35 Burst results for "Staff Writer"

Inside Jimmy Butlers Psyche

ESPN Daily

05:06 min | 1 d ago

Inside Jimmy Butlers Psyche

"Nick for Dell I WANNA start in a very important place here. The question that everyone I think is obsessing about at this point in the NBA playoffs. What the Hell is going on with this coffee business that Jimmy Butler is running. Twenty Bucks Cup twenty bucks it is some high level stuff from everybody who has had had a taste of big face coffey. Why is this guy selling coffee? Why is this happening because he can Pablo Nick Fidel is a staff writer for ESPN WHO's been covering Jimmy Butler ever since he entered the League in two thousand eleven this guy brought a French press with him into the bubble because he wanted to make sure that he had the very best coffee that there was. So in true entrepreneurs style. Jimmy is charging twenty bucks a pop cash only as he's said repeatedly. Last couple of months to teammates or whoever else wants the show up and and give them some money because I can't get coffee nowhere here that's my bump it up to thirty bucks a cup just depends people here can afford it. So anybody complaining. Through the years it's only the best for Jimmy, Butler on a lot of levels in in the coffee is the latest example of that. So we're GONNA take a deep dive with you into Jimmy Butler today but let's start with the most recent stuff because they're coming off this Saturday night loss against the Celtics they still have a two one series lead game four is Wednesday night but on Saturday night in game three, the heath tendency to get behind early finally did catch up with them and in the final minute when they're flirting with yet another potential comeback. We saw Mr. big face coffey himself sitting on the bench. Usually, in these situations, look beyond the floor and I don't know of Jimmy Barbara asked out or injury does not back in the defensive possession. Especially Butler. Meeting offense who In the same reasoning behind. So. What was going on there? Eric's bolster said flat out that. He's fine. There wasn't an issue. Babo I've watched Jimmy Butler. For years and years to take him off the Florida eighty point is a struggle because of how bad he wants to be out there but to take him off the floor at the end of a playoff game. I just wondering if if there's something lingering that we should all keep an eye on but. In fairness the Spoelstra he did have a bunch of shooters on the floor, and I, know Jimmy has hit some big three's over the course of the playoff bubble the last few weeks but that is not a strength of his game. So maybe everybody is telling the truth and maybe Jimmy's GonNa be fine but my Jimmy radar went off at the end of that game big time because you you just can't take him out he wants to be in there until the very, very end. So. Certainly, certainly something to keep an eye on. That is absolutely something to monitor, but prior to all that happening game three nick in this series, and in these playoffs, the Miami Heat have been surprisingly impressive as a five seed. They're currently ten and two in the playoffs, and with this two to one lead, they still have over the Celtics. Their hands are still on the steering wheel and the one guy steering all of it. The one guy at the center of these comebacks gave them that lead is Jimmy Butler. So. When we look at Butler's clutch moments so far. Which one stick out to you. WHO As far as Jimmy in this series. Those first few shots. Down, the stretch in game one. Everybody's focused on Bam's block and it really is one of the best there's ever been. Sky. With the block and rejection. That is a ridiculous defensive play. Aside. From that, you're watching. Pablo. Early in those games especially in the first one, they're just throwing body after body after body. Jimmy. And in the fourth quarter, he's making tough shot after tough shot. Shot Praise God Jimmy Butler giving Miami the lead with twenty two seconds to go. Butler against Tatum drives them Deep Pang. Shot up and then and one Jimmy Puckett's delivering again, twelve seconds to go over time you start seeing steals and gave to your like there's no way in the world that he would have won that game without him poked away by Jimmy Butler all the way down the other end Butler leaves it and crowder puts it in Jimmy Butler in the last four minutes delivering for the heat. Heroes made some shots and and drag it has been there over and over but it's Jimmy who is setting the tone.

Jimmy Butler Jimmy Jimmy Barbara Jimmy Puckett Pablo Nick Fidel Miami Celtics NBA Dell League Espn Staff Writer Coffey Eric Florida BAM Spoelstra Tatum Crowder
Jiayang Fan On 'How My Mother And I Became Chinese Propaganda'

All Things Considered

04:24 min | 2 d ago

Jiayang Fan On 'How My Mother And I Became Chinese Propaganda'

"We've been talking a lot about how crises collide in this country. The corona virus pandemic has led to serious hardship for many people. And at the same time, longstanding grievances have led to street protests, which are exhilarating for some, but for others, emotionally draining and even destructive, and that's also how it's been. For many individuals. One crisis begets another in a way you never expected. We have a powerful story about that. It's by Ji Young fan, a staff writer at The New Yorker. A recent issue of the magazine. She tells the story of how she and her mother, who's living with a less in a nursing home in New York, became the subject of Chinese propaganda and a vicious campaign of online harassment all because John was trying to get her mother the care she desperately needed during the covert locked down. But it's much more than that. It's also the story of a mother and daughter coming to terms with how they're decades in this country have shaped them. Both thie essay is entitled Motherland and We asked Giant fan to join us and tell us more about it. Giant fan Thank you so much for speaking with us. It's great to be here First. I have to say the essay is both beautiful and devastating. I mean, what what inspires you to write? And I say that because It had to have been hard to right, right? I mean, I didn't intend to write a personal essay, especially one this personal in nature. I intended to write a much shorter piece about the phenomenon off this information and Chinese nationalists trolls in The geopolitical moment that has made their appearance almost par for the course. So when I was writing this much shorter piece, I realized that I wanted to make sure I could give them the humanity that they sometimes don't grant their targets. So when I was reading through the messages where many had wished me to die, and to Pull apart my corpse and things much worse. There was such rage in a fury and in their words. And I detected the existence of a person who was very alive. On the other end of this anonymous attack and He made me think of all the times. My mother when I was growing up in the darkest moments had launched similar attacks on me for being a traitor to her. And for disobeying her, And as I thought about my relationship to her on DH, the trolls on the other side of the world. It made me think about where that resentment comes from, and all the sorrow and the indignity and emotions that we don't often speak of that lives on the other side of that rage. So I guess I'm just trying to understand. Like why would people be attacking someone who came here at eight years old through no decision of her own The polarization. Um off. China and the U. S. Has caused rampant this information to be distributed and I am somewhat stuck in the middle as someone who is of Chinese heritage who spent as you said, You know the first almost eight years of my life in China and then who received an American education and is currently Lives here. So for my detractors, what makes it so personal for them is that China has been a very good job of Telling its citizens that their personal identity is aligned with political identity of China, you know? Propaganda from the Chinese government has been quite successful. And also I remember as a child. I mean that you know, in from our earliest school primers, Tio. What came through the loudspeakers are personal identity was very much intertwined with that of the national and the Communist Party identity so For my detractors. They see what I'm doing as a personal attack on them.

China Chinese Government Giant Communist Party Ji Young New York Harassment Staff Writer The New Yorker John
The Pandemic Is Pushing People Out of Prisons

Science Magazine Podcast

03:51 min | 6 d ago

The Pandemic Is Pushing People Out of Prisons

"The novel coronavirus and prison is dangerous combination in the united. States. One hundred and twenty thousand cases have been detected in prisons and one thousand incarcerated people have died so far these deaths and the danger of more have driven prison and jail reforms that have been long delayed staff writer. Kelly Servic is here to talk about De car Suray Shen in the US what is happening how researchers are weighing in on the process and how it's affecting public safety and Health Hi Kelly is there the US is unusual not just? In a large number of corona virus cases that we've had, but also in the size of its incarcerated population, how does the United States compare with other countries? In this respect? The US is is sort of the leader in terms of mass incarceration. Unfortunately, the US has the highest prison population of any country in the world with over two million people in in prison right now, it was very clear from the beginning of the pandemic that the system of jails and prisons in this country was going to be especially dangerous for. The people living in them because not only are they not designed structurally to allow for social distancing but many of them are already extremely overcrowded. There's been calls for years to D Karsh straight or to cut down on the number of people in prison and jails, and now there's been a big push to make this happen quickly what's happened with the number so far have we seen a big decrease in incarcerated people? So some analyses have suggested a decrease pretty early in the pandemic of about twenty, five percent of the. Population of jails in the US, which is pretty dramatic. That's something that a lot of jails have not been able to achieve in any other way but jails and prisons are are a bit different in this respect. Jails are often holding people who have not yet been convicted and are awaiting sentencing are waiting trial prisons meanwhile told people who are already convicted and serving sentences have not budged nearly as much in terms of population despite some efforts by states to reduce populations of seen figures of eight percent thirteen percent so still. Pretty, modest reductions there the numbers are going down how is this happening who's getting out or are people just never going in in the first place it's happening for all those reasons is happening in a bunch of different ways which was one of interesting things in talking to corrections administrators about this some jail systems have focused on, for example, eliminating the bail requirement that was keeping people there if they couldn't pay to get out or eliminating the requirement of people, sit in jail on parole violations of picking out specific populations. Of People that they felt didn't pose any public safety risk and and were there sort of on technical violations of various kinds prisons, it's been a little bit more complicated in that they've had to select groups of people. They don't pose any public safety risk and also are particularly high risk for covid. Some governors have commuted the sentences of people in prison because they're medically vulnerable or older, for example, or if they have a short time to serve on their sentence and then beyond all this, there's also the factor that A. Major reason that jails strength is simply because arrests went down particularly early in the pandemic as police officers were making fewer arrests, fewer people out on the streets, but also likely officers were seeking to avoid physical interactions where could so yeah, all these factors are complicated and some of them are are a bit more locked in place, and some of them are likely to fluctuate again as states reopen and things change with the pandemic. So it's really hard to to sort of know what's GonNa happen next

United States Kelly Servic Staff Writer Suray Shen D Karsh
Postmaster General defends changes made to USPS during Senate committee hearing

WNYC Programming

08:56 min | Last month

Postmaster General defends changes made to USPS during Senate committee hearing

"Friday, recently appointed Postmaster General Lewis to Joy was grilled by the Homeland Security Committee about his sweeping cutbacks that intentionally or not fulfilled Trump's vision. But as Republicans on the committee were quick to observe, he didn't start the fire. From what I've heard so far today. Apparently the post office never had any issues. There was never any delays. There was never any male that was late. There were never any financial problems. There was never any challenge the mail in voting until 65 days ago when you arrived, and then apparently all chaos has broken out in the post office fair point Senator James Lankford, but what he and his GOP colleagues failed to point out. Was that it was their party's own policies that intentionally or not crippled the Postal Service to begin with, And according to New Republic staff writer Alex Shepherd. When journalists start talking about the public sector, they tend to be sucked into a similar partisan ideological narrative. Yeah, the postal Service exists is a kind of symbol of good government, and it's one that has been surprisingly resilient, Tio Republican attacks, particularly ones aimed at privatizing various public sector services. But that you know hasn't dimmed their enthusiasm for making widespread demands for greater efficiency that, in fact lower efficiency. These have certainly increased over the last 15 years, but it feels like we've only started paying attention to them over the last week or so. No. You just said lead to greater efficiency first by creating lower efficiency, and we'll get to that in a moment, But first we should observe that this process goes back decades. Along with the privatization, dreams for schools, colleges, social security, prisons, even parts of the military. But you write that the particular image we have of the post office today. Really has its origins in 2006. How so? Yeah, In 2006 Congress passed the Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act, known as Pica. On that required us B s to make a number of changes. The most substantial was that it required them to fully fund all of their pensions. 75 years in advance, which created a $72 billion hole and the operating budget immediately. No other institution is required to do this, and it immediately turned a profitable arm of the federal government into an unprofitable one. Now the timing of that was interesting because That was a year in which the USPS was, as it had been for several years in the black. It was also the year that Facebook opened up, Tio everyone on and you start to see large standing changes in the way that People communicate. That also has provided a hit to the Postal Service's budget, but not as substantial as this one about pensions. Now, over the past couple of months we've observed trumps over meddling into the post office. In the person of his new postmaster General Lewis to joy, he isn't Underqualified Trump mega donor with financial ties to Postal service competitors. And next thing you know, he was cutting overtime for workers in the middle of a pandemic in advance of an election and had removed mail sorting machines from post offices nationwide. Which raised media eyebrows, but not exactly at first at least alarm. Until about a week ago, when Trump blurted out his sabotage scheme on Fox business. These Ah ha! Journalistic moments about public sector institutions follow a pattern yet in the case of U. S. P s There are a few things happening where you know at the same time Lewis to Joy is fulfilling this longstanding conservative project of hobbling USPS of creating space in which its competitors can thrive. He is also doing so at a time where it will, almost certainly if not aid. The president's reelection campaign, then certainly bolster claims that he may make challenging the legitimacy of the election. The press is largely focused on the second one of those still, and the first part is, I think, still gone unnoticed. You send that the Republican strategy over the decades Has been to defund the post office, for example, by forcing them to fund their pension plan going out 75 years. In order to actually forced their service to deteriorate in order ultimately, to privatize the organization. What Louis to Joy has been doing since the spring. You know, is familiar to anyone who's covered the private equity industry in America in recent years, it's you look at an organization that's losing money. And then you strip resource is from it in the name of efficiency. And then, of course, it becomes less efficient and you're in this endless cycle of taking things away. But the larger project, I think is ideological as much as it is practical that conservatives don't like the fact that this is a government institution that works. That the USPS should be treated like a business that's put a giant target on its back. The Postal Service itself is a kind of American value. Saying that you know, we're all Americans, and we all should be connected together, No matter what that costs. The drive, Tio privatized that Not only would have dramatic consequences for people who rely on USPS, Teo get medication or keep in touch with loved ones, particularly incarcerated people. It also would be a betrayal of what I think is an ideal, which is that we should have a system that brings us all together. You believe that we've allowed a distorted picture. Of the public sector to form in the public's minds over decades and and that we've even internalized the Reagan doctrine. That big government is not the solution. But the problem. Drunk. The Kool Aid halfway Yeah, I think that the image of a postal worker sort of remains Newman from Seinfeld. You don't even have to lick the stamps. It's not to be So I'm hanging it up. You quit the post office kind of I'm still collecting checks. I'm just not delivering mail. Somebody who's you know, lazy. They take a three hour break. The post office itself is a drab and dreary place where you waited line for hours and then are told to go somewhere else. It's sort of the The M V next door. Part of the issue, I think is political and that Democrats have also internalized a lot of these ideas. But I think that there's also a sense that journalist walk into a post office and they see Not the connective tissue of this country. They see another, you know, failing organ of big government. One of the strange things about all this hand wringing about if the USPS can handle the election is that they just finished. You know, a substantial project, which is handling the United States Census. USPS does this kind of work all the time, and they've done it despite the fact that they've been, you know, hobbled by staffing cuts and demands Teo to run like a business when it's not a business And how do we get The narrative that you just provided. Back into the minds of the media. If, in fact we have drunk the Kool Aid. I think there's a really shyness about communicating values in media. That's not true. When it comes to sort of First Amendment issues. Members of the press will always you know, beat their chests when They're kicked out of White House briefing room or something, but you don't get that with other values. Instead, there's a real reliance on others. You need advocacy groups you need opposed to workers Union or Members of the Democratic Party. But there are a lot of cases where those voices aren't going to be forthcoming and that you need Teo look at institutions for what they provide beyond. Profit and efficiency. It's a public service and the American people, for the most part recognized as that. It's Congress that hasn't and if it does do that, then I think things will get a lot better. Alex. Thank you.

