18 Burst results for "Stallard"

"stallard" Discussed on The Friends of Israel Today

The Friends of Israel Today

09:25 min | 1 year ago

"stallard" Discussed on The Friends of Israel Today

"Eight six six four two five eight four and that's in in Canada. Welcome back everyone. We're talking with Dr. Mike Stallard about really serious doctrinal issues here. Before the break we looked at sin we looked at God's plan of salvation to rescue us from the sin that has tainted all of his creation. But now that we're we've we've understood and have a grasp on salvation throughout biblical history. Let's understand what it means now to have good works how that fits into that so mike. Can you explain how to good works fit into salvation. Salvation do good work save. How good works fit into this relationship? We have okay good works. Do not keep us saved. Only God keeps a saved and memory. Fijian's two late nine that we read a last section. We're saved by grace two-faced not by works list any should boast. Nobody's GonNa Brag in heaven. Appear because I deserve to be. Nobody's going to be able to do that But good works do flow out of salvation. Fijian's two tin gods were deigned that we follow good works the come out of our salvation. Good works are also the basis for awards in the coming kingdom. Luke nineteen eleven so good works do have a role to play in the in our lives but they don't save us. Good works are an out work of the love that we have for God because he did save us that is ultimately what I think James this is pointing do but I wanNa Park here for a minute. We're going to transition. We're I want. I want to talk about this idea that you can't lose your salvation. I think this is a fear. Was that a lot of Christians have. Can I lose my relationship that I have with God but we at the Friends of Israel believe in a doctrine called eternal security. And what I love about eternal security is that it has both a present tense aspect right now but it also has the future in mind. Mike can you lay Out with this idea of eternal security is all about well. He trolls courtesy. Sometimes call one saved always saved we once. We have trusted Christ as savior. There's a permanent transaction justified forever and that will never be taken away from me now. Paul the New Testament emphasizes the future aspect to that by future eternal life. John Represents the present aspect of that first John five thirteen in the passage about assurance. I've written these things that you may. I know that you have eternal life well. Eternal Life wouldn't be terminal if you could lose it So eternal life is present possession. So there's a president aspect expect to that but there are a lot of passages that point us to eternal security Fijian's one thirteen to fourteen the Holy Spirit seals us those of us who are faith in God and were kept for the future there's a guarantee and ernest down payment. That's made the God gave gave us through the spirit to guarantees do more phlippines pins one six. He who began a good work in you will perform it until the day of Jesus Christ so then Romans eight twenty eight thirty nine might be my favorite deal He's GonNa call all all things work together for good but there's the plan of God there's the son of God and his word and the love of God nothing will separate us from the love of God which is in Christ is Jesus and that would not be possible to say that if we could lose our salvation Now some people fear that if we hold that view that will go out and live like the double after we trust the Lord But the problem with that kind of arguing is motivation for serving. God and doing well is not just fear of hell. The great love. You'll always spirit shows abroad nor heart. The love of God once we come to God he moves and works in our hearts to motivate us to do differently. Not We can sin. But there's a greater motivation than just fear of Hell for serving the Lord love of God and service for others. In fact I say this the Body Eternal Security Eternal security keeps me grounded in the idea that I need to be focused on other people. Not focused focused on myself. If if I'm not an internally secure that I need to be watching my own steps and paying attention to myself instead of focused on helping other people so I think he turned. Security Eighty is a very important doctrine Christians and you had read from a Fijian's chapter one versus thirteen and fourteen. which is one of my favorite the idea that God is sealed? You and he's given you that deposit the Holy Spirit within you which is a guarantee he put a down payment on you all timidly so that you have assurance today like you said you don't have to wonder whether or not you're GONNA lose your salvation your assure today but also with the anticipation with the hope that there's something greater coming that that ultimately that day of redemption when Jesus returns that's what you are sealed for that's what we're waiting for. That's our hope. That's the thing that we fix our eyes on his is the coming and of the Lord Jesus the blessed hope that when the Church sees him we are with him and that is the beauty of of what I believe. Eternal security is all about and that's why I I want to thank Dr Mike. Stallard for being in studio always enjoyed abuser. Thank you Israel. On on the verge of becoming a state a teenaged Holocaust survivor arrives on her shores alone. His name is fi calendar. Little did he know his search for a new life in the Holy Land would lead him to the Messiah Spe- enthusiastic to share his faith. Engaged others in spiritual conversations many of which can be found within our magazine Israel my glory whilst fee is now in the presence of his severe his collected writings from well over fifty years of ministry continue to encourage believers levers worldwide. Now apples of gold a dramatic reading from the life of I recently was working in the Old City of Jerusalem and I saw two young Orthodox Jewish students carrying a very heavy package when I asked what was in the package answered. This is a package of good. Deeds what we have here are wholly commentaries for the Ultra Orthodox doc students. When I heard that I said then you hold a big package of misdeeds which is more important the music law or the so called laws contained in your package? That is a very hard question. One boy said come with us and and we will ask our rabbis. I agreed to go with him and as we walked. I shared God's word within when we arrived at the Shiva one of the students said that's kind man has asked us a question. We would like you to answer the rabbi asked. What would you would like to know so I asked rabbi? Why do you spend all your life and encourage your young students to spend their lives studying these books that have no value? Oh you who are you to speak to me like that. He demanded to have anything for there to say yes I replied I am. I'm sorry to see such young boys following after false teachings. What do you mean the rabbi asked then took out my small Bible and said had you do not even know what is worth in this book? Deuteronomy six sixteen and Seventeen says who shall not tempt the Lord your God and you shall diligently keep his commandments. But instead of keeping God's commandments you have spent her entire life studying commentaries. He's casting away the word of God. You have tempted God because what you're doing is against his will by this time others had gathered around around us they angrily asked. Are you an apostate. Oh I have been a complete Jew since I came to know the Lord. According to the way he is is instructed us in the Bible. I am sorry for you because you have been living in darkness. And you're taking these young boys with you as we say when Shepherd's trays sheep will stray after him. And you have all gone astray. But there is way to escape the darkness and come into the liked I then read. fifty-three emphasizing verse six all. We like sheep have gone astray. We've turned everyone to his own way then asked now tell me who are the apostates. One man responded. We Are Jews. But you're not a Jew because you you believe in another God I asked. How is it possible for one who believes in follows? All that is written in the Bible do believe in another God. I have shown you facts. From God's own word facts to show you that you are apostates if you will study with an open mind and hard before God. I'd he will show you the truth. They all became very quiet. Ni- added if you'll put your trust in the Lord alone he will give you what you can never ever received by studying these false teachings think about this you will have certainly given as much to think about. They admitted these students and.

