone was freaking out about where they were going to drop their salon. Yep. Yeah. So we talked about Galaxy Digital was engaged to help, which is a big crypto focused asset manager to help the liquidators or the administrators sell down these assets. So what they have is $1 .16 billion worth of Solana and they have $560 million in Bitcoin and the rest in other tokens. So, you know, this is a little bit concerning. I think the Bitcoin market could probably absorb, you know, the sell down of $560 million of Bitcoin over, you know, a period of time. But what's the market cap, Craig, of Solana? Well, Solana is still, you know, in the billions. Let me just fact check. They can't sell all the Solana at once or it's going to be $9 .2 million of Solana released for them to sell every month, which I think is fine. So not all the Solana will be dumped in the market, but they have an $8 billion market cap. Yeah. And Solana did take a bit of a dump. I think it dumped around 5 % off this news. It's about 20 % of 15 to 20 % of Solana's market cap. But if they're smart, they're going to do this strategically over time anyway. Yeah, well, the three biggest holdings are Solana, Bitcoin and Ethereum. And then the other ones I've got is APT, Updos, Doge, Tron, Matic, Ripple and BNB. Very minuscule amount of BNB. So, yeah, this caused a bit of a shakeout, didn't it guys? Yeah. But, you know, I'm sure that they'll work on a strategy to release those tokens back into the market over time. I will potentially suppress price, but, you know, hopefully not for too long. Next one. This has happened over the last four or five days. The SEC has gone after the Stoner Cats project. I remember this one from a few years ago and mainly for its connection with Mila Kunis and Ashton Kutcher because it was, you could buy the rights to, it was a TV show, a cartoon Stoner Cats show. I think they only produced a couple of episodes and Mila and Ashton were the voices of the Cats. I think Jane Fonda was also one of the voices. So the SEC has charged a project for conducting an unregistered NFT offering that raised $8 million and one of the arguments the SEC used was that the entire, the entity promoted the potential for its NFT prices to increase in the secondary market, similar to all NFTs. So Stoner Cats agreed to pay a $1 million penalty and to destroy all NFTs in its possession, but they did not have to admit that it was guilty of the charges. So setting precedent there, so I'm not sure if that was the best way to go for them. And the SEC, you know, are really going for different projects at the moment. This wasn't the first one in recent weeks. So one to watch here, I know Elliot from our marketing team, who you guys see sometimes on our Instagram page, sent an article around talking about the SEC going after NFT projects and Guy from the Coin Bureau also made a big statement about it recently that he's slightly concerned. What are your thoughts, Blake? Well, I think there's a big lesson here. Don't sell cryptographic assets to Americans. Stay the hell away and you'll be fine.

Tracey Blake Singapore Craig Dubai $8 Billion China $9 .2 Million Trace Asia $3 .4 Billion Coin Bureau Polygon $1 .16 Billion Zk Sync Robbie United States Jane Fonda Elliot $1 Million
A highlight from Episode 122 - Sept. 17th, 2023 - B.A.N.S

On The Rekord

07:39 min | 2 months ago

A highlight from Episode 122 - Sept. 17th, 2023 - B.A.N.S

"All right, all right, all right, all right. Welcoming you guys to another lovely episode of On The Record Podcast. I am DJ Intense, your host the most. And to the left of me, I have I am Walt. What's up, Walt? I'm about to say another word, my guy. If you guys heard earlier, you know, we were just doing some things off cameras. They're off the record. Things we don't, we're not going to bring on the record. And if we are, you're not going to get it. Unless you paid for it to Patreon. You know? Yeah, me too. That voice you hear right now, but there's no other than Ceddi said, what's up Ceddi? The infamous C -E -D. What's up people? How you doing people? I'm doing all right, I'm doing all right, man. You know, we took some time off. It was Labor Day weekend. Yeah. And then the final weekend, which is work weekend. Dude, we were work, work, work, work, work. Nonstop. Dude, I just figured they don't. Almost 90 hours of work. OT, OT. Man. One day was 20 hours of work. That's the state job. I can't wait till you quit that job. You and I both, brother. I need to make some money, but working like a slave ain't it, man? Nah. Bob Brock just said it. You think that you can get by with this hard work alone? Nah, you're fooling yourself. You're fooling yourself. Used to do that, but now you're doing that. It's a lie. It's a lie. It's a myth. All people is you do hard work, and you'll become a successor, that's all. Listen, reality is in this country, in America, you have to do a lot of grime. You gotta do a lot of collaboration. Depending on how you wanna do it, but most of the time, all those people who are billionaires and trillionaires are the ones who did the most foul -ish humanly possible to get what they're at right now in life. Listen, right now we're at over 180 days in the writer's strike and the actor's strike right now. And it could have ended this right now. This thing should have been handled already. $50 million for both unions. And now they're gonna get a loss of over $300 to $500 million because of this strike. And you have people like Drew Barrymore's punk ass. Well, she reneged on it though. She had to, because dude, she was getting the business with the WGA and the SGA. And it's separate, you know. Even... Bill Maher's bitch ass too, man, was... I didn't get the damn thing off the running. Was, oh, I don't need no writers, I'll be our show. Look, dude, your show sucks. The Seddie Swear Counter is in full effect. There you go, you have one. You can do like a ding sound from now on for my swears. I'm gonna keep it calm. I'm gonna keep it professional. Seddie the Sailor Man. I can't swish, come on. Listen, man, I'm just telling you, when Seddie get that spinach boy, man, we poppin' ice today. Oh, yeah. Little bird watch out. Now, but on some real issues, like dude, Bill Maher, the guy who said, I'm not a field n -word, I'm a house n -word, and who crapped on Stan Lee after he died and stuff, and says a bunch of other ridiculously retarded things, says he's gonna do a show. Stan Lee who? Marvel comic Stan Lee. Oh, Stan Lee, oh. That's what Bill Maher said. Yo, he be going extra heavy trying to relate to us blacks. You're a not house n -word. You're at the table, bro. You got the good chair. You got the good piece of chicken. He used to be down by the dam, but nowadays, man, it's horrible. He's just, you know, he's trying. What the legend Paul Mooney said, everybody wants to be black, so it's time to be black? Listen, you think Paul Mooney is trying to be black and competent? Hell no. I want to be in a gated community area. What's wrong with you? Like he says, everybody wants to be black. He listen to King Koon, so he know what that's about. Yeah, but Bill Maher is doing his show still, which I think it was crap with writers. It's going to be crap about writers. And then, you know, you're going to have to hire writers who are not non -union writers. We're going to be scabs. We're going to pretty much destroy their any chance of them getting actual work when the strike is done. If you get caught. Well, if you are what you say you are, then have no fear. Even if you're on YouTube and you want to get a chance of being in the industry, you can't do no reviews. No, no movie reviews, no TV show reviews, nothing. There's a strike. You doing that? You will be known and accounted for when you want to get your membership. And trust me, you don't want those problems. But my thing is, if there was already YouTubers like successful already doing movie reviews and being credible and stuff like that, that won't affect them. Is it already locked in like a partnership or whatever with certain movies? Then they could do it. As long as they get the permission from their respective union. OK. If they do something brand new, if we're coming out with The Exorcist coming out next week, they can't do no review for that at all. Oh, wow. Wah wah. Listen, I can't go into it because I want to become in that union because I want to be a voice actor. You want to sell out. I get it. So I can't speak on it at all. No, no, no. He's not selling out. No, he wants to. He wants to. No, he doesn't want to sell out. You want the Disney money. No, I want to buy in. He wants to buy in. Oh, yes. You want to buy in, you got to sell out, right? No, the license is fucking me, bro. I'm just saying. The license, the thing to get a SAG card, it's over $3 ,000 to get a SAG card. And you have to get that SAG card in order to get some work and residuals and all that stuff. That's just what it is. Listen, man, listen, Harvey Weinstein's in prison, bro. He can't get to you, my guy. He can't get to you, my guy. Listen, man, don't take that hotel meeting, bro. Am I Rose McGowan? Shoot it. It's either a Zoom call. I'm actually Judd. It's either a Zoom call or a posh Beverly Hills restaurant or a Permell Studios, wherever that super creep was out here making his rounds. But you don't got to worry about that no more. Filthy behavior. One of the girls was saying like, yeah, when I said no more hanky panky, you know. He felt a way. Yeah, you want that rolling letter to there, don't you? My guy, how could he feel a way? You've been imposing your will on these ladies for a long time. Speaking of entertainment, you had a concert this weekend, right? Yeah, yeah. I was, you know, I was like. This guy was really outside. I was like, I was like, I was like. What concert was this? I was like. Let me tell you. Go ahead, say it. I was like from the acting sheriff up north, back to back out here, you know. Yes, so for all the first time, longtime listeners, and you know, last time listening to how evidence goes, I had a couple of shows. This past Thursday, I went to an event that was sponsored by Spotify for up and coming artists. I saw three, three very, very talented artists. The main artist I went to see goes by Kamari. He's an artist that I discovered around COVID. He has a lot of like influences. He reminds me of like a Frank Ocean. He's really that, you know, artist type dude. And he put out this great, incredible album called A Brief Nirvana, which I advise everybody to check out. His name is Kamari, K -H -A -M -A -R -I. Highly recommend him. And I also saw these two other artists from the UK, St. Harrison and Elmin. That's my boy. And overall, it was a great experience, very, you know. It was at SOB, Sound of Brazil in New York City. Very intimate setting, great turnout, great energy.

Harvey Weinstein Paul Mooney Frank Ocean Ceddi Drew Barrymore Bill Maher Bob Brock WGA Disney Rose Mcgowan SGA America 20 Hours $50 Million Next Week Seddie Stan Lee UK New York City Walt
A highlight from Orange Pilling Through Sport with Steven Nelkovski & Patrick O'Sullivan

What Bitcoin Did

24:19 min | 2 months ago

A highlight from Orange Pilling Through Sport with Steven Nelkovski & Patrick O'Sullivan