Usps Postal Service Postmaster General Lewis TEO Donald Trump Alex Shepherd Congress Senator James Lankford Homeland Security Committee White House Facebook GOP New Republic TIO Staff Writer Kool Aid FOX
Wildlife behavior during a global lockdown

Science Magazine Podcast

03:07 min | Last month

Wildlife behavior during a global lockdown

"I up this week we have staff writer Eric stocks that he wrote about what we can learn from wildlife or about wildlife human suddenly go quiet high, Eric Acerra, this spring and summer the world has been quieter less travel must commuting fewer gatherings that make large crowd noises in fact, in the stories term anthro pause. What is a change? This change in human behavior look like from the point of view of wild animals say you're a squirrel what's going on around? You Will Sir I. Think the biggest change is that so many people were staying home. There were less cars on the road. There were less flights we know that for sure some researchers have estimated that at the peak of the lockdown, maybe sixty percent of the human population was was staying home so far far fewer people out cars, trains, planes, ships, all these things that make noise and. Our presence on the on the natural landscape this term, the anthropology, right? It's it's a nod to this term called the anthroposophic scene, which is this concept that the era we're living in right now is so defined by the incredible impacted humans are having on the planet, and so the anthrax pause is just the sense that for these weeks or months, there's been a slowdown in that I have to say it's a much nicer term than than one that I've seen elsewhere to mother researchers call this the global human confinement comment and boy. They're really hits home how this? How much this sucks doesn't it so? Maybe we'll stick with the anthroposophy. Yeah I think we'll stick with us. I've heard a lot about researchers losing a summer at their field sites. They're not able to fly to their destination. They've had to cancel cruises that were doing ocean research things like that. But this time also presents an opportunity to study animals and their behavior and ask questions but it will be like if people were just less present, which studied caught your eye first when he started a look at this one example of the kind of opportunity that this has been. For scientists that I came across is it's a project called the international quiet ocean experiment. It's lovely name isn't it and what they're looking at is all the sources of sound that humans create in the ocean ship propellers banging at ports, and for several years, they've been trying to find places where the ocean has gotten a little quieter because humans have stopped doing something it might be with shipping lanes have changed for a while from one route to another war if there is construction at port that might. mean boats are coming in anymore. This has been a search to find these places where they can figure out what animals experience in the ocean when humans aren't is noisy as they usually are

Eric Stocks Eric Acerra Staff Writer
A call for quick coronavirus testing

Science Magazine Podcast

06:01 min | Last month

A call for quick coronavirus testing

"First up this week we have staff writer Robert Service he's GonNa. Talk About Rapid Corona Virus Testing Bob. You write about rapid testing this week because even though we've ramped up from maybe a hundred thousand tests per week in March two, now five, million her week. This is all in the US there's still a lot of lag in when people get results and we're seeing a lot of uncontrolled spread. How would a new strategy based on rapid testing work? The problem there is a set the whole testing scheme using a diagnostic test is just not really addressing one of the key questions of. The current pan-demic and that question is not so much do I as a patient am is sick today or not from this disease, but the question is more of a public health question it's Where is this disease in our community? Who has it doesn't have it then can we identify people quickly in order to get them to self isolate and that way break the chain of transmission of the coronavirus so if you're coming at this from a public health angle, why is it important for the test to turnaround rapidly the speed with which you can give an and get a result back turns out to be the most important factor in reducing the transmission of a virus in the community. If you get a test and get the result within fifteen minutes or half an hour, you get a positive result, you can take yourself out of circulation not. Go to the grocery store not go to your friends barbecue or whatever, and that in a community will begin to lower the transmission of the virus pretty quickly. What are the differences between a rapid test like you described and the diagnostic PR has? No. We started talking about there are a couple of different classes of these rapid tests. One class of them uses an approach that's pretty similar to CR. They do some of the steps differently or skip some steps and most of those have sensitivity that's quite high. So they can still be used as diagnostics and one example I think that we're probably all familiar with is at the white. House uses a rapid. Tests called the Abbot idea now test. So that's great for the White House and it would be fantastic if we could all get such a rapid test, the problem is, is that those aren't available on the scale of hundreds of millions of people but there are other tests that could be there are Jessica on Antigen tests that worked very differently. They tests for the viral proteins. These tests are what people might think of like a pregnancy test where it's just a simple. Yes no answer. There's not a whole lot of extra machinery involved. So they can be really cheap you can make him by the millions. Tens of millions, hundreds of millions, and so then you can begin to think of designing a system that's very different. How cheap are these tests? The Antigen task for the of the rapid test his tests in general can be around one hundred dollars or more the rapid. Tests can be down to twenty dollars in hopes of maybe using cool strategies or something like that. You drive it down possibly even the ten dollars tests that starting to get pretty good. The Antigen tests can be made for as little as a buck or two. So they're really quite cheap. Then it becomes possible as a national strategy to begin thinking about giving these to everybody PC. Has An amplification step where it looks for peace of Arne, and then it makes a bunch of copies of it. So the signal is strong whereas an antigen test it's looking for a scrap of protein and it might be easier to miss someone who is positive but the sample didn't capture that the antigen test doesn't amplify anything because it's not amplifying anything it's not sensitive, it tends to. Very low levels of the virus. But what I think a lot of epidemiologists are coming around to the idea of that might not be such a bad thing. Because in the case of this novel coronavirus, what happens when people get infected is their body in the first couple of days starts to produce more and more virus, and then it goes up really rapidly than it plateaus at some point and then comes down on this long tail, and then it kind of stretches out for a long time where people can have low levels. Of the virus for a very long time and the problem is is the PCR machines can pick that up and say, Hey, you've got this corona virus genetic material you might be positive. Well, you might only infect others when they're really cranking out there large amount of virus, and that's what most epidemiologists think today. So the Antigen tests though they are less sensitive than the PR. Their flagging people who are at risk of being most effective with from a public health standpoint. That's exactly the people you want to identify, and if you have a strategy that focuses on rapid testing of a broad swath of the public, you're also going to want to do it multiple times and so you might pick up somebody if an antigen tests miss them the next time then take a test that is absolutely key. So that's one of the other things says being recommended. You don't just give people one Antigen test and call it good. You would give them a whole batch and say, hey. Every three days. Even if it's if you have a test seventy percent accuracy or sensitivity, you might miss thirty percent of the people on that first test. But then you're going to pick up seventy percent of those thirty percent on the second test and on and on and on, and so you're going to pretty quickly catch up part of the way to think about that is the PTR tests are dismissing these people altogether because they're not even testing huge swath of a symptomatic people because they're just saying, well, we only have enough tested around from symptomatic people. They're just letting those go right by and so the. Virus continues to transmit through all those people, which is why there's become this huge debate about Masson trying to find other ways to contain the virus.

United States Staff Writer White House Robert Service Masson House Arne
Feds clash with Portland protesters again

AM Joy

05:34 min | 2 months ago

Feds clash with Portland protesters again

"Now we all know that Donald trump has a thing for dictators and each time he praises leaders men who he has called. Good friends trump exposed and apparent autocratic envied that foreshadowed what we are seeing happening right now in Portland, Oregon we're on Friday thousands of protesters, including the wall of MOMS and a wall of. Of veterans standing in solidarity with black lives matter we're met by federal agents who fired pepper balls and deployed tear gas to disperse the crowds for two weeks now federal officers wearing military style, camouflage and helmets have been patrolling Portland with batons and tear-gas, driving around in unmarked vehicles, sweeping up and detaining protesters in a way that Oregon's own attorney general says resembles abductions. This ladies and gentlemen is trump's secret police. Federal agents igniting chaos in the city led by a democratic mayor who was also tear-gas by US agents this week. According to trump, he's simply trying to quell unrest. In other words, he is clinging to the image of the law and order president as his approval ratings continued tank borrowing from the playbook of the dictators. He's so admires. will go into all of the city's Eddie of the cities we're ready will put in fifty thousand and sixty thousand people that really know what they're doing. Then they're strong tough, and we could solve these problems so fast. Joining me now is in Applebaum staff writer at the Atlantic and author of twilight of Democracy Renee, Graham columnist and associate editor at the Boston Globe. Sarah Kinzir scholar, authoritarian states, and all of hiding in plain sites and Philip he goes of the center for Policing Equity Thank you guys for joining me and I'm going to start with you. We are living in a world where secret police are detaining protesters without probable. So. If you look out on the nation, you will note across the chasm a lot of steering thing we try to tell you and you really touch on some interesting things in your piece in the Atlantic I loved it and you say that Donald Trump's authoritarianism is a form of politics that reached new heights. And you compare this what we're seeing in the landscape to Russia explain that to me. So. Thanks I think the important thing to understand about what trump is doing is that these are not tactics designed to solve the problem? Why is he sending customs and Border Patrol Coastguard Tsa. Officers into American cities these are people who don't have training and riot control who aren't used to dealing with political protests, and whose main goal seems to be to create more chaos. Of course, this isn't full on dictatorship. Resting the mayor or conducting mass arrests are putting thousands of people in jail for what he is doing is creating pictures. That are designed to show other Americans. How tough he is! So the fact that these men are wearing men and women maybe are wearing camouflage. They look heavily armed. They're wearing. Face Masks this is designed to show and kind of act out dominance. Look were pushing back against the liberal America the. Urban America the chaotic in America that. You're all afraid of and this is how we're going to win the argument. This way of using troops and using photographs of violence is something that we have seen in other authoritarian states. particularly in Russia where. Putin in twenty, thousand fourteen. Used pictures of violence to imply that the democracy movement in Ukraine was really some kind of Nazi fascist uprising, and that he was then putting it. Is, this is a tactic. We've seen US in other parts of the world, and we've already seen the photographs and footage of this be used in campaign. So that really punctuates your Article Philip. I want to turn to you because one thing that concerns me about. This is the experience that black and Brown people have when we encounter police so attorney general bill bar has said that in these new cities that the police officers are going to be clearly identifiable. I don't know that that makes it better. Considering that when black people encounter police there three times more likely to be killed in Chicago there six times more likely to be killed whether you make this. Yeah amp put it exactly right. These are not here. These troops are not here to make anything better. They're set up. In camouflage, which by the way they're not blending into any urban environment with those uniforms. To make the folks who are protesting who had been almost entirely peaceful important up until this point. Make them fear that there's going to be some kind of forceful, physical violent, a reaction to their peaceful expression of their rights and the thing I want to understand is this is over the objection, not only of the mayor of the US Attorney Attorney General the governor of local law enforcement as local law enforcement has been trying for the last seven eight to figure out how dare legitimacy at trust of New York, and this is explicitly not helping

Donald Trump America Atlantic Russia Attorney Oregon Portland Putin Border Patrol Coastguard Tsa Philip Sarah Kinzir Us Attorney Applebaum Chicago President Trump Center For Policing Equity New York
"staff writer" Discussed on Borne the Battle

Borne the Battle

01:54 min | 2 months ago

"staff writer" Discussed on Borne the Battle

"Military dot COM If someone. Is this field coming out of the military? Warrior, what's the one thing that you would want to share that? They should know? I gotTa tell you that. It's a combination of things I don't need. There's just one thing. One, you gotta realize that even if you did this job in the military that you're starting over. The your starting from the bottom, and you cannot let your ego bring whatever you learned in. The military is great like you learn great technical. Stuff I i. hope that you you use the English language well. Organized does things a different way, and if you no matter where you start like just remembering to start from the bottom and try to learn as you grow. I on top of that. Every organization does things a different way, and everyone needs an editor and you got to check your ego. No matter how great your masterwork is that day, someone's going to change it and it was gonNA. Change it probably a lot, and you just have to realize that you're getting paid once. You ship it off to whomever they. They're allowed to change. However, they want. You still get paid. Though and you. You see the changes, and then you learn from it and the other thing I'll say is. You may have to work for free. For a long time especially, if you WANNA work. Really Yeah, if you went to work in a creative field I sure. People want to see that you've been published by other people. People want to see some sort of progression. Editors WanNa see that you can make deadlines, and they WanNa see that you. Can. You've done work that you've been paid for? So I mean you may start out writing for a blog or You may start out. There's a lot of doctors, blogs and stuff that right about healthcare I still right for one again I'll pay I'll just pay me all. Right anything you want but you know I don't be too proud to do something that may.