Dr. Mike Stallard Israel Dr Mike Canada John Jerusalem Holy Spirit Luke James president Paul Ni Seventeen Messiah Spe Little ernest Shepherd
"stallard" Discussed on Freelance Pod

Freelance Pod

16:17 min | 2 years ago

"stallard" Discussed on Freelance Pod

"Yes having breakfast with their children and often do I not about Britney Spears recently is posted about her mental health and the way they share that is is fascinating to me because it just immediately gets my brain going thinking Oh home what's interesting concise it thoughts and actually only relate liked that but with the Jennifer Aniston especially said that the interview which before would only have been in print but I actually read viewer online think it was hard to spot check in style correct myself install so at the online so actually it was so accessible to me. I could then react to it within probably about half an hour. I'd written quick pitch worked. Who wants to send it to fit went whereas when I started you you'd gather the magazines every week? Can the office gotree the magazine. See who's doing what or you went to policies and so he was doing what so you lose and celebrity. I was in the toilets chatting away the great she's dating so instead of all she spout with seven so he nice she said something about not smoking or something but yes said not you can just pick up on something spin it in terms of a personal pace or a lifestyle trend or something to do with what they said and you pitch can go out within within a half an hour with reading that information is is changed everything dramatically and while there's an overload for me as a journalist is change things in a way because I can just produce seventy feature ideas couldn't do this without social media. I won't to exist very much on instagram where people find the daily dose of kind of inspiration or you know they see something on one of my post that makes them think oh brilliant. I wasn't allowed in that oil yeah. I feel like that as well all I felt like that last week. Actually I don't feel like that now you know looking at just kind of the day of the kinds of as four PM moments but four PM in an office you'd have to make a cup of tea or you might Wanna spend the Internet with someone might be playing a youtube video those as moments where you'll you then when you're working from home by yourself when a kayaking spicy you kind of look to the Internet for a little bit of emotional downtime and I'm hoping deeping that the social media side of this will will fill that void for freelancers so I did. It was quite surprise. It still is surprise voice when I think the I. and I must say because I do have other up that helped me with this so I couldn't possibly claim to a clip of the size of the buddies healthsouth plus by myself but yet it's amazing. I do look at it some days insane what how you knew that was gonNA happen. I certainly wasn't the plan and sometimes perhaps that's the best way when actually it really was done from the hall. It was very much a friend deny he sat info. Why don't we create a page? Women who were freelance in. Let's try and bring work to pull past people be sharing opportunities case study hunting kind of people people and then I think as people move in and out of the freelance world because in the media particular it's very fluid between and I've done this myself night. Freelance woman it then the initial union contract still doing something else someone else we can pass people that went to work on a website and magazine we know moved into a PR company would still be on the buddies and knots when it began to grow into a software commissioning editors would find people to write stories for them and journalists to case studies on it because other people were freelance but not necessarily hundred journalists repeal would say oh I can be. FHM I actually do gardening mental health to use the same thing we now have a pitching our Friday. We have a pitching our where people can pitch to the page and commissioning this they can jump on and look at the pictures for our while than than pitching a week and I'm getting lost in the threads we just have pitching our and that's been really really successful. people now post says they own woods to be in the key for us to approve for pitching our That's really pleasing 'cause that's one of those things I think s just try. This might not work. Let's see what happens and actually people indicate on an people will comment. I've done pitches on around people will say Oh. I really love this. Have you thought about giving on the angle you mentioned the second second line. If you pitch you know what I really like the fact that you've mentioned bit lower down on the other so okay people kind of debate the angles pitches and you know kind of where they might go that kind of leads onto one thing that whether including but we do have a rule about not sharing contacts and sometimes we come up against people so saying well why not and I remember it was one of the very original things we said because it was kind of a failing that taxes so hard one that to give out a contact that might have taken some one three four years to establish to just hand that contacts thousand people is is kind of like letting your baby out into the world is that was my contacts but then we'll say of the we can't let people and our emails kind of on a page to allies allies people when the person who's email it might not want them. Hunting outs overwhelm also saying can you tell me anyone know the website XYZ website in somebody but he giving out while that person might get up to one thousand emails with pitches so that that's the reason we've done that and that's probably one thing that actually I still would stick to even though I think things are changing in that very much shaving community now network these days is much more about. Can I help you. Can you help make may can we work together by that needs to be monitored when you cited many voices in one group so I think on a personal level and I very much learn by continuing to do the shifts as when I can so when I left Metro it was because because I thought what I really need to focus on digital here and I was lucky enough to secure three month contract. BBC three and that was well. I started I play used beats the ticks and I hadn't seen before because I haven't worked commitment for websites. I haven't worked on website so I hadn't correction on but I hadn't seen choppy so then I would assume chop beaten assaulted learn there so it was kind of an on the job thing in many ways a that the other things that I've done for myself so when I went freelance again eight twenty seventeen decided it was time I had my own website for my family. Finally I am and I have not been published by somebody who knows what they're doing properly with with websites but we built apartment on he helped me. We voted together I'm lucky if but yeah I've learnt kind of upload a new article on today so that's kind of a self teaching thing where you kind of think well. I want a new piece of my portfolio or my website. I can't pay someone every time I need to learn how to do this. Same with instagram recently funny very simple but frustrating eighteen example was I was like how do you get a break in your instagram because I could see people posting that that Kinda Post and then there was a few lines gap before folded hashtags little things like that yes you could go on a forum INCI or facebook patients. They 'cause anybody know. How are you do a kind of instagram Graham but I think by the time I'd have done that I by donald tactic which is Google or ask a mate? 'cause I guess little free nods friends. Come say guys city. Will I know how to to make bitten spice on instagram post those little things than become a habit just learned because then you do it every day. Every time you pasted instagram UNSCRAMBLE my website you'll be learning just reminding the south that price S. uneven recently mice we contract with the Press Association on the digital lifestyle team that was quite interesting because that was the print wire where they have put customers but then we'll say we were doing daily reactives actives so that was very much polishing skills and kind of lending how they used wordpress because I obviously have funds in different cod how to countries or areas of the country where it couldn't be things about London at to be articles related to anyone across the UK and second of working out how how they like the headlines kind of thing say kind of mixture of working in house which has been very beneficial trial and error and stubbornness trying to the instagram thing thing is is a good example of stopping this as I shall not rest until I've worked out how to make a gap on my instagram post. Yeah Not Save the coaching it was it was many that I could see a change in the people that were joining office but grapes originally it was established journalists unite people who'd been paps on Magazines Kazini nationals for ten fifteen years and then handle they'd been freelance for the amount of time and very established United People that were on on the speed dial of a feature to say from the mirror the male they'd have that group suspect Trustees Lake County but over the years seemed so many more people wanting to join who are graduates or pre Greg people who still collegian unique he wants to to start freelancing while they're studying because they can suspend this is so I think they should do is free. Don't sauce coils to build up before you even graduate. I mean not show the pressure that people around. I guess we did that as well. You know I experienced that kind of thing but then change in change in the people that are coming coming through on there for a change in Van Looking for and I'm kind of a not nervousness perhaps but for one of the best word nervousness business to ask because I suppose they see this sort of this group of various topless journalists who are come closest very knowledgeable and speak in some way the report. Please speak for our industry in a way that we forget people. Don't understand the law of the terms like I said Fun O'CONNELL. I would say that to someone without thinking I might go on earth. I don't even it's a technical term. It's just what he needs to cool it and still do do anyway so I think I've seen iota of women in particular saying help so I have this phrase flannel panel big referring to and I believe the technical term is most heads and it's essentially why you see the names of every day he's in the magazine. is what in most magazines now I think sort of it's not to have it but I guess tunnel panel comes from it sort of fits picking picking them up saying Oh look here's the features editor in his the editor in this person not talking it. It's kind of a bit of a a WHO's who looked house. We put the magazine Together self-congratulatory list but yes I would I would collect cruelly cooler to flannel pattern but I suspect people pokes more we think about things 'cause you forget how much the Internet has changed things because we're so used to it now. It's so normal to us to have social media stuff. It's sometimes I feel a bit like dinosaurs. I all I remember before the Internet then I think no is is in one way. It's been stealth bombers you coming to us and now this is relentless and it's never probably going to go away. I don't on the other hand is really crept up because there are still so many things that actually we still do in person and I think a polk cost especially freelance port really shows actually guy in back to to the verbal with talking here with we're talking. Another people are listening so they're not waiting scrolling. They're actually stopping and saying I want to listen. I want to hear voices again. I don't want to see words again. It's almost like we've had so many woods thrown at us on the Internet she not going hold on. I'd like something old audible..