"The beautiful thing about Bitcoin is if it works with baseball, it works with anything. If you think about value for value, the model, it changes everything. Right. Hello. How are you all? Hello from Lebanon. What a cool country this place is. It's really strange. As I travel around the world, sometimes I go to these places where you worry about the economic situation, you end up meeting the most amazing, incredible people, most amazing resilient people, and Lebanon is exactly that. So I cannot wait to get this film out. Anyway, welcome to the What Bitcoin Did podcast, which is brought to you by the legends at Iris Energy, the largest NASDAQ listed Bitcoin miner using 100 % renewable energy. I'm your host Peter McCormack, and today we have Perth Heat on the show. We've got CEO Stephen and chief Bitcoin officer Patrick, Patrick O 'Sullivan. I was going to try and say Stephen's name. I think it's Nelkowski, Nelkowski, I think Stephen Nelkowski. Danny, what is it? Nelkowski. We've never had Danny on an intro before. Nelkowski. Yes. CEO Stephen Nelkowski. Now I've known Stephen for quite some time. When we announced Rael Bedford, he'd already announced his Perth Heat Bitcoin project, and then I met him out in Miami. He gave me a jersey, and we've kind of been knocking back DMs on Twitter for this whole time sharing ideas, talking about what they're up to, what we're up to. There is so much alignment between the Perth Heat baseball team and what they're doing in Australia and what we're doing with Rael Bedford over in the UK. And so yeah, I've been keeping an eye on their progress, been impressed with everything they're doing. They're definitely a little bit ahead of us, but there's so much alignment between us and them. And I know not everybody loves the football side of things, but this Bitcoin and sports thing, I'm telling you, it's so important. It's important on so many levels, there's so many chances to orange pill people by meeting them where they're at. And I'm telling you, Bitcoin and sports is going to be big. So give me your feedback. Let me know what you think. I hope you enjoy the show. Absolutely loved it. Steve is a legend. Patrick is absolutely beavering away like a legend trying to get all the Bitcoin stuff going for them. I'm going to be nicking some of their ideas. Hopefully, we will have some cool ideas. They can nick as well. But yes, let me know your feedback. Let me know what you think. It's hello at whatbitcoindid .com. Welcome, brother. Good to be on. Who's your friend? This is the chief Bitcoin officer of the Perth Heat. You actually the chief Bitcoin officer? That's it. That's the title. Chief Bitcoin officer. That's all I do. That's what I'm trying to get Ben Ark to do for us. You know Ben Ark? Yes. He doesn't even like football. But he comes along. He gets the whole thing. Great role to have. Emerging role. Yeah. You saw that job ad for that Bulgarian team. Yeah. That's amazing. Yeah. We've got a call with them. Joe Hall's trying to get me to talk to them. But there's two upcoming Bitcoin football teams, young whippersnappers. The league is expanding quickly. We've had a couple of recent inquiries from teams in Europe wanting to speak about what we've done with the baseball team. But as we've said so many times on Twitter and in comments that the Bitcoin sports league is a lot closer than what most people think. There's a lot of interest. Yeah. You beat us to it. I think you beat us to it. We had a couple of weeks between us, I think. Was it that close? It was. There was a nose between, I think, the two announcements. We were early November. I think you were late November, early December, something like that. We're talking 21, aren't we? 21? 20 said? Yeah. It was 21. Because I think I announced - November 21? Yeah. I think I announced December 21. Yeah. And we took over the team in April 22. Yes. That's right. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. You just beat us. Justin. So many things have changed since then as well in so many ways. What we thought we'd be doing in two years has just dramatically changed so quickly. It's awesome. There's loads we can get into and we're going to. But let's just do a bit of background stuff just for people listening so we can build the picture of what we're doing. So, like, introduce yourself, what you do, and yourself. I know we know you're the Bitcoin officer, but like, and then just tell people about Perth Heat, who they are, and then we'll build from there. Yeah, easy. So my name's Steven. I'm the chief executive of the Perth Heat, who are Australia's most successful baseball team. We've won 15 national titles. We've had 34 players who have played Major League Baseball. We've got an exceptional relationship with the Tampa Bay Rays, who send us out six to each eight players Australian summer. And these are top end draft picks. So one of the players they sent us last season, Junior Caminero, is on the verge of playing in the big leagues right now. So they send us the best of the best in terms of their young talent. And we build a squad and we play a season in the Australian summer. We've got a history of winning. We've got a history of producing great players. We're also the Bitcoin baseball team. And it's been, yeah, it's been an incredible ride. How big is baseball in Australia? It's big. It's look, it's obviously we've got the big sports in terms of Aussie rules. You've got rugby. You've got strong national teams with the Australian cricket team. You've got the Socceroos, you've got the Matildas. So it's not a tier one sport. But in terms of the quality of the competition, if you look at the fact that Perth Heat have had 34 players who have played for the Heat and then gone on to play Major League Baseball, there's no other team or competition that could produce that sort of statistics. So if you looked at one of the football teams like the Perth Glory, they haven't had 34 players who have played in the Premier League. So it's the competition is extremely tough and would be one of the best winter leagues in the world, especially with our association with Major League Baseball. So they send players out to you to get game time. And they also scout players that you have got of your own. There's a bit of scouting. There's international scouts in every city. But the idea of sending them out to us is they will see how the players will react in a foreign environment, a different style of baseball, different time of year. How do these players go in an environment over Christmas, New Year? Some of them are coming back from injury. Some of them have had interrupted seasons. That's a good chance for some of them to also build game time. But it's a program now with Tampa. Then in the last five years, we've had five players already play Major League Baseball. Jacob Lopez was the last just a couple of weeks ago. And as I said, Junior Caminero is knocking the house down, his 27 home runs this year. It's just a phenomenal generational athlete. And what kind of crowds do you get? Yeah, they vary across the weekend. We play a series. So we'll play Friday night. We'll play two games on a Saturday. Two? Two games on a Saturday. And then we'll play another one on a Sunday. So there's four games in the space of 72 hours. And the crowd's roughly between 5 ,000 to 7 ,000 over the weekend. OK, wow. So two in a day. What kind of demands are put on the players? Well, it's different. So baseball, if you're a pitcher, the demands are extreme. Every time you throw the ball, it is logged. It is monitored. It is counted. If you're an outfield player or an infielder, one of the batters, then that's what you're built for. You're built to play every game. So all the pressure's on the pitcher? Pitchers, yeah. Good pitching will win you championships. You need a really strong pitching lineup to bring in the different times of the game. And that's the part of your lineup which you really have to monitor so carefully. Because you could start a series with a pitcher. And if he doesn't perform well, when you bring him out of the game, when you introduce someone else. And then if they don't perform well, how quickly do you run through your rotation knowing that you've got four games to get through? So there's a lot of analytics that we look at, we monitor. And as we said, that pitch count is very, very closely watched. I've been to a few baseball games. I've been to see the A's. I've been to see the Dodgers a few times. I've been to see probably your team. Yes. We went to the Yankees. Yeah, we went to the Yankees. It was too hot, wasn't it? Yeah, it was so hot. It was so hot. Our knees were burning. There's not many roofs on the stadiums, yeah? So you're sitting out in the sun, yeah, baking. But there's heat, but it was too hot. Our legs were in shorts, our legs were burning, so we just went and stood at the back and drunk beer. Then the Yankees get absolutely back. I think they were 10 down within two innings. It was like insane. Yeah, but it's a crazy game. It can be 10 down, and you can still win. My wife has now accepted that no matter how far in front we are in a game, she won't relax until that last out. You can be 6 -0 up, 8 -0 up, and you can still lose a game just like that. It's very, very different of football. In football, if you're 3 -0 up, it's effectively game over, yeah? But in baseball, a three -run lead, a four -run lead, it can change with just one pitch if a batter walks, and then suddenly things just change. It's taken a while to understand and to even get comfortable with it. When I first started in the role five years ago, baseball traditionalists would say, well, that's baseball. It's like, no, it's not. It's bad game management. But yeah, it's baseball. It happens in the big leagues. It happens in Australia, and sometimes it happens with Perth Heat. And so your wife, is that because she's got into the baseball, or she's planning for what your move's going to be like? Bit of both. She has to be into it, but I'm not a good loser at all. Yeah, I'm not probably the best person to speak to if we lose a game for a good 24 hours. After we lost the championship series, that 24 hours was probably four months. Mate, honestly, I know exactly how you feel. We lost three games last season in the league. We lost one cup game, and then we got thrown out of a cup because we played an illegible player should have been suspended, administrative error. Every single one of those, I was not good for 24 hours. I spent the next 24 hours saying, what did I do wrong to contribute to that? Even though it's the team and the manager, it's like, what could I have done more? Could we have prepared the team better? Did we not provide the right resources, or did we not get the balance of the roster correct? There's so many things that go through your mind, but yeah, I'm certainly not a good loser. Were you a Perth Heat fan before? No, with a surname like Neil Kobski, you grew up with a round ball in my household. I was a football fan from an early age. This is a true story. Before I took the role with Heat, I had not watched a baseball game from start to finish. I had not watched a full nine innings. I'd watched parts of a game, but I hadn't watched a whole game. That first year in charge was challenging because you'd be with corporate partners, and I didn't know all the rules, and something would happen during a game, and they'd ask, why did that happen? I'd scratch my head and say, I'd have to find out for you. I'm obsessed with it now. My wife loves watching players steal bases, just running from base to base or trying to steal. Then I look at my family, Grey Caritage, and they're all into it and enjoy coming to the ballpark. Most people I introduce do enjoy it because, again, it's a different sport in terms of the pace of the game. You can relax a little bit more and then sit back and enjoy the menu of the hot dogs or the crackerjack and see some home runs in the background. Well, you don't understand the sport. It's a bit like cricket, right? Most Americans, almost every American does not understand cricket. Are you trying to explain test cricket, that it's five days, two innings each, it could rain and end in a draw? Nobody understands it, but when you understand the game, you understand what brilliant test cricket is. Like my son, he watched the Ashes with me, and I had the first two tests, I was explaining how this works, why they might declare, what the follower knows, which never got used. Trying to explain the strategy of it all. And then once he understood, he got into it, and I was mentioning going to watch baseball. I said to you before we started recording, I was dating that girl in LA, so we were going to watch the Dodgers. It was a playoff season, and I must have gone to maybe five games. I went to the game, I don't know if you know the one where Justin Turner hit a walk -off home run in the playoffs. I think it was against, it might have been the Cubs, but by the way, that itself was an unreal moment. The great finish there. Unbelievable. But I had a guy who was sat with me each game explaining it to me. And one of the things I'd never known about is the whole pitcher strategy. My from assumption the little I'd watched here or there, it was just one guy all game. And if somebody came on and it was injury, I didn't realize you're strategically placing different pitchers in the game, especially towards the end of the seventh, eighth, ninth innings. I didn't know any of that. And so once you understood that, you understood the strategy. And then there's huge strategy, whether you're bringing in a left -handed pitcher to pitch to a right -handed batter, left -handed batter, or someone that can face up to a curveball better than a slider, et cetera. Explaining the game to someone in baseball is a lot easier in the ballpark. If you're watching it off the screen, it's a bit harder to pick up. If you sit in the ballpark and you've got someone that can explain the rules, you will understand it a lot quicker than watching it at home. But the strategy behind pitching is nuts. The movie Moneyball and the strategy behind the analytics is spot on. There's so much you can gain out of the numbers. And that's a big part of our relationship, even with Tampa, is the Tampa front office and what they have in terms of identifying talent and how they use it is something that is a great benefit to an organization like the Perth Heat as well. There's a whole Moneyball thing that started coming to football as well. I know specifically teams like Brentford and Brighton have used it. But they're using it in a different way. They're trying to identify talent, which they sell out. I mean, Brighton. Can you look up their sales of players? I mean, Brighton. They have a profit of 130 million pounds, was it, this summer? I mean, historically, they weren't ever a Premier League team. No. It's only in the last, what, five, six years did they become Premier League? They're now established. But the volume of players they sell and the rates they sell their players for, have they got recent sales? Yeah. Let me pull it up. It was the same with Southampton. They kind of had that strategy as well. So there we go. Okay. Caicido, 160 million euros. McAllister, you went to Liverpool, 42 million. Sanchez, 23 million. But there's more in the previous. I mean, is that just this season? Yeah, that's this season. Did you have last season as well? I don't think it was on him. What was up at the top when you scrolled to the top? That was people who had come in. Right. Okay. But this is their whole strategy. I mean, they're now talking, this guy just got a hat -trick. The other Ferguson got the hat -trick against Newcastle the other day. People are starting to talk about him. And they've managed to have this rotation of players. Even though they're selling their best players, they've got these new ones coming through and they've got like an identity, which means it's a profitable business. Luton were the same. So Luton Town managed to get back in the Premier League from going into non -league, which itself is incredible. But they had a whole strategy of bringing players through and it's part of their revenue model. Does that perform part of your actual revenue model to develop players? For Perth Heat, it's a little bit different because if we have players that we continue to develop, they'll get drafted. And the draft system works a little bit differently to football where the club doesn't take the profit. The actual transfer fee goes direct to the player. Oh, wow. It's one of the first questions our board of management asked when they took the license over. How can we develop players and on -sell them? But it doesn't work like that in baseball, unfortunately. So, yeah, we've got a great farm system of producing young Aussie talent to go and pick up minor league contracts. But there's no return there to the club, unfortunately. Were you a baseball fan before you joined? I mean, I played when I was a kid. But not much of a fan. No. No, it was strictly because of the opportunity that came up that I joined. And when did you join? When? Same time. So about a year before, when the talks happened about, well, maybe this is something that we might be able to do. And then what the details look like for making it a possibility for a team to embrace Bitcoin as much as the team has. And then suddenly realizing that it's going to be significantly more work than what it first appeared to be. Because I didn't really have a role there to begin with. I didn't have a job. I wasn't working there at all. But then sort of trying to orange pill the board after Steve got it and to show them what we could do with it. It was very much, this is the idea. This is what we think we can do with it. And their attitude was, OK, go out and prove it and show them exactly what we could do to kick things off. And then from there, it was just small win after small win. And then realizing, well, if we're going to actually do it and announce things in November about just how far down the rabbit hole we were going to go, that we couldn't just, you know, Bitcoin is not at the point now where you can just launch and say, OK, everything worked perfectly. I mean, you know, it's so hit and miss with things that will work and things that won't work. And that's integration with systems that are already in place, especially when you're talking about a business of this size. You know, it's not your micro strategy. We don't have teams and teams of lawyers or people that can look after all of the various elements. And to go all in on Bitcoin means really restructuring how you do everything. And eventually that came back to me as my sort of ability to transition and see what will work, what's going to work now, what will work in 90 days from now and what it's going to look like in 180 days from now. All of that has changed and just somewhat to stay on top of that and to help integrate it into the systems that Steve is already looking after. Yeah. So I'm going to be interested to compare and contrast what you've done to what we've done, because like we're tiny. You know, our crowds are tiny. When we take, if you want to pay with Bitcoin on a match day, we're talking a handful of transactions. You got up to 7000 people there. So that's that's an entirely different beast. What were you, sorry Steve, what were you doing before you joined? My background is media marketing, so I used to be a sports reporter on one of the commercial networks here in Australia with Channel 7. I was there 14 years as a broadcaster, used to commentate to football games. But after being a reporter for the best part of 15 years and seeing how sports organisations run, that's where the real appetite for running a sports organisation came in and wanting to win championships. So I went and worked for a local football team, which is the Perth Glory, who play in the A -League. I was in a media marketing role there for a few years. Is that where Robbie Fowler played? He did the great man. God. Yeah. He used to come over to Mum's house every week for dinner. Shut up. Yeah. Are you serious? A gentleman. One of the most beautiful men. Yeah. We're always on the text to each other. He's a... You're friends with Robbie Fowler? Yeah. There we go. You're in. I want an interview with him. He's one of my childhood heroes. Oh wow. Yeah. And you know what? He's just a lad. He's just brilliant. He came and played for the organisation. And yeah, it was Monday night's dinner at Mum's house. He loved the Greek food, so we kept to a winning formula. That's unbelievable. Do you know the song the Liverpool fans sing about him? About we all live in a Robbie Fowler house. Do you know about this? I don't know. So Robbie Fowler is one of the footballers who was very smart with his money. He just bought just properties all over Liverpool constantly. And see, he's got this huge property portfolio in Liverpool. And so the Liverpool fans sing, we all live in a Robbie Fowler house. Yeah. He's a... He's God. He's God. He's just an awesome guy. Good fun to hang out with. And yeah, made so much time for the people of Perth. We had a great year together. And he's also very cheeky as well. There was a time where we weren't performing too well. We'd lost, I think, five games on the trot. And it was the time that Wayne Rooney was having a whole heap of issues with Manchester United. And we were about to do this live TV cross for Channel 7. And we knew the chairman wasn't too happy at the time. So I said, we've just got to try and deflect here. And Robbie had been in the UK for a week. And the presenter said, so Robbie, what was the trip to the UK all about? And he said, it was to chat to Wayne. And my phone had been, the media marketing guy just blew up, Fleet Street just went mad with this. It was just an off -the -cuff joke that we were trying to sign Wayne Rooney. And it was just everywhere within hours and we had to put out a press release and it was great because it deflected off the five losses that we'd had, but it was just a bit of a piss take. What was his scoring record like at Perth? Look, it wasn't as good as what it was at Liverpool. We would have been nice for him to score a few more goals, but the team struggled a little bit that year. And I think he ended up maybe with a dozen goals from memory somewhere around there. But it was a good year. And then again, I remember him taking out a little urn when England won the Ashes out before a game. And he put it up on his head and there was photos of it. He's just a great prankster in a lot of ways. He's an awesome person to have in your change room. And yeah, I'm really happy to call him a friend. So I went down the Robbie Fowler rabbit hole with my son the other week because, did you watch the Liverpool Newcastle game the other week? No, I missed it. Right. So I said to my son that there were two games when I was a kid when Liverpool played Newcastle. There were four, three consecutive years. The first one was a back and forth. I think Liverpool went 1 -0 up, then Newcastle went 2 -1 up, then Liverpool got it back to 2. Then they went 3 -2 up, then 3 -0. Liverpool went 4 -3. Stan Collimore in the 90th minute. It's an unreal game. And then a year later, Liverpool went 3 -0 up, Newcastle got it back to 3 -0. And then in the last minute, Robbie Fowler scores ahead of this flying header to go 4 -3. And so I then just had to explain Robbie Fowler to my son, why everyone said he was God. And we went down this kind of rabbit hole of Robbie Fowler goals. I was always really sad, though, because when he left Liverpool, I'm trying to remember, was it Leeds and Man City he went to? Did play both, yeah. Yeah, and I just couldn't accept him, not in a Liverpool shirt. Not in a Liverpool shirt, yeah. It didn't make sense to me. No, iconic to that club, and yeah. Absolute legend. Sorry, there's a bit of a tangent. OK, so going from commentator to chief exec, that's quite a jump. Did you have to kind of prove yourself you were capable? Did you have to pitch yourself for it? Look, I did the four years at Perth Glory in a media marketing role. I then stepped outside of sport for the first time in my career and just did some sales, what they called home and land packages here in Australia, selling some land in the house with it, and quickly went into a management role there with one of the companies. And then the opportunity came with the heat, and I was given the chance to run my first club, which was good because at the time I'd just started as president of a football club as well. So the management position was quite similar. I've run both roles now for the last five years, which has been brilliant. What is the mandate for the chief exec? How does it compare to, say, a chairman in a football team? Just look, every club's structure can be a little bit different, so yeah, a chairman for us is one of the shareholders, majority shareholder of our club, so he's who I report to. I've got the day -to -day running of the organisation, and I report to our chairman. What are the main things that you're responsible for the team in ensuring they've got the resources they need? Everything, yeah. Everything, yeah. I run the organisation. So it's basically probably almost identical to my role. Correct. Yeah, absolutely. Bigger numbers. Yeah, there's bigger numbers, but I don't think it really matters, and there's probably a good contrast with a football club. Whether you've got 10 members, 100 members, 1 ,000 members, a million members, the communication is still the same. You still treat your members the same way, regardless of how many zeros are involved. It's the same if you do a social media post, whether your club's only got 50 members or 50 ,000, you're still putting out information. So in some ways, don't get scared by the numbers. It's treat the position with respect and your members and partners, et cetera. Again, corporate partners, regardless of what the partnership value is, they're a corporate partner.

Neil Kobski Steve Robbie Fowler Justin Justin Turner Jacob Lopez December 21 Wayne Steven April 22 Robbie November 21 Peter Mccormack Australia Ben Ark Mcallister Stan Collimore 10 Members 34 Players 100 Members
A highlight from Marriage as Ministry Power

Timothy Keller Sermons Podcast by Gospel in Life

02:14 min | 3 months ago

A highlight from Marriage as Ministry Power

"Welcome to Gospel in Life. The power of marriage is that it is a reflection of the gospel. Today Tim Keller explores how marriage can help us more deeply understand Christ's love for us and how Christ's love for us can completely transform our marriages. We are preaching a little sermon series on marriage, and we did Immortal, Invisible, God Only Wise at our wedding. That was our hymn. On the way in, on the way out, it was Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen. So anyway, but on the way in, we sang Immortal, oh, a stan, Immortal, Invisible, God Only Wise. So, as you know, we're going through the book of Ephesians, and instead of really a series of sermons, I don't know when I started these, but instead of a series of sermons on Ephesians, what it really is, is a series of series on Ephesians, because when you get to a particular set of verses and you see it's on a new subject, and what we try to do is, it's something we're not doing, obviously, in the morning services, because the morning services have a slightly different focus. What I'm doing is I'm trying to show you, when you take a look at a small number of verses on a subject, that there's a tremendous amount that can be drawn out of there. So we try to go through in a more, not a totally, but a more comprehensive and exhaustive way, looking at that subject. Now, we come to the classic, maybe the locus classicus, the classic passage in the whole Bible on marriage. It's Ephesians chapter 5, and I'm going to start reading from verses 21 down to verse 32. It's maybe the most famous, it's certainly probably the longest, and the meatiest passage there is in the Scripture on how God understands marriage. We're going to read that, and tonight we will kind of give an overview of some basic principles, as we often do when we begin, and then we're going to go to the Lord's table and ask Him to meet with us. And you don't have to worry about covering all the territory on the first night, because as you know, I never, ever do. Let's take a look at Ephesians 5, though, and I'll read verses 21 to 32.

Tim Keller Tonight Bible Today Christ Ephesians 32 Nobody Knows The Trouble I've Ephesians 5 Chapter 5 First Night Verses 21 God Only Wise Only Verse 32 Invisible Immortal Stan
Karine Jean-Pierre Wakes up at 4:30 to Give No Answers

The Dan Bongino Show

01:23 min | 3 months ago

Karine Jean-Pierre Wakes up at 4:30 to Give No Answers

"That Jim sent over. Corinne Jean -Pierre says she gets up at 4 30 every morning to prepare for to prepare for what to refer you to the DOJ to refer you to Hunter Biden to say it's a complicated question she doesn't have an answer for to tell you she'll check on it get back to you later to tell you that that's that's not an issue she's going to address from the podium i'm not going to discuss it what what is is what is she ever has Corinne Jean -Pierre ever given a substantive answer from the podium ever has has there no i'm serious like Kaylee did Sarah Huckabee Sanders did even Saki it may but you not may have agreed with the substance but it's been an answer right has Corinne Jean -Pierre ever said something at the brady press room bob stan podium we were like oh okay i get it now ever she is the single worst press secretary easily in the history of the united states there's not even a close second there have been some embarrassing messes up there but no one nobody is genuinely awful as her jim can you just play this for me again cut four please and and keep in mind she calls you to check this out you know that is something i can get into a political she don't do i do hyper theoreticals i mean she gets up at four thirty

JIM Corinne Jean -Pierre Kaylee Saki Hunter Biden 4 30 Sarah Huckabee Sanders DOJ Single Every Morning United States Four Thirty
A highlight from 653:SEC Targets NFTs, GOPs Fed Showdown & Argentinas BTC Adoption Race

The Crypto Overnighter

04:48 min | 3 months ago

A highlight from 653:SEC Targets NFTs, GOPs Fed Showdown & Argentinas BTC Adoption Race

"Rockstar Energy punched, bringing a bold and unapologetic flavor packed with energy through a blend of B vitamins, corona extract, and 240 milligrams of caffeine to fuel what's next. Rockstar Energy drink. Good evening and welcome to the Crypto Overnight -er. I'm Nickademus and I will be your host as we take a look at the latest cryptocurrency news and analysis. So sit back, relax, and let's get started. And remember, none of this is financial advice. And it's 10 p .m. Pacific on Tuesday, August 29th, 2023. Welcome back to the Crypto Overnight -er, where we have no sponsors, no hidden agendas, and no BS. But we do have the news, so let's talk about that. Tonight we delve into the SEC's latest crackdown on NFTs, what it means for the future of non -fungible tokens. We'll also examine the legal quagmire that Stan Bankman Fried finds himself entangled in. On the political front, the GOP is locking horns with the Federal Reserve over crypto regulations. We'll unpack that. Minances navigating a complex regulatory landscape across nations will break down their latest maneuvers. Then, we'll discuss Digital Currency Group's big Genesis deal and what that means for the broader crypto ecosystem. And finally, we'll contrast Bitcoin adoption in El Salvador and Argentina. Two countries, two different stories. Buckle up. We've got a packed show tonight. The Securities Exchange Commission made a landmark move. Impact Theory is a LA -based media company. The SEC has charged Impact Theory with some serious offenses. The company raised about $30 million. How? By offering NFTs. The non -fungible tokens were divided into three tiers and given fancy names like legendary, heroic, and relentless. Impact Theory told buyers that owning these NFTs was akin to investing in the company. If the company hit it big, so would the NFT holders. The SEC wasn't buying it. They said these NFTs are actually investment contracts. That makes them securities under the law, and securities have to be registered. Impact Theory hadn't done that, so they were in violation of federal laws. The company didn't fight the SEC's charges. Instead, they agreed to a cease and desist order. They'll be paying a hefty sum, too. Over $6 .1 million in penalties and other charges. To make things right with the buyers, a fair fund will be set up. This fund will repay the affected investors. Also, the founders' keys to NFTs that Impact Theory controls will be nullified. Now, what's critical to understand is the broader picture this paints. This isn't just a one -off penalty. By its very nature, it's a precedent. The SEC's actions against Impact Theory signal a more aggressive stance regarding the NFT market. Antonia Apps, who's in charge of the SEC's New York office, was clear. Any offering of securities has to be registered. No exceptions. Either way, this case is a wake -up call for the NFT world. There are many other projects out there offering NFTs as a form of a company share. This could make them the SEC's next targets. This case sets a precedent. It's likely the first of many actions against NFT projects. But not everyone at the SEC is singing the same tune. Commissioners Hester Pierce and Mark Yayeda have publicly disagreed with this action. They question the SEC's application of the Howey analysis to NFTs, suggesting the commission may be jumping the gun. Moreover, it's important to consider the ripple effect of this case on the broader crypto landscape. The SEC's move has triggered responses from the crypto community. Many are concerned that it could stifle innovation in the NFT space, adding another layer of uncertainty to an already turbulent market. The SEC's actions could be a double -edged sword. On the one hand, it aims to protect investors. On the other, it could hamper the growth of a nascent industry. The crypto community is alarmed. They see this as an overreach by the SEC. It could deter creators from launching new NFT projects. The lack of clear rules adds to the confusion, leaving the community in a state of uncertainty. In the end, the SEC's actions against impact theory is a pivotal event. It ignited a debate that's far from over. The dissent by Commissioners Pierce and Ayeda also fuels this debate. It questions the SEC's readiness to regulate the complex world of NFTs. The SEC's actions and subsequent dissent among its own ranks reveal that we are in the early stages of defining what NFTs are in the eyes of the law. This is a story that's still unfolding, and one that could have far -reaching consequences for the crypto world, for better or worse. If you think the SEC is only zooming in on NFTs, think again. Let's pivot to another legal maze. Sam Bankman -Fried is in hot water, so don't forget to hit that follow button to stay updated on these unfolding dramas.