The Racial Justice Reckoning Over Sports Team Names Is Spreading

The Retirement Trailhead

05:37 min | 2 months ago

The Racial Justice Reckoning Over Sports Team Names Is Spreading

"Trump Trump weighed weighed in in this this week week on on the the Washington Washington NFL NFL team team and and the the Cleveland Cleveland Indians Indians baseball baseball team. team. Considering Considering changing changing their their names, names, names that native Americans have long said are racist. Both franchises announced they're reviewing their names and changes maybe coming before. 2020 NFL and Major League Baseball season's begin perspectives producer ABC is Eric Mollo has more with America In the midst of a reckoning over racial inequality. More athletes are continuing to speak out across the sports world. By noon, Stanford was right. Arizona Cardinals quarterback Cuyler Murray announcing he'll be taking any during the playing of the national anthem this year, one of several players pledging to stand in solidarity with former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who knelt during the playing of the national anthem to protest police brutality and social injustice. Erica. Over the past week, There's been another reckoning in sports, whether to change team names or logos that contain Native American emblems. In stereotypes. There is time to Move for Major League Baseball's Cleveland Indians announced they're considering changing the team's name manager Terry Francona feels now is an appropriate time for change Older. We're never trying to be disrespectful. I still feel that way, but I don't think that's a good enough answer. Today. The announcement comes a little over a year after Cleveland removed its chief Wahoo logo, a cartoonish caricature of a native American man long considered racist. It also came shortly after the announcement at Washington's NFL franchises weighing whether to change its team name, which is widely regarded as a racial slur. Julian Brave Noise Cat contributes to ESPN is the undefeated He writes that the team name references Native American skin color. In the bloody scouts of indigenous People taken his bounty by white colonists. If a group of people are speaking out about the racism of a team logo, it's It's quite the thing to go and claim that actually know you are honoring them, and it's hard for me to imagine the same thing happening for another racial group in the United States. Team owner Dan Snyder has bound for years. He never changed the name. Saying the term actually embodies honor, respect and pride. Protesters and advocacy groups have called for change for decades. But on ly in the face of mounting economic pressure did Snyder finally announced they're reconsidering investors with major sponsors from Pepsi. FedEx in Nike sent letters asking the companies to terminate their relationship with Washington unless it agreed to a name change, which you know kind of exciting on the one hand, but the reality it reveals about the power of capital. In our culture and society is a little bit of a downer for me. But those two franchises don't stand alone. A world without native mascots is the ideal world. Nick Marin is a member of this a pony tribe in a staff writer for the New Republic any kind of imagery like that and specifically as it relates to native people, because we have been made invisible, forcibly the idea that we would You get rid of the walking Jim NFL team and keep the Kansas City Chiefs It speaks a certain hollowness that I think this kind of corporate social justice campaigns often involve the Kansas City Chiefs. Atlanta Braves in Chicago Blackhawks are among professional franchises that continue to employ Native American imagery on their jerseys in their team names and in cheers by fans has become a very normalized thing, which I think is common place with a lot of systems and forms of institution. Oppression. These things we don't think of them in the moment as being particularly egregious because they've become so normalized in society. Those franchises aren't following the lead of Washington in Cleveland. None of them announce name changes, though Atlanta is reportedly considering no longer allowing the Tomahawk chop chance at games, and the Blackhawks went on to say that their team name and logo symbolizes an important native American figure. And they aren't moving toward formal change. It reduces you to a caricature there, 570 plus tribal nations. That's 570 plus tribal cultures. Any kind of idea that, like there is one kind of Indian is very reductionist kind of view of US. President Trump even weighed in this week via Twitter, saying the names of Washington's in Cleveland's teams Signify strength and not weakness, and they're merely considering the change to be politically correct. The president's statement in the very decisions of these franchises do raise questions isn't important to distinguish between the offensiveness of each individual team name, and is any of this iconography, actually honor or respect the Native Americans? Or in same team names and logos on our native people. Is that merely perpetuating cultural appropriation and the use of stereotypical Native American imagery, Martin says. It's not that slippery of a slope. If you're saying our mascot, our team name is not as racist as Washington NFL team still an admission that it is races, Washington's head coach, Ron Rivera, who is one of four minority head coaches in the NFL, told The Washington Post. It would be awesome if the team changed its name. In the National Congress of American Indians have long opposed the use of Native American stereotypical imagery in professional sports. As professional sports franchises are choosing to reexamine these issues in the midst of America's reckoning over race relations, they're faced with a new choice. Well, economic pressures determine if they choose to rename their teams or will they listen to decades long calls from Native American advocacy groups to eliminate the use of these emblems of the only reasons happening so swiftly is because their this is something that native people years of ground Work into and so what this moment kind of larger cultural reckoning has become. It's just kind of an impetus to say Okay, Now is the time to finally get rid of these things.

NFL Washington Cleveland Washington Washington Nfl Cleveland Cleveland Indians In Trump Trump Dan Snyder National Congress Of American United States America Kansas City Chiefs Terry Francona Jim Nfl The Washington Post Arizona Cardinals Major League Espn Atlanta Braves
The Racial Justice Reckoning Over Sports Team Names Is Spreading

The Retirement Trailhead

04:55 min | 2 months ago

The Racial Justice Reckoning Over Sports Team Names Is Spreading

"Week, week, There's There's been been another another reckoning reckoning in in sports, sports, whether whether to to change change team team names names or or logos logos that that contain contain Native Native American American emblems. emblems. In In stereotypes. stereotypes. There There is is time time to to Move Move for for Major Major League League Baseball's Baseball's Cleveland Cleveland Indians Indians announced announced they're they're considering considering changing changing the the team's team's name name manager manager Terry Terry Francona Francona feels feels now now is is an appropriate an appropriate time time for for change change Older. Older. We're We're never never trying trying to to be be disrespectful. disrespectful. I I still still feel feel that that way, way, but but I I don't don't think think that's that's a a good good enough enough answer. answer. Today. Today. The The announcement announcement comes comes a a little little over over a a year year after after Cleveland Cleveland removed removed its its chief chief Wahoo Wahoo logo, logo, a a cartoonish cartoonish caricature caricature of of a native a native American American man man long long considered considered racist. racist. It It also also came came shortly shortly after after the the announcement announcement at at Washington's Washington's NFL NFL franchises franchises weighing weighing whether whether to to change change its its team team name, name, which which is is widely widely regarded regarded as as a racial a racial slur. slur. Julian Julian Brave Brave Noise Noise Cat Cat contributes contributes to to ESPN ESPN is is the the undefeated undefeated He He writes writes that that the the team team name name references references Native Native American American skin skin color. color. In the In the bloody bloody scouts scouts of of indigenous indigenous People People taken taken his his bounty bounty by by white white colonists. colonists. If If a group a group of of people people are are speaking speaking out out about about the the racism racism of of a team a team logo, logo, it's it's It's It's quite quite the the thing thing to to go go and and claim claim that that actually actually know know you you are are honoring honoring them, them, and and it's it's hard hard for for me me to imagine to imagine the the same same thing thing happening happening for for another another racial racial group group in in the United the United States. States. Team Team owner owner Dan Dan Snyder Snyder has has bound bound for for years. years. He He never never changed changed the name. the name. Saying Saying the the term term actually actually embodies embodies honor, honor, respect respect and and pride. pride. Protesters Protesters and and advocacy advocacy groups groups have have called called for for change change for for decades. decades. But But on on ly ly in the in face the face of of mounting mounting economic economic pressure pressure did did Snyder Snyder finally finally announced announced they're they're reconsidering reconsidering investors investors with with major major sponsors sponsors from from Pepsi. Pepsi. FedEx FedEx in in Nike Nike sent sent letters letters asking asking the the companies companies to to terminate terminate their their relationship relationship with with Washington Washington unless unless it it agreed agreed to to a name a name change, change, which which you know you know kind kind of of exciting exciting on on the the one one hand, hand, but but the the reality reality it it reveals reveals about about the the power power of of capital. capital. In In our our culture culture and and society society is is a a little little bit bit of of a downer a downer for for me. me. But But those those two two franchises franchises don't don't stand stand alone. alone. A A world world without without native native mascots mascots is is the the ideal ideal world. world. Nick Nick Marin Marin is is a member a member of of this this a pony a pony tribe tribe in in a staff a staff writer writer for for the the New New Republic Republic any any kind kind of of imagery imagery like like that that and and specifically specifically as as it it relates relates to to native native people, people, because because we we have have been been made made invisible, invisible, forcibly forcibly the the idea idea that that we we would would You You get get rid rid of of the the walking walking Jim Jim NFL NFL team team and and keep keep the the Kansas Kansas City City Chiefs Chiefs It It speaks speaks a a certain certain hollowness hollowness that that I I think think this this kind kind of of corporate corporate social social justice justice campaigns campaigns often often involve involve the Kansas the Kansas City City Chiefs. Chiefs. Atlanta Atlanta Braves Braves in in Chicago Chicago Blackhawks Blackhawks are are among among professional professional franchises franchises that that continue continue to to employ employ Native Native American American imagery imagery on on their their jerseys jerseys in in their their team team names names and and in in cheers cheers by by fans fans has has become become a a very very normalized normalized thing, thing, which which I think I think is is common common place place with with a lot a lot of of systems systems and and forms forms of of institution. institution. Oppression. Oppression. These These things things we we don't don't think think of of them them in in the moment the moment as as being being particularly particularly egregious egregious because because they've they've become become so so normalized normalized in society. in society. Those Those franchises franchises aren't aren't following following the the lead lead of of Washington Washington in in Cleveland. Cleveland. None None of them of them announce announce name name changes, changes, though though Atlanta Atlanta is is reportedly reportedly considering considering no no longer longer allowing allowing the the Tomahawk Tomahawk chop chop chance chance at at games, games, and and the Blackhawks the Blackhawks went went on on to to say say that that their their team team name name and and logo logo symbolizes symbolizes an an important important native native American American figure. figure. And And they they aren't aren't moving moving toward toward formal formal change. change. It It reduces reduces you you to to a a caricature caricature there, there, 570 570 plus plus tribal tribal nations. nations. That's That's 570 570 plus plus tribal tribal cultures. cultures. Any Any kind kind of of idea idea that, that, like like there there is is one one kind kind of of Indian Indian is is very very reductionist reductionist kind kind of of view view of of US. US. President President Trump Trump even even weighed weighed in in this this week week via via Twitter, Twitter, saying saying the the names names of of Washington's Washington's in in Cleveland's Cleveland's teams teams Signify Signify strength strength and and not not weakness, weakness, and and they're they're merely merely considering considering the the change change to to be be politically politically correct. correct. The The president's president's statement statement in in the the very very decisions decisions of of these these franchises franchises do do raise raise questions questions isn't isn't important important to to distinguish distinguish between between the the offensiveness offensiveness of of each each individual individual team team name, name, and and is is any any of this of this iconography, iconography, actually actually honor honor or or respect respect the Native the Native Americans? Americans? Or Or in in same same team team names names and and logos logos on on our our native native people. people. Is Is that that merely merely perpetuating perpetuating cultural cultural appropriation appropriation and and the the use use of of stereotypical stereotypical Native Native American American imagery, imagery, Martin Martin says. says. It's It's not not that that slippery slippery of a of slope. a slope. If If you're you're saying saying our our mascot, mascot, our our team team name name is is not not as as racist racist as as Washington Washington NFL NFL team team still still an an admission admission that that it it is is races, races, Washington's Washington's head head coach, coach, Ron Ron Rivera, Rivera, who who is is one one of of four four minority minority head head coaches coaches in in the the NFL, NFL, told told The The Washington Washington Post. Post. It It would would be be awesome awesome if if the the team team changed changed its its name. name. In the In the National National Congress Congress of of American American Indians Indians have have long long opposed opposed the the use use of of Native Native American American stereotypical stereotypical imagery imagery in in professional professional sports. sports. As As professional professional sports sports franchises franchises are are choosing choosing to to reexamine reexamine these these issues issues in in the midst the midst of of America's America's reckoning reckoning over over race race relations, relations, they're they're faced faced with with a new a new choice. choice. Well, Well, economic economic pressures pressures determine determine if if they they choose choose to to rename rename their their teams teams or or will will they they listen listen to to decades decades long long calls calls from from Native Native American American advocacy advocacy groups groups to to eliminate eliminate the the use use of of these these emblems emblems of the of only the only reasons reasons happening happening so so swiftly swiftly is is because because their their this this is is something something that that native native people people years years of of ground ground Work Work into into and and so so what what this this moment moment kind kind of of larger larger cultural cultural reckoning reckoning has has become. become. It's It's just just kind kind of of an an impetus impetus to to say say Okay, Okay, Now Now is is the the time time to to finally finally get get rid rid of of these these things. things. Reporting for perspective. I'm Eric Mollo ABC News

NFL Washington Cleveland Team Team Dan Dan Snyder Snyder Blackhawks United States Cleveland Cleveland Indians Atlanta American American Indians Indi Terry Terry Francona Washington Washington Major Major League League Pepsi President Trump Kansas Kansas City City Chiefs Julian Julian
Unjust Systems of Power are Solvable