instagram United People Britney Spears Jennifer Aniston BBC deeping facebook London UK editor Google Press Association Lake County Graham donald Greg one three four years ten fifteen years three month
"stallard" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

Piecing It Together Podcast

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"stallard" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

"Okay. That is my first puzzle. Oh, that's cool. Yeah. Any as classic is a a little miniature, Nintendo entertainment system. This is. I believe came out in nineteen Eighty-three from intendo and features. I think twenty games twenty the classic games that everyone knew and loved growing up. Everybody apparently still wants to play it like constantly, and I don't blame them because there's some of the best games ever. But yeah, I mean, this is like such a perfect example of nostalgia. And mid-nineties is absolutely a movie that the seems like the senior idea is to bring you back to that time everything from. Not just the things happening in the movie. But even right down to the look of the movie and everything it looks like you're watching VHS tapes. Most of the time with the the way that it's framed and even some of the the effects like the scan line affects and stuff that popped up here and their little. Visual degradation and all that was shot in. I instead of p alerts where they have the scan lines for fast movement and things like that. Four by three aspect ratio. So I mean, yeah, they kind of laid it on pretty thick and turn look like we're watching it through nineties television, again works, great the content. But yet it's funny that you mentioned style because you know, and especially with video games because I'm not a big video game guy because they've become such an art form unto themselves. And I've yet to hop onto that train, but I played video games growing up in the nineties, and I remember just telling people how mazing golden I was and how it's the greatest ever. And then I played it like recently, it was like a gold block That bullets. was a flesh colored block. What is this? And this is a horrible. This is a lot better than my brain. Yeah. A lot better in my brain, some people will swear that it's still amazing liars. I actually I'll get plenty of hate mail for this. But I I don't think anything except for the Nintendo and super Nintendo era aged particularly well sixty four on those. I'd rather just play a new game if I'm gonna play golden eye. Yeah. But I'd rather play intendo or super Nintendo. That's definitely my favorite kind of game. Well, that's fair doesn't it's no one should read you hate mail about that. That's just the cold hard truth. Bring it on people. Stallard is really dangerous has concept. And so I feel like the movie like we said says a joke in the beginning. It was kinda hard to be objective..

Nintendo Stallard
"stallard" Discussed on Monday Morning Critic Podcast

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"stallard" Discussed on Monday Morning Critic Podcast

"After that. I was in three or four other movies his soup. Is it? I mean, it's it's beyond funny. So I almost feel deal these thing it's funny because I laughing at something that's very near and dear to you. But well, that's what that's what comedy is the, you know, the Oakley say that comedians, very unhappy people. I I'm I'm not that. But I certainly was I was thinking that movie was that was that was a tough time for you. Or is that just, you know wanna? I was just making the movie, right, right? And I enjoy it seemed when you had that club of a Stallard, and you work and work. And you you you you largely find your way out of it. You don't ever completely find your way out of it? But you, but you get on top of it your framed that if you go back into it completely even like in a role that you're never gonna get out of it. It's sort of now that's not that's not logical because you develop the tools to get out of it. But still primal feeling. So it's on top of being a top of it being embarrassing on top of that. Putting you back in some of the most painful moments of your life. You actually feel ever to get back out of it. And so do we do we have to do so many takes just? Just to feel like that, you know. And I wouldn't do it again. Right. I mean, the pack. I can't imagine. How breathtaking the role would have to be amazing go into that kind of territory, and then people say people's people have replaced people I respected in the industry set after it came out. You'll never been this. Good, and you will ever be this good again. Well, can I use an expletive on your son -solutely? I to myself said to them fuck, you you're saying if I'm fluid you won't believe me. That is ridiculous. Terrible thing to say somebody awful things is somebody awful. Yeah. Yeah. And indeed the offers stopped. I would go up for an interview for a movie in the and say really love you Mike has been which became codes for. I'm not gonna hire you..