Mark Yayeda El Salvador Argentina 240 Milligrams Two Countries Over $6 .1 Million SEC About $30 Million Three Tiers Stan Bankman Fried New York Digital Currency Group Federal Reserve First Pierce Two Different Stories Securities Exchange Commission Sam Bankman -Fried GOP LA
A highlight from WSJ Says Binance Facing Trouble Over Sanctions Violations

The Breakdown

14:31 min | 3 months ago

A highlight from WSJ Says Binance Facing Trouble Over Sanctions Violations

"Welcome back to The Breakdown with me, NLW. It's a daily podcast on macro, Bitcoin, and the big picture power shifts remaking our world. What's going on, guys? It is Wednesday, August 23rd, and today we are catching up with all the latest intrigue around Binance. Before we get into that, however, if you are enjoying The Breakdown, please go subscribe to it, give it a rating, give it a review, or if you want to dive deeper into the conversation, come join us on the Breakers Discord. You can find a link in the show notes or go to bit .ly slash breakdown pod. Hello friends, welcome back to The Breakdown. When we survey the landscape, the wreckage, some might say, of this industry after the last year or year and a half, it is pretty clear what the biggest hanging chad or threat left is. One might argue that there's still contentiousness around DCG and whether it will be able to successfully get itself out of this Genesis situation. There's obviously a lot of jawboning about that and recriminations flying back and forth between Barry and the Winklevosses, but the bigger threat, at least that most people identify, or perhaps not threat but concern, is whether Binance is really doing as okay as they say they are. CZ has been quick to wipe away story after story with his customary four, indicating that everything is just FUD, and it is certainly the case that there has been an extraordinary amount of leakage from various US government offices around their investigations into Binance in ways that have led some to assume that they don't actually have the goods on Binance and so are just trying to try them in the court of public opinion. This week we got even more of all of that when on Tuesday, the Wall Street Journal reported that Binance is still facilitating large amounts of Russian transactions, raising the question of whether the exchange is flouting Western sanctions. The article claimed that, quote, via layers of intermediaries, clients can turn funds at sanctioned banks into balances at Binance, while Binance also enables peer -to -peer trades of rubles for digital tokens that frequently involve banks that are on Western blacklists. A spokesperson for Binance said, Binance follows the global sanctions rules and enforces sanctions on people, organizations, entities, and countries that have been blacklisted by the international community, denying such actors access to the Binance platform. They added that in operating their peer -to -peer service, Binance has, quote, no relationship with any banks whatsoever, in Russia or elsewhere. Now, of course, US sanctions have not been imposed on Russian citizens generally. However, most of the Russian banking and financial system is subject to sanctions, which prohibit US citizens and firms from dealing with them. The EU and other US allies have similar levels of sanctions in place. In October, the EU tightened restrictions on crypto transfers to Russian wallets, removing a 10 ,000 euro limit to prohibit crypto transactions to Russian residents and entities entirely. The claim made by the WSJ is that Binance is facilitating international transactions for Russian citizens who have been cut off from the global financial system through their peer -to -peer platform. According to the Bank of Russia, around $428 million in peer -to -peer crypto transactions are taking place each month. The reporting claimed that there are hundreds of active peer -to -peer sellers willing to buy and sell rubles for crypto with a significant market for Tether. The main centralized exchange is also seeing significant volume in rubles. Volume is massively down from its peak of $80 billion per month in May of last year, but still processed $8 billion in ruble to crypto trades in July according to data from CC Data. Tatian Maksimenko, a Russian businesswoman who formerly worked at a crypto exchange, said, Now, according to a recent review of Binance's peer -to -peer services, as reported by the Wall Street Journal, the platform allows Russian clients to receive payment at at least five sanctioned Russian banks. Crypto sellers on the platform provide payment details to Binance, who allegedly disbursed funds out of escrow after the on -chain transaction has been completed. The article raised further concerns that payment provider Advanced Cash continues to facilitate ruble -denominated transactions with Binance through additional intermediaries. The Belize registered payments provider said it had severed ties with sanctioned Russian banks in March of 2022. However, its website provides links to, quote, Now, of course, the report comes after months of speculation that the DOJ is investigating Binance for money laundering and sanctions evasion, but to date, no charges have been filed and it's unclear whether any charges will be forthcoming. The reaction from the crypto community is basically one of, if this is true, it's a big deal. Investor Adam Cochrane writes, Can you imagine the sheer level of chaos if Binance is hit with OFAC violations? Like how do they deal with that seizure? If they blacklist the hot wallet, then your deposits are effed would be way worse than any regular DOJ action. Travis Kling writes, Sheesh, $428 million per month of P2P ruble to crypto, $8 billion per month of ruble to crypto trading on the main exchange. If you think the US government isn't going to drop the hammer hard on that kind of scale of sanctions violations, you've lost your mind. Now, as with basically every story that we've had on Binance this year, there are two possible explanations. One is, though, where there's smoke, there's fire. And these things are leaking out because there's just so much to leak out that it's coming out of all sides and that we're still just in the period before some action comes. The other possibility, however, is, as some have claimed, that because the DOJ or OFAC or whomever don't actually have a good enough case to bring charges, they're instead trying Binance in the court of public opinion and in so doing feeding sourcing for these types of articles. I don't know what the case is, and I think everyone is right, especially after the last 18 months, to be extraordinarily skeptical. A default position at this point in crypto of assuming there's fire where there's smoke is definitely sensible. But we're coming up on a year now of rumors of DOJ or criminal action. We still haven't seen anything yet. So I guess for now, we just have to wait until the next article comes out with all sorts of its accusations, just so that CZ can say four. The people who are concerned can say they are concerned. The people who are Binance stans can just say four as well. And we're right back to the beginning where we started. Now elsewhere in the Binance empire, some customers are reporting difficulties withdrawing euros. In response to a user complaint on Sunday, the Binance help desk responded that, quote, we have temporarily suspended euro withdrawals and deposits via SIPA. SIPA is the Single Euro Payments Area Network, a bank transfer protocol similar to ACH. Now Binance later deleted and revised this public statement, stating that the SIPA deposit and withdrawal service will continue until September 25th, as originally communicated. The customer service message was sent in error. We apologize for the inconvenience, and we will have alternatives for our users in place before then, so stay tuned. Making their feelings known, the user experiencing the problem simply replied, lies. The issue comes a few months after Binance informed users that its European banking partner PaySafe would be discontinuing services on September 25th. A Binance spokesperson addressing the specific users issue said, some users may occasionally be asked for more information as part of routine compliance checks, which could lead to early closure of their accounts. They said that Binance will have alternatives for our users in place before the end of the SIPA service. Now, trouble processing euro payments comes just a few days after news broke that Binance were also being cut off by London -based credit card processing company Checkout .com. Binance were the single largest customer for the payments firm. Forbes reporting cited letters sent in early August, which cited concerns over anti -money laundering, sanctions, and compliance controls at Binance. The letters said termination of service would occur on August 17th, and a Binance spokesperson said that the exchange disagreed with the reasoning for the cutoff, but stated that it would have, quote, no impact on our services. Finally, making everything so much the worse for Binance, their native token BNB has been on a renewed slide. The token reached a low of $204 on Tuesday, but has since recovered and is now trading at around $217 as of Wednesday afternoon. Tuesday's level was BNB's lowest point since June of last year and represented a 14 % drawdown in under a week. Part of the downwards pressure on BNB relates to a massive $150 million loan on Binance smart chain lending platform Venus Protocol. The position was opened up by a hacker in October of last year. After exploiting a cross -chain bridge to mint a half a billion dollars worth of BNB, the hacker took a loan against some of the fraudulently created funds, presumably as an exit strategy with no intention to ever repay the debt. In November, a governance vote was taken on how to avoid a massive impairment accumulating on Venus Protocol. The BNB core team proposed becoming the sole liquidator of the position to ensure they could prevent any liquidation cascades. On Thursday night, the liquidation began with $33 million worth of BNB cleared to shore up the loan. Venus Protocol tweeted out that the account was quote, made healthy, but there's still another $126 million in outstanding debt sitting on the Venus Protocol waiting to be liquidated if the BNB price continues to fall. Now, summing up all of the chaos, Travis Kling, who it should be noted is warning, and intentionally so about Binance after being caught up in the FTX collapse, tweeted, Pretty wild price action in BNB. Not sure what's going on. It's almost as if Binance was sued by the SEC on numerous charges with damning evidence, Was sued by the CFTC on numerous charges with damning evidence. Had three senior executives quit in the same week? Had a billion -dollar -plus collateral hole in Binance peg BUSD? Had Paxos forced them to wind down BUSD? Got kicked out of Canada, Germany, Netherlands and Belgium? About to be charged by the DOJ's strong evidence of massive money laundering, terrorist financing and sanctions violations? Under investigation in France for aggravated money laundering? Had their auditor quit and remove attestation? Lost multiple banking partners and payment processors can't process fiat in most countries? Had Binance US effectively closed? Laid off thousands of employees? Cut benefits for remaining employees? Dot dot dot. Oh. Wait. Like I said, I don't know what the truth is. The fog of war is thick. But a default position of defensiveness, and assuming that things are as bad or worse than they seem, is probably the safest approach right now. Speaking of things being as bad or worse as they seem, let's close on a quick Sam update. Sam Bankman -Fried has pleaded not guilty to a superseding indictment. Prosecutors formally presented the indictment during an arraignment hearing before a magistrate judge. The fraud and money laundering charges remain the same, but the campaign finance charge has been dropped. The details of campaign finance violations will be folded in as evidence for the remaining charges. Prosecutors said they were required to drop the campaign finance charge due to complications with their extradition arrangement with the Bahamas government. This was Sam's first appearance in court since he was remanded to jail earlier this month. The judge has not yet dealt with Sam's request to be released to prepare his defense at the However, Sam was allowed to meet with his lawyers on Tuesday until 3 p .m. when he was transported back to the Brooklyn Metropolitan Detention Center. During Tuesday's hearing, the issue of Sam's inability to review documents due to a lack of internet was raised, with his lawyer stating, Prosecutors noted that the matter had already been briefed to the judge overseeing the case. The magistrate responded to Sam's lawyer by noting that, Sam's lawyers also bemoaned conditions at the jail. He said that Sam had been denied vegan food options and stated that, The lawyer also noted that in the past 11 days of confinement, the jail has not provided Sam with Adderall, a drug for treating ADHD, and according to his lawyer, Sam is also running low on his supply of MSAM, which is a depression treatment. Prosecutors quibbled over the suitability of the jail conditions to enable Sam to prepare his case ahead of an October 2nd trial date, with ultimately the magistrate saying they would look into the issues once the hearing was adjourned, hoping to resolve them that day. Sam is still yet to provide details of legal advice regarding his conduct at FTX, despite prosecutor requests. He is seeking to rely on this as an advice of counsel defense. The judge set a deadline of documentation of this advice to be submitted by Wednesday. Now also the night before the arraignment, prosecutors and Sam's lawyers submitted competing sets of jury instructions for trial. The DOJ's document laid out the basis for each charge in detail and explained the difference between substantive crimes and crimes of conspiracy. Prosecutors outlined what jurors would need to determine if they decide to convict, specifically that there was a scheme to defraud, that Sam knowingly and willfully participated, and that the defendant used interstate wires to conduct the scheme which includes the internet. SPF's filing suggested that he may argue that he had an honest belief that use of customer funds was not unlawful. The filing suggests that his behavior amounted to honest mistakes in judgment and errors of management rather than crimes. It leaned heavily on the idea that unregulated crypto firms are in something of a gray area. Sam's filing said, If Mr. Bankman -Friede acted in good faith with respect to the use of FTX customer funds and with the belief that as a business matter FTX would be able to cover all customer withdrawal requests, he did not act with specific intent to defraud. It is also not relevant whether you believe certain conduct should have been regulated even though it was not regulated at the time. Now to put it mildly, the community does not have a lot of sympathy. However somewhat more sympathy is being extended for Nate Chastain, OpenSea's former head of product who was convicted of fraud and money laundering in May and has now been sentenced to three months in prison for insider trading. Chastain was responsible for deciding which NFT collections would be featured prominently on OpenSea's homepage. The scheme involved him purchasing NFTs ahead of them being featured on the website. All told, Chastain was accused of making over $50 ,000 in profits from this scheme across dozens of trades in 2021. At the time of his arrest, authorities referred to this case as the first ever insider trading scheme involving digital assets. Chastain's lawyers argued that the case should be dismissed because NFTs are not securities and Chastain leveraged information that was not confidential. The judge however was unconvinced and allowed the case to proceed to a jury trial in May, ultimately ending in his conviction. In addition to the three months behind bars, Chastain has been ordered to serve three months of home detention, to conduct 200 hours of community service, to pay fines of $50 ,200 and to surrender 15 .98 ETH, the spoils of his crime. US Attorney Damian Williams said, Nathaniel Chastain faced justice today for violating the trust that his employer placed in him by using OpenSea's confidential information for his own profit. Today's sentence should serve as a warning to other corporate insiders that insider trading in any marketplace will not be tolerated. So there you have it friends, that's the update from here. Another set of dreary but important events as we try to close the door on the last chapter of this industry and move to something hopefully a little bit better. Thanks for listening as always and until tomorrow, be safe and take care of each other.