Solvable

05:51 min | 3 months ago

Unjust Systems of Power are Solvable

"Were excited to share with you. A new season of conversations with leaders and change makers about how to solve the world's biggest problems. This is an extraordinary moment. We're living through global pandemic, and in the United. States were experiencing the most powerful protest movement of my lifetime against police, brutality and racial injustice. It's a time of great possibility. Our Society seems to be open to the kinds of moral and social transformations that were much harder to imagine before the virus, and before the killing of George. Floyd! For this are second season I'll be joined again by by Pushkin. co-founder Malcolm well and journalist and friend and Applebaum a Pulitzer Prize winning historian and staff writer at the Atlantic. To start this season, we're focusing on two problems racial injustice and the twenty twenty election. We can have an election that is participatory. With robust. In twenty twenty justice isn't blind. We have to be far more critical and thoughtful and have that Lens. On today's episode, we hear from an international expert on non violent protests. Let's saw this one big issue. Let's more racial equality. Great to look at our narcissism of small differences later. When the outcry went up over George Fluids, killing peaceful demonstrators took to the streets in Minneapolis then in other cities across the country and across the globe, and a problem arose. It's a problem. We've seen elsewhere. Bad actors outliers with destructive agendas overtaking the news coverage by engaging in retaliatory violence. This isn't a new issue. It's one peaceful. Protesters have long faced in south. Africa Egypt Ukraine Tunisia and during occupy Wall Street. Of Popovich is a Serbian activist and scholar, social movements, organizers from around the world have turned to him for advice about how to strengthen and propel their movements. Popovich, as the Executive Director of the Center for Applied Nonviolent Action and strategies or canvas. He literally wrote a user's manual for successful. Social Change. Our host and Applebaum lives in Poland. She spoke to Popovich from his home in Belgrade Serbia. Here's their conversation. My Solo bill is to create social change through the successful strategic nonviolent movement so surgeon. Why is this your solvable? In other words? What makes this issue personal to you? While first of all I started getting better young on my freshman year on the university, we were faced with a with a crazy regime in Belgrade their nineties any kind of choices, you can fight three concisely. I guess I was stubborn. Police stadiums fight together. Together with a group of France who launched the movement, called out four, which is a Serbian for resistance, and then built from eleven people to seventy thousand people, eventually getting rid of the best guy lawsuits, and I kind of addicted to the idea of the social change. Group People Power movements since you originally began odd for you and your friends without any experience. You had run protests before you had an organized movement before. And now you're able to advise people. So how did you begin thinking through the problem in the beginning was just spontaneous, or did you plan first of all? We started by doing it without planning. Which is why it took us nine years to actually do it so ninety two. We did a little bit of the of locking ourselves in the campuses, seeing east kind of stop. It didn't work because it didn't enroll the rural. Deny, six seven lot of people were mobilized. To smaller places, we protested for one hundred days day by day by day. This refigure out that everyday protest is probably not the best way to do it because it's very exhausting, so we figured out that it is unity thing that we are message. Most of the protesters were getting wall in the protest in, and they say we are too busy to plan so a learning by doing and making mistakes is actually the best way to do stop, but it's very slow so strongly. Advocate to the people start reading books and learn from other people's mistakes, rather than learning from there on. How did you break it down into solvable pieces How should people who WANNA create? Change think. Think about that for a successful protest. You need so much more than the protests. You need an idea what should be different with the cold vision of tomorrow. Then you need to share this vision with different groups. Then you need to work with people. You're not normally alike and probably disagree on many other stuff to really get to the change, so need to take a really sober. Look at the groups you need. And then then we dealt politicizing indulging groups, and then you try to figure out how you work together for the change that benefits everybody because we talked to stand. Social change is a very kind of selfish of for matinee, people and the trick indistinct stinks is. A unifying proposition, which is the smallest common denominator from the groups you want to mobilize and very orchid. You want to agree on what you agree. Also went to read what you disagree, so this is not about the things that that are different among us. We leave this thing for layer, but let's solve this one big issue. Let's get rid of of communism. Let's get rid of luxury L.. Let's make more racial equality, and so on and so forth, and then we are going to look at our narcissism of small differences later.

Popovich George Fluids Applebaum Belgrade Floyd Center For Applied Nonviolent Pulitzer Prize Atlantic Minneapolis Serbia Poland France Co-Founder Pushkin. Malcolm Well Tunisia Executive Director Staff Writer Africa
Why men may have more severe COVID-19 symptoms, and using bacteria to track contaminated food

Science Magazine Podcast

08:01 min | 3 months ago

Why men may have more severe COVID-19 symptoms, and using bacteria to track contaminated food

"Welcome, science. I've Casper June two thousand and twenty I'm Sarah Crespi. First up this speak staff writer Meredith. Bodman discusses a link between Corona. Virus, sex hormones and male pattern baldness. It turns out. This link might be behind the higher numbers of men dying from the infection next we have researcher Jason Chen he talks about a system for tracking objects using DNA. Bar coded bacterial spores. We spray the spores on something like lettuce, and then if you ever need to know where that led us came from, perhaps if it was contaminated with dangerous bacteria, you can collect the spores and read out the bar. Now, Ashraf writer Meredith Bodman. She wrote this week in science on a potential source of the male bias. We've been seeing in severe cases of Corona. Virus even corona virus deaths. Hi Meredith Hi Sarah. How are you? I'm okay I. GonNa, Say Okay for now this has been a mysterious, but persistent skew, and the number of deaths with regards to men. How big is the spy us? Well, it's considerable on. It's consistent from the very first days that we getting reports out of Ruhan China. Men have been made sicker by covid nineteen in the died at higher rates than women. From covid nineteen at the same time, children have been largely spared that two lines up with this theory that some researchers putting forward that Andrew Johns which are male hormones may have a role to play in how badly people get sick from woven So there's this new research linking sex hormones and the severity of coronavirus. Where did this idea come from? At first blush. It really landed with a paper that was published in cell online in early March. And it designated or describe a role for a particular enzyme that is bound in cell membranes called temperatures to. And it is an enzyme that cleaves the spy protein on the virus, and in doing that it allows the virus to enter host cells, so it's important for viral entry now. A bunch of prostate cancer researchers looked at the cell pay per and said Whoa. Wait a minute. We know that protein know that protein. They knew the protein because years ago. It was described as being culprit in prostate cancer, this very same t. m., P. R. S. S. two or temperature to enzyme in a mutated form. It was discovered early in this century was responsible for about fifty percent of prostate cancers PSA. Prostate researchers were intimately familiar with this this enzyme in one of the things. Things, they knew about it was that it was controlled by male hormones. At least in the prostate gland, known as Andrew Jackson's of which testosterone as the most famous, actually increased the production of this enzyme in the prostate gland when the enzyme was in a mutated form, it causes prostate cancer, basically in simple definition, and so from that you can take away that if you have more testosterone or other androgen, you're going to have more of temptress to, and so that's kind of the thinking behind this that you might have something that makes it easier for infection to take place, absolutely more tempus to on the cell membrane more opportunities for the virus to knock an inter-. It's almost that simple. Though, of course, it's way more complicated, but basically right and there's there's some other interesting observations that a link to this in your story, and one of them out relates to male pattern baldness. How does that fit in? There's not a clear scientific explanation for why it would be that a couple of studies in Spain have observed that man with male pattern baldness seemed to be over represented in male patients who are hospitalized with covid nineteen, and that's not related to age. No, interestingly, the peak baldness decade among these Spanish patients was in the fifties. Fifties whereas male baldness, typically as most common in the eighties or even older, and there's a link between baldness and temperatures. Well, that's what's not entirely clear. What is known is that one very powerful male hormone named dihydrotestosterone or D. H. T. for short, which is a derivative of testosterone, is abundant and thought to be causative of male pattern baldness. When there's lots of it in the SCALP, it's not causative on its own. It also take some genetic predisposition had a couple of conditions, but one of them is high levels of this hormone dht, and that is. Is the hormone that returning to the prostate we know binds androgen receptor, which in turn kicks up production of T.. N., P. R. S. to compress too

Meredith Bodman Corona Testosterone Sarah Crespi Andrew Johns Staff Writer Jason Chen Ruhan China Scalp Spain Ashraf Researcher N. Writer Dihydrotestosterone Andrew Jackson P. R. S. D. H. T.
Journalists covering protests face assault and arrest

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

05:57 min | 4 months ago

Journalists covering protests face assault and arrest

"We have to talk first about what we've seen in the past forty eight hours. The appalling targeting of reporters who are trying to tell America's story there is so much that so wrong about this situation first and foremost the video seem around the world, the video of George Floyd's final minutes alive. It's so wrong that it's hard to see, but it is right that we look. It is right that we bear witness. And it is right to see protesters taking action as a result, but it is wrong to see reporters and photographers and news crews, being assaulted and arrested at these protests, police firing rubber bullets at reporters. When their pores are holding up press badges. That doesn't belong in America authorities handcuffed reporters is wrong. That's what happens in authoritarian regimes, not in America, but yet it happened again last night in Minneapolis and in New York. These threats against the press, not just coming from police. In recent days, protesters have ganged up on the press in trouble cities. We've seen a photo journalist attacked. We've seen on TV. News crew chased out of a park. That is wrong. Rioters destroying TV. News vehicles and stealing cameras is wrong. Almost everybody knows this, and it's right to call it out and say that America is better than this. Reporters don't want to be the story. They just WanNa, tell the stories of the protesters and the police and the residents of these communities that want to be able to feel safe. Some of the examples of what we see in in terms of reporters, seemingly being targeted this for example was on Friday and Louisville. is a local CBS reporter and her cameraman in Louisville, Kentucky apparently shot with pepper balls while live on the air Later, the police apologized to the station, but we've seen other reporters that here's Dallas for his other reporters being being hit by rubber bullets. Tear gas there. These situations we've seen in a number of different cities I'll read some other examples to you. A reporter in Columbia South Carolina was hit by a rock and had to be taken to the hospital. Here's a freelance photographer in Minneapolis. who was shot in the left eye while covering the protests? He says she's been blinded in. One of her is as a result in Chicago Chicago. Tribune, photographer. Photographer said looters shoved and stole her cameras in DC. This is in Washington and Lafayette Park a Fox. News crew was harassed and then chased out of the park by protesters who were cursing and screaming at Fox News and criticizing right wing media. This is deplorable behaviour by protesters. We've also seen in LAS. Vegas. The arrests of two photographers police took these photographers into custody. That is completely inappropriate Out The next morning, you know we need to follow up on these cases and make sure that people are held accountable when these incidents happen, reporters should not be the story in these cases, but it's happened again in the past few hours overnight here in New York City. A reporter for Huffpost was arrested while wearing police badge and covering the protests in Brooklyn in Minneapolis Angeles, Time staff writer had police firing tear-gas remember bullets at point, blank blank range at her into a crowd of protesters and journalists. We're going to talk to her and just a moment. Reuters cameraman also said He. He was hit by rubber bullets. Some reporters have had to seek medical attention. A news crew KCRW says. The LAPD shouted her rubber bullets as she was holding her press badge above her head, and at least one case as I mentioned. We've seen protesters being the aggressors. This is a photographer for K. D. K. in Pittsburgh. He says he was attacked by protesters downtown on Saturday quote they stomped and kicked me. He said in a tweet from the back of the ambulance I'm bruised and bloodied but alive. My camera was destroyed. Another group of protestors pulled me out and saved my life. Thank you. This is what's happening. Members of the media in cities across the country this weekend. It feels like targeting. It feels like an escalation. It is deeply disturbing. And, we're waiting for statements about it from the president and from other national leaders when about a dozen reporters were arrested in Ferguson in two thousand fourteen. President Obama spoke about that defended the rights of the press. We will see who defends the rights of the press this weekend and in the days to come. Let's talk to the reporters, so we're in the middle of this. I just showed you. One of them molly. Hennessy Fisk reporter for the Los Angeles Times, who's got some wounds on her leg. We'll talk to her in a moment and Omar Jimenez here from CNN of course, famously iconic arrested live on CNN on Friday morning I. Don't think we're ever GonNa forget that image Omar of you being taken into custody your hands behind your back There's been a lot of news sense. Then tell me about last night and what it was like when. The police officers were were moving toward your crew and you had to seek shelter on Saturday night. Well. I think Brian we expect some of that. When you come out to a protest like this, because part of trying to cover the clashes between law enforcement, and those that are coming out, is you you expect in some ways for for things to escalate just based on how previous stories like these have gone so our team actually had a plan to sort of watch. How this law enforcement team is advancing. Go back to our first safe spot. Then continue to retreat to our next safe spot, but that didn't stop. That stop us even though our camera was rolling from getting shot at Berlitz wise, my producer got hit in the back with Some rubber bullets. My talk got hitting his leg with bullets. Actually he says that he had a cellphone in his in his pocket there and he didn't get any bruising on his leg, and when he realized, or he realized the reason was because he put out his phone, he was completely shattered, and he still has that piece of that rubber. Bullet is well so so in some ways. It was the normal aspect of covering protests, but in many ways. This one felt just a little bit different. Sort of looks different same question to you, Molly. What happened to you last night? Is it right that your colleague? Photographer had to go to the hospital. That's that's correct. My colleague Caroline coal photographer. We were both standing right

Reporter America New York City George Floyd Minneapolis Fox News Tribune Reuters Vegas Chicago Tv. News Molly Louisville Lafayette Park President Trump Caroline Coal Omar Jimenez DC
Steve Martin On His Years As A Comic — And Walking Away From Stand-Up