Stallard Oakley Mike
Kroger shooting suspect indicted on murder charges

Democracy Now! Audio

00:38 sec | 3 years ago

Kroger shooting suspect indicted on murder charges

"In Kentucky, the white man accused of shooting and killing two African American customers at grocery store Wednesday was indicted on murder charges before the deadly shooting last week. Gregory Bush was captured on a surveillance camera. Trying to force open the doors of a predominantly black church. The First Baptist Church of Jefferson town before turning his attention to a nearby Kroger supermarket where he opened fire and killed Marie Stallard. And Vicki Lee Jones Bush has a history of making racist slurs and has a long rap sheet of misdemeanor charges, including domestic violence menacing and making terroristic

Gregory Bush Vicki Lee Jones Bush First Baptist Church Of Jeffer Marie Stallard Kroger Kentucky Murder
"stallard" Discussed on NWAP

NWAP

04:22 min | 3 years ago

"stallard" Discussed on NWAP

"And the the memory care to be shot at random, but people whereas with them is Maariv Stallard sixty nine and the second victim is making Joel sixty seven because if the middle of the day, and you know, people our age aren't shopping at the grocery store in the middle of the day. So he is this article, by the way is is on CNN John Weedon from any said he walked into the store and five months was shots said Stallard who was the first night he killed and then as he left he fired a fatal shot Jones, which is second woman and this article says that on unnamed citizen unnamed armed citizen exchanged gunfire with him. But neither was struck. And then he fled the scene, and then he was captured alive. But from what I saw this morning on. I once I saw like a man who confronted the other the shooter. He said that the man put his gun out and said, I'm not gonna shoot you. Because why people don't kill why people. So he randomly killed back. We'll who are on on Opal. And when it came about the white person who who did it who had a gun. He said I'm gonna I'm gonna shoot you could show white, but they will have no motive, yes. Yes. That's motive enough idea. But this article here doesn't mention anything about it. So. I don't know if CNN doesn't report on it. But I'm the crazy thing is when I watched the interview demand says, you know, the mess. The man the man says, my father told me that the man said why did we don't care? Why people and she lady reporter said excuse me. What did you say again as I said, why people don't kill people? That's what he said that lady's. Like, oh, so how they like she didn't want to touch that whole thing. I'm like, no like extra fucking follow up question. Like understand. It's uncomfortable. Reporter like an like when I go on. Scared to have these conversations. But they know it's what they need to report on. But it's it's almost like if she had said anything the wrong way Nash, she could have been a bad guy whenever right because of this atmosphere around like all these conversations around race. I think I think we'll have to stop being scare. I mean, I do agree with you there. She should have went into a deeper. But I think everybody's like so scare right now that. Like where are they learning how to have appropriate conversation? What do you mean by scared? Rob where no scared of any type of backlash if anything said wrongly how how do they learn exactly what said that that is wrong, and they need to change their way of thinking or how do they know? Like the right making sure they savings in the right way. If they had the right intentions, but with that question, right? When he says, he said, why people don't care you will all she had to say it was. Oh, so do you think this shooting was racially motivated? And he can create expounded on what he meant. Right. Like you. Don't change the subject, right? Yeah. You don't if you don't want to say anything that you let whoever it is. You're interviewing saying right questions. Right. Because all I mean because somebody gives meta jobs as it has a question. I like my job is to ask questions as a reporter as a journalist. I ask questions into people answer. Whatever they give me an answer is whatever they gave me. But I didn't you know, whatever, I'm not biased where I didn't put myself into the story. Whatever the fuck it is that you have to say about any of that stuff. Speaking of journalists in us that good I use that term very loosely for our next topic your girl. Megan Kelly getting fired out this bitch. Meghan Kelly is working at NBC couple of days ago. She did a panel quote unquote, talking about black face with nothing, but white people and she was trying to. This should have as every Halloween like every Halloween..

reporter Megan Kelly John Weedon Rob Maariv Stallard CNN Joel Jones Nash NBC five months
"stallard" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"stallard" Discussed on Here & Now

"From NPR and WB. You are I'm Jeremy Hobson. I'm Robin young. It's here and now funerals are underway for three of the eleven people killed in the tree of life. Synagogue, President Trump is traveling to Pittsburgh despite a call from the mayor to wait until after all the services and thoughts and prayers are also heading to the city from the Louisville Kentucky urban league which released a statement, even as we mourn Marie Stallard and Vicky league Jones murdered by a racist shooter at a supermarket. We stand with our Jewish brothers and sisters in Pittsburgh Stallard Jones. Both African American were killed last week at a Krogers in Jefferson town Kentucky by a white gunman who reportedly told a white bystander. Oh, I won't shoot. You whites. Don't kill whites. The story was overshadowed by last week's pipebomb Miller and also overlooked was that before the shooting the gunman tried to enter the First Baptist Church of Jefferson town, black parisioners inside. But the doors were locked Louisville's white police chief Sam Rodgers spoke to. The congregation on Sunday tragic appears to be racist in nature is the elephant in the room that some don't want to knowledge in this case. And that doesn't get acknowledged many times and other similar tragedies that have occurred. Elsewhere sedate, Kwa Reynolds is president and CEO of the Louisville urban league that was her statement. I read a few seconds ago and sediba so he could have seen a synagogue shooting and a church shooting within a week when you heard this your thoughts. Thought about Charlottesville, and what we felt across the country. Worried about our safety in Louisville and the burden of being black or being identified as something someone that deserves to be hunted down and murdered because of hate now. And it is devastating. Louisville is a is a big city, but it's still small enough. There's just one degree of separation and to hear the chilling comments. That the killer made, you know, whites don't kill why to think that you have a man who's taking his grandson to the store for poster board for a school project. And then Vicky trying to go get food for her mother. I mean, it's not the kind of thing that you expect to happen anywhere. Really? But then the truth is that there's so much hate being start in our country that I guess none of us can ever really be caught off guard but adjust does fail so painful, and it does feel like an act of terrorism. This idea that we would be. Pushed into so much fear that you don't want to leave your home that you can't feel safe at a grocery store that you hesitate to check your mail. You know for black Americans. We have to push not only through the fear to find our courage. But then also this this need to stand up and say what about us? What about lowering the flags when we are killed? You know, I mean at some at some point, you say, there's this level of respectability politics, when you know is the person are they worthy of flag-lowering, and that's ridiculous leaving when you have Vicky Jones, and the MAURICE Stallard, it's not until you have the synagogue shootings that the White House lowers the flags, and so it forces this conversation of really show me that black life matters in America. Well, in addition to lowering the flags, I know there's a lot of criticism and conversation Louisville about the fact that this wasn't called an act of terrorism the Kroger shooting for quite some time as being investigated as a potential hate crime. And then there's what we're finding out about the gunman. He was once married to a black woman who got an emergency protective order against him in two thousand one a judge bar. Guard him from having her buying guns for three years, then in two thousand nine there was another domestic violence incidents involving his parents again, he had a surrender his guns in the cord. He's a dentist himself as having schizo affective disorder a lot of questions about how he could possibly have gotten guns. Just I do though want to spend just a second on the victims. You mentioned more he Stallard who was with his grandson Vicky Jones was the caregiver for her mother who had dementia. Her brother died of an illness just two weeks before. And now someone has to tell this mother..