Tatian Maksimenko Nathaniel Chastain August 17Th Travis Kling March Of 2022 Wednesday Adam Cochrane July October Cftc Thursday Night Sunday October 2Nd November Wednesday, August 23Rd Wednesday Afternoon Sam Bankman -Fried 2021 $8 Billion Tuesday
A highlight from MONEY REIMAGINED: A Rant | The Labyrinth of Digital Feudalisms Grip and the Quest for Intentionality

CoinDesk Podcast Network

29:22 min | 3 months ago

A highlight from MONEY REIMAGINED: A Rant | The Labyrinth of Digital Feudalisms Grip and the Quest for Intentionality

"You're listening to Coindesk's Money Reimagined with Michael Casey and Sheila Warren. Hello and welcome to Money Reimagined. I'm Michael Casey. This week, it's Sheila and I just doing what we do from time to time just to sort of do a bit of a roundup of what's going on and like get in each other's heads a bit. We are, of course, available. We can listen to us weekly on the Coindesk Podcast Network or wherever you get your podcasts. And if you've enjoyed this episode or any of our episodes, we would really like to hear from you. If you didn't like our episode, you could also talk to us and you could email us to do so at podcasts .coindesk .com with the subject line of Money Reimagined. As always, there's just lots going on, Sheila. Maybe we can talk a little bit later about the ongoing saga that is Sam Bankman free. He's in jail now, of course, but he's now pled not guilty to his latest indictment. We had some news of Coinbase acquiring a stake in Circle, which has got people intrigued. Markets aren't looking so great. A bit of a weird, wild collapse in Bitcoin. And that's, obviously, a determinant of all sorts of other things. But look, you came on, I don't know, saw text messages from me before we started this. You were obviously in a bit of a mood, a bit angry about a few things. You just want to rant about a few things. And you talked about comparing the United States to Japan and maybe the regulatory framework in each country. I thought we can get you under that. But it got me thinking that maybe we should, and if we do these two -way things, the one -on -ones, that we should just have a section just called Sheila's Rant. And I'm trying to think about what - The Rant of the Week. The Rant of the Week. The Rant of the Week. There's always something to rant about. I could just like a now. I could bring a now BBC voice. It's time for Sheila Warren's rant. Sheila, rant away. She's like, over to you. Over to you. Please rant away, Sheila. But your rant, actually, I thought you were going to rant about, you know, the US v Japan. I was. But then you joined us and you started talking about problems with your Google connection on things that was actually undermining your ability to actually do things, which got me thinking that this is a perfectly good rant because it is a way to speak about the whole dependency on centralized platforms. Yes. Yeah. Let me let me just walk our listeners through the last hour of my life. So I have a new laptop. Yay me. Hooray. That's very exciting. And I was trying to do what I thought would be a fairly simple task of pairing my Bluetooth mouse with my new laptop, which you would think would just be a very simple click a couple of times and things are done. No, apparently not. So in the course of this, I restarted my laptop and now I don't have access to Google Chrome. I literally cannot use Google Chrome. I can't download it unless it comes from someplace, whatever this that bottom line is without Google Chrome. What the realization I was late to our recording today because without Google Chrome on my machine, I have to use my laptop, not my phone, because I have a mic and I have to plug it in whatever for a variety of reasons. I'm dependent on my laptop for our particular from any reimagined to record this podcast and between Apple and Google and their willingness to interface in some ways and not others, etc. And then throw in Zoom, which is where we do our recordings for the podcast. I wasn't able to access my Zoom account. So then I had to like back into my Zoom in a different way. And then I had to like reset a password. It was just like, you've got to be kidding me with this. But all of that, I think, Michael, just it's just emblematic of the problem that I think we talk about, even not as pointedly as this, but more generally on this show, which is we are beholden in ways we don't even realize. Like I'm at a point now where, thank goodness, I've got people on the back end working on figuring out how to get me Chrome. Yeah, you've got an army of people trying to. Well, I wish I had one person, but regardless, I've got someone helping me with this and it's going to figure it out on our IT support side. But without access to Chrome, I basically can't really do my job unless I'm on my phone, in which case if I work on my phone for too long, I'm just going to like lose my eyesight, which is a whole other issue. You know, it's just it's just we're beholden in ways we don't even understand, because when these things function, the point is that when these things function, we don't even realize how connected they are. I don't know that I deliberately set my Zoom account up to run through Google, but at some point I did that or someone did it for me is probably more likely what happened, to be very honest. But regardless, the whole thing just kind of falls apart. And yes, you can very deliberately choose. I'm very conscious about data person, right? I mean, we've talked about this many times. So I do tend to use different kinds of browsers for other things, this and that. But when it comes to kind of hyper efficient work product oriented things, like we just default to the big platforms because everyone else is on there. It's a lot easier. You can make different kinds of connections. We work in Google Docs, whatever it is, right? If those things don't function, the integrations are somewhat default. And if those don't function, your productivity takes a massive hit. But your ability, I think, to engage is really complicated. So this isn't so much about data capture and control. It's about the ability to actually engage online, engage digitally in a meaningful way, which is is not it's just it's so beholden to these gigantic entities. And I find that today I find it deeply irritating and annoying and frustrating. I want to throw my machine out the window. But as a general matter, it's highly problematic. Well, the two are related, right? Like it's not just that there's data capture going on. It's that they create such a level of dependency. Yes. And such an integration of all these other elements of your life that the data is all the more rich from their point of view and therefore valuable from their point of view. Right. So, I mean, it is all related. But yeah, there is this convenience of the network effect of everything tied together. The one that I often think about lately is what's happened to email. So we often talk about how, oh, at least email, right? SMTP, it's this independent protocol. And you can send an email to anybody on any email server anywhere. And then whatever client you're using, you're fine, right? Well, I'm not so sure about that anymore because everybody has Gmail, right? So many corporate accounts are now just Gmail accounts. It is so big that Gmail's spam filtering system will, if you happen to be from a smaller server, I mean, there's not really not many left. People have ProtonMail for privacy and there's a few Yahoo and a few others that are still there. But any of the little guys, any independent email provider, you're going to be interpreted by Gmail's spam server as spam and just pushed out into the... You're not going to get your stuff read because you're not using... So there's this backdoor way in which Google has created control of what we thought was at least an architecturally far more decentralized system. And that is problematic in addition to all of the other ways in which Google just sits there in the middle of our lives. When you're using Waze in your car, it's Google. If you've got Google Home, it's Google. And of course, we can say the same about Amazon with Alexa and Prime and AWS and everything else, but this is the reality. We've built these dependencies. In fact, as anybody who listened to last week's episode will now know, I'm actually in the middle of writing a book with Frank McCourt, as I said then. More information will come about what it's really going to be about, but maybe it's going to come out in a drip form because I'll just offer this little tidbit. I mean, I'm just in the process of working on a chapter to try to give it a little bit more context to what we mean in the book by this concept of being a subject or a vassal in a new modern form of feudalism, as opposed to being a citizen in a kind of a republic and a democracy. Given that our information system is fundamental to who we are as a society, like it's critical to democracy, it's critical to a free market. If that information system is so controlled by these powerful platforms and that they are using that data to then actually feed back on you to direct you to what to read and what to say and how to behave and all that behavior modification stuff, which by now is very well documented, by the way, then in effect, we've lost agency. We've lost our citizenship, right? So this goes into digital feudalism. And I think one of the ways to describe it is this, right? It's the same way that like, oh, you can't actually go to this part of the country unless the king lets you go there or this dependency on the say so of some powerful lord is very similar to, I think, what we're at here right now. And that's a cause for great concern. I completely agree. And I think what's really even more disturbing about it is unlike physical feudalism, right, where there are boundaries and markers and you physically could not cross. Here, it's very invisible. And so to your point about Gmail's ubiquity, I think most people know this, but I don't think people really realize that your domain name does not say anything about the corporate master behind the email account, right? So most companies, to your point in tech, do use a Google interface. And so they have their own domain name of their own company. It's going to be whatever .com or whatever .org or whatever it is. But that's all run on the back end by Google. It's a Google account. It's all a Google workspace. And that's very common in tech. And unless you're a competitor of Google, in which case you have your own interface that you're using, right? Microsoft being a great example of this. But regardless, I mean, there is almost complete capture of many parts of the ecosystem through that functionality, not to mention servers. AWS servers come up with some regularity. But the idea is that most companies are back ended into an AWS server. AWS is actually a bigger portion of Amazon's profit than Amazon, than the brick and mortar kind of the retail facing part. And you can imagine, given how often the frequency of how people use amazon .com to buy things, you can imagine if that's like a drop in the bucket compared to what AWS is making in terms of gross profit. It's pretty wild to think about that. But our entire digital infrastructure is really dependent in ways that when they break down, it's like, you have a day like I'm having today, it's really abundantly in your face and obvious how problematic that is. When it functions well, it's something that is pretty invisible in ways that I think regular feudalism, if you will, was pretty in people's faces. It was a pretty obvious system. This is invisible to a lot of people. You don't think about it until it breaks down. And when it breaks down, you're just annoyed about it and you're frustrated because you can't, like I'm a person who's incapable of not contextualizing things. But I think most people in my position today would just be very irritated and want to just fix it and move on without the reflection necessarily on what it means, right? Right. We were talking before about how this is actually very different from, say, a regular tool breaking down, right? This is not just getting a flat tire on your car and being annoyed with that. But I think most people will see it that way. They'll just go, oh, damn it. Yeah, it's a temporary problem. The dishwasher's got some problem with the detergent rinsing function and that's it, right? But no, it's actually a very clear reflection of the dependencies that we're talking about. I'm glad you mentioned Amazon because we should recognize this is not just one company, there are a few of them that have these particularly powerful roles. But I'm going to go back to Google because I was thinking as you were saying this, one of the ones that, like back in January, of course, there was the ruling from the Department of Justice that sued Google successfully for monopolizing digital advertising technologies. Right. And like, yes, now there's been a response to that, thankfully. But it's just the very fact that we've managed to create this system, I think is one of the most clearest reflections of this power, right? So, again, Google controls Chrome, Google is control search. And so every aspect of how we actually find things and therefore all of the ways in which every single website is incentivized through search engine optimization, which is a buzz word that we journalists have to deal with every single freaking day, SEO is designed to keep that Google algorithm happy. So we are shaping the way we design our content and curate our content specifically to keep Google happy. So that's on the content side. But how is our content monetized? Well, regardless of whether or not it is on Google, it's like, you know, like it's not just Google ads, but our own ads themselves have to really play through the sort of the big Google network. So our content enter ads because there's the Google ad exchange, which has a sort of a combination ad of network technology to actually broker that the amount of space that's taken up inside the whole real estate of the Internet by bringing the sell side components together with the buy side, right? You've got folks who are publishers trying to sell that space and you've got folks who want to buy media space. Google sits right in the middle of it because it's engineered this perfect ecosystem in which you have no choice but to sit in the middle of it. Why this isn't looked upon as something that is, I don't know, 10, 20 times worse than Standard Oil was or rubber barons and the thing that led to the antitrust movement and Teddy Roosevelt's very important laws at the turn of the century. It baffles me. We've never seen anything like this level of monopolistic control over our economy. Well, I think it is in part because a lot of it is, as we were discussing, it's somewhat invisible. People don't really realize the interconnections and the way that it kind of reminds me of this show 30 Rock, which probably most of us are familiar with. And there was this running joke of like the corporate map, right, of 30 Rock and who owned the studio and the fact that they owned like it was a microwave or whatever it was, but all rolled up to this one central company. And Alex Baldwin character, Jack Donaghy was his character, which joke a lot about the fact that everything rolled up to this one company and there are all these different things and they were all in the do product placement of the other kinds of parts of the company and whatnot. But when it comes to our online world, people just don't really they don't even understand the different things that go into making these services possible. Right. And how they all interconnect. And I also think that there is an element of just sort of embarrassment, like I think most people like I am beyond this in my personal life, but I'd say probably a decade ago when everything failed on my laptop like this morning, I would have been like, oh, my God, it's user error. I did something wrong. I messed it up. Now I'm like, no, no, it's not me because I'm sophisticated as an Internet user at this point. And I know what is me and what is a pepcak issue, as they say, problem exists between keyboard and computer. Right. And what is not. And I know this is not. But in many cases, people feel a level of tech illiteracy or embarrassment around it because they don't understand it. They don't they know they don't understand it. They don't really get it. There's nothing visual about it that you can really process. You just know it's not working and you feel an immediate. It's part of partially the addiction of it. You feel stress. You feel a tremendous amount of stress that you're not able to get this thing to function. And then you feel, I think, according with that embarrassment and shame. And this has been documented by many sociologists that when people's tech is not working, they feel shame and embarrassment in ways they don't feel when their microwave fails or they get a flat tire or whatever. They don't have that level of anxiety and shame around it, which they do. Right. Which they have when their online tools aren't working. It's another form of control in terms of like the trust us. We got this because we know don't get this. That differentiation is dividing divide. You don't understand this. You don't. And you can't trust. And you can't. Right. So we build up that even if you could easily just by building up that expectation that you can't by holding out these tech geniuses as sort of the lords of everything you can only only once you can get it. We build that expectation and therefore we ultimately lock ourselves into again, more dependency. I think that that's what I find even more challenging about this. Right. Just to take this out, go out even one more layer is when we think about how this is affecting a lot of the ways that elites think about education and not just elites, but really, but the way that the focus on technical mastery, being a coder, all this stuff is now considered the pinnacle of educational achievement in many ways. And there's some backlash against this around liberal arts education. You need to have other kinds of skills and talents and creativity, all these kinds of things that really matter. I think anyone who's been in tech for a long time will tell you that the EQ component is the thing that really makes or breaks a career in tech, not so much your technical ability or capacity to do things like code. Nevertheless, the emphasis on that, I think on the one hand, it's important to be competitive in the global economy. That is certainly an important thing. But the overemphasis I would say on it, it reinforces this concept. So as demographics get older, there's a sense that, well, I'm too old to understand this is too complicated for me. My oldest kid and I are watching the show called Avid Elementary. Highly recommend. It's phenomenal. I'm Avid rewatching Elementary. It's fantastic. 110 billion. I mean, we're going back and rewatching season one, and it's really funny. But there's an older teacher who's been teaching for many, many years. And there's an episode we just watched last night that's called something like tech or whatnot, new tech or something like that. And they bring in this tablets, right? And they're like, this is how you're going to teach the kids to read. They're going to use these tablets and you're going to do all this stuff. And the older teacher who's probably in her 40s or whatnot, she's not that old, but relatively speaking, she is like, I don't know how to do this. She just kind of like does an end run around the technology and winds up coding in that her kindergartners are reading it like fourth grade level. Okay. So of course there's an assembly and they want to pre it's really funny. It's a great episode. But part of it, I think she talks about having a hot male account, all this stuff. Right. But I was watching that and I was thinking about this idea that we have basically created a generation of people. We've kind of told them and shamed them into thinking that they are just not capable of understanding these technologies. And in countries, I think where you're getting older and older versus younger and younger, there's this kind of flip, right? This flip has happened where not only do we prize youth and vigor and all that kind of thing, but we also think there's something about their brains that makes them more capable of understanding how a computer works or how an online, which is just absolute nonsense. That's just completely untrue. It makes no sense whatsoever. If anything, the logic that underlies how a lot of these systems work is something that age and experience actually are helpful in comprehending, right? Because you understand systems, you can be a systems thinker, the older that you get. So I find all of this kind of cultural framing of tech and our dependence on tech equally challenging to how complicated tech itself is, which is not to say that tech is not complicated. It is to some extent, but it's not, it's not unparsable by anyone, frankly. We hit on something there that I think is really, and I do want to get to another quick rant before we go, because I got to run this out, but a different topic. But you said systems thinking, which I think is really important here because to me, the biggest insight that I think I've had, and I really do believe that being in the blockchain space has allowed me to think about these things, about what is wrong with this web two world, these centralized platforms is the business model, right? Is the idea that there are literally incentives amongst everybody to keep drilling down on this model and building out essentially a system of data extraction, this abusive manipulative system that we have, because it pays, because everybody's locked into that system. And I think one of the things that I find talking to my daughter sometimes about this is that she knows there's something big, bad, and wrong about this. And yeah, she gets tech as well, and she's comfortable using a whole range of technology, but she doesn't have that economic understanding. I don't think of business models of thinking through what's driving Wall Street. What's driving capital? Where is the actual profit motive that's driving all this? That is definitely something that you acquire as an older person. Right. And so in some respects, what you're talking about as well is a system that prevented those of us who have that knowledge, that EQ, that broader knowledge of systems from being able to then apply it to this model. Oh, it's tech. I can't. I couldn't. You know what? How could I possibly? You would see the same old stuff that we've seen for years that drives business decisions that leads to these extractive, broken systems. That's kind of where the book's going to be all about, by the way. Anyway, look, the segue I'll try to pull off here is, of course, I thoroughly believe we need not just blockchain technology, but a range of other decentralizing mechanisms that will require perhaps some centralization as well, but to redesign this whole thing. And that's where the policy challenges come into place because we really need to be thinking creatively about enabling these technologies to develop in the right environment to emphasize what's leading centralization. And of course, you've been looking at different models around the world and the U .S. is really lagging. And I keep writing about it. And so now we've got Japan somehow strangely leading the way over here. Well, that was my original rant. So I just got back from family vacation in Japan, 11 out of 10 recommend. Phenomenal. It was really amazing, even with the really little kids. And part of the reason it was so incredible is just the infrastructure. And so not only I immediately noticed a couple of things since my last trip, which was in 2019, which is a work trip. A, the transit system has gotten even more efficient and effective, which is remarkable considering in the United States, our transit is just, I mean, infrastructure bill and all that, but that's a long time coming. And oh, my God, that's a whole battle. It's going to be fought and how that all gets implemented. But, you know, grateful for at least a step in the right direction. But also the accessibility, just the way that accessibility is modeled into urban design is something I just found remarkable. And I live in San Francisco, and we're pretty thoughtful about these things here. But it is my kids were asking, like, oh, why is there this thing there? Why is this thing over here? Why is there the sound or why is there this bumpy thing in the road or whatever it is? I was like, that's all for people who are visually impaired. And it's just built into urban design in a way that I found remarkable. I don't think I've seen that as prominently a feature of urban design anywhere else. My co -author Frank McCourt will be loving, I mean, he's going to get into this next episode. He'd be loving to hear this because this is this idea about building architecture with people in mind. Right. As opposed to the company that runs things. It's truly human centered. Right. And part of that look is the demographics in Japan. We talked about demographics. And the Internet was built for machines, not humans. This is one of the problems. That's exactly right. So looking at AI, for that matter, is built as a tool to help make machine learning. Right. So just put there, leave it there and say what you will. I think, though, that there is a demographic thing there. There are older people in Japan. It's an older demographic. There are fewer and fewer children being born in Japan to the point that the government's providing incentives for people to actually have more children to kind of try to alter and adjust the demographics. So there's a real practical need for this. But imagine if this were the default in everywhere in the world. It should be. There's really no reason. And I looked a little bit, because I'm a nerd, into the kind of cost structure behind all of that. And it's marginal. It's negligible if you do it from the beginning and do it intentionally. So I've always loved Japan. I used to run an office in Japan and have major Japanese colleagues in my last role. And we, of course, have engaged in Japan at CCI as well, because to your point that you were making earlier, it is quite robust and thoughtful in how it's thinking about crypto regulation in ways that I find very impressive, especially around NFTs and stablecoin as well. But regardless, I hadn't been there as a tourist and as a regular person in quite some time. And it was just a remarkable experience. And I can't say that I came back overly impressed by the American offerings in these areas like infrastructure and accessibility, which I have not been historically, but I was even more deeply unimpressed when I was faced with the parallel option of what could be, with a little bit of imagination, a little bit of political... I'd love to really understand some of the aspects of Japanese culture that makes this sort of instinctive recognition of building for use and for humans so automatic almost, because there's one little example that I just thought was so fascinating. If you walk through the streets of Tokyo and look down, I don't know if it's right across the city, but certainly in a number of them, you'll see manhole covers sometimes in the city, which one has its own little design with colors and artwork in it. Somebody decided that it would be of interest to the society to have artwork that was differentiated across each of the manhole covers. That's a unique thing to decide to do. And it's a lovely thing to decide to do. It brings a whole new experience to being walking outside and looking down and being part of the environment that you're in, right? It's fascinating. It's something really quite magical about that capacity. Look, Japan's got lots of problems as well. Yeah, no culture, no countries, but on an infrastructure level, it was really hard to argue with the manifestation of a vision that really did put people and their needs at the center of the plot. You know, there's a place called the Shibuya Crossing, which is the biggest intersection in the entire world. It's got the most foot traffic of any intersection, apparently, in the entire world. And so we, of course, my kids wanted to see that and they wanted to cross it multiple times and whatnot. It just functions. It just functions. And you look across a city like that and you think about what that would look like in many other cities in the world. And suffice to say, it's not the same experience. Just not the same experience, right? It's organized. Part of that's cultural. Part of that is a cultural politeness, which has its own challenges, right? I'm not here to say that. I'm not here to laud any particular aspect of that or anything else. I think there's individualism is not as highly prioritized that has its own challenges. But nevertheless, just from a straight up urban infrastructure perspective, it was pretty hard to argue with how it functioned, how it was maintained, how efficient it was. All of those things I found not only admirable, but really compelling. And so coming back, I have to say, you know, I'll be in D .C., New York and San Francisco and none of those cities, I'm sorry to say, have anything to compete with that with what you've got on offer. So there you have it. That was actually less of a rant and more of a kind of a bit of a wistful observation. Yeah. And a little bit of an acknowledgement, a love song, if you like, almost to Japan, which is I mustn't say I love the place, the food. I love going to those little cocktail bars where the guy will spend like, you know, 10 minutes gently stirring you a martini. There's something very, really unique about it. All right. I'll wrap up there. Hopefully, this meandering conversation has actually landed in a place that our listeners found useful. Hopefully, it'll lead to people thinking a little bit more about intentionality. When I think about Japanese culture, the number one thing that comes up to me is intentionality and intentionality and how we engage online, intentionality and how we engage with each other, intentionality and how we build in our infrastructure, both digitally and physical. All of those things, I think, can only benefit us as a society. And I just don't know that that is a, I think the intentionality is there in our digital environment based out of the US, but it is intentionality to your point around a particular business model, which is not one that necessarily puts people and their needs and their desires at the center of anything. Well, the connection between the two ideas is the physical infrastructure into Japan being built with its intentionality to humans. And we need to really start to think heavily about the infrastructure of the internet, our infrastructure digital being built with humans in mind. And that is a major challenge that every one of us needs to be confronting right now. Okay. Let's leave it at that. We didn't get to talk about Stan Bankman Friedman, talk about Bitcoin price. Those of you who are looking for that, read Coindesk. There's loads of great material on that, as always, because it's the one stop shop for all of this vital employment information. A little bit of a housekeeping note for everybody, since I am writing a book, just so you all know, those of you who are subscribers to my newsletter that comes to the same name, Money Reimagined, thank you for doing so. Unfortunately, I'm putting on a hiatus for a little while. So if you're not getting in there wondering where it is, it will be back. But I need to kind of get this book project done. The podcast will continue every week. Don't worry. This is Sheila and I doing this. We're never going to stop, Sheila. This will go on to where like, I don't know, 105 years old. I'll be dialing in from, you know, wherever I need to dial in from when I'm 80. We're hopefully not a Google Chrome problem at that time. But otherwise, yes, just stick with us. It's great to have you around. And if you do have anything to say about this episode or any other ones, of course, you can reach us at podcasts at coindesk .com. Subject line Money Reimagined and certainly, you know, tell it to all your friends, subscribe. You can listen to us weekly here on the Coindesk Podcast Network or wherever you get your podcasts. That's all for now. Bye. Bye.