Fresh Air

10:00 min | 4 months ago

Steve Martin On His Years As A Comic — And Walking Away From Stand-Up

"But if you could hold Steve Martin has been making people laugh often with highly conceptual humor since the nineteen sixties when he was a staff writer on the smothers brothers comedy hour in the seventies he became a major stand up comedy star filling arenas with his fans he rose to fame along with his then new TV show called Saturday Night Live on which he made many memorable appearances as a wild and crazy guy a medieval barber and a fan of king tut eventually the fame that brought in huge audiences also made it impossible for him to do the kind of comedy that made him original he starred in movies from the jerk to parenthood and in recent years has also written plays essays and books and toured with both his bluegrass band and with friend and fellow comic Martin short Steve Martin won the Mark Twain prize for American humor in two thousand five in was a Kennedy center honoree in two thousand seven Terry gross spoke with Steve Martin in two thousand eight about his memoir born standing up Steve Martin welcome back to fresh AIR eleven returning her thank you I thank you very much I'd like you to open with a reading from the beginning of the book and we've we've edited the slightly to make it crystal a little shorter for the broadcast great be happy to I did stand up comedy for eighteen years ten of those years were spent learning for years were spent refining and for years were spent in wild success I was seeking comic originality and fame fell on me as a by product the course was more plodding than her ROIC I did not strive valiantly against doubters but took incremental steps started with a few intuitive leaps I was not naturally talented I didn't sing dance or act the working around that minor detail made me inventive I was not self destructive though I almost destroyed myself in the end I turned away from stand up with the tired swivel of my head and never looked back until now a few years ago I began researching and recalling the details of this crucial part of my professional life which inevitably touches upon my personal life and was reminded why I did stand up and why I walked away in a sense this book is not an autobiography but a biography because I am writing about someone I used to know yes these events are true yet sometimes they seem to have happened to someone else and I often felt like a curious onlooker or someone trying to remember a dream I ignored my stand up career for twenty five years but now having finished this memoir I view this time with surprising warmth one can have it turns out an affection for the war years thanks for reading that that Steve Martin reading from his memoir born standing up which has just been published in paperback yeah I guess I didn't realize how much you closed the door on your comedy years how much there was like a before and after it ended you were done and that was it right I I I'm it was about nineteen eighty one I still had a few obligations left but I knew that hi I could not continue but I guess I could have continued if I had nothing to go to but I did have something to go to which was movies and you know the act had become so known that in order to go back I would have had to create an entirely new show and I wasn't up to it especially when the opportunity for movies and writing movies came around why would you have to create an entirely new show well like I say the the the act was really it there is a passage in the book which I caught because it was so hard to explain but the act essentially besides all the jokes and bits and everything was conceptual and once the concept was understood there was nothing more to develop it's like saying painting the same blank canvas over and over and over and over and over once the concept is no you don't see the need to see to that and that was in the back of my head that I was really done artistically with with what I had created or pastiche to you know in the reading that you just did you describe yourself as not being naturally talented did you think of yourself as naturally funny I'm I didn't didn't think of myself in that way no although I I just love to comedy I I was raised with laurel and hardy and I Love Lucy Anne and Jerry Lewis and I just loved it and I had a friend in high school and we would just laugh all day and put on skits and you know it's the Andy Kaufman thing over to Marty short thing where you're performing in your bedroom for yourself and I I loved magic and so I would practice my magic tricks in front of a mirror for hours and hours and hours because I was told that you must practice you must practice and never present a trip before it's ready but I was just inclined toward show business but I didn't know what I just like being on stage you got your start working in Disneyland you were living in southern California and when you were ten you were selling guidebooks there then you later work for magic shop demonstrating magic tricks and I get the sense from your memoir that demonstrating those magic tricks you know hours a day and really getting them getting them down because you're doing them so much that that gave you a sense that performance required a great deal of craft that even comedy wasn't just a question of going out on stage and saying funny things that there was enormous amounts of work and practice and thought that would have to go into it well that that idea of that that you really had to work at this stuff didn't necessarily come from Disneyland it I I mean I think yes and in terms of presenting a trick but having having it so well honed in your mind was really giving me a sense of security it was I don't want to go out there half baked and you know you learn that through the years you know you're you do a magic show with a friend and you rehearse it a couple of times and yes every all the timing has to be exactly perfect but while you're out there it's it's a different world it's not your mirror you have to make on the spot adjustments but that's just you know whatever entertainer does actually working at the magic shop really gave me a sense of comedy because it was all the jokes we did the tricks but we have all these jokes I had a friend Jim Barlow who you know he he was the the guy I worked with there but he had patter worked out you know it he would go to customers and say Medicare money I mean help you not and you know call them suckers it was really funny and and kind of friendly rude what was your patter I just took all of Jim's patter I'm I'm trying to think of other ones yeah I said it would just it would somebody would buy something it would say and because you are hundred customer today you get a free paperback it's a little silly things like that but Disneyland I'm fifteen right here at early act was a combination of banjo playing juggling magic tricks and comedy and some of that stating your later at two but it sounds like a vaudeville act yes I was very interested involved it was the only sort of discipline that was a five minute act on stage which is what I really enjoyed ins and saw myself doing and I bought books on it I went to the Long Beach pike which was off the carnival fair you know four is really a place for drunken sailors to get tattoos but there was also side shows is very interested in that but you know there is these are all in there these are short acts there was one of the employees at Disneyland that I worked with was named Steve Stewart and he worked in vaudeville and he did a sack for me one day on the floor of the magic shop and I had a couple of great gags one was that I actually used and I asked him if I could use them because I was very strict about using any material that wasn't mine or that that was taken from somebody else let's put it this way I became strict wasn't strict at first there is one trick that one joke that Dave steward did where he said are not yet a glove white glove in his hand the magicians glove any he said and now the glove into dove trick and he threw it into the air and then it hit the floor and he just looked at it and consent and set up for my next trick he went on and it was the first time I saw comedy created out of nothing of nothing happening and I Glaum don to that wait wait wait you're doing I think is not only making comedy out of nothing but making comedy out of people's expectations which you were going to fail to fulfill well yes exactly and I I really started that when I became a semi professional meaning I was working the local folk music clubs going around either working for free or for a week and I quickly decided that you know the material was you know good or weak or whatever and I decided whatever it was I was going to pretend like it was fantastic and how great am I how great is what you're seeing and I think that's what grizzly hunting it's a tune him too because they couldn't believe that someone actually was that confident

Steve Martin Staff Writer
Blood test for multiple cancers studied in 10,000 women

Science Magazine Podcast

09:26 min | 5 months ago

Blood test for multiple cancers studied in 10,000 women

"Now we have staff writer Jocelyn Kaiser. She wrote a story this week about a large trial of blood based test for different kinds of cancer. Hi Jocelyn Hi.

Jocelyn Kaiser Jocelyn Hi Staff Writer
Wearing the World Out

Why It Matters

02:46 min | 5 months ago

Wearing the World Out

"So what is fast fashion? So it fast. Fashion means is just the rate of turnover of clothing in stores. Every several weeks I'm Linda grier and I'm an environmental toxicologist. I study and advocate on industrial toxic chemical pollution. So back in the day the stores basically had four seasons and you went in seasonally to buy whatever clothing that you wanted and your expectations were not such that. If you went back in two weeks you would buy it all over again but then with fast fashion basically this dramatic lowering of prices and a new sort of marketing model that draws consumers in at any time to see what's new what we found was this immense acceleration of people buying clothing and people buying things that they might even neverwhere or only where a few times and a sort of a whole mindset shift from buying things really love and buying things you think will last sort of a timeless fashion to us really dated term. Which would be probably Mike. My parents generation Me when I'm like I'm going out tonight. Something New Right not to mention you know. I think the impact of instagram. Where people feel like they need to look different on every shot. Sure all of these things have had a very corrosive effect because from an environmental standpoint. That's just massive throughput. That's just massive amounts of fabric massive amounts of apparel coming into these stores. And it's fair to say that almost no matter what these factories do. If they're making that much stuff their carbon footprint water use and chemical use and pollution is just very hard to curtail when we think about how enormous fashion industry is it starts to become clear. What kind of impact it has. Hi I'm Liz. I'm the senior staff writer at Fast Company magazine and I focused on the fashion industry. So for instance in two thousand and fifteen hundred billion articles of clothing were manufactured. And if you think about how there's just over seven billion people on the planet that is a lot of clothing per person a hundred billion pieces of clothing a year and I'm probably buying more than my fair share. And what have I gotten out of them looking around my closet? There's a lot of things I love and still wear but there are also some that I've never worn and quite a few. I've only worn once or twice. They served their brief purpose and are now just kind of

Mike Fast Company Magazine Linda Grier Senior Staff Writer
Wildland Fire Leadership for Project Managers

Between the Slides

09:19 min | 5 months ago

Wildland Fire Leadership for Project Managers

"Welcome back to the people process progress. Podcasts I am Kevin Panel. I really appreciate you all hitting play on this episode. Finding me on your various podcasts platforms. Today I'm going to cover. Leading the wildland fire service which is a manual created in two thousand seven by the National Wildfire Coordinating Group with their training team there and by mission centered Solutions Inc. It was one of the leadership. Manuals that on episode ten in one of the archives from between the slides here so check that out where I covered leadership lessons from Gettysburg. And beyond so this manual as title entails is focused on folks coming up in the incident management world in particular in their wildland fire service. And we use this may new even though we weren't wildland firefighters because we were all hazards folks so please firefighters. Ems public health wherever that lives kind of in the regular day to day world on the streets of America but this was a great template wildfire has been around for a while and they have great leadership set up so this was a pre read before that staff writer at Gettysburg National Battlefield. We've talked about co that in public health and those kind of things and hopefully that's been helpful but also you know my day job is on on project manager and so I wanted to share some of the parallels which I've talked about before between just good leadership and whatever industry and in this particular case looking through this leading in the wildland fire service manual and applying it to project management and. You all will see whether you're a project manager or not or you're an incident management or public safety. The pair allows I mean again. I've said it before to me. Good leadership or a good leader can transcend any industry meaning. If you're a good leader I could pop you in technology or public safety or health care or farming that you would be able to bring together teams. You would be able to take some kind of process. You're not going to be expert in each. There's but that's often not the leader's job and so let's let's get into this book a little bit. I'M GONNA I'm GonNa read some of these things and then kind of comment on them and then look forward y'all's comments if you want to send me stuff. At people process. Progress G MAIL DOT COM or facebook page. People process. Progress can get hold of their or on instagram panel. Cagey here we go so. This is part of the preface of the book very early on. And there's a couple of statements that I think are really outstanding and the first is that leadership is the art of influencing people in order to achieve a result the most essential element for success in the wild and fire service is good leadership so let me touch on that last piece but switch out a couple of words. The most essential element for success in project management is good leadership right. There's there's no difference you know saying I'm a person whose job it is to go out and help put thousands of acres that are burning out that are on fire or I'm a person that's going to help get organization put thousands of devices work. Well right good leadership is you know the most essential element. Here's another statement and this one just applies all around right leaders often face difficult problems to which there are no simple clear cut by the book solutions and these situations leaders must use their knowledge skill experience education values and judgment to make decisions into take or direct action in short to provide leadership so project managers out there right. We you know part of bringing together. A new project team were coming into a project. That's already inflate is getting together looking at solutions that I've said it ad Nauseam but I'll say it again. The Project Management Body of knowledge is a great manual but if you try and manage projects strictly by using that book or agile guide or six sigma like if you just try and do completely out of the box and I've seen some of this where we're trying to apply principles that we would normally apply when it's a sunny day and there's no pandemic and all that. Y- then we're GONNA fail. We're going to spend our wheels a little bit and so be okay with everything not being exactly like it is in the book and some of that comes with experience right so if you've been around a little bit in life you kind of understand that let alone if you're new and project management or have been around there you understand it's not gonna go by the book ever not even. GonNa go buy your project plan exactly ever and that's fine. Just do the best you can for all the constraints and this and that so as the main goes through then we're gonNA look at some some leadership values and principles and these are like. Human leadership is in principles right but think of these as a project manager and the three guys that are outlined that this book kind of everything else falls under our duty respected integrity so according to the leading in the wild on fire service which we could rename this and change some things that could be leading in project management. So let's look at duty be proficient technically as a as a leader these these apply to these principles that apply to the value of duty. Make sound and timely decisions. Make sure that the tasks are understood. Supervised accomplished right and develop your people you know all of those apply directly. If you're a project manager if your project manager this is invested in your team you're invested in being the best person the best leader that you can be then. All of those should be absolutely proficient in your job piece to me is. Do you know how to use the tools that organization us right to do stumble through them or refuse to use them be proficient. Get get good with them to the point where you can try then leverage them to make solutions for certain things like you know being able to stand up very quickly way to track phones you've deployed or using excel or using project line or a share point lists or whatever product to us you know sound and timely decisions. I've talked before again that that I think it was episode ten from the archive there with Gettysburg leadership about the time wedge. Right the longer the time goes down the less options we have so we got up. We gotta be ready to make those when we get to the task level in the overall project schedule. Do We know that the folks that have the resources the people that we have on our team that are assigned tasks that have taken on those tasks? Do we know what they're supposed to do. And what when when we've asked them to do it by and how to do it. And if the answer is no then we need to make sure and that we can clear that up and part of our jobs as project managers along the way from day. One when you introduce yourself to when you're handed off top developing your people. So are your teammates coming out the other end of the project better are you also and I think we should always look at that. The second value here respect. And here's the principal so no your people and their wellbeing now in this time is an excellent opportunity to develop this. If you're maybe not as heavy in this as a project manager is checking on your team how are you doing? How's your family getting enough rest? You need help. Let me know if you need more people. We need to staff if we can to help give you a break like that. Should be a constant cycle a constant check in with our teammates. Keep your people informed. We've all been part of silos or I copied these people on the email. But not these other people you know what cut down on emails and copy folks and if someone says Hey. I don't need to know this just work with my people awesome then cut down. But there's really unless you're actually working in top secret security compartment mental information skift stuff like none of this is top secret right so we should be open have good communications and keep our entire team informed at all levels. There's one thing I've heard a lot on calls of then and when folks use the term. We'll talk about that offline which you know partially sometimes if you've been on those calls means. I don't WanNa talk about this in front of everyone else you and I can just talk about it somewhere else now. There's utility in that when in a quick update meeting. We'RE NOT GONNA get into a working session that makes sense. Hey you know what? Let's dive into this deeper offline so we can work through that that makes total sense. You should be doing that anyway when folks don't want to talk about something and you can tell through the conversation that there's already other silos happening in the project. That's something that you should be aware of as a project manager in that you should you should maybe address. Knx You guys want to talk about this. Offline is information that I can help with or that. Maybe the rest of the team needs to know and just kind of reach out again. There shouldn't be a ton of separate discussions that don't relate to everybody else on the team and the objectives that the project is trying to meet right if it's truly unified and we'll get into that a little bit. This other principle that has to do with respect is build the team. Right your job as a project manager whether you've been matrix than they actually report to you or most often. I found like no one actually works for you but your job is to build the team up so that folks want to do work for the project or you if you've built those relationships through you reaching out to them directly through talking to them through active listening all you know some of the other things we'll get into about good leadership but part of your job is not just build. Get people to get the job that it's build. The team to be cohesive

