35 Burst results for "Staff Writer"

What 9/11 Did to One Family

The Experiment

02:29 min | 10 months ago

What 9/11 Did to One Family

"Is one the thousands of people who lost someone. They love on september eleventh. Two thousand one twenty years ago now. Big brother bobby. Mcilvaine died that day in new york city at the age of twenty six. He was like reaching out insane. I want to show you my office and was specifically onto the because it was the last time i saw. He told this story to atlantic staff writer jennifer senior. Who wrote about the mcilveen for the atlantic magazine. How did this story come into your life. Well i mean the most obvious way it came into my life is that i knew bobby mcilvaine. He was my brother's roommate in college. He was my brother's roommate in new york city. When they were young then starting out. I would visit my brother at princeton. Bobby would be there and he would. Just be ridiculously precocious charming. He wanted to be a writer. But one of the things that bob learned early in his life in publishing is that a lot of people in publishing came from upper middle class families. They had cushions of money beneath their toes. And bobby's family didn't have that kind of money and bobby knew. He wanted to make a living and so he went into corporate. Pr after two years of being in book publishing. And that's how bobby ended up working for merrill lynch and going to work conference on one of the top floors of the north building of the world trade center on the morning of september eleventh. I went down had coffee and was going over my work like many americans on that morning. Bobby's mom. Helen was starting workday as a teacher and they had the tv set on in every classroom. And i my knees buckled and light. I had to be helped. Bobby's dad bob senior. Also a teacher at the time was also at work. It was on tv. I call home. Of course i try to bobby. We get colon now. The phone was ringing. No one could reach bobby. His parents is friends his girlfriend or his brother. Jeff

Mcilvaine Bobby Jennifer Senior Atlantic Magazine Bobby Mcilvaine New York City Atlantic Princeton BOB Merrill Lynch World Trade Center Helen Jeff
Approval of New Alzheimer's Drug Could See Surge in Blood Tests

Science Magazine Podcast

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Approval of New Alzheimer's Drug Could See Surge in Blood Tests

"Last year about six million people in the us. We're living with alzheimer's disease and by twenty sixty that number could be as many as fourteen million people living with the disease. There's no cure and it's not easy to tell if someone has it from symptoms alone. The testing for alzheimer's is invasive and resource and pensive staff writer. Kelly servic is here to discuss. How testing the blood for alzheimer's might facilitate new treatments and new research. Hi kelly hi sarah alright. So this is kinda spurred on by the approval of a potential treatment for alzheimer's disease. I'm not going to say the name of the struggle. I'm going to leave that to you. It's very long but it's really put a spotlight on this issue of testing for the disease in the blood. Why is that first of all. Fda really surprised a lot of people by approving this drug called kanye mab marketed as as you home for alzheimer's and that that approval was special. Not just because there hasn't been an alzheimer's drug approved in more than a decade but also because this is the first approved drug that aims to actually interfere with the underlying disease process and slow the progression of disease and the reason that that is shaken. Things up is that essentially a lot of older people with memory problems. Who did not see care. Did not seek an alzheimer's diagnosis before. Might do so now that there is an available treatment. And what they would do to get screened would be what get speidel. Fluid take it out so diagnosing. Alzheimer's is really complicated. There other neurological conditions that can cause dementia and an older people a lot of other factors. That might contribute to their memory. Problems and as a result really confirming alzheimer's diagnosis requires waiting to get assessed by a specialist and be assured as you can be either getting a pet scan which is expensive. And there aren't a ton of pet scanners in this country or spinal tap so that your spinal fluid can be analyzed for certain

Alzheimer's Kelly Servic Kelly Hi Sarah Alzheimer's Drug Alzheimer's Diagnosis Speidel FDA United States Dementia
Critical Race Theory: What Is It?

On The Media

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Critical Race Theory: What Is It?