Stallard Jones Louisville Vicky league Jones MAURICE Stallard Louisville urban league Jefferson town Kentucky Marie Stallard president and CEO Pittsburgh Robin young Jeremy Hobson President Trump NPR sediba Kwa Reynolds pipebomb Miller First Baptist Church Charlottesville Sam Rodgers
"stallard" Discussed on What's Good Games

What's Good Games

03:48 min | 3 years ago

"stallard" Discussed on What's Good Games

"Will the poem be better? No, it's a great point because a lot against software development in particular is really tricky because if you coders use, they all have their like different. Sort of styles if you will, and not everyone note like you can have a piece of programming and have another engineer come to look at it and have the be like, what did they do here? I've worked at Sony places where like that's happened and someone has left and not provide documentation, and no one knows how the fuck this thing works like no. No, no notes. No one knows how thing works Mike, how is it possible that no one thing works. It's like wealth. The engineer left and you're like, the fuck the end. They're just left. It's like, now we have a thing we can't use because no one knows how to use it like, that's that's a real thing. Engineers, the most valuable position video games, at least that's what GIO Corsi told me, said engineers may animation engineer, I think specifically he said, is the job that if you want to, if kids your thinking about going into video game school, that's the job you want. They want to work these hundred hour weeks. No. Well, at least she'll make money, I guess. The other thing to consider to do are these people Stallard? Are they getting overtime like for you need to make sure that if you are asking crunch of your team that you are taking care of them monetarily and you're not just like you're salaried. Fuck off. Absolutely. I mean, even like the, I think that's why people are so kind of, you know amped up about this because in the wake of the telltale follow where you had a bunch of those people who were salaried saying, I worked overtime. I did crunch on these games and look what I got for it a whole lot of fucking nothing, you know and they're like, so be wary. If an employer asks you to cruncher work overtime, make sure that you're going to get some kind of benefit from that. And I think that obviously varies studio to studio, and I don't wanna make any generalizations about how rockstar treat their employees financially because I have no idea or insight into that whatsoever. I can only hope that they're all well taken care of given the financial success of that studio and its parent companies. But I want to touch again on what you said about normalizing this kind of behavior because it comes back to what these two developer said at the end here about saying that, you know, even though you know Dan Houser and said, hey, you know, this is just me and my small team of four people were working. He's hours. We don't expect other people to do this. That's such an easy thing for him to say as the guy that top of the food chain at that studio to be like, I'm going to work this, but you don't have to as somebody who probably would look up to him. I would imagine if you work at rockstar games because you're passionate about the products that they're working on, and their legacy is a studio, and you look up to the house and go, hey, you built something really amazing something historic record setting in the industry. I want to impress you this up there working. One hundred hour weeks. You aren't gonna be punching in nine and punch it out at five. You know, this is not the way it's going to work, and I think that pressure is the thing that people at the top people in leadership positions need to be aware of and they need to address, you know, the not to say that they should be working less. I would never tell somebody who runs their own business to work less because Hello, we run our own business here. We work a lot, but I would say just be mindful of the people that are underneath you that may be can't work as you do. Maybe don't get the financial windfall when the game ships eighty five million copies.

engineer Dan Houser GIO Corsi Sony Stallard Mike developer One hundred hour hundred hour
"stallard" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"stallard" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

"That's when they connect in really helps them performance. The top of their game. That's the thing that they can also hold onto and think about as they're working, it's you gotta give them something to aim for they, you know, when this sale blows them a little off course, they need to know where the tacking back to vision value boys. It's really easy to member. Remember. I mean, just a quick quick example that's on my mind because I, I saw a YouTube concert at Madison Square Garden. Recently. I'm thinking about that band, but you know, they're a great example of connection there for teenage boys who came together when they were fourteen fifteen years old and they weren't very good at that time. You know, it wasn't unusual for them to be booed or laughed off stage, but they persisted. They were really there for each other. You know, their vision was to write music that promoted human rights, social Justice in matters of faith. They really valued one another. They split their profits equally between the four band members and their manager. They've helped each other through the store. Terms of life. You know, Edgeley guitar players went through a tough divorce. He had a daughter who is sick in the band released, supported him through that Bono's had death threats. The guys have been there to support him through that Adam, Clayton developed a drug and alcohol addiction. The guys helped him overcome at rather than throwing him overboard. And Larry Mullen junior the drummer, his mother was hit and killed in a car accident within about a year of the ban farming and Bono who lost his own mother just probably within the previous year, reached down, helped him get through a tough time. So this guy's really do value each other. And you look at bottle. He gets a lot of attention as the megastar, but he also directs a lot of attention to his bandmates and says, you know, I, I, why would I ever leave these guys? Because they made me better person always talking about how great each and every one of them are. They're like family to him, and he says, you know, families, people who have strong families tend to be the strongest people. And that's what our. Message really says, when you have that connection through family and friends, you're more resilient to deal.

Bono Clayton YouTube Madison Square Garden Larry Mullen Adam fourteen fifteen years
"stallard" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

04:29 min | 3 years ago

"stallard" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

"I wasn't in a position to to do that. And so I really started digging into the research and trying to understand why mergers were not working. And I started it really led me to a place that wasn't on my radar screen, which is the importance of relationships and just how were hardwired to connect. And it's very relevant today. Robbie, because we're going through a time where there's an epidemic of loneliness in America is round the world signage. Just released research in on may. First, the showed they used the UCLA lowest scale, which is the gold standard of loneliness assessments in the survey, twenty thousand American adults and found that the average response was above the threshold that they consider lonely, which is very bad from a health standpoint because that's quiver. Want to smoking fifteen cigarettes a day. It's actually worse than obesity in terms of its effect on them. Just breezing your risk for early death and people who have high connection, our lives have a fifty percent, reduced risk of early death versus the average person. So a connection has, you know, I call it, it's a superpower that makes us smarter happier and more productive in isolation, whether it's through social isolation where we are alone or loneliness will refill alone. Even if we're around people, both of those are lethal in terms of their effect on our productivity, our happiness in our lifespan so that you feel like you've made a really clear case for why people should on an individual level strive for connection, but I also know how hard it is for somebody who's gotten into that right that you just described. Where you're just so focused in her job and you've forgotten to nurture and sustain the connections around you. And once you're in that downward spiral, I think it's hard to pick yourself up and get out of it. Do you have any like thoughts for people about how they could start to make some steps in that direction if they're like, oh, you just described me. Oh, that doesn't sound good. My health is really at risk. Okay. Well, I should do something about that. What what could they do? Well, it's, you know, first of all just mentioned this because I think it's important that I think there are a lot of people like I was who knew they didn't feel well, but they didn't. They wouldn't have said they were lonely because they're around people all the time. But I was only because the people I was around, it was all about tasks rather than really connected connecting people, and we need that connection is people need to have people weaken a share our struggles with our the weekend. Also here and encourage it has to go both ways. The connection only works. If it's a, we're both serving others and being served a loving and being loved. That's the only connection that truly works to think really fits well with your message to. And so I would say just a few things, it's number one, you know, reaching out and repairing relationships that are broken. We've had some of those in our in our family and even went on working on now. I think that's important. I think having a group of friends locally that you can get together with, you know, certainly my spouse Katie is my closest friend, but I have a group of guys that I'm really close to, and we see each other most Saturdays and they're a group of guys that I can really share. You know, these are my highs and lows for the week and and I can go to and and get support. You know, those guys really care for me, and I care for them were just a really tight knit group, and it's one of the best things I've ever had my life. To have that. So just encouraged people to get involved in the community tried to develop a group of friends. You know, look at faith communities. If you're open to faith, those can be great places to really connect with the support group and if it doesn't exist, start one. No, I, I really recommend it because we need that in this age of isolation that we're in. We don't have it. We dysfunction. Yeah, I, I've also heard that if you're in a really bad place, a good way to get out of it is to go find someone you can help because that kind of Friday, it's a good way like just think, well, who can I help right now and just volunteer your time, getting gauge new community. Go be part of a big project..