Project Manager Project Management Body Kevin Panel National Wildfire Coordinating Facebook Mission Centered Solutions Inc Instagram Gettysburg National Battlefiel Gettysburg America Staff Writer Principal
When Linda Yvette Chvez Realized She Couldn't Quit

Latina to Latina

02:30 min | 5 months ago

When Linda Yvette Chvez Realized She Couldn't Quit

"I think our insecurities that have come from many traumas at work through therapy in the thing with this particular moment for me by said this. Is it like you have to dedicate yourself to the thing that you want to do? Which is writing. It's now or never you can't give up on this industry because the reality is you haven't really tried in the one area you know you want it and they you know you could do it so. I said if I can't make this happen within a couple of years then that's it then you can. You can move on with your life and say did everything I could and it just didn't work out for me but you gotta give it everything. Linda is a toy. So you gotta give you gotTa leave this feeling like I gave it everything I could and I'm at peace because I always ask myself. How will you feel at the end of your life? If you didn't do that so I gave it my. I give it everything and within a few months ago. Hint defied and right away within those two year is we were pitching or TV. Show and and I had put out around that time My family and I were very cute or a very cute little immigrant family Mexican family but we would do these dream meetings where we would talk about our dreams and like what we wanted to to achieve him and we would you know manifest there talk about things we wanted and my sister kept saying she wants to be a mother and I kept saying I I WANNA BE I WANNA create my own TV. Show and I didn't know how it was going to happen. Because any OS and going through it the traditional way in television and knew there was a traditional way I had so much experience. Managing my skill level was not at a staff writer level. Like I knew that I my writing that I could do way more than that and I didn't WanNa come into television at that level because so much experience in different areas and skill sets that transferred so I was like God. I don't know how you're going to do it. This is what I WANNA do. And within two years I had sold me and Marmon had sold the show to net flix and now about a year later year and a half later we just released it and give it my all. I can't sit you know. A cancer really proved to me that like the truth is when you feel a calling your men to do it and it's just a really the only thing between you and that calling is will you choose to give it like if you choose to go after it because there was countless obstacles but at the end of the day you'll get there if that's that's truly what you want.

Linda Marmon Staff Writer
Trump's ambitious infrastructure vision faces Senate GOP roadblock

This Morning with Gordon Deal

04:56 min | 6 months ago

Trump's ambitious infrastructure vision faces Senate GOP roadblock

"President trump faces a clash with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and other Senate Republicans over the president's desire for a two trillion dollar infrastructure spending bill something he promised during his twenty sixteen campaign what's going on here here to explain is Alex Bolton senior staff writer at the hill Alex set this up trump earlier this week in Dorsey two trillion dollar infrastructure package of member during the twenty sixteen presidential campaign he blocked his opponent Hillary Clinton formally proposing something like two hundred seventy five billion dollars for sure after trump one thing big old robot that failed to materialize during its first three years in office now he sees an opportunity on on Twitter earlier this week you need to call in dollars but that is facing opposition from his allies in Congress Senate Republicans Mitch McConnell the Senate Majority Leader he's putting the brakes on a package that is emerging from the house he said look we need to wait for me to figure out what we need to do it would first need to address the direct economic fallout from the across the borders the crisis before going on to sort of more tangentially related policy priorities which is what infrastructure is yeah you said the the phrase there is tangentially related I guess Augustus of an infrastructure bill would had some benefit or spur vide some help to the economy during the pandemic well I mean we just are I mean just this week or more than there are more than six billion unemployment claims this is a an all time record on top of that more than three billion last week so in two weeks we'll see ten million claims for unemployment benefits that is the sky high record shattering all previous records so I think the thought or discussion right now this marks the record is that the need is going to be more media more acute than anything that two trillion dollars in infrastructure can address I'm sure instructions nice but we are in a crisis right now people need money to pay the bills pay the rent for groceries is infrastructure projects that said take an introduction you can take a year to two years perhaps longer to get the money on the economy that takes way too long and you know they remember the lessons from the two thousand nine American recovery and reinvestment act passed under president Obama during the last financial crisis that took a long time for those benefits to matriculated in a bombing that a lot of heat for the economy taking so long to respond speak with Alex Bolton senior staff writer at the hill his pieces called trump's ambitious infrastructure vision faces Senate GOP GOP roadblocks so at this point even though infrastructure might be beneficial to members of Congress coming up for election in November phase four of a relief for stimulus bill it might be more likely at this point well if the question is what's going to be in the face for stimulus bill and Nancy Pelosi the speaker and co chairman of L. conference calls this week saying they want infrastructure would be a major major component of that space for bill now what Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says that look this this is hello C. subscribing to the attic you over Obama Kerr chief of staff Rahm Emanuel bill number never let a crisis go to waste in other words you can use the crisis to achieve policy goals that you have been able to previously the instructor kind of falls into that category now only people she bills the president this is an opportunity to get a break through something that they've long wanted immediate pressure talks going on well before the coronavirus crisis and so I just think right now we're gonna include top sellers will consider it to be wrong with it because while it there are potentially long term economic to be sure to package it really doesn't address the immediate economic fallout of this coronavirus cases which as I mentioned has created a ten million unemployment claims in two weeks what is our treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin say about all this he seems to be the go between between say the White House and Congress these days well I mean he said in a recent television interview that he's at the grocery store Richard Neal with democratic chairman of the house ways and means committee and eagle east twenty to move forward so he would like to get this done and he doesn't need to have a bit of problem debt Republicans in Congress to do what I eat all you know that during the negotiations of the packaging to truly dollar perhaps two point usually about package we'll see what the dust settles when those negotiations were going on if some Republicans were critical writing we wonder what she'd do to this plane for

President Trump Mitch Mcconnell Senate
"staff writer" Discussed on Happier in Hollywood

Happier in Hollywood

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"staff writer" Discussed on Happier in Hollywood

"And I think when you're a staff writer that's an easy way to communicate you. Care and staying late is another we talk often about drew goddard on buffy the vampire slayer which was his first job as a staff writer. I'm pretty sure yes and everybody on that. Show would leave because it was like there were several seasons in it was a very upper level staff. People would be like all right if jaws isn't coming in yet we're out of here but drew goddard would stay and then when Joss got there and ready eleven pm yeah to kind talk something through drew would mean there and like that was huge and then they ended up becoming like best friend and drew. I'm sure we don't need to tell anyone is <hes> become hugely successful as he should but he's an amazing writer yeah so Brooke. Stay doing the right thing. Come stay late. Yes singley is huge even for <hes> like Derby Times. Where you guys were working on rewrites and I would like I would say if you you don't have kids or you know a significant other that demands more of your time just to put the time in and stay because I would even learn just by listening to you and Marcia work through all the changes yeah and there is a point at which that becomes abusive so you know be don't if you're in a situation where you feel like you have to do that? That's problematic but yeah if you can if you're getting something out of it yet you're saying yeah then it's a good thing to do and you all would definitely be like Brooke. You can go home. Uh Now. I'm just curious. Do you feel like you were hurt in the room because I do think that's a problem that many staff writers face I mean I know we've dealt with this before where you have ideas but it feels like people pass them over <hes> MHM. That's a really good question. I do feel like I was hurt in the room. I definitely think that I had to get better about communicating my pitches and that's talk about. I got better at over the course of the series and hopefully we'll get. Even better at <hes> but there were times I would pitch an idea and people it'd be like the room was so nice. I cannot emphasize that enough because no one was ever like Oh that's a shitty idea right. They would say oh okay well. What about this and just pivot and you knew at that point like that's not what we yeah and I know they say not to like? If you pick something and it doesn't to never pitch it again you know it's kind of like move away from it but I will say I pitched something in the room and I didn't do a very good job of pitching it and I kind of knew after I talked to one of the other writers after Hey my pitch this idea and they were like that's not what you said in the room. When you just say what you said in the room and I was like oh I didn't experimental so actually went and found jerome after the room and was like hey I have this idea it was for episode? Five Live is like this is what I meant to say. I'm not sure that I said that in the room and he was like Oh..

Derby Times staff writer Brooke goddard jerome writer Joss Marcia
"staff writer" Discussed on Happier in Hollywood

Happier in Hollywood

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"staff writer" Discussed on Happier in Hollywood

"It's the lowest level of writer on a T._v.. Show and it is a huge aged deal. She a staff writer position. Yes and we've talked about this before but we want to revisit it with someone who's just completed her first season as a staff writer of course the person We know best in that position is brexit graves Turner Brooke. Welcome Committee eat you now Sarah. We've gotTa tell everyone <hes> part of what inspired the segments was are happier in Hollywood writers retreat. Yes because Brooke was at the retreat in everyone knew she was a staff writer on the fix and we heard from many people after the retreat that they would have loved to hear more from Brooke that she was exactly where they want to be and they would've. I love sort of Brook to have her own session to talk about being a staff writer so we thought we'll let fashion on the show because we finally did do our surveys after feedback we got. We really appreciate him. We're taking it to heart so here everyone to share her garnering. Hopefully have some gyms. We'll see so Brooke. Was it what you expected. That's my first question. You know it was <hes> I mean the great thing is you're finally doing the job you've always wanted to do and I've worked with you too and Marsha before so I kind of had a sense of what the vibe would be yeah and thankfully everyone in the room was awesome so yeah it was totally we do have and they'll more policy we do and <HES> and sometimes people slip through her sure on that show everybody was a really nice person and very supportive of the lower level writers so supportive so was there anything surprising about it like. was there anything that kind of May go <hes>. I don't think so honestly I had prepared me so well for this experience. They really didn't feel like anything surprising to me. You know what what do you is there anything that you think would surprise other people like the because what surprised me and we'll say when we got our first job was how hard it was for me to follow the conversation. Yes how fast it moves. It really does for us. It felt like a different language the first couple months we had no idea people here I think we're talking about the second scene of act one and suddenly someone's like and then in the fourth act break. This happens and I had no idea what was happening. We'll see you to preps me for that. Yes we said Hey. It's going to be difficult to follow the conversation. Sometimes give yourself a break so I was like Oh yeah..

staff writer Turner Brooke writer Brook Welcome Committee Hollywood Marsha
"staff writer" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"staff writer" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Exactly what you're doing. He says it's callous, and it's cruel because President Trump says that if I don't know if I open up the government, you won't give me what I want. But Democrats are saying the same thing Democrats are saying if I don't open up the government, then I won't get what I want right. If Democrats if Democrats give him what he wants, then he'll have what he wants. And the government will be. So they can't have both of those things it takes two to Tango in all of this. Now, some of the arguments that are being made against President Trump on this score come courtesy of members of the media. Of course, George Packers a staff writer for the Atlantic has a piece today about ABRAHAM LINCOLN. And he talks about visiting the Lincoln Memorial. He says Abraham Lincoln's eloquence touched levels of morality and high resolve that preposterously out of reach in the first days of one thousand nine hundred and the third year of the Trump presidency a constant theme runs throughout Lincoln's writings from his years as young Illinois politician to the last great speeches of his life. The supreme value of self-government everything depended on this idea are ancient faith, which itself was absolutely eternally. Right. But it's endurance was never guaranteed from the. Start of his career Lincoln foresaw. How Americans democracy might not through foreign congress. But by our own fading attachment to its institution self-government requires that the union should live, and it also negated slavery. And then it talks about ABRAHAM LINCOLN. I this is the best is during the civil war. The government never shut down. Not even when the capital was threatened by confederate troops. You know, what the president did not shut down the government during the civil war the president arrested journalists who opposed him the president conscripted hundreds of thousands of people. The president blatantly violated civil liberties, none of this is to say that ABRAHAM LINCOLN was wrong. But if you're going to use an example of a president who held the government open. In the most democratic fashion Lincoln is not the guy you want to look to because Lincoln didn't do that. He used his War Powers, which is exactly what Trump is threatening to do. Right. This very second. The second. We're gonna get.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN President Trump government Lincoln Memorial president George Packers Atlantic staff writer Illinois
"staff writer" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"staff writer" Discussed on On The Media

"Is a staff writer for the New Yorker coming up the Hanukkah story. Relit bottle. Bottle against extinction by a brave and United people leaving. Maybe not this is on the media. This is on the media. I'm Bob Garfield. And I'm glad stone this weekend brings us to the tail end of Hanukkah Judaism's. Eight day festival of lights marking one of God's lesser miracles involving lamp oil and the perseverance of the Jewish faith celebrated with drills and Minora's lacquers and jelly donuts. This relatively newish holiday serve says, Michael David Lukas described in the New York Times as the semitic sidekick to Christmas. The Hanukkah story begins in Greek controlled Palestine over two thousand years ago, where Jews enjoyed religious freedom until the new ruler the Assyrian Greek king and Taya Cas took power as memorialized in the much beloved nineteen Ninety-six Rugrats on IKA special from now on king anti is says you have to wear what he wears and read what he reads, you also have to worship his guns. I'm people these new lifeless funny. Addy's? If that new key catches us what barrel books, we're you to the love of trouble. I don't care. These are the books are fathers five dollars six fathers in a messed up. Now, Judah or Yehuda and his small band of followers, the Maccabi defeated and Taya's after the war under the command of Judas priestly family. The has Mony ins the Jews found the holy temple of Jerusalem in ruins the temple lamp with chest enough oil to burn for single day but Monday by and then another. I'm kill finally days had passed and flame still finding and this day. The light them every year to remember the miracle of Hanukkah. That's the popular Hannukah narrative pass down through cartoons and kindergarten classes wherever Jewish kids are at risk of feeling left out at Christmas..