"Is critical Race theory? Yes. So critical Race theory began around the 19 seventies with the law professor Derrick Bell and a couple of other legal scholars trying to understand the ways. That race and American law intersected how history of slavery and segregation was sort of codified and continue to influence American law Today. Adam Harris is a staff writer at the Atlantic. His most recent article was titled The GOP S Critical Race Theory Obsession, Harris says. One of the first instances we started to see critical race theory being used as a political bludgeon was in the early 19 nineties, President Bill Clinton nominated Atlantic near to the Justice Department. She was a legal scholar who done a lot of work and voting rights and conservatives effectively used her previous work in voting rights to sort of tag her as someone who was arguing for racial quotas in voting for the amount of seats that people should hold on city councils. They also tagged her as championing a radical school of thought. Called Critical Race Theory. Amid mounting pressure from conservatives, President Clinton has withdrawn his nomination of Lani Guinier to head up the Justice Department's civil rights division, claiming veneers writings lent themselves to views that he could not embrace the president cut her loose rather than fight a divisive battle on Capitol Hill. From there you have A kind of dormant period. It's not really until after George Zimmerman was acquitted in the murder of Trayvon Martin, the Jesse Jackson like race profiteer race grievance industry says everything's about race. America's a racist nation. You see a mention of critical race theory after a video surfaces of President Barack Obama hugging Derek Bell in 1990, you know When he was a law student at Harvard Law. The president is actually kind of aligning himself here with a well known campus radical. There is a conservative back last thing that he believes in this radical critical race theory. And then they're a kind of a couple of mentions up until 2020 shortly after George Floyd is murdered, You start to see a

Derrick Bell Adam Harris President Bill Clinton Atlantic Justice Department Lani Guinier GOP Harris George Zimmerman Trayvon Martin Capitol Hill Jesse Jackson Harvard Law Derek Bell President Barack Obama America George Floyd
"staff writer" Discussed on South Asian Stories

South Asian Stories

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"staff writer" Discussed on South Asian Stories

"Is the most tenable trajectory for me. It is something that i think. I would for lack of a better phrase Have the least shot. failing at wrong enjoyed. It was great but it was during those years that i got to know better and he was sort of like you know if this is something. You're you're interested in you should pursue it and more than that. I didn't i didn't know what types of jobs existed in the entertainment career. Not only did he push me towards that type occurs he pushed me towards specifically saying i see you as a writer and i think i think based on what i know about you. Writing is what could be. You know your background. And so i ran with it and again very much under his his guidance and mentorship he. I'd be working in dc in the administration and he would call me and say. Hey i'm gonna be on colbert in new york on tuesday and so i would I would get take work off and take a bus. Take a mega bus to new york. Had i don't know why i had to specify that taking malcolm omega buses. That's how i was smiling. Thing samir you. And i we need people to know that we got a good deal from the one dollars people out here paying eighty dollars for For an amtrak. And i'm pocketing the seventy nine dollars profit two hundred percent so we got that out. There was a mega. And so cal would go on cobra for example and bring me along and i chill in the in the green room and wright jokes for him some that he would use some that would land and get a big laugh. occasionally some that would and then afterwards he he would introduce me to say this my writer rahman and that is a holy shit moment for me. Wow why you want to. I want that to. I want that to be how. I see myself in how i'm present. He'd so that that story. That was a specific moment. But i remember that is being the moment of. I don't just want this to be a part time thing. I want this to be what i do professionally. Managed somebody questions. The first question is. Do you remember the jokes that hit versus the ones i didn't. I somehow magically remember the ones that hit and not the ones they didn't. So i can only tell you the one short term memory. No so yeah exactly. No so this one was for. It was the first presidential debate of thousand sixteen so kobe went live so cal was like. Let's watch the debates together and then if you can brainstorm jokes so long you know this is not brilliant material here but one was that one observation i wrote down in my notes was a cannot tell if trump is saying that he's going to do something about attack a. T. t. a. c. k. s. or a tax a. t. a. x. because no one can figure out what the hell this dude is thing but it does not really matter because he doesn't have a plan for either and so cal said. Some form of that. Much more articulate than i did but it got a big laugh and then the other one was colbert asked asked him. Do you see yourself potentially so basically what could you do to. What would it take for you to. Support donald trump. And i think he was able to slip in again. Not a brilliant line that he he couldn't see himself supporting someone who is actively trying to deport harold komar now that that's good that's good. What was it like a surreal. Moment to see cal share. The you know the the jokes that you had come up with right. Wow that came from my brain now. It's spoken to colbert. Were like the like the pillars of comedy. You know is that it was like a pinch me moment. Here's the thing. There is no doubt about that. And and more than that even i think. A lot of writers come to terms with the fact that we we live in the background to some degree. You know our job is to make the folks that we write for look good. And that's great. I i truly love doing that when i you know. We'll talk more less. But when i'm writing for someone and you read the online comments thing. God lillies thing i. I love that joke knowing knowing that. That's why there's not even a part of me that wants acknowledgement by the opposite. I wanna be the person in the background. But and to be clear the folks i've worked for what has been great at shouting out there writers but in this moment with cal especially he was so quick to introduce me as writer and and give me that credit and that was especially felt really really good about it. That's amazing taupin is one of those people. That's like the pioneers for south asians entertainments. I feel like he's on a special mount. Rushmore off of people. That like south asians because look up to because when i saw that movie the first time i'm like wow he's actually a cool indian guy right not someone that you see the the stereotypes in a movie. You're saying. Wow that person talks and acts like me. But i'm curious to know what was it like knowing cal behind the scenes behind a screen because a lot of people listening have seen the movie but they don't know what's he like as a person. Can you describe that total ashville. I'm just like what a what a prick you know. Sorry cow if you're listening obviously a joke nicest guy funniest guy so actually let me tell you a little more about limited sort of continue on my plan line because it's still very much involved him so i'm working I'm working in the obama administration and we know that it's gonna wrap up. We know that it's about to end. And so we are thinking ahead to the future jobs that said we were told there is a chance you know. Obviously hillary is gonna win and maybe it will even take the senate and the And you know the house and therefore there could be way more jobs in. Dc for folks you can maybe stick around in the new administration so in the back of my mind i was like i'm looking ahead for future jobs. But you know the the likelihood is that i'll just kick around dc for awhile. Jump between branches. Suddenly you know complaining about not having a stable job in dc truly the the least of anyones worries when we got the election results in two thousand sixteen. But i was like. Oh okay i will not be staying anymore. It is time to get serious here. So i in some ways did the chase the starving artist dream of all right. Well this is it. This is the time to move to. La it's something that had been weighing on me for a little while. I had started thinking that. I had missed the boat on that that it was that it was too late to pursue the entertainment career. How's willing sorry for myself about it. I would rick in turn on an episode of entourage and be like oh man. I don't wanna watch this. This makes me just feel jealous of Of of being out there and chasing but when when my job ended in january two thousand seventeen. And i knew i was leaving dc then i was like. Let's do this. i moved out. I stayed on a buddy's couch again very much. The cliche i will not say i had like five dollars in my pocket to my name or or any. Bs like that. you know. I had a very small amount of saving more than that. I had a. Who is incredibly supportive. And my mom saying to me. I want you to take this risk. Because it's what you care about and if you fall flat on your face thinks she said if and not when. I don't remember exactly but i think it was. If you fall flat on your face that i will support you and for one. I was incredibly touched for another. I think it's important to tell that. Part of the story. Because i came from a place of privilege that i was able to have that safety blanket. You know we're not a wealthy family. Ed say midwest middle-class..

harold komar donald trump five dollars new york rahman trump eighty dollars tuesday one dollars Ed seventy nine dollars hillary first question samir kobe two hundred percent ashville amtrak two thousand sixteen january two thousand seventeen
The Future of Ecstasy Plus Therapy for PTSD

Science Magazine Podcast

02:25 min | 1 year ago

The Future of Ecstasy Plus Therapy for PTSD

"We have staff writer and editor kelly cervix. She's here to talk about the future of md m a this is a controlled. Substance sometimes called ecstasy or molly that has had some success in clinical trials for ptsd alongside talk therapy. Okay kelly how you doing. I'm doing okay. How are you sarah. Good i'm good. Let's start with the recent clinical trial results of md m. a. and therapy that was tested on. Ptsd patients. how did that go. How did that work. So there were ninety people in this study who were revised to get kind of a unique course of psychotherapy. They had a series of preparatory sessions with a trained therapist and then they got three eight hour long experimental sessions where they got either. Md ama or a placebo and then they got this series of sort of integration sessions to process that experience and the results were that two months after the last experimental session the difference between the drug and the placebo groups was pretty clear. Sixty seven percent of the participants who got md may no longer met the diagnostic criteria for ptsd at that point compared with thirty two percent of those who got placebo so this is sort of the the biggest and most thorough study of its kind to really find potential benefits of this drug in ptsd. What are the effects of this drug and people. I think maybe from popular culture people might think of it as something you take in a nightclub. Yeah this has definitely a reputation of a club drug that. I think that these investigators are really trying to overcome and may have a lot of complicated mechanisms and we don't understand all of them but it's thought that many of its effects come from its ability to increase certain neuro transmitters in the brain including dopamine and serotonin and so people sometimes described euphoric experience. Sometimes a sense of openness and sort of a heightened ability for empathy and you can imagine that something that in the case of ptsd therapists might aimed to exploit if a trauma survivors facing intrusive flashbacks in israeli avoiding these disturbing memories of something that happened to them. This drug might give them sort of less. Fearful less judgmental state in which to reflect on and process. What happened to them. That's the

Kelly Cervix Ptsd Kelly Sarah Trauma
Hollywood Foreign Press Association to Vote on Reforms

All Things Considered

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Hollywood Foreign Press Association to Vote on Reforms

"Thursday. The association that awards the Golden Globes is set to vote on reforms after more than 100, heavy hitting Hollywood publicist threatened to stop doing business with the group. Reforms would fundamentally change the way the Hollywood Foreign Press Association does business. It's a big question whether that's going to happen, and there's a lot of people waiting to see. It's not just the publicists and time's up in these advocacy groups. But NBC, which broadcasts The show and Dick Clark Productions, which produces the show that Stacy Permit a staff writer at the L. A times who detailed years of unethical and possibly illegal conduct in an investigation of the H F P A She spoke with us earlier today, and I asked her about some of the conduct in question. They ran the gamut from issues of sexism and racism and homophobia to that I convention is one publicist said that They had an actor, amateur actor and one of the members asked them. Do you still have sex at your age on brother situation and actor came out and they asked him if he was going to be filing for bankruptcy again. I mean, these are questions that are inappropriate in any form and certainly have nothing to do with the project that they're there to talk about him promote, but more important, and perhaps more more damaging. They described that the age of P a would snub clients. Those clients, particularly if they were people of color if the projects they represented were led by people of color or non a listers. So why is this this so significant? So first of all, in order to get a nomination, a Golden Globe nomination. You need to get in front of the H F P A. And that means one of their sanctions, screenings and press conferences. So if you're not going to get their attention, you're not going to get a nomination. And a nomination. It's become a huge marketing tool in the industry, which translates to attention for the projects that it translates to box office, which means money talent themselves. You know, with the nomination or wind on her hand, can use that you know when they're leveraging their next deal, so it's part of the Hollywood eco system.

Stacy Permit Hollywood Foreign Press Associ Golden Globes Dick Clark Hollywood NBC Golden Globe
Interview With Emily Atkin, Founder of Heated

The Digiday Podcast

02:27 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Emily Atkin, Founder of Heated

"Thanks so much for being on today. Emily thanks for having me so you ventured out to sub stack It was about a year and a half ago now. is that right. yeah. I started early. September twenty nineteen what appealed to you about joining sub stack at that point because it was a rather new platform right. It was new. A lot of people thought i was being stupid. I mean i was quitting a pretty established job at a magazine. Things you know from the outside seem to be going well and you know they were i just. I had ambitions to do things that were i guess. More me so But yeah it was certainly knew there was not a lot of there is not a lot of role models to look at in this space but fortunately i had one who was judd leg of the newsletter popular information which is still a really popular newsletter. He encouraged me to do it. and so i did. That's awesome. i guess making that leap. Did you have the idea for heated kind of rolling around in your mind for a while before you knew what platform you would take it to. Or i guess how did you get your idea that you're willing to leave your job for. I definitely did not have the idea beforehand. I sort of had the idea that i wanted to do something different. Or i was at the place in my job at the time. I was working at the new republic where i wanted to make a move And i didn't know exactly what that move would be. And i just started considering my options looking at job openings and nothing was really speaking to me. Even the good jobs that i felt. Maybe i had a chance to get. I started thinking to myself. Well is that really what i want. and meanwhile i had judd in my other ear saying you should start a newsletter. You could start your own thing and more and more as i weighed my options that that seemed like that was what made me the most excited honestly. I was trying to trust what what just felt like. Even if it was the riskiest thing like what would be the funnest thing. What would be the mc brought me the most joy and sort of sense of purpose. And that's where the idea came from the create. Anything what would i create. And and that's where the idea for heated came from.

Judd Emily New Republic
Jelani Cobb on the Murder of Daunte Wright and the Derek Chauvin Trial

The Kicker

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Jelani Cobb on the Murder of Daunte Wright and the Derek Chauvin Trial

"This week coverage of the derek chauvin trial. It's been an amazingly distressing week in terms of the coverage of what's going on in the courtroom minneapolis where derek chauvin is on trial and even as is happening of there was another police shooting this one of dante right also in minneapolis and it requires journalists. Who are doing this to cover all these things at once. What's going on in the courtroom protests in the streets. What's going on with the dante right case and how to put all this together too so it makes sense and how to tell. The wider story is the job of now as we face a critical week next week when a verdict could well come down in the chauvin trial. I'm really happy to be joined by. Johnny cobb new yorker staff writer. Who has a piece about this. This week in the new yorker and has been covering the george floyd murder happened last may welcome gilani. So you've been reporting from minneapolis. For how helen helen we. They're a do days. What does that mean like. What how do you do that so you wanna you wanna keep an eye on what's happening in the courtroom but you also want to keep an eye on what's happening the street. So how did