Katie social isolation Robbie UCLA America fifty percent
"stallard" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"stallard" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

"People were just so giving and so loved what they did and the impact than had the ripple effected hat on people that sound like it was incredibly profound moment for you. Can you share a little bit about that? Sure. Let me just take people back to. I remember the first time we went to Sloan Kettering, it was just for a consultation, but we, we parked the car were walking down the street toward the entrance on fifty third street across from city of Corp center for those who've been in New York City. Probably know the building I'm talking about and is we entered. We got with an ice. Site of the entrance doorman named Nick Mesli, locked his eyes on Kadian as you. And I know being from this area or large cities, people don't make eye contact on the street. So is unusual to see Nick, you know. But obviously he spotted Katie and he could tells us wearing a wig. So he just greeted her with such warmth and it. It really caught my attention. I, it took me a little while to realize that was going on, but we've, you know, he's still on the front lines at medicine. We see him when we're there, whether we're a teaching a workshop or katie's there for a checkup, but then we entered into the reception area. The receptionist was calling everyone. Honey, also very unusual in Manhattan and these Curie people, the ministry ministration people were helpful. Friendly are in colleges, Dr Murray Hensley spinning our with us. She was upbeat enough to mystic. She told Katie not to look at. The statistics or anything online that she was not a statistic and people do survive this disease. And just by the end of the day, I came away with. Realizing two things. One I knew in advance going in that this was one of the best teams from a competent standpoint to treat advanced ovarian cancer, right? But the second realization really caught me by surprise and that was I knew they cared. And that made a difference. It just made me more optimistic Robbie, that maybe we could get Katie through this and you know that was that happened back in two thousand fourteen, I'm sorry in two thousand four. And so you know all these years later katie's a survivor. Yeah. Yeah. And I think going through that experience and getting that kind of caring support and you being able to, you know, a lot of people have gone through that experience and gotten that carrying support, but the fact that you're able to then translate that into something you could then teach others. That's interesting to me because you clearly you saw something and you're like, okay, and you're already knew a little bit from your earlier career that you, you know, being a connector appeal being willing to kind of rally around you and ideas that you had was important. How did you take that? I get this question at myself, like how did you know you wanted to teach this thing? Which is so morpheus. And other people like, how did you know this is the thing that you do? You know what I'm asking? I do. You know, it's a crazy journey. I went on just it almost seems impossible in hindsight that this happened, but it was, you know, I had drifted away from connection in my life and. It it really the. The drift was maximized during a period when I was working on a very difficult merger, it was around the time of September eleven. So I think people were traumatized in New York City from what happened. And I know you know, I, we know people who lost their lives. Also, people who lost family members who lost children, who lost parents during that. So it was it was a tough season, but I was working so hard on this particular merger that it crowded out time for family and friends. And even when I was home, I was thinking about how to crack the code on this thing and make it work and. My performance. My health started declining. I wasn't performing as well. It wasn't, you know, playing at the top of my game, so to speak. And after about a year, I really lost hope that this merger was gonna work. You know, six months later, they fired CEO one of the CEO's and ended up selling the company. But I laughed. And of course about that time I got offered joining Goldman Sachs, which I turned down because I knew it would just burn me out..

Katie Nick Mesli New York City Sloan Kettering Goldman Sachs city of Corp Dr Murray Hensley Manhattan CEO Kadian Robbie six months
"stallard" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"stallard" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

"Let's just go with that and it's a certain level trust, and it's interesting the course that doesn't live just in the how they acquire products has has to be how they treat everybody in that system or wouldn't work. You can't just be focused on, you know, having the best toy or something and like the people are upset, you know, who are working for you, like you have to be well rounded. You must be. So gratified that you're now having these companies that are attracted now to you because the spokesman out for a little while they're seeing, you know, you're seeing some results. What is it that you're sort of what's most rewarding about the work you're doing today? Well, it's the, it's the people I work with. They're inspiring to be around. You know, I think of Victor machine, the chancellor of Texas Christian university. You know, this is a school. It's getting twenty thousand applications for eighteen hundred freshmen seats because the words gotten out. I think you know the, they're really moving quickly up the rankings, both academically and athletically, and he is a leader. He's such a connector. He really cares about students. He still teaches the class of freshmen seminar and he knows so many students names. He cares about students, faculty and staff, and he walks the talk, or we do work with the ambulatory care group at Memorial Sloan Kettering. Cancer center. We work with actually writing a story right now about Rosana Fe, Hugh who runs the group that we work with. It's about three thousand people in sixteen locations and Rosanna started out as a volunteer. She was a student at Fordham university. She was taking a philosophy class on death and dying. And part of the class requirement was to work at a hospice wasn't interested in that. So she worked down agreement with the professor to volunteer at Sloan Kettering, and she went there and ended up working in the pedia Edrich cancer ward just playing with kids and that her that semester, she had an assignment to write a paper about her experience, but it just affected her in such a deep way that she couldn't process the feelings. She had about kids and serving and connecting with them in their family members that she ended up dropping the class, but she tripled volunteer hours at Sloan Kettering while twenty five years later, she. He's one of the highest ranking women in the organization, and she really cares about connecting with, you know, even she also she has this huge responsibility. You know, you'll see here around Sloan Kettering, she'll stop and see if somebody has a question or they're lost. They help getting somewhere. 'cause you know, it's a big. It's a big organization that spread out in Manhattan and she walks the talk. She connects with people and really expects people on the frontlines and medicine to reach out to connect with patients and their family members because we know from research experienced that reduces stress and proves patient outcomes. When I know that this is a very personal thing for you to be able to support the organization that your your wife has had a couple of really scary moments with cancer. How she doing now, she's doing great. Yeah, actually, we work together and go, yeah, it's katie's three time cancer survivor, so it. It is amazing because there was a time Robbie win. When her chances of survival for more than five years was less than ten percent. So it's it's a miracle, the cheese alive. And at that time, our daughters were just twelve and ten. So it's, you know, our oldest daughter just got married in December and every big event like that. I just say, you know, thank you God that Katy is alive and is able to see this. And the girls had this really wonderful mother growing up brings a lot of gratitude in my life. Yeah. Why you? That's where you start in the book. You share the story of how you saw this connection taking place in a cancer center, which if you've never been in one, you'd think, oh, must be such a sober, like kind of dreary, you know, you like, you know, it's like I, it doesn't sound like a place want to hang out, but then you went there and you, you saw just every time like.