Taya Cas New York Times Bob Garfield temple of Jerusalem staff writer Michael David Lukas IKA Addy Palestine Judah Yehuda two thousand years five dollars Eight day
"staff writer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on KCRW

"Davidson is a staff writer at the New Yorker we've been looking at the financial crisis of two thousand eight the ongoing climate crisis. And how those things are somehow connected to get the long view on this the really long view, we turn to Jill Lepore. Djilas staff writer at the magazine and a historian at Harvard University, and she's just written a big excellent history of the United States. These truths. In chills view, this kind of short term thinking that we've been talking about and complaining about is. No accident. It's actually baked into our democracy. The federal constitution is really only long-term plan. Everything else is running for office. Everything else is election driven. Everything else has an incredibly short time. Horizon. When there has been more long-term planning, it's come from people who don't hold elected office. So thinking about maybe Alexander Hamilton economic planning in the seventeen ninety s which is a kind of blueprint for. Economic development in the nation. That is going to take decades to really see results. Long-term planning comes from other sources that can come from party strategists. It can come from cabinet members. It can come from social movements. Think about the campaign to end lynching takes decades and decades and decades and decades, and it takes changed coming from all quarters. It takes muckraking journalism. It takes rallies it takes marches it takes legislative act after legislative act, and but it also takes a very big public conversation and a reckoning with the costs and a sense of what it does all of us to live in a world of violence, and that kind of stirring, NAS of political change the nature of our public conversation about climate change really hasn't happened yet. But there's no reason it can't happen now. But with climate change.

staff writer Jill Lepore Harvard University United States Davidson Alexander Hamilton cabinet
"staff writer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"If you get to work again for another year, you have to sort of save with an anticipation of disaster all the time. So it's not even like you really can enjoy that feeling of security because on the other side of it is a big unknown question Mark. And so everybody's sort of squirrels away anticipating the worst, which kind of creeps into your psyche. Example I gave was on a network show that you know is a twenty week show, but like so many shows as hurt for streaming there for cable and there's no guarantee that many weeks are gonna be at that rate. And one of the sort of WJ negotiations that has happened was about opposite acidity. Basically, when you finish this show, how long can they hold onto you without paying you cases another season of the show coming up. And so that is a huge factor in sort of like your ability to make a living as a TV writer. And so you know what was great money for Allison coming out as a first time staff writer would be challenging amount of money for somebody would have young family. That's a lot. It's why don't have the family. The truth is I have friends who have kids, and when I say to them, I was up until three or four finishing script either. They look at me slack jawed and then I think of, oh my God, what had defeated kid to would've even had walk a dog. So perhaps the most useful piece of information to someone listening to this podcast and God, I wish podcasts existed. Was first starting out is that if you are uncomfortable with the notion of instability and Ryan to spoke to this, this life isn't for you. It just, I mean, Linda's story is, is, is a perfect example of that because you would think no one has greater stability than someone who has a fifty million dollar deal who's Pru with proven track record was into manned, but she was yoked so severely by les Moonves and she couldn't were. I mean, that was an exclusive deal. I had to, you know. So obviously, that's an extreme example. She she had been very well paid for a long time. She earned all the money from the her shows that had been on the air, but television is predicated on failure even more specifically than any other area of show business, perhaps theater. But you just have to assume that you're not going to work for a long time, and that's not a catastrophe that's being a realist. So you have to be. Able to weather that storm emotionally psychologically and financially and it never ends. You know, I've been doing this now almost fifteen years, and when my room wraps in two months less than two months, I don't know what my next gig is going to be. So. Right. And you've been doing this for less than a year on the whole, how would you compare the experience of of writing TV writing.

les Moonves Mark writer staff writer Allison Ryan Linda two months fifty million dollar fifteen years twenty week
"staff writer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"It's to keep you just work while we're eating. Most rooms and what's become quite standard now is there is a very hard rule about budgets, so try and be in Los Angeles, New York and find a lunch that you can get for like eleven twenty five again, you know, this is not. We're not talking pampering and flying in sushi from lasco's, but I would also say that Ryan, right, like there is there could be cultural wars over. Can be holy wars waged over lunch. Like I worked with this one guy who was so obsessive and and you. And even if someone is trying to institute a democratic process, like each person in the room gets to pick like I've been that writer. It was a staffer show an I not knowing LA. I looked at the menu some place and said, this is fine and everybody complained about the lunch. So of course you feel like you've got the scarlet letter a. but I've also been in rooms, whereas Ryan just said the Showrunner at likes to work through lunch, which is torture, and it's not just torture because you don't get that decompression in the middle of the day, it's because you have to watch other people eat. Mel's like. The more rooms that you're in the more contemporaneous mental notes that you take like I will never do this when I run room. I will never do this. You have to give people lunch and you have to enforce the no eating in the room edict because it needs to be a pure space in all senses of the word except for the fact that we're writing television. But yes, let's talk about money and the financial aspect of it to questions that came in daft kid wrote is a pay enough to live off in LA. Then Anthony Cucolo asked, please give us a ballpark on salary. So it's always awkward to talk about money. But I texted a friend who's on a network one hour and he pulled staff writers on network one hour and they said that after taxes agent but not coming manager, it's roughly twenty two hundred per week for twenty week guarantee. And so for twenty guarantee that's forty, four thousand dollars, which seems good, but it's a challenging amount. If that's the only money you're making a year in Los Angeles, that's a challenging amount. So we are brought onto a staff writer on Whoopi show. That was probably you're just out of college. That was really good money for you. Yeah, it was. It was more than I can count. Yeah, and and I, you know, and by the way I just finished paying off my films colognes of six weeks ago. Congratulations. Maybe it's been eight weeks. I can't believe that I haven't. I don't have hash marks on my arm the amount of time and just the amount of mental space that vote that debt took out. But it did feel like a lot of money in that very naive sense that you're used to sing a negative balance, but you are talking about living in New York or Los Angeles, and if that is the one job that you have twenty weeks, you work out of fifty two week year than that has stretched quite a long time, and you have no idea of knowing whether you'll work five months from them one year from them to two years from them. So it's, you have to learn to budget your money and live very, very modestly. I would say the the, the rhetoric around it reminds me Laura about the way anybody talks about any kind of well paying seasonal labor markets. Like you could be a rough neck on oil rigs, and it's a very similar kind of culture where it looks like you're being paid just a rebel. Niculae amount of money. But then when you think about twenty five percent of it goes to your agent manager. Lawyer bunch goes to taxes. It only gets paid out over six months and then you'll find out six months later..

Los Angeles staff writer Ryan New York Anthony Cucolo lasco writer Mel Whoopi Laura six months one hour four thousand dollars twenty five percent fifty two week twenty weeks eight weeks five months twenty week six weeks
"staff writer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"So you're absolutely going to be writing in an office or like in a production vehicle, the more you can test your, your ab- ability to endure those extreme circumstances is the better off. You're going to be like, how nice it is to sit home and right in your pajamas. Oh, you screenwriters out there, John. I'm looking at you. You don't for the most part. You don't have that option. I'm currently on the show where the Showrunner sometimes specified like you to be around in the office, should something change or you know, it's fine. Go ahead right at home. But I, I usually force myself to do half an have an important question from Gary woulda who asks sweats in the writer's room acceptable. So it is a feature writers. I don't have to get dressed. I anything you are actually going into the presence of other people. So what are experts for how you should dress in a room? What. Also, in your experience, what are the the levels of dressed up nece in writer's room. Comfort is key. I mean, I won't be tongue-in-cheek with my response. Comfort is key because as Ryan said, depending on the room, you may be there for eight to fourteen hours and I've seen it all in terms of tire, but writers on the whole. I think you'll forgive me for generalizing but are pretty casual folk. So I worked with some dandies and that's always a bit strange. But there is no code. I think that the strange thing about Hollywood and truly you found this even a screenwriter is writers tend to be the the worst dressed. And agents the best, and then the network execs, you know, it's like business casual for all of them, but agents definitely in pearls or suits and ties. Yeah, but writers it's, yeah, it's a right night. See your dress dress codes are described is a red and black flannel the only time I have not seen you in a black t-shirt that seems to be uniform. So can you offer any insights on the wardrobe of your own Maryland blind guy. They're all naked for line. Now. Running jokes that there's there's an and I'm sure he'll be happy s.'s that Disney pee on our show who I just love. And he's just a great veteran, comedy writer. And you know, he spent so many years, eating lunch out of plastic takeout containers that he just refuses. So he has played his fork and he does his dishes and he's always dressed to the nines every day is just like, he's really committed daddy. I'm here a lot. I'm just gonna make it good and apparently on a show he was on years ago, people started rubbing him about his fork and knife in this plate and all that kind of stuff..

writer Ryan John Gary woulda Maryland Hollywood s. fourteen hours
"staff writer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"Thing. That's that's the the brass ring. If you could do that. But again, like you may find that you're better at doing that on a on a procedural, then you are legal thriller. But I think to answer the person's question, perhaps in a different way is there's no way to predict on a daily basis what you're going to need to do in any given situation. So I think having an open mind and being courageous than that way, you know if if that doesn't sound too precious to the part of it is, and I was really aware of this prior one hundred thought about it was the as you go into production, people start peeling away, right? So there might be writer of draft. There may be somebody I don't outlined to somebody on set or somebody post. So the composition of the room isn't stable either. It's changing all the time. So you might have had a particular role that you started. You know, you sort of fell into for wiles feeling. It was your comfort zone, but as personalities in the room shift, you know, you might get. Called upon for other things that you didn't do before? I love it. When people ask questions, and you said the question is wrong. It's the classic advice column move, but you know, that's that's just the the nature of the beast. Guess let's segue to question from Victor. Herman is asking about that shift of the room once in episode stories, broken and a writer leaves the room for any number of days to write a script. What does it feel like to come back in the room? Now, the story has progressed without you. Are you vocal? If there's things happen that you don't like? So Alice of, let's pretend that you are off on writing script. Now you come back in the room and they're working on another episode. Things have changed. If you see something on the board, they have says, going in a way that you sense, it's going to be trouble speak up. How do you address that? You work the room and you're like, who's Victor names on the board? You don't. A quick anecdote. I I once was sent off on outline and got a call day to that. The the network decided they didn't want to kill off his character that was killing off, come back in the room. We have to re break the story. So let's clarify. Often outline means that you are writing the outline or you're writing the script. It means that you're writing the outline. Now there are extrordinary circumstances where you're writing both simultaneously, and that's when yes, network has blown something up and you have to there so many extrordinary circumstances that you talked to enough TV writers like, oh, yeah, that's happened to me where just bureaucratically than network will demand an outline even though the script has already been written. So you're trying to distill script into outline form. It's it's ridiculous. But I would say you always have to bear in mind the value of diplomacy. You're often script, so your silo and you're focused on you have this myopic focus on the task at hand. These these twenty eight to fifty five pages while the room is going on without you and they're discovering other things about season arc and and perhaps even series are that you weren't privy to. So they have information you don't have and you have information they don't have because you're discovering something about the character as you're writing it jokes that weren't pitched in the room or layers to the character that weren't discussed in the room. And depending on the room, you may have a great deal of autonomy or you may have very little. So I think if you come back to the room and something doesn't jibe with you, it's just, you know, how do you. How do you go about farting in a close an enclosed space..