Jack Donaghy Sheila Michael Frank Mccourt Sheila Warren Alex Baldwin Apple Michael Casey Sam Bankman 2019 San Francisco Teddy Roosevelt New York Microsoft CCI Tokyo January D .C. BBC Two Ideas
A highlight from BIG CRYPTO NEWS! PAYPAL STABLECOIN ON ETHEREUM, BILL HINMAN SEC INVESTIGATION & RIPPLE XRPL CARBON MARKETS

Thinking Crypto News & Interviews

19:12 min | 4 months ago

A highlight from BIG CRYPTO NEWS! PAYPAL STABLECOIN ON ETHEREUM, BILL HINMAN SEC INVESTIGATION & RIPPLE XRPL CARBON MARKETS

"Welcome back to the Thinking Crypto Podcast, your home for cryptocurrency news and interviews. If you are new here, please hit that subscribe button as well as the thumbs up button and leave a comment below. If you're listening on a podcast platform such as Spotify, Apple or Google, please leave a five star rating and review. It supports the podcast and it doesn't cost you anything. This content is brought to you by Uphold, which makes crypto investing easy. I've been a user of Uphold since 2017, so I can certainly vouch for this platform. They have 10 plus million users, 250 plus cryptocurrencies, and they're available in 150 countries. You can also trade precious metals and equities on this platform. If you'd like to learn more about Uphold, please visit the link in the description. Well, folks, the big news of the day is, of course, PayPal launching their U .S. dollar stablecoin on the Ethereum blockchain. This is massive, massive news. PayPal is a giant company, a well -known brand existed before crypto, of course, and they are building on the Ethereum blockchain. So there are multiple impacts to the crypto industry and market here. One further validation that the technology solves real world problems. You have a big name like PayPal adopting it further gives credibility to the crypto industry and the asset class. It will help usher in more capital from institutional investors and obviously more retail will enter the market. So let me give you some details here. PayPal launches U .S. dollar stablecoin pay USD, which is, well, the ticker symbol is PYUSD is designed to contribute to the opportunity stablecoins offer for payments and is 100 % backed by U .S. dollar deposits, short term U .S. treasuries and similar cash equivalents. PayPal USD is redeemable one to one for U .S. dollars and is issued by Paxos Trust Company. Now, remember, Paxos was the one working with Binance to launch BUSD. In fact, I interviewed the co -founder and CEO of Paxos last year, Charles Cascarilla. You can definitely check out that interview. And Paxos is a regulated entity. Now all of a sudden, six months later, Paxos was green lighted to, of course, manage issue and manage the PayPal stablecoin. Funny how that works out, right, guys? So they said here, starting today and rolling out in the coming weeks, eligible U .S. PayPal customers who purchase PayPal USD will be able to, one, transfer a PayPal USD between PayPal and compatible external wallets, send person to person payments using PYUSD, fund purchases with PayPal USD by selecting it at checkout, convert any of PayPal supported cryptocurrencies to and from PayPal USD. So another on and off ramp. And remember, PayPal already offers the ability to buy and sell crypto via the PayPal app as well as the Venmo app. So this is huge, guys. Once again, further validation, massive adoption here, very bullish. And, you know, one of the things I was talking about today and I was tweeting about it, we're seeing some big news items coming out here that it's almost priming for a pump. Right. And Bitcoin has been moving sideways for a long time. Kind of boring. It needs some sort of catalyst to drive it either up or down. So there's no guarantee which way it's going to go. We'll have to wait and see. But this news is almost looking like a primer for a move upwards for Bitcoin to continue its retracement. Now, some are calling for new all time highs this year. I hope it happens, but I'm going to default to how Bitcoin has played out historically. So here's a quote from Dan Schulman, the president and CEO of PayPal. The shift towards digital currencies requires a stable instrument that is both digitally native and easily connected to a fiat currency like the U .S. dollar, said Dan Schulman, president and CEO of PayPal. Our commitment to responsible innovation and compliance and our track record delivering new experiences to our customers provides the foundation necessary to contribute to the growth of digital payments through PayPal USD. And it continues here, the article, which and this is really insightful. It says, building the bridge between Fiat and Web three for consumers, merchants and developers, PayPal USD will be available to consumers, merchants and developers to seamlessly connect fiat and digital currencies as the only stable coin supported within the PayPal network. PayPal USD leverages PayPal's decades long experience in payments at scale, combined with the speed cost programmability of block chain protocols as an ERC 20 issued token on the Ethereum block chain, PayPal used or PayPal USD will be available to an already large and growing community of external developers, wallets and Web three applications can be easily adopted by exchanges and will be deployed to power experiences within the PayPal ecosystem. Folks, big things are happening. I hope you recognize what is taking place here right before your eyes and what's on the horizon. What's going to take place here? Game theory, expect more players to come out with their versions of the stable coins or their stable coin, and I tweeted about it. I expect the stable coin wars to heat up, folks. And I tweeted about this in October of twenty twenty two. My predictions about what's going to happen this year and I said, expect stable coin wars to heat up next year. It wouldn't surprise me if the U .S. government was to select like Circles USDC for their digital dollar. And right now, Tether is the largest stable coin in the market. USDC is the second largest. But boy, expect P .Y. USD to jump up there because PayPal has millions of customers and they can easily get a lot of adoption overnight right in a very short period of time. And they have a trusted brand. People recognize it. They will want to use it. So huge, huge news. And one of the things I tweeted about is I'm curious if Elon Musk, he's going to create a stablecoin for X. Some people said he said he won't do that. But look, he could change his mind or he's going to use PayPal's stablecoin, given he was one of the founders of PayPal. That's where his pedigree is, right? Payments. And that's what he's trying to do with X. So this is has a lot of implications, guys, and very bullish for the market. Here's what Patrick McHenry, the House Financial Services chairman, one of the gentlemen who put out crypto regulations and much more. He said this announcement is a clear signal that stablecoins, if issued under a clear regulatory framework, hold promise as a pillar of our 21st century payments system. So big statements there, folks. Now, Chainlink God, many of you may follow this handle, did a great summary on why this is a big deal. So he said he did a whole thread. He said, why does PayPal launching a stablecoin P .Y. USD on Ethereum matters? First, P .Y. USD shows there's a clear demand from financial services companies to tokenize assets on blockchain. Tokenizing dollars is the most straightforward asset to tokenize and is directly relevant for payment processors like PayPal. PayPal has a majority share of online payment processing with 40 million plus transactions processed per day, over 400 million plus active users globally and 30 million plus merchant accounts. PayPal launching their stablecoin legitimizes crypto Web3 and stablecoins for normies and regulators. The fact that PayPal is issuing P .Y. USD on a public or the public Ethereum blockchain instead of a private PayPal chain shows the power of network effects. Folks, that is key. It goes back to what we've talked many times about and even I've shared thoughts from David Schwartz of Ripple. Wall gardens, you know, they're they're fine, but don't expect the public and people to use it, right, because it's just another centralized ledger. And we've seen JP Morgan try it with JPM coin. But who the hell is going to want to use it? It's a wall garden. So private blockchains will exist. That's fine. You can do your private blockchain, but that doesn't mean it's going to get mass adoption. And as Chainlink got highlighted here, network effects, Metcalfe's law, right, folks, the more adoption a network gets, the more participants, more builders, the stronger it becomes, the more valuable it becomes. So he said here, no doubt they will expand to other chains as well as other stablecoins have to obtain more market share. So we know USD and UST together, you know, they're on multiple blockchains. Expect P .Y. USD to do the same thing. He said the market cap of all stablecoins is over one hundred and twenty two billion dollars, peaking at one hundred and eighty billion a year ago. While amount circulating has downtrended during the bear market, it has held up much better than the price of most tokens or total value loss of most decentralized applications. The demand is sticky and P .Y. USD could be a major growth factor. Stablecoins are fundamentally a superior version of fiat, digitally native, programmable, low fees, fast settlement, zero borders, permissionless to transact in. Is this just the very beginning of PayPal stepping into Web3, which shares many of the same properties? Folks, I think so. I think they're going to do a lot more. So he continues here. But I want to just share some some of the thoughts. You know, this is a pretty long thread. So bullish news, bullish news for the market, whether you hold Ethereum or not. But I hold ETH. I've been holding ETH for a long time. I diversify. My number one holding is XRP. My number two is Bitcoin. My number three is Ethereum. And I stake ETH and I earn passive rewards. So great news here. Now, folks, speaking of Ethereum, we got some big news. We all know Bill Hinman and Jay Clayton did the backroom deal with Ethereum folks, Joe Lubin and Vitalik. Right. And Ethereum got the free pass. It was through the speech of Bill Hinman that Ethereum was said to not be a security. And that, of course, gave it an unfair advantage over the rest of the altcoins in the market. But we know this was an under the table backroom deal corruption. Right. I don't want to rehash all the details. You guys all know this. Well, Stuart Aldorati of Ripple, he's the chief legal officer. He tweeted out something very interesting today. And I couldn't believe it when I first read it. But he said, Crypto critic, ex SEC official John Reed Stark, who has blocked me, by the way, says there should be an investigation to Bill Hinman. This is a this is broader than Ripple. There could potentially be serious conflicts of interest by a government official. An investigation will either put it to rest or hold folks accountable. So even someone who is a critic of crypto, John Reed Stark, and he blocked me because I used to I share a lot of facts with him. He didn't like that. But even he can agree. Yeah, this does not look good. Yeah, of course. Anybody with a normal sense of logic and reasoning can see something is fishy here. And I think Jay Clayton should be investigated to these two corrupt government officials. Obviously, they're not at the SEC anymore. And it's funny, I often criticize both of them, especially Jay Clayton. He's the chairman. He rubber stamped everything. Then he filed a lawsuit against Ripple and ran out the SEC door the next day. Then he goes to work for a crypto company. These guys are scumbags. Right. They're supposed to have integrity. And serve the people. They're there, you know, working in government, using the taxpayer dollars. And yet they're doing all kinds of nonsense like this. But guys, I hope I hope Congress and some folks in the House Financial Services Committee take action and they, you know, go ahead and launch an investigation. I think we deserve that. And look, big shout out to John Deaton, who's been beating the drum on this for a long time and as well as the people at Empire Oversight, the nonprofit whistleblower organization, which did a lot of FOIA requests, sue the SEC to get the Hinman documents, emails and much more. And of course, we saw they were colluding with Joseph Lubin and Vitalik and much more. Right. So John Deaton did a full post on this. I'm not going to read through everything, but essentially saying, look, if crypto is going to stand back, Mifrides and Alex Mashinsky, we need to be held accountable. The cleanup includes the unelected bureaucrats who sold out. Well put, John. And look, people call John a scammer. They called him a liar. They call him a conspiracy theorist. But he was right all along. And the folks at Empire Oversight got a lot of the information, all the facts that we were looking for. And we know a lot of people who were attacking John were those trying to cover it up because they knew what happened. But the truth will come out. Everything done in darkness will be brought to light, folks. So I'm hoping Congress launches an investigation in order for us to get that. We have to keep using social media. We have to keep contacting a representative. So if you're not on Twitter, please get on Twitter. Follow me. Start retweeting John, myself, all these all these facts that we're putting out there to get the attention of Congress and to hold these folks accountable. Now, let's move ahead. Ripple and Rocky Mountain Institution are proud founding partners of Centragate Earth, a new open data platform that brings increased transparency, trust and integrity to carbon markets. Centragate powers the next evolution in carbon markets. So the TLDR here is there's a lot of tokenization on blockchains around carbon credits. And Ripple is working with different folks to get this done. And of course, the XRP ledger will be a solution for for these folks to do that. You know, they highlight that here in the article. Ripple, for example, they said Ripple and other industry players recognize that blockchain can be a catalytic tool for helping global carbon markets reach their full potential. As its core, blockchain enables more efficient transactions. Unlike proof of work blockchains, the open source blockchain technology that ripples that powers Ripple solutions, the XRP ledger is natively sustainable, requiring low amounts of energy and no cryptocurrency mining. The XRP ledger is the first major blockchain to achieve net zero status through the purchase of renewable energy for its remaining energy use. So pretty clear the goal here and with tokenization. So that's big unlocking new utility and use cases, folks. Now, we got news here of a new crypto fund about to launch. So CF Private Equity is building a blockchain fund. It appears to be the first fund dedicated specifically to blockchain investments for the business. So we're seeing all the TradFi hedge funds, investment firms, they're launching crypto funds. Of course they are. Right. We saw it with Paul Tudor Jones and Stan Druckenmiller and the list goes on and on and on. So the firm known as Common Fund Capital, prior to a rebrand at the beginning of this year, has hinted at its crypto interests since 2018. But CF Private Equity, according to an SEC filing from the beginning of August, is preparing to launch what appears to be the first fully digital asset private equity venture. The move is perhaps the most telling indicator yet of the firm's crypto ambitions. The vehicle's filing indicated an expected fund raise of one hundred million dollars. But it's possible the disclosed figure only pertains to the fund's first close. A spokesperson for the company declined to comment when reached. Folks, again, I know I ask this and I say this a lot. Do you see what's happening? Right. Watch what they do, not what they say. I see a lot of capital flowing in this market. I see building and adoption funds being launched, and that makes me very bullish. Now, let's end it with some news here. We started the podcast with some news about stable coins. Now we got some news around Huobi. So Huobi dismisses plunging stable coin reserves as FUD. Exchange spokesperson refuted claims that any team members have been detained by Chinese authorities. In my opinion, Huobi seems like a dying company. It's connected to Justin Sun, with Tron and much more. Look, I would stay away from Huobi, folks, and Justin Sun. I don't know what that dude is up to. I've just seen a lot of shady activity from him. So following speculation that Chinese officials detained some Huobi executives, the crypto exchanges stable coin reserves have dwindled as much as 34 percent in the past week. Local Chinese media reported that law enforcement detained at least three Huobi executives. Allegedly, some employees were sent an urgent notification advising them to depart the country at the earliest. Adam Cochrane, a partner of Sinem Hain Ventures, relayed information. He alleges came directly from a high ranking executive at Tron, stating that team members were facing a criminal probe tied to the activities associated with Huobi. So we'll see, folks. Things are not looking too good here. If you are a user of Huobi, I would highly recommend you be very careful here. You know, I would avoid this platform at all costs, guys. There's something happening here where there's smoke that expires, so please be careful. All right, folks, that's the news. Please be sure to check out my interview with Brock Pierce. He's a crypto OG and legend. Guys, we talk about everything. He's one of the co -founders of Tether. So, you know, he has great perspectives on the crypto market. Be sure to check out that interview as well. And let me know what you think about the PayPal news. I think this is very bullish for the crypto market. And we're going to see stablecoin wars heat up. We're going to see game theory play out other. Look, I wouldn't surprise me tomorrow if Amazon launch a stablecoin and they call it Primecoin, right? Because they already have Amazon Prime. Guys, the future is bright for this market. Ignore the FUD. Be prepared for the volatility that just comes with the market, but that swing, the swings that go very low also go very high, my friends, and it allows you to make money. But you got to be patient and you have to know when to enter the market and when to exit when there's blood on the streets and fair, you buy the dip dollar cross average when there's euphoria and everybody and your Uber driver and grandma are telling you about Bitcoin. That's the time to sell. We've we've seen this, right? If you've been here multiple times for multiple bull markets and bear markets, you know the deal. For those of you who are new, you got to put your emotions to the side. You got to spend time researching and educate yourself. That's super important. All right, folks, let me know what you think. Leave your thoughts and comments below. Hit the thumbs up button, hit the five star rating, and I'll talk to you all later.