Memorial Sloan Kettering Fordham university Rosana Fe cancer Texas Christian university chancellor Rosanna Katy professor Manhattan Robbie Hugh katie twenty five years ten percent five years
"stallard" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"stallard" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

"He fixed hot rods rebuilt, hot robs. That was a hobby for him. It was very patriarchal culture, but it still there is a strong sense of community primarily through sports. Who was there a leader, anyone that you knew early on that you'll be looked up to and you thought like I hope to be like that person one day. Well, it definitely would have been leaders in sports that I was a cub fan. A Packers fan. Yeah. And so I, you know, one of the people I really admired on the Chicago Cubs was Ernie banks who was a very outgoing friendly person. He just seemed to be the person on the team that people pulled around. And during that time during that period, Robbie, they had a commotion for a manager a guiding Leo Durocher who was not a very good leader. I'm sure he had great skills in terms of baseball, but I think there was a lot of informal leadership in the of the team guys like money banks and Ron Santo, and they were just better connecting people grocer was he just used his power really push people, but they weren't following him because they wanted to. They were falling him because they had to. I love it. You have this distinction. And I'm wondering when you started to see this idea of informal leadership, were you even aware then that there was. The difference between how the the former leader was sort of leading and whether people wanted to follow them or not an or informal leadership that these captions said, he don't know how where I was of it, I could tell that, you know, there were certain leaders who was all about power, and they tended to be jerks, and there were leaders who people were just drawn to because they were good people and they pull the team together in the team achieved great things together because of an informal leadership. Not that they necessarily were leading from a position of power, but they were the individuals that people rallied around team together. And I imagine that in today's work that you do, you still you still see the importance of those roles and you try to give people sort of the supports to to to take on that informal leadership when they see the opportunity will I, I learned this the hard way. Robbie, there were years when I used to go after clients where I could see they needed a better. Culture, they needed better leadership, but I found that my work didn't really resonate with them and then it was through interactions I had with Vern Clark. He's a former chief of naval operations. He's actually the second longest serving chief in the US navy, and I got to know him when I wrote an article about how he really changed the culture of the navy and it. He came in in two thousand when the navy's first term enlistment was under under twenty percent. So if you can imagine eighty percent of the enlisted sailors were leaving at the first opportunity. That's a huge problem, right? Yeah. And he changed the navy's culture so that I can listening went up to almost seventy percent within about eighteen months. And he was a guy who really loved sailors and their families. People he called him, you know. America's sons and daughters and people who serve a cause greater than self and Vernon his wife, Connie, they just so clearly love sailors and they really cared about them at nine. Eleven, of course, happened during that period, but emerald Clarkson great leader and he gave me some advice. One time, remember as having a dinner with Connie at the navy yard in these, and he said, you know, Mike, just focus on leaders who who really, you know, they're already doing what you're describing because you'll help them be better. 'cause you're providing a clear framework and of, oh, cabbie, Larry, that will make clear what they're doing and it'll help them really develop the future leaders of the organization and they'll embrace it. And that's turned out to be good advice. So that's what I do now is I don't really work with any leaders us. They care about people and care about results. This is really interesting because if the if the company. He was culture needed to be shifted, but they, they weren't already doing some of it that is resistance. 'cause no one wants to start from a deficit and need to be fixed..

Vern Clark navy Robbie Ron Santo Chicago Cubs Leo Durocher Packers chief of naval operations baseball America Larry Connie Mike Vernon eighteen months seventy percent eighty percent twenty percent one day
"stallard" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"stallard" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

"His message resonated so strongly the Texas Christian university founded the TCU center for connection culture based on his work. He is the author of two books, connection culture and fired up or burned out. Please join me in welcoming Michael Stallard. Hello. Oh, Robbie is so great to be with you. Thanks for having me. Thanks for joining us, and I know that you're in your home office in Greenwich, Connecticut. I appreciate you're able to tune in like this. I wanted to jump right in. This is a podcast about leadership and building strong networks. So tell me what is leadership means to you? And when did you realize you had the skills to lead? Well, leadership to me, I'm saying good leadership is really comes out of a leader who number one cares about people and number two cares about results. And it's usually because the results are helping people in some way, so it's deeply rooted in their care for people. And that's the type of leader who people follow. You know, there are people in formal leadership roles that have a thority, but unless they care about people and care about results than people won't follow them in a sustainable way. And I started learning these lessons from really from. My early years I worked at Texas Instruments, and my first leadership role was in a financial position controller for a small group of TI, and that's when I started learning that I really connected with people and attracted good people who worked in the business. And so over time I can't say I fully understood while high at the time, but more time that's become clear to me why it's why it's important. So we dug further back and we started to think about who you were when you were really little when you're on the playground or in high-school college. Like in those years as formative years, were you like actively engaged your you? The kind of person who sought leadership opportunities, you know, in a formal way that other people see that in you or you like kinda watching the room from like the corner. Well, I, I was a quiet kid. So. In my life evolved really revolved around baseball season basketball season season. So you know, sports was an all team sports until I some point I switched and really develop an interest in tennis, but all those times of playing team sports. I just connected with people and and I love being a part of the team. So that's that's I think when I started those were important experiences for me to understand the importance of connection. Yeah, fitter. Thank you. Actually, your thoughts. Go back to the idea being part of a teaming parv unit being, you know, working together towards a common goal. You know you were very drawn to that even early age to to have that experience. Yes, definitely. And we click did baseball cards and your big Packers fans. And we lived in northern. Illinois close to Wisconsin, and that was the age of Bart star. Vince Lombardi in. So it seemed like all these guys we worshiped at group cuts. M it. My dad was a tool and die maker..