Victor writer Herman
"staff writer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"So if there's a silence at last fifteen seconds, that's not. The end of the world drama reverse a comedy room that could be could field death. I it you. It's almost like unleash unleashing virus. I'm gonna go to a question from Twitter, Michael tall asked which is better to able to come up with unique dialogue slash stories on your own or to be able to go with the flow and have random bursts of input for other people's ideas. So as a staff writer, which you think serve you better to be able to contribute in the room and to add onto things or be a person who can craft whole idea in present it. You know, it's interesting from my observation anyway. I don't know if that is. I don't know if it's an either or question in some ways. One of the things that that seems to make a room really work is the composition of the people in that room. So you might have somebody who has a different skills of the somebody else. But there's also this undersung value, but different personalities. There's some people who are just great cheerleaders to keep things going forward when it feels pretty down. There's some people that are just workhorses that just get up there and they hold the board together and they've got the best handwriting in the world. So you know, it's not like there's a very narrow bandwidth of skill set you can specialize in. I think the strength to know what you can contribute and to see its contribution to the whole in in the the way that people are kind of arranged around that table and what they bring and sort of, you know, I have. I have different skill sets, I think. And in this particular room, it took me weeks to kind of figure out, oh, this is probably. Really the best thing I can bring to the table because it can't bring everything I want to. You know, there's just not room to try and do everything. So knowing what you can bring and how it will complement who's there as more, I think valuable also, what's your take on that? I would concur one hundred percent and it changes from room to room. What the show runner is doing at the outset of any room is assessing skill sets sheer. He may have hired you thinking that your special areas specialization was going to be x, but in this constellation of writers and experiences and levels, you may be more useful doing why. And and the best example of this is comedy rooms which will often have story though often split into two. I was once on his staff eighteen people and they'll often split into two for efficiency sake. You just can't be in a room with eighteen people pitching jokes. You really shouldn't be in room with ten people, bitching jokes, but one room will. Just be on story and the other room will just be the joke room, which I found to be no exit, like a cats. Which one liners of for six to eight hours every day. And comedy is such an unfunny business. Again, that's another. That's another episode but but I was surprised, but depending on the room, depending on the show in question, I was either in the joker more in the story room, and it was just how that particular show runner assessed my ability. And that goes back to the Unietd of a full set of skills because any one of them may be called upon or required war in in any particular room. And I think what most honor show owners would probably say is that if you can get a couple of people who can give you really solid first drafts, that's invaluable because that's where most of the time suck comes in, having to rewrite and the rewrite may not be because of anything you can necessarily control a, you may get studio notes and they. Exactly. They stripped and suddenly it has to be rewritten into days that actually happened to me my first script. So somebody who can write quickly and right well quickly. You know, like we would always in him like, you know, you can add the jokes later. You can add them on set, but structure. You can't piece together on a set. So that skill set I think is is certainly help me out here..

Twitter Michael tall staff writer one hundred percent fifteen seconds eight hours
"staff writer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"So it was armed and prepared. And that's the best piece of advice that one can give anyone because nothing else is in your control. And he explained to me the way writers are staff and how writers have long since been hired of which UPN is sitting setting up an office, but he was he was very, very kind and said, leave me your card, and I'll let you know if any positions open up specifically Greider system. So I went back to my office and asked the the other PA who is in the office the time, what's a writer's assistant. Because if you obviously, if you aren't in this world, you aren't introduced to the various levels of support stuff that these shows have. You have no idea. I mean, even if intuitively know, okay, this is someone who assists threatres and what way. And it affords one very close proximity to the process, and there's no greater. Apprenticeship than that job. So anyway, long story short, I was ultimately hired as the writers researcher for that show step, not quite assistant, but you're in the mix, do you? It's interesting about it. I don't know that those jobs exist on most shows Whoopie wanted someone who could keep an eye on topical subjects for the show to explore. And that's what landed in my lap. So he's only too happy to do that. So I didn't have the administrative tasks of a ride assistant. I e you're, you're being the court reporter and you're typing down contemporary what everyone is saying and then having to call all those notes at the end of the session, I was just working on Thomas Lii and again, you try to serve what's what's happening in the in the in the swarm around you. And I saw, okay, I'm not in the room with writers the way the writers assistance. So I don't have the proximity, but they can read my right. Eating. So I was going through the newspapers on a daily basis and calling things that I thought might be topical, appropriate for the show, but then also writing a paragraph no longer than a paragraph, a satirical take on what you know, that particular story was and don't Sukur drove, you know, and it's one that I was able to craft on my own. Nobody said, this is what we're expecting. It's just give us some new stories. So the idea popped into my head to attack the task this way which you know if you could look through John sties I feels like menial task. You're just cutting and pasting newspaper stories, but make it an opportunity, do it with purpose. So what came to pass the more writers approach me and say, oh, they thought today's edition was really funny. I got other people they were passing this around. So other people in the production said, would request me to put them on the distribution list and. Eventually caught the attention of Whoopie producing partner who wants to show got its back-nine recommended me for a writer gigs, so I actually moved up the ladder faster than any of the other writers assistant still where you wanted to freelance gigs or or what was it. The way that happened is there are two options and they went with option a. was to make me a staff writer as opposed to just paying me for freelance script. So I was on staff. I did wind up getting a script, but it's it was more satisfying because then I was in the room and I became a colleague. It was. The funny coded to that story. Is this something you would know if you are entrenched in the culture? Is that in writers rooms typically the, the upper level writers tip their assistance. So the the Showrunner tips, his or her assistant, and then all of the writers combine in. It's all based on seniority. So depending on how big away you are what you mean. So the way one would a server in restaurants. So yeah, just to service tip vio-. 'cause it's Hollywood and everyone loves to give gifts in it and these jobs don't pay well. So let me let me state that. So as part of the support staff, I was tipped. Suddenly now in the room working with them, and it's like, I hope y'all don't want your money back. I had bills to pay. So you're in your early twenties? Yeah. And I mean, we'll circle back around in and Ryan can give his experience that being fresh out of film school. I was not prepared to read the room the way I was even a year later..

writer Whoopie UPN staff writer researcher Thomas Lii Sukur reporter Ryan Hollywood John partner
"staff writer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"I started to wonder like is anyone let's move as me right now. I just, you know, it was all the talk in the writers that morning and there was such a palpable rage about it, and it was interesting because as you pointed out, it wasn't specifically about sexual harassment, but about just sort of the cult of power and personality and how it would even exceeds 'economics like you just pointed out that that's what's kind of shocking underneath. It is a town that seems to love to cudgel you with economics as an argument for making something or not making something, but then to have the whim of personality and power above that have even more cloud. It was truly astonishing and it was like an amazing piece like it. The knife in that thing is so sharp. And if you haven't read it, I just encourage everybody to go read it because it is quite the the rallying cry, I think. So you were in a room to be able to talk about it and it's unusual experience for you. 'cause you're mostly feature writers this right now, you're writing on this. CD show with this is the first time you've been. Writing on show. Yeah. And so I want to get into this. I want to sort of talk through the process of getting on a show answer what it's like to be writing on a show versus writing features independently. Alison, you've written independently to want to compare and contrast those to really dig into it because I've had no three ranked riding on his staff of show. So really, really just gonna ask you questions and not doing very much about what it was like. I went out to Twitter and I had a bunch of people tweeting their questions for you guys about sort of what is like to be TV staff writer. Cool. So Allison's been awhile since you've been a staff writer, but can you time travel back and toughest through getting first job writing on television and how you got the job is sort of what it's like that I was first few days at first week getting settled boy. It's a triggering. But I do I wanna preface what my responses by saying that if you asked if you pulled a hundred different writers with this question, you might get anywhere from twenty five to ninety nine different responses. So this was my experience. I am somewhat unique in that. I did not set out to have a current television. I went to film school wanting to write and direct independent films, and then the bottom fell out of indie features that just was not a career to be had in the so it was both necessity and somewhat fortuitous that I fell into my first TV job. So that's the preface I was newly out of film school and had worked as an intern, and Jim Jarmusch his office in New York, wonderful experience. And I met a UPN unit production manager for anyone who doesn't know. Who is essentially in charge of finances for production. That's that's true TV on film, and she left her job with Jim, the the production ended, and she went to work on a feature and offered me job as a PA, which is a step up from an intern because you actually get paid in quotes. Although I came to find out that she was paying the male PA more than she was paying me. Lots of have me back on John. In your eight. I was working that job initially as a PA and was bumped up to production secretary at some point. And then our production offices moved to Calvin story all this New York and next door to us. The Whoopie Goldberg sitcom was starting to set up their production. So this was before the writers were actually there. Most of the writers think perhaps all of them except for the Turner's where Los Angeles base. So the room was up and running yet, but they're UPN was sitting up the offices and starting to hire local crew. So I just walked down the hall one day, poked my head in his office and said, hey, if you need a writer, you know in that in that way, that speaks of one's naievety. But also you have to be emphasis and why not. And I had just being out of film school Ed written directed to shorts that had. Gotten some attention on the festival circuit and also had some writing samples..

writer Jim Jarmusch staff writer New York harassment UPN intern Twitter Whoopie Goldberg production manager Alison PA Allison Ed secretary Calvin Los Angeles Turner John
"staff writer" Discussed on On Shuffle

On Shuffle

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on On Shuffle

"Tiana taylor was the fifth of five kanye west produced albums to arrive last friday sort of and as you just heard be and my colleague justin charity discuss it's pretty good perhaps the best of all the good music releases to come out this past month but after an overlooked two thousand fourteen album katie s e which stands for keep that same energy which wasn't quite the triumphant return it was supposed to be and here to talk a little bit about why that might have been and how common those reasons are of and of course the album itself is staff writer at the atlantic and very dear friend of mine how did you how are you doing i'm great mike thanks for having me of course thank you for joining so let's just start with the album itself like the largest takeaway here feels like tian sounds great yeah yeah her i mean her vocal come up has been great she does husky thing that she's known for and then kind of hit higher notes no edge and expect and it was a fighting here yeah i mean like also the so what terry was say was that we should only let carnegie produce r and b albums from now on the produce wow okay let's let's let's talk about that let's dig into that a second like what was your favorite song off of this project what seemed like the the most perfect marriage of his production and like her i guess explore expiration of her vocal register yeah i think no question so my my initial response is the best song i think are now is issues flash hold on which is for her that your yes it is say they'll give me oh your phone this is this is.

Tiana taylor justin charity staff writer terry kanye
"staff writer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"New yorker staff writer he and frazier you can find his piece on drawing racing at everything that he's written for us range of subjects that really boggles the mind at new york dot com oh mm there were going to close the show with the ryder t see boil tom boyle as a novelist and he's written stories and essays for the magazine going back to 1993 that by coincidence is right around the time he took up residence in montesino california the town seemed almost like eden to him then but boyle and millions of other california's have just lived through backtoback natural disasters capping a year of weather related calamities around the country tom boil wrote about returning home to montesino a few weeks after the mudslides there the eerie thing about those first nights back in montesino after the mudslides had to do with absence the absence first of all of our neighbours almost all of whom were under mandatory evacuation order they were gone their houses dark their cars rolling down other streets altogether most homes were without electricity which brought the dark as close and still too apart from the sounds of nature the muffled hoots of the owls come to nest in the woods outback of my house and the chairman of the tree frogs and live and by the first rain here in nearly a year it was the delicate almost apologetic beating the heavy equipment brought in to clear away the debris the helicopters were for the most part gone the survivors airlifted to safety and the search for the missing.

staff writer tom boyle california montesino chairman frazier new york
"staff writer" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"Hello unhappy 2018 everybody this is evan longform podcast cohost max erin and myself are off this week so we're sending un episode from the archives this is ben taub from 2016 ben is a staff writer at the new yorker magazine he's done a lot of international reporting you'll hear him talk about isis you'll hear him talk about his incredibly wrenching story around doctors in syria since this episode's come out he's also done big stories including one on the humanitarian crisis in chad and another about human trafficking i recommend you checked both of those out this is one of my favorite interviews that i've ever conducted for the podcast both because ben has a really fascinating and fawn and selfstarting way that he got into journalism and because he's also extremely thoughtful about how he approaches his work i hope you enjoyed if you haven't heard it already if you have i hope you enjoy revisiting it we'll be back with a new episode next okay bent bintao walk to the podcast thanks for having me on yeah thanks for coming in here it's funny that were having you are now actually because uh we had mr david rennick on just a couple of weeks ago he did not name check that many writers in the course of the podcasts but you were one of them and he brought up your name as an example of like being on the lookout for in identifying talented riders and diligent reporters and how he uh has to sort of always be open to people who might be someone who could write for the new yorker you know someone who could produce something great and said that leads me to want to know how you got to the point where you got identified in that way by someone who then points you up to david ramnik so.

erin ben taub staff writer new yorker magazine syria humanitarian crisis chad human trafficking ben mr david rennick new yorker evan longform david ramnik
"staff writer" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Budging johnson the staff writer uh in a new article up at the top of the page all out outclass war gop bill cuts taxes for private jetowners yup there's a new tax break if you on a private jet bought it raises taxes on students brilliant just what we all need a dry these guys are heartless soul listen uh anyway and holy oak mass hey dave what's up hey how you doing i wanted to tell you that uh back in two thousand and i started listening to your show and inspired me to become a poll worker good yeah i was thinking this did it for ten use and uh the media wanted to got swelling there the uh they need a city clerk need neither warden down at the same clear uh we were running taught that was funny i was about thirty years old and the precinct world bank where people vowed it was a senior citizen housing project and on my cowworkers lydia women uh off that we need more of your day of i mean you know the the the next generation needs to be stepping in and stepping up you know and taking over all that stuff i got this we build the the two thousand and and uh i don't do that anymore but uh i listen to show all the time but i wanted to uh wrenching that this feels to me like some to bow to the azs 1 the conservatives really wrenched hauling we've been named uh horst put think like adolescent boys societally yeah the in san jose shen of the us population i coudn't god and in and it can be done in marketing and advertising in politics television cinema music uh from the media's on uh we're all like selfish little bullying due to thirteen year old boys every conservative i talk to my age of fifty two uh the congress they should always turns feel like collecting attacked and it's also personal and uh they snowflakes these conservative i'm like yeah that's a that total boise's good a billion billion i gotta tell you they this is a uh i think it our political dialogue and political discourse that that the reagan administration stirred this and the republican party has been singing this to an ever since and of course reagan made structural changes in our media functions that also led to a you.

johnson horst us congress boise reagan administration republican party reagan staff writer gop san jose thirteen year thirty years