Stuart Aldorati Jay Clayton David Schwartz Dan Schulman Adam Cochrane Patrick Mchenry Alex Mashinsky Charles Cascarilla John Reed Stark Amazon House Financial Services Common Fund Capital Last Year Next Year John One Hundred Million Dollars 100 % Bill Hinman Stan Druckenmiller Paypal
Caller Pitches 'Article V' Segment for Every Week of the Show

Mark Levin

00:48 sec | 4 months ago

Caller Pitches 'Article V' Segment for Every Week of the Show

"Thank you. Fred, Sunnyvale, California. We lived there for a little bit. The great bow. Hello, Captain. Good to hear from you. Thank you, my friend. By the way, have you ever gone to Stan's Donuts? No, sir, I have not. Let me encourage you to go. You'll never eat anywhere else. I'll work on that. First of all, Mark, I want to thank you for everything you do and your crew and everybody else. God you bless all. Thank you. I am very frustrated. Let's get Fred's number. I interrupted him, Mr. Deuce. I'm serious. get Let's his number. I'll call him tomorrow. By the way, Fred, have you ever heard of Waxwing Avenue? in get him Sunnyvale. Check it out. That's where we lived. I'm sure there's a

Mark Fred Deuce Tomorrow Stan's Donuts Sunnyvale, California Sunnyvale First Waxwing Avenue GOD
We Made Todd Watch "Leatherface: Texas Chainsaw Massacre 3"

The Horror Virgin

02:59 min | 4 months ago

We Made Todd Watch "Leatherface: Texas Chainsaw Massacre 3"

"Don't like scary movies But you guys make me watch them and this week you guys made me watch Texas Chainsaw Massacre 3 Yes had either of you seen this movie before apparently not no I'm not sure I saw much of it today because it was too dark to see My first time seeing it as well and I did honestly I loved the audacity of Starting it like Star Wars. I mean it was like somehow Leatherface return. Yeah, exactly deep in the forests of the deserts of Texas. I Wish it had been like tilted back like the Star Wars ones were just so Like Wow, all right steal that footage and then drop in that music under it and just like I Did in my notes label it as the crawl I did too it is a crawl like wait Whatever yeah, yeah, sorry. Sorry. Sorry. We'll talk about that in a bit. What did you guys think about it? This may be one of the worst films we've ever done objectively. How dare you insult Aragorn like that? I think we've done worse But I started to question why this movie was made at all and why they made the choices they made Yeah, because this basically retcons the entire second film. It's like the it's like two doesn't exist to this movie Yeah, which is insane because two is amazing Like I love to to is fucking mad. That's my favorite. Yeah, and here's the thing this follows very generic horror beats like Structurally, it's pretty sound which I know sounds crazy It's just that they didn't have Great characters or a ton of information and then by the time it gets to the third act It does the same shit that every TCM movie does up to this point Which is have a dining room scene that I'm just like we just don't fucking need this We don't need 20 minutes of her screaming. Just give me more Viggo Mortensen and leave me alone Yes, and this film we will be calling him Viggo Mortensen I love the energy. We're bringing in tonight I would like to mention when we did TCM to we did bring up the Army hammer Sebastian Stan and Viggo Mortensen So like the curve remains, it's still wild. I mean, I feel like this was more of a you thing than an us No Todd texted about it in the group chat Viggo Mortensen is hot in this movie Oh, I just said that Aragorn was in this movie. I wasn't like would smash with a sledgehammer

20 Minutes Star Wars Sebastian Stan Viggo Mortensen Second Film Third Act Today First Time Tonight TWO This Week ONE Texas Chainsaw Massacre 3 Texas Leatherface TCM Todd Aragorn NO
Controversial Speech Raises Questions About Father's Day

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:52 min | 7 months ago

Controversial Speech Raises Questions About Father's Day

"The first excerpt is not a hate hateful thing. But I'm very curious what it means, and you may say, it doesn't matter. And you may be right. You may truly be right. But I'm playing it for you just because I'm curious about the mindset that would say that. You'll see what I mean. Number one, please. Graduates. Before I begin, I mentioned many times tomorrow's Mother's Day. Stand for your mothers and grandmothers. Stan and thank you. All right, come from. Mom's rule. Okay, so this is interesting. You may, again, all of you may think it was not worthy of my noting that line. But I want to comment on it anyway. This is an old black college. Howard University. Right. So whether it was a black college or a mixed race college. I wonder, no. One. If he had spoken a day before Father's Day, would he say, let's all stand up for our fathers and grandfathers. Do you think he would have? Don't know. Is it a fair question? It is a fair question. I'd love to know what you would bet on you listening. Would he have said a day before Father's Day, stand up for your father?

Father 'S Day Howard University . Mother 'S Day A Day First ONE Tomorrow
Sudan envoys begin talks amid pressure to end conflict

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 7 months ago

Sudan envoys begin talks amid pressure to end conflict

"Talks on ending the Sudan conflict, a planned for Saudi Arabia. The U.S. and Saudi Arabia say Sudan's warring sides are beginning talks aimed at firming up a shaky ceasefire after three weeks of fierce fighting that's killed hundreds and pushed Sudan to the brink of collapse. They say the negotiations will take place in the Saudi city of Jeddah. It will be the first between Sudan's military and the paramilitary rapid support forces since clashes broke out on April 15th the talks follow concerted efforts by Saudi Arabia and other international partners to pressure the two warring generals in Stan to the negotiating table. I'm Charles De Ledesma

Charles De Ledesma April 15Th First Hundreds Saudi Two Warring Generals Jeddah U.S. Saudi Arabia Three Weeks Stan Sudan Conflict
What Are the Characteristics of a Police State?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:59 min | 9 months ago

What Are the Characteristics of a Police State?

"I thought what are the characteristics of a police state I'm just going to name a few and through the course of this show after the January 6th videos came out last night I think I'm going to make a strong case to you that ladies and gentlemen it's already here So here are the characteristics Number one can we both agree that in a police state That law enforcement and the government they don't target the investigation of crimes in search of people right That's in a normal functioning constitutional republic they do that There's an allegation of a bank robbery You report the bank robbery the police go out and try to find out who did it right Everybody gets out nothing complicated about that That's not how it works in a police state folks See in a police state you got to get rid of your political opponents So what you do is you investigate people and then you find the crime later It's even been said but was it very the Soviet Union you show me the man I'll show you the crime See in a police state you just walk into a political operation and say we need to take out Donald Trump Don't worry we'll find a crime Kind of sounds like something that happened in those release videos last night with the QAnon shaman guy right Now that we got a hold of the videos kind of sounds like what they've been doing with Trump box checked What's another characteristic of the police state Well of course you have to abuse the surveillance infrastructure to spy on and surveil citizens Well it's not happening Of course Geofencing warrants around the capitol the spying operation on Donald Trump corporate cronies working to spy on your purchases the new digital dollar This stuff is all here It's all here now or being talked about right now This isn't some otherworldly esoteric idea This is stuff is here now What's another characteristic of police states Well state control of the media come on guys coach Stan used to say of course State control the meat I want speaks for

Donald Trump Soviet Union Stan
 President Joe Biden makes unannounced visit to Kyiv: 'One year later, Kyiv stands. And Ukraine stands. Democracy stands'

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 10 months ago

President Joe Biden makes unannounced visit to Kyiv: 'One year later, Kyiv stands. And Ukraine stands. Democracy stands'

"President Joe Biden has suggested the Ukrainian people during a visit to kief and unannounced trip coming days before the one year anniversary of Russia's invasion of the country. The Ukraine visit comes at a crucial moment in the war as Biden looks to keep allies unified in their support for Ukraine as the war is expected to intensify with both sides preparing for spring offensives in Kyiv, the president underlines total American support. One year later, key stans, and Ukraine stands. Democracy stands, the Americans stand with you and the world stands with you. Biden, with Ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky, salutes the will of the Ukrainian people. You and all Ukrainians, mister president, remind the world every

President Joe Biden Ukraine Kief Biden Key Stans Kyiv Volodymyr Zelensky
"stan" Discussed on The Tennis.com Podcast

The Tennis.com Podcast

07:04 min | 10 months ago

"stan" Discussed on The Tennis.com Podcast

"We also have some great young players now that are great to speak at the Australian sea 8 American males in the round of 32, 25%. That hasn't happened since the area of agassiz Sampras courier Chang Martin Malibu, all these guys that have been good pro players and have done well in science, but we haven't seen that since then. So excited about it. You know, Ben, of course, core to Fritz, tiafoe, brooksby. I mean, there's a lot of players that talk to semifinals. It's really exciting. But in our academy, we want to give the parents and the players a little dose of reality that all they can do is work as hard as they possibly can and give it their best shot. And if they are capable of doing the next level, then it'll come about. Now, I always talk about college tennis me and tell me always joke about this. He wanted to go North Carolina and they went off from full scholarship. This is Tommy Paul. Yeah. That was his dream. When did you get my scholarship? My coach was not too excited about giving me a scholarship either. So some coaches take a while to learn. Yeah. My best mess. So you got a book coming out. And a documentary. Give us a little for those who like to clip notes version. Give us a little look inside the book. You know, I got, I'm a man when I got a kid in college, two kids at a 6 and 7. So I'm just gonna take me some time to hide in the bathroom and make it through the book. Give me some stories that I can skip to kind of entertain myself and one of my little ten minute bathroom breaks. Well, the book is a coffee table book. It's one of those things that they're stories that are about two pages long. And there are stories about my career and their stories about the shoe. And so I wanted to get this book done so that it would before some people who had been involved in this shoe died or involved my career. And so we've had, you know, short stories from players and from designers and from advocates from Friends of mine, you know, unfortunately, you know, Arthur's not in the book, but Arthur's wife, Jeannie is in the book, and she's a good friend of ours as well. So just it's one of those things you can look at for ten minutes or 15 minutes and then put it down and come back. It's got photographs that probably a hundred different colors and types of shoes that you can see and it really goes through the history of the shoe and as well as the history of the highlights of my career. So if you don't like the book you can get it and you can use you can do curls with it. So it's very heavy. And because of the book, LeBron James has a production company called Spring Hill and they looked at the book and they said, we want to do a documentary. So we did the documentary last year and had a great director out of LA that did it and we're excited about it and they're looking now at finding a home for it and getting on TV. Very cool. Talk about lifting weights. You and I are both skinny, wiry guys, right? So I've never been in journey to bulk up. Now I always have to ask the question, Stan Smiths are known as a casual shoe. Had you ever considered? Given the fact that Adidas and Nike sort of fight for that top spot of Davis has got gardenia, I mean, they've got a ton of athletes feeling, right? Had you ever considered making a playable version of the shoot, right? Where players can actually wear it and compete. That's the next step. Well, you know, the fashion world and the demographics there are a lot bigger than Google Dennis players. And so it has become a fashion shoe. Now, having said that, they did the a zero, which is kind of a commemoration of my 50th anniversary with Adidas. And so the players have gotten that and it's got my name on the actually has the score of the match of the Wimbledon finals on the tongue of the shoe. On the inside of the shoes. So they did that to commemorate the 50th anniversary that they've got the barricades, of course, have been the great Adidas performance shoe, and they keep coming out with another generation every year that's going to make a little bit better. The bells and mushrooms and the support systems in the shoe are going to be much better than my shoe. My shoe hasn't really changed. In over 50 years. And so it has been, it's become a shoe that people like to wear. You know, just chilling out and it's really been fun to see people wear it where they're not being paid to endorse it. I mean, you see, you know, the president of the United States, Obama, you know, and you see Trump's wife. It's fun to see people wearing it because they'd like it. And not because they're being paid to play. Well, man, this has been a real treat. I've got 5 or 6 pairs stands. I got the black version. I actually wear my black Stan smith's presentation so instead of wearing, you know, the additional dress shoes. My blazer and my black Stan Smith. So it's become a staple in my wardrobe now that I feel like that the corporate world is loosening up in terms of fashion. You no longer. It's ready. It's ready. It's ready for the sneakers. I mean, people were in sneakers doing everything and people are getting married in it. They're doing the meetings in it. I like there's 5 guys that went to international tennis Hall of Fame legends ball and their young guys about 30 or so and they are in a beautiful, nice black tuxedo with the white shoes. Right. They look great. I want to thank you for coming on the show. You're a legend. Not only in the fashion world. But in the tennis world, your presence as you walk through the cafeteria walk through the site is still there. I don't know if you know that. But you know, we look up to you, we're grateful for everything you give to the game, and I'm grateful for you for coming on the show. Thank you. You can't give it up to the game, but you're doing it. And I appreciate that as well. We'll get a few more champions out there. And those people, so keep it going. But thank you so much. Dot com podcast with Stan Smith.

Australian sea Chang Martin Malibu tiafoe brooksby Tommy Paul Adidas Arthur Stan Smiths Fritz tennis Jeannie Ben North Carolina Spring Hill LeBron James Stan Smith Nike Davis LA
"stan" Discussed on The Tennis.com Podcast

The Tennis.com Podcast

08:19 min | 10 months ago

"stan" Discussed on The Tennis.com Podcast

"Was standing man before Wawrinka. This is Stan. Welcome to the show. Thank you. Yeah, you know, one time I wanted to stand at Wendell and he's wearing a stand the man's shirt. I said, I said, stand up. That's what they used to call me. He said, they still call you that. You should have trained Mark, man. You can have the shoe, the frames. Yeah, well, Stan Musial, I think, had that first, but it's been around for a long time. So I was in a meeting just last night at dinner meeting at the Goodman theater and a guy had on the Adidas, Stan Smiths. And I said, I'm interviewing that guy tomorrow. Who's he? The guy whose shoes you're wearing. He was like, oh, what does he do? And I said, we wanted to create a tennis players of all time. I said, that's how the shoe came by. He's like, oh, well I just love the shoes. That's not the first time that's happened because, you know, a lot of people now, unless they're 55 and over, probably, probably never suddenly played the game. So that's normal to see that. It's great to see that guys like that. And young girls and young boys and babies and old people still wear the shoe. Right. And then I've got another friend who owns a clothing store, sort of an urban streetwear store in the south Lucas called success. He's actually a former NBA player. And he's got Stan smith's ten different versions of the Stan Smith shoe. And he was like, I don't know who the guy is. I know he played tennis with these shoes. We can't keep him on the shelf. And so it's just, it's just amazing how you create a sort of a brand off the court. That, you know, that lives on 40 years later. But I want to talk about your client career, right? Because I think people know you for the shoot, but they don't know. 1968 NCAA champ. Former president of the tennis Hall of Fame. 7, 1971 U.S. open champ. 1972 Wimbledon champ. USC Trojan, which is what we all know in tennis is a great tennis school. I mean, before the shoe, that's a hell of a playing career. But how did you get your start in SoCal? Because, you know, I think about all these tennis pros, you know, we all had a lot of people help and I know you have San Diego tennis patrons help you as well. How did you get into tennis? Well, it was really my two older brothers and they played a bit, my father actually coached the pest in a city college. He coached XS as well as other sports. And he never really coached me too much, but a group of parents in my area formed this tennis patrons association they hire pontius Segura. Who, in my opinion, could be the smartest coach that's ever played that's ever coached the game. He was a great player himself. And he was a little guy, but he had to use his brain to win and his legs. And he transferred some of those thoughts and ideas. He worked with Connors. He worked with Chang. He worked with a lot of players along the way. And he was great. And so I used to, every Saturday morning, we go to passing a high school, which was not really a country club situation, and it kind of pink beige is tennis courts, peaches, color, and hardwired nets. You hit the net in a bounce up, you know, 20 feet. So we did that every Saturday morning and I got to learn the game and then start playing tournaments in the area. And then USC offered me a scholarship. Not until the May of my senior year. I mean, he was trying to get other players and he kind of got stuck with me because everybody else turned him down, but you know, it worked out great. He's coached. And I'll soon and ralston and of course lots and Ramirez. A lot of great players over the years and they not only became good players, but they won majors, you know, like tomato one, Wimbledon and the U.S. open. Sooner one U.S. open, Ramirez won a few doubles titles along the way in the majors and of course lots and I played and Ross and once a major. So he was in my opinion the best college coach ever. You know, dick cool. Certainly one more title 17 titles, but George totally would, I think they won ten titles in his coaching career. So, but he coached guys that became great players, you know, on the international scene. And it was a great experience to be there for four years at USC. Now, you did something that we don't see a lot now. And that is 1968 NCAA champ in three years later, Grand Slam champion. How did that transition happen? So quickly. I mean, that was odd for ash was competing. I mean, there were some people who could play in the game at that point. So it wasn't like, oh, it's old days. You just walked into the tour. Well, it's a gradual thing. I won the national junior championships in 64 and then went to college one 68, and then was able to really play tournaments during my college days in the summertime. I played 5 or 6 tournaments against these top players during the summer. And then once I graduated in 68, I got to play Davis Cup and then just went right on the tour and played those same guys in the same tournaments in the summer, then of course year round. So I was able to get some good experience early on during college and I was the last guy to graduate from college to win a Grand Slam. Now, Arthur Ashe was the last guy he graduated before me, and he won a Grand Slam after me, but we were the last two to win grand slams to finish college. Now, how did you finance your career? Because in those days, you win a Grand Slam and you get a handshake. Get a check, right? So I gotta check. I gotta check the guys right before me in 68 got a warm handshake. And a coupon for maybe a sweater. But what I won the U.S. open, I won $20,000. And when I won the Wimbledon, I won 5000 pounds. So it was not the same as today, but it was more than just a warm handshake. Yeah. And then you go on and I was having a great career, lots of doubles titles. And at what point did the shoe come about? Because about in 71, the shoe had been created by horse dosser, who was Adidas son, and a guy named Robert haye, who was the number one French player. And the shoe was created in France in a place called lander shine, which is in the border of France and Germany and Austria. And so they wanted to get a stronger presence in the United States. And I was American player number one in the world at the time. And so we worked out agreement they were looking for a great looking guy to put on the tongue of the shoe, a great face. And they couldn't find one. So they got made. And so they put my face on the tongue, they had ro bears name on the side and had several iterations of the names of both names and that sort of thing. And finally, after about four years, I took his name off the shoe, and it was just my name after that. And then they took the shoe off the market in 2012 and 13, and the meeting in 2011 when they lured him into that. I wasn't too happy, but they came back with a vengeance and January 15th of 2014 and it went crazy after that. They did a lot of things with collaborations with hip hop artists and that sort of thing. And people that I didn't really know very well at the time, but the kids knew them. And so they really marketed to kids from 18 to 24, which I thought was a mistake because I thought those kids wouldn't know who I was, but again, they had collaborations with people for kids

tennis Wawrinka Goodman theater Stan Smiths south Lucas USC tennis Hall of Fame pontius Segura Stan Musial United States Stan smith Stan Smith Wendell Adidas NCAA Ramirez dick cool Stan Connors NBA
If Jan. 6 Was Planned, Why Didn't FBI Informants Flag It?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:28 min | 1 year ago

If Jan. 6 Was Planned, Why Didn't FBI Informants Flag It?

"Why didn't these confidential human sources warn us about the planned insurrection Strange right It was planned and the FBI had confidential human sources who clearly must have known about the plan and yet the planned insurrection happened anyway according to your telling of events That doesn't strike you as even Jim's got his head like cocked to the side Can the story about the bureau really get any worse I'm serious at this point Can the story about the FBI and their involvement in political affairs get anywhere since the answer is yes clearly So if it was a planned insurrection here's question number two From this point on known as the deuce there was a plan insurrection who planned it Oh now we start getting into the ugliest So if the FBI had a confidential series of confidential human sources working with the groups you believe colluded with Trump to plan the insurrection The confidential human source planet content Come on Let's coach Stan used to say come on guy Come on guy Where would you get that from Gee I don't know this July 2021 headline from the Washington examiner FBI informants had bigger role in Whitmer kidnapped than thought says report

FBI JIM Donald Trump Stan Washington Whitmer
"stan" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"stan" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

"Writer, for Sports Illustrated, what a week in the NBA. Troubling week and exhausting week. A week where it was often about everything but the actual basketball and I don't want to belabor the Kyrie Irving saga. If you do want to hear all the latest there, Chris manix and I broke it all down, discussed it at length in a bonus edition of the crossover that posted earlier today. You can find that in your feed. I did want to discuss some actual basketball today and some of the more positive stories of the early season. And so for that, I was happy to bring back TNT's Stan van Gundy and we get into some of the pleasant surprises so far. I'm talking about the Cavs, the blazers, the jazz, the spurs, just some of the fun, surprises of the early season, we did discuss some unpleasantness to regarding the nets and Kyrie, but more from the basketball standpoint. Where do they go from here? Is this season salvageable or is it time as I believe to blow it all up? Really interesting discussion with Stan on all of that and more. Before we get to that, my weekly plug. There's a great new book from Sports Illustrated and triumph books about the Lakers. It's called greatest show on earth, featuring 15 stories from the pages of SI from the 60s through to the present. Covering all the Laker legends, Kareem magic Wilt Chamberlain, Elgin, Kobe, Shaq, written by some of the greatest sports writers of the era Frank to Ford, Jack McCallum, Lee Jenkins, Chris Ballard. I had the honor of writing the introduction for the book and it's available now for pre order with a 30% discount. Here's what you do, go to triumph books dot com, search for greatest show on earth. There is also a direct link in the summary of this podcast you can also type that in Bitly to Bitly link BIT dot LY slash Lakers 75 when you get to checkout, use the discount code Lakers 30. Again, triumph books dot com, discount code Lakers 30. Okay, my conversation with Stan van Gundy is coming up next. So stick around. This is the crossover, an NBA show hosted by Sports Illustrated's Chris mannix and Howard back. It's a whole new level for you and me, Chris. This relationship. Like and subscribe for the best weekly NBA content these two are capable of. What does that mean? Could be the best duo ever. I don't see how you can beat that. Here they are. Chris mannix, and Howard back. Now very pleased to welcome back to the crossover Stan van Gogh. Stan, how are you, sir? I'm good, how are you? Doing well. Been a strange week in the NBA strange start to the season overall and kind of a stressful week. Kind of an unpleasant week overall between the Kyrie Irving saga, the Josh primo situation San Antonio miles bridges, I don't think I've seen a week quite like this in the NBA. And certainly on the Kyrie front, this is all new and troubling territory. So we will get to as many basketball related basketball things as we can on this conversation today. But real quick, overview. I mean, it has been a really strange week. Anything that has stuck out to you struck you just thoughts that are still kind of percolating in your head about what we've seen on all fronts. Well, I think the big thing is, is where we 8 or 9 games in, you know, lead sort of by the Kyrie thing. We've just seen so much drama going on. I mean, we've got all these stories. I mean, you know, it sort of started off with, you know, he may do and coaching change there. Now we've had our first in season coaching change already, Kyrie just primo. I mean, it's everything. It's hard to get people get fans to just focus on the basketball right now. Yeah. Yeah, and there's some great basketball being played, which we will get to, but yeah, I mean, listen, we are used to and we use the broad heading of drama and some of these are more serious things than others. Sometimes it's just a team in fighting. Sometimes it's coach firing or whatever. But in terms of NBA stories that are not about the basketball, this flood of them early in this season is something that in my 25 plus seasons I don't think I've seen and they're all troubling in their own way. So let's talk about Kyrie real quick and not we've all talked a lot and Chris mannix and I folks, if you haven't listened already, mannix and I have kind of an emergency pod that we put up earlier today about all of the latest goings on there. The suspension and where things go from here, Kyrie's apology, everything. So Stan, what I wanted to ask you broadly about is this. And I'm going to use the word distractions that I do not mean to diminish anything about the Kyrie situation because this is not the average NBA distraction. But we talk about things that take away from the teams focus, things that take away from the mission on the court. And this is a pretty large one and with ramifications that go so, so far beyond basketball. But I want to put it not to trivialize it, but I do want to put this in basketball terms. You've been a coach in this league and an executive in this league and you've been around this league of very long time. When something like this arises, controversies both big and small, both weighty and not so weighty. What does this do to a locker room to team spirit when we in the media talk about, oh, it's a distraction, how much does this actually permeate the day to day? What do you imagine the nets are going through right now as they try to also overcome a terrible start to the season while this is all now hanging over them? Well, I look at the nets and the first word that comes to my mind is chaos. I mean, and it's not just right now. I mean, it's like disorganization since the day they signed Kyrie Irving and Kevin Durant, a day that Brooklyn fans celebrated and was going to lead them to championships. It's been chaos ever since. And so, you know, we had James Harden wanted to get there. They trade for him. Oh, now we're definitely a championship team. You know, to, you know, harden once out. He goes, kairi won't get vaccinated and so he can't first they said they weren't going to have him play at all. Then they let him play on the road. You know, and then we go through in the summer Kyrie doesn't want to come back, you know, and then he found out no one else wanted him. So he wanted to come back and then Kevin Durant supposedly wanted to go, but he came back, but he wanted Sean marks and Steve Nash fired. And then when Ben Simmons first came to the nets, he didn't want to play. Then he plays for the beginning of the year and now he's hurt again. And then the Kyrie saga from, you know, look over the last few years, you know, the earth is flat, anti vax, support Alex Jones, and now support a movie that, I guess, has a lot of anti semitic stuff. Now I'll admit I haven't watched the movie. So, but it's just, and then we're going to fire Steve Nash. You know, right into the season. And by the way, supposedly higher, he may do who was suspended for

basketball Chris mannix NBA Kyrie Lakers Stan van Gundy Chris manix Sports Illustrated Stan Kareem magic Wilt Chamberlain Jack McCallum Lee Jenkins Chris Ballard Stan van Gogh Josh primo nets Howard Cavs TNT
"stan" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"stan" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

"A lot of shooting. And a lot of shooting. A lot of shoes. You know, that's the thing. Butler and at a bile are both guys who can make plays. They play through them. And then you've got Tyler hero who's the best bench player in the league, can really score. And then you've got Robinson stress, Vincent. Martin, I mean PJ Tucker is shot the ball real well. Kyle Lowry and now they're toughness is just, that's the physically probably the toughest team in the league. I still think Milwaukee's probably better. Everybody at full strength. I still like Milwaukee, brook Lopez looks good to me. You know, he can still play the role that he's played all these years. They needed him back to have some size. I'd still probably pick them if I had to pick it, I'd pick them and Phoenix to be right back in the finals again with a different result this time. Well, and by the way, since you mentioned Jimmy Butler's reputation or his past, there's also one of the all time greatest game of zones episodes featuring Jimmy Butler and that Timberwolves team that he was part of. That one's also worth looking up. I'll send you both links. This has been a, this has been a blast folks. Stay tuned because after Stan, we still have Hall of Famer Ben Wallace coming up for the latter part of the episode. Stan, this has been great, man. Thanks so much. We'll have to do it again during the playoffs..

PJ Tucker Jimmy Butler Milwaukee Kyle Lowry Butler brook Lopez Tyler Vincent Robinson Martin Phoenix Timberwolves Stan Ben Wallace
"stan" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"stan" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

"The team that surprised us the most, right? So the Taylor Jenkins Memphis Grizzlies scenario and you were talking about that earlier. But we also have a bunch of those kinds of teams this year. The other category is occasionally a Greg Popovich actually wins it for being a great coach of a great team that one 60 plus games or something. But more often than not it goes from somebody who the team made a big leap and we couldn't see it coming. They made the most out of the least that that kind of category. And so drawing from both of those categories, there's some overlap too between the two, I came up with like 11 guys the other day, which is ridiculous. It's a third of the league. But that's where I'm sort of at. To me, the two hardest ones Howard this year, when I was looking at it, somebody had questioned me and I started looking at it. We're coach of the year and most improved player. I can do the other ones all pretty, pretty quickly and easily, at least get it narrowed down to a couple guys. But most improved in coach of the year to me are hard and I had a long list on coach of the year also. So this was my list. I'm sure they're similar. Taylor Jenkins, emea doka Mani Williams taron, JB bickerstaff, Mike Malone. Perennially underrated and underappreciated, I think, for what he's done there. We give jokic a lot of credit rightfully for what the nuggets have done with no Jamal Murray and Michael Porter junior, but Mike Malone keeping that thing together and getting the most out of the rest of the cast should be noted. Billy Donovan, Jason Kidd, Chris Finch, Steve Kerr, Eric spoelstra, all for different reasons or some similar reasons. Some of those I'm going to be able to knock out quicker than others, right? It's like, it's a three man ballot. Steve kerner exposed to probably won't be there at the end. I think I'm leaning pretty heavily toward Jenkins, you DOCA, I feel like ty Lou has to be on there. I voted for money Williams last year, thought he should have won. He actually had the most first place votes, but lost on points to tibs. I'm tempted to get money back in there again. But this is a really tough one this year. Stan, when you look at it, do you see it the same way that we in the media do at your part media now too, but you have the coaching background, do we lean too far sometimes toward the, oh wow, that team really surprised us so that guy's coach of the year, or do you kind of see it the same way? Yeah, no, sort of the same way. I think, again, I started with a long list to me, what Monty's done has been incredible. I mean, you know, 61 wins was still 7 games to go. And really impressive going 11 and four without Chris Paul. I thought that was an impressive streak and just how complete that team is and how disciplined that team is. I think it's been incredible. The thing with Taylor Jenkins and why putting at the top is I just haven't seen teams this young do this. Yeah. I mean, to be so good at both ends of the floor, you might get a yum team and you see their talent and their great offensively and their defense breaks down. But they're a top 5 or 16 at both ends of the floor..

Mike Malone Taylor Jenkins Memphis Grizzli Greg Popovich Taylor Jenkins emea doka Mani Williams taron JB bickerstaff jokic Jamal Murray Chris Finch Eric spoelstra Steve kerner ty Lou Michael Porter Billy Donovan Steve Kerr Jason Kidd Howard nuggets Jenkins Stan
"stan" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"stan" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

"Going to make the playoffs or play in and now house poll George. Is this going to be the proverbial team? None of the first top seeds want to see in the first round. Do you give them a shot of actually winning a series as they are assuming no Kauai? Well, I think a lot of it depends on that first play in game, right? I mean, so they're going to get Minnesota probably maybe Denver Dallas, but probably Minnesota. If they can win that with Memphis being a very good but inexperienced team and John morant going through some health problems right now, I would definitely give them a chance because they're also I think very optimistic they're going to get Norman Powell back, which gives them another big weapon. Then I think they would have a chance in a first round series, but if they lose the first play in game and they even say when the second one and have to play Phoenix, no. I just Phoenix is too good. Like the narrative has been. Oh, there's no dominant teams this year. It's wide open. And then I keep looking at the standings and looking at the numbers and saying, you can't dominate a league much more than Phoenix has this year. And I just don't see without Kawhi Leonard. I don't see the clippers being able to get through a series against, you know, against Phoenix. You've perfectly previewed one of my other topics on my notes list about the sun. So I'm gonna put a pin in that though, we'll get back to it. You touched on something or made a remark about the grizzlies that, you know, I believe this after covering the league for 25 years, there are certain almost immutable laws of the NBA of the playoffs in particular. And occasionally they get broken, but one of them is young teams that are just making their breakthrough don't usually win at a high level in their first year, right? Even if you're the second seat as the grizzlies are now, typically you got to take your lumps. And we all believe in that because we've seen it happen so many times over it feels like that's in a immutable law of the NBA postseason. But the grizzlies have been really good. And I know, as you mentioned, is banged up right now. So let me just do the truth test here, Stan. Is it really that hard for a young team that and they were in a playoff series last year granted, but that has not even won a single playoff series together yet. Is it really the case? And why is it? Is it, I mean, it's an easy thing to say, well, they're inexperienced at that level. Is it as simple as that that the grizzlies are going to get hit with some things? Let's say against the clippers if they make it or whoever it may be in the 7 spot that they're just not used to seeing is the adjustments that are going to be thrown at them, that they're not used to. Like what is it that makes it so difficult for the young inexperienced team, especially when they've had a regular season like this. Like it feels disrespectful when we say this about the grizzlies almost, but I believe it also. Well, right, first of all, though, I would say, you know, they were in the playoffs, as you noted last year. So they have a little better idea of what to expect. And then they're also as far behind as they are in Phoenix. I mean, they're 5 full games ahead of,.

Phoenix grizzlies John morant Norman Powell Minnesota Kawhi Leonard clippers Memphis NBA Denver Dallas George Stan
"stan" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"stan" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

"Yeah, I've got two guests for the second week in a row. We're very generous here at SI. First, I've got the Hall of Famer Ben Wallace, former NBA champion with the pistons, of course. Ben has launched a new cannabis venture, it's called undrafted, a nod to his own career, of course, which you can learn more about at BW as in Ben Wallace, BW undrafted dot com. We discussed that new venture, as well as a bevy of NBA topics. Of course, having to include had to include defensive player of the year because Ben Wallace won four of those tied with to kimbi matumbo for the most ever. Ben Wallace actually second, I should say, in the pod because first up, I've got Stan van Gundy of TNT and NBA TV. We had a ton to discuss, of course, at this late stage in the season, we get into the sun's title hopes why he thinks that Phoenix is absolutely the favorite. How far the grizzlies can go, what the Celtics can do now without Robert Williams, how far can the nets get after their weird jagged season? Plus, Stan gives us his picks for coach of the year and defensive player of the year and lots, lots more, never any shortage of strong opinions when you have Stan van Gundy on the pod. Before we get to all that, a reminder, please rate review and subscribe to the crossover wherever you get your podcasts. If you got feedback for me, please hit me on Twitter at Howard Beck. Okay, Stan van Gundy followed by Ben Wallace all coming up next so stick around. Now very pleased to welcome Stan van Gundy Stan. How are you,.

Ben Wallace NBA kimbi matumbo Stan van Gundy pistons Ben TNT Robert Williams grizzlies Celtics Phoenix nets Stan Howard Beck Twitter Stan van Gundy Stan
"stan" Discussed on Hack

Hack

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on Hack

"We can now see because we can see the technology trends on the cost of electric vehicles. We can see where the price of solar is going away. The price of batteries are going where the price performance of induction cooking and hate. Competing is going the by twenty twenty three or twenty twenty full if you can finance those items and bring them in your life. By twenty thirty end of the decade every household would actually save about five thousand dollars a year. But i think the real point you're driving at is there's an expensive upfront cost to buying these goodies. And so i think that's where there's a role for government and the private sector to play in helping finance these things so that everyone can afford it totally. So how do you expect that governments. Should i guess subsidize. Some phase transitions for for every australians. No one's put the package together yet in a single house really let alone in a whole sub and so there's sort of a race to figure out the right set of policies to make it affordable to build the workforce so there's enough trades that can do all the work because most of this work will go to trade. Because it's retrofits it'll happen with your renovations will when you move house. And so we need to start building that capacity now so the destroyer can be reaping those savings in those benefits later in this decade. Obviously a lot of these rides on governments taking a lot of action. And you know there's been a lot of scrutiny on scott morrison government and it's i guess lack of action in this space. I mean just today. It's approved a third new coal project in a month and just a few weeks away from the climate change conference in glasgow. I mean the big question here is is there any incentive or have you got any indication from the australian government that it's cain to actually take on some of these costs and some of these policies my radical nineteen year old triple j self which still exists would like the australian government. Go to glasgow and say you know what will we're going to show you how to do it. We're gonna decarbonising our domestic economy by twenty thirty. We know how to do that. We're going to build that on the back of the australian sola miracle. We've got the cheapest electricity in the world deleted. The consumer is destroying rooftop solar. We're gonna run similar programs today. Cobb nizar heating systems by using. Hey pumps as a substitute for. Natural gassing are harms it will also improve the health of children and given that we're a nation that imports all about petrol and diesel which is thirty billion dollar. A year lost to the economy. We know electrify out conflate instead and we're going to run it on australian sola that's the recipe for decarbonising out. Domestic economy will do it by twenty thirty and we the rest of the world matches and then he should go on to say something like strangers is enormously lucky and can produce are much renewable energy that we will be able to make grain steel green aluminum green medals even grain hydrogen grain ammonia and we will be exporting that to the rest of the world to help them make the climate commitments in the decades. After twenty thirty that is a believable achievable vision for australia on climate. If any serious. Economists would like to see down and go numbers. I think it. Actually it works out that this would be the best possible path for the australian economy's honestly a government not signing up for plan like that he's actually costing the australian economy and denying our youth the future so i think we need to rise up. We need to ask for that in a very ambitious thing. We should eat demanding that that's what we take. The glasgow is a national climate commitment. Hack on triple jack. That he's the sole griffith who is an inventor. He's an entrepreneur he's also been advising the us and now australian government's on how to electrify everything to reduce carbon emissions. Thanks so much for listening to this episode. I'll catch you next time.

"stan" Discussed on Hack

Hack

18:38 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on Hack

"This is an abc podcast. When i opened tick talk this week there was. These fake video edited to show the full new south wales. Prime mia gladys baradji. Cleon dancing at a club to talk is just one place with it are a lot of people. We love her on these episodes of hack. We're going to talk about. Why young people standing this state leaders and what that means for accountability. Because let's be honest gladys burji clean ease being investigated for corruption. Hello avenue dies. He and later on this episode. The federal government has approved third new coal project in just one month and where a few weeks away from a major climate conference where australia will continue to be pushed to eradicate cobb emissions. We're gonna talk to the scientists who says we can lower emissions by electrifying everything and we're going to hear from young people who've been to prison and i'm being supported when they get out. Good morning everybody. good morning. everybody thought she was great. She did amazing. Jack is now in new premia. In new south wales off to gladys burji clean. Step down over a corruption investigation. But if you'll information is purely from tick talk then you probably have no idea. Because they're gladys stands making fake videos of hoods rest in raunchy outfits grinding at the club and throughout the pandemic we've seen w a premium moth mcgowan being cold. The state's daddy there. The den andrew stands a young people just blindly trusting politicians. Even the ones accused of corruption. I want to know your thoughts. Do you like your.

"stan" Discussed on Wealth Is In The Details Podcast

Wealth Is In The Details Podcast

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on Wealth Is In The Details Podcast

"The bond guys are known for being the the the boring crowd at the company christmas party. Nobody wants to talk to him until all of a sudden everyone does women. That's topsy turvy. See in the markets in trouble. And you're really relying on ear. Bond manager to provide safety. Our number one goal for all investors is always going to be the preservation of principle that trumps all else that trump's income that trump's performance we kid around or not kid around it's really a our internal mindset is our job is to keep our investors wealthy first and foremost peer. You have plenty of other options in terms of investments that you can be sort of high flying or growth or risk on as they say that can create more wealth we want to produce some income we want to produce some extra well but our number one job is protecting capital so the majority of our clients tend to be a wealthy individuals that are looking to make sure they're capital is in place or wealthy institutions but we do work with quite a bit of a younger more aggressive types of investors that that'll use as a nice sort of placeholder maybe they have concerns about other investment opportunities and they wanna place capital for a few years. The high quality safety and the liquidity in the bond market can be great to us almost depending on how you structure the portfolio but can be used sort of as a sounding off point to pull capital from one investment invest in the other and vice versa. We see quite a bit of that. Yeah and that that. Non correlation between those risky volatile assets like stocks is really advantageous. So even if it's a ten fifteen twenty percent of a portfolio it can make a big difference and in the long run. It's real rewarding as well so you're definitely not boring. It's very smart group of people. Ed i really appreciate you being one of one of our our partners or go to advisory firms for for that so thanks and it really So glad you could join us. If a listener would like to discuss bonds or like a second opinion on the on the on the bonds or the funds they own. I suggest they reach out to me. And then if it's appropriate. I can bring you into the conversation stan. Would that be okay with you. That would be fantastic. I would love that. I mean there's so many little nuances deeper. Conversations about taxable municipal bonds or how bonds trade or how to get the most bang for each individual investors bach customize a portfolio. Please lean on us. We'd love to do that. Our role is to work as a sub advisor. So we work on behalf of advisory firms like yourself. Obviously yourself firms you've worked with. We've done quite a bit of due diligence on us way before we were given the right to participate here today and obviously peter. You've put us through our paces with plenty of tough questions before given this opportunity so we'd love the opportunity to speak with individual clients and i'm sure peter's already asked that question so bring him on. Great shall do stan. Thanks thanks so much for joining us. I if if listeners wanna reach out to me please go to my website at raskin planning dot com and reach out and my our contact. Information.

trump stan Ed peter
"stan" Discussed on The Pig Wrestlers

The Pig Wrestlers

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on The Pig Wrestlers

"So i assure you it's you know in my mind is whatever we do. But less so much. And i think really highlighting the stories of patients by a trident vision. Bus time was something that we would stage affects ray Helping us to tell. I don't think us mostly engineers team we don't really do with action to sorta com which is so and i think the the resume but are what about so. Stan you really interesting story about how you you came here just elaborate a bit more about your life before division came to uk. France steady university and islands of gilo career military officer business and enroll into the eligible economy Sat's and not the proper examination. So i couldn't believe wine business instead so and also he was much more expensive. Do that formerly so Resorted to just visiting my friends in the classroom and eventually the bolt on letters That was a student. So i attended for years worth of university. Lectures underpin subjects legal. that is. Let's say my way or being the rehnquist to help other cds with their homework assignments to various degrees. We'll your favorite subjects to you. I don't think ahead of favorite subject because the university whatever it have learned once i came through a uk Cert- experienced numerous ultra is less about the information backs. Electric alerts urine is much more about the acura classic thirties. You're joining the gill. More debating society or visit society. You said of relearning subjects or was much more of umer experience to me than going to let you and i think even now most lecturers from her you can find online or mit worse for apple. But that's maybe ten percent of the universities so no one will in the remind pay amount of money for allowing people really want..

gilo Stan ray uk France apple
"stan" Discussed on The Pig Wrestlers

The Pig Wrestlers

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on The Pig Wrestlers

"I'd generally find myself having to edit most of what i say because usually known since and let Today it will be a notable exception. Because you'll just most mostly have to edit me out a joke rain. You're listening to the pig. Wrestlers appalled cost. Where ray ni- reviewing this book never wrestle with a pig by mark mccormack. I stand a fire. Division bashing about is figuring out how we use technology to shift away from the healthcare. While where you go to the clinic warrior ill religious. Mama wear to knowledge You should now isn't fierce our months or days. You might have or else is wrong with this. Is what excites me. The most is applying weirdo To reduce and in that way save lives enemy healthier more accessible and more reckless ables. Before i introduce. Stand like stunt phyllis again way to his crumbs. Well if it's my inner child. Mutual back-to-school just have the knowledge my life just i feel wary love stan deliverable on that with a straight face. It's the was to the deepest british values of not taking so serious that is the highest. British matthys immigrants. That's what i learned over the recommend up to my kid's school in ways that eats yet that..

mark mccormack ables stan deliverable phyllis
"stan" Discussed on Leadership Lab with Dr. Patrick Leddin

Leadership Lab with Dr. Patrick Leddin

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on Leadership Lab with Dr. Patrick Leddin

"What doesn't just do what's important to us. That is very important. That can think back to those ideals. You talked about earlier ultimately. It's it's it's easy to easier to stay tethered to stay tethered difficult times. If you know what you're connected to train yeah. It gets back to ask the question. Why is it that way and someone says well. it's been that way while no we just. We just proved. It doesn't have to be that way. So what do we want it to be. And those are very important conversation. Some of which are be it had. But in many cases i think they're fairly superficial. I think we need to have deeper conversations about how we want our society to work how we want our politics door how we want our economy to work. And you know in the moment when everybody's just trying to go on vacation or you know. Enjoy a post kobe thing. There's a little reticence to have those but things will happen in an unfortunately if we missed the moment if if we take the next year and we don't take advantage of it. The pieces will slow. Down inertial a setback in short of wherever wheel and it will be hard to adjust again and so we don't want another pandemic to help us. Well stand you said. We had a gift of this moment to make some new choices. I think we had a gift today with you. Being on the podcast. I really appreciate your service to our country The lessons you're teaching all of us as leaders and your willingness to spend thirty minutes or so chatting with myself and the audience. I really appreciate that so much that you're completely my honor and thanks for all you. Oh my pleasure. Take care of yourself. Low folks that's all. I have for today's episode. My thanks to general retired stan mcchrystal for joining me today to discuss leadership and global an ever changing world..

stan mcchrystal
"stan" Discussed on Leadership Lab with Dr. Patrick Leddin

Leadership Lab with Dr. Patrick Leddin

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on Leadership Lab with Dr. Patrick Leddin

"You're gonna learn a great deal from this conversation so grab something to write with. Sit back and prepare to take some notes. As general retired stan mcchrystal and i meet in the leadership lab stanley.

stan mcchrystal
"stan" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Stan Kronke is not going to routinely spend into the luxury tax. Guys for the Warriors or Mickey Aronson, with the Miami Heat like they'll do it. Why? Because that's that's their baby. Stan Kroenke's got worry about a lot of babies. He's got Arsenal, Baby. He's got Rams babies got nuggets Babies got avalanche babies Got rapids baby, He's got mammoth baby. He's got so fi stadium, baby. And that's his favorite child. Sofi Stadium, not the Rams. Sofi Stadium. That's his favorite child. His favorite team. His team Sofi Stadium. They're going to allow him. To own more teams, which will mean that those teams that he owns are going to be more restricted in terms of what they'll be able to spend in payroll because he's got to worry about all of these different Properties. And you don't allow Owner NFL owners to own Other teams in other NFL markets. So stand Krockey turns over the nuggets and avalanche to his wife. And everything's good. I want to I have never seen Stan Kroenke's wife. That ball arena. That doesn't mean that she doesn't go. I just don't see her ever. I've never seen her. I've seen Stan Kronke. They're like half a dozen times. He's the owner of the team. We all know that. Let's Josh play around with The Nuggets. They neglect the avalanche all the time. Like is that the spirit like letter of the law Stand crock is fine letter of the law. Dan Snyder's fine. He gives up control to his wife. Is that the.

Dan Snyder Stan Kroenke Stan Kronke Josh Miami Heat Rams Arsenal Sofi Stadium Krockey Mickey Aronson half a dozen times Warriors NFL fi stadium
"stan" Discussed on Strange Brew Podcast!

Strange Brew Podcast!

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on Strange Brew Podcast!

"To you. Can you can do that. Was that for that. So i guess it's time for still not record..

"stan" Discussed on Strange Brew Podcast!

Strange Brew Podcast!

08:06 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on Strange Brew Podcast!

"New pen. It can read underwater. Okay it can write a lot of other words to. that's all. I've been writing with man point of it possibly can be more news host. Tom cat aka tom thompson. Call me what kelly. And he's wife beater. Billy today didn't even realize roseburg. It's fucking hot in here man and open the window because there's too many children playing out there. You all you hear is fucking screams for wondering like. I'm on the way my backyard. Up like i can see out my bedroom window to like. There's like five different houses that they're all right along back of mind and they all have kids all just scream all day. I'm drinking some white clog in like a college girl. I shots juice juice. Yeah i accidentally got the with pope and it's kind of funny. It's not that bad. It wasn't even paul bhai. I read. I thought i read nope. But it actually says lots of fought with vodka no marsh just all right. Well i got even dubey for this episode is going to get dark. It's gonna get strange. Because we're talking about the kidnapping of colleen stan aka the girl in the box on the box and our source today is rancor the graveyard shifts sites fucking great. There's a lot of dark very dark subjects on there and you wanted to get into. It will spur cup dubinsky. Procast spark it up. Got my little drinks going out the box. There's so many questions. I have one thousand nine hundred. Seventy seven cameron hooker sees a twenty year. Old colleen stan and held prison in his northern california home for seven years. He proud that last name daito. No one's got hooker anymore. Think that's a hooker. that's a fuck game. It's not a good last name. Yeah he kept her for seven years. You probably kept calling in a wooden box underneath his bed that he shared with his wife janice hooker which is like what's in the box. Janice hooker sounds like someone from arkansas. That goes through old dumpsters of where the baby fetuses are thrown out. And then she's like looking for one specifically for dinner. That's what that reminds you that that's the first thing your mind goes to sounds like dirty. Arkansas bitch is a nice little crackhead could see it. We got to leave arkansas alone soon. She found a good baby skull and in the dumpster and chooses an ashtray and so initially cameron only released colleen from her confinement to beat her enforcer and to engage in intimate relations after they sanded psychological coercion colleen became a live in babysitter and sexy for the couple. A babysitter feel like you'd have a lot of alone time to just leave. I know and they. They scare them and we'll get into why she was scared to leave. And and it is. I want to get into this. Finally because we've never really talked about kidnappings or abductions. That is human abducting humor and talked about aliens abducting clearance. There is many episodes. We can get into sex dungeon sort of things and people keeping people hostage for years and shit like if they're like locked in a basement or something or like physically can't get open when you say babysitter. It seems like she had like free access. We'll be back in an hour your pin. You'll see why she was scared. But it is the same way where i wanna get a joseph frizzell sometime. And that's that crazy. Fuck i think from austria any like had a kid with his daughter and then they like. It's really fucked up and kept her like a cage. You know your flags upside down right. It's on purpose. do not know. I said it on the one episode but my flag can flag for all the youtube listeners is upside down because it means is upside down now means canada is in distress as it means international distress. Because we're forced to be locked our homes and trudeau in doug. Ford have taken my freedoms of my rights away and also means that you're displeased with your fucking government doesn't understatement kirk. Yeah i know right. Look that up but i was like cool by upside out. I guess so should just true that she became known as the girl in the box and her story shocked people around the world. The true details of what happened to call. Dan and her crimes of her captors is almost like an urban legend. And billy. beware of how you. I can't hear my mike now. So get into on the morning of may nineteenth ninety seventy seven twenty roll-call newsday and decide to hitchhike from her home in eugene oregon to northern california to attend a friend's birthday party where she went a long way for a fucking birth. Good friend birthdays be a her birthday care for oregon and california are far enough. Where you're like. You're just gonna keep hitchhiking until you can fucking make it there. It's like is there a better way is not a better way. I'm not gonna geography. I don't know if she spent most for day. Accepting rides and various strangers mostly truckers. That probably were nice. But you know if we've learned anything from jan janssen bob the way of the road right. If you if some of you accept the ride you have to be willing to know you get a choice as grass or catch. Yeah that's that's true but you know yes. An instant johnson. Bob for all the fans not seen that movie arena to go see she slowly. She was making your way to our destination. What a young couple cameron was twenty three and his nineteen year old wife janice picked her up and we'll get into more of the background but janice was also abused by cameron and they actually met camera was nineteen and she was fifteen when they fucking map and then he strung up to like a tree and like whipped her and she was like i think she was epileptic and shit and she was low self esteem so he kind of and ought epilepsy have to. I don't just that she was. She was put fucking strobe light that She wished she was acting just their buchan shaken up five more vulnerable. I guess you could say because people are vulnerable. Sure about that. Yes i know. I know one one. I was the manager at the game. Tiny couldn't walk into the game. Got fucking trumping to the gym one kid. That wasn't that's why. I've said that that story i've said before i worked with. And they'd like strobe. Light light sabers. I was waving it around. And someone's like stop doing that. You're going to give him a seizure. And i was like yes but she was just vulnerable at the time and so he kind of brought her like janice into his like sexual sadism fantasies and shit. Like there's so make you feel better though. Jesus fuck all over my crotch all right anyway. Why would you. That's so cold man my balls. So yeah they picked her up colleen had turned down a number of rides but decide to get into the couple's blue van largely because she believe the couple who were traveling with their eight year old daughter and she almost took.

tom thompson janice seven years Dan colleen stan paul one thousand fifteen arkansas youtube nineteen twenty year twenty three cameron eight year old joseph frizzell oregon janice hooker eugene oregon today