Robbie Texas Christian university Michael Stallard Vince Lombardi Illinois Greenwich baseball Connecticut Packers tennis Bart Wisconsin
"stallard" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"stallard" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

"He then asked if I would make time to be interviewed for virtual summit. He was launching later the summer, of course, I said, yes. After the interview, I asked to Elsie at lined up speakers and he listed a lot of men. So I asked if he was looking for women to share their expertise and he said, yes, he'd love introductions. So I posted a note in a Facebook community. I'm active in and specifically encouraged women in the group to reach out about being interviewed on this virtual summit out of twenty three speakers. Ten ended up being women and I knew eight of them and found out the other two were invited by the women. I had encouraged to apply. They could stop there. But the ripple effect of that reader reaching out to me keeps going because several of the women finally figured out how to share freebie with. The virtual summit listeners in a way that will help them grow their Email list. This is a bit of technology. They had been meaning to setup, but having a deadline helped them get it done. And of course they're all the people who tuned into the summit and benefit from the wisdom that was shared by myself and the other speakers. And I've strengthened my relationship with each of these women by making this connection for them. All of this value is added in several different ways because reader dare to reach out, say, thank you and invite me to participate in a project. He was working on your challenge for this week. Have you ever thought about reaching out to an influence in your field because you'd marry their work and want to say, thank you. Perhaps your life or business has been improved because of a book you read podcast, you listen to or some other piece of content that someone labor to put out into the world. Do you find yourself holding back from reaching out because you don't want to bother them step out of your own way and reach out start by thanking them with some specificity and. Then make your ask if you have one, don't be attached. The outcome be open to what becomes possible. You never know. The ripple factor. Actions may have try this and let me know how goes now onto this speak show. Today's guests learned through a family health crisis, how crucial human connection is and became an expert on how effective leaders can boost human connection and cultures to improve the health.

Elsie Facebook
"stallard" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

The mindbodygreen Podcast

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"stallard" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

"They're like shoveling and into the fire and it's coming up processed and it goes through the small intestine and things get absorbed and you know in chinese medicine like small intestine sorts pure from impure and everybody has a little function in this tree okay so imagine if i throw a twenty ounce cold smoothie into the tree won abbas to the alps then they're like moving a little slower they're not shoveling as well they're a little sad their mittens or sloppy and cold like they just move a little slower right and maybe the next meal's like chicken and cooked broccoli and then they're moving a little quicker but like what if you like cold smoothie and kind of envisioned the elves being covered in smoothie and then you have like a stallard and then like what are they then they're also and then for dinner you're having like another salad and then you're having ice cream what if you're having a cold shower in the morning to which is like the other new thing although i will say i do that okay i love it booker yeah it's so chinese cold food yeah like it's it's a game changer for health if you can just warm up if you're having more than two cold meals a day your spleen is just so unhappy it's a sad keebler elf trae nobody's months that so what about all the other stuff we have all these amazing doctors in our world has been on the podcast and they'll talk you know somewhat lean more vegans more paleo summer on the voice some sugars terrible some gluten terrible some say glutinous fine than beans and we can go on and off road only so like what what's like your petits em world view in your opinion on all the stuff that easy i'm world the you they really like me i mean i'm not this is not you know my personal belief that i would say trish all chinese medicine really likes to have your meat and not even just like regular meat but weird meet they like you to eat chicken livers.

abbas stallard trish twenty ounce
"stallard" Discussed on Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"stallard" Discussed on Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

"What is it totally broken system and end ripple as a companies looking to replace that would its token is looking to do which is to kind of separate than that are messaging system is allow banks to more friction leslie send money overseas to one another with greater liquidity and speed than they can now so will the banks be use yet against death sentences now they're not merely using it today by diseases is if if this can reach a hundred billion or five hundred billion dollar market cap it can actually be an incredible with quantity to especially that has this stability historically has accepted into these runups where it actually actually stays between various small number between twenty and twenty five cents for the past nine months then it could be actually a really cool bank liquidity transfer tool so you if you were going to give a call for yourself at eighty cents you feel like it's a bit high for you it's not that he's a bit i assume to larger party is a whole crew to a market is is based off of speculative value right yes and that it is the same goes for extra pay serbia's a really strong company behind it in strong partnerships behind it and thus it makes sense that it's highly valued but i can't reasonably say any of the companies in good even i can't even say bitcoin or eat that are reasonably priced right now because in reality there are probably not but their base of future value and thus they could go up exponentially more than they are right now and that's why i will never sell any of these in their entirety you just kind of have to rebalance and decide sometimes when you're gonna take cash off the table there so now let's switch iskoe go back your story then we'll come back to light coin sure and when you talk about stallard some things some of these smaller cryptocurrencies or or less wellknown in mainstream crypto people mainstream doesn't the media hasn't qatar so going back to your story how does it feel to make a ton of money let's talk about money.

serbia stallard qatar five hundred billion dollar nine months
"stallard" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

The Tai Lopez Show

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"stallard" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

"At eighty cents you feel like it's a bit high for you it is not that is a bit i i'm being assumed to larger report is a whole crew to market is is based south of speculative value right yes and that it is the same goes for extra pay serbia's a really strong company behind it and strong partnerships behind it and thus it makes sense said it's highly valued but i can't reasonably say any that companies and can even i can't even say bitcoin eat that are reasonably priced right now because in reality there are probably not but their base of future value and thus they could go up exponentially more than they are right now and that's why i will never sell any of these in their entirety you just kind of have to rebalance and decide sometimes when you're going to take cash off the table there so now let's switch just go back to your story then we'll come back to light coin show and we talk about stallard some things some of these smaller cryptocurrencies or or less wellknown in mainstream crypto people mainstream does the media has collar so going back to your story additive feel to make a ton of money let's talk about money because this is this is complicated for people yeah i mean so pupil because i'm 25 m because i have a all all these different things that my resume people love to talk about have made a ton of money i love the party all over the world because your mind hearty now i apart elevating but the money component as long as i have the money to go travel around the world freedom party adventure in go invested technologies i think we're gonna make the world a better place that's all i care about like i don't care about cars i don't care about close i don't only houses i don't wanna boats like that that's not what i value what i invest my money into is almost entirely this startups into new technologies into people really i do a lot of philanthropy and then my money i i mean my money i spend on food and drink that's really yet.

serbia stallard 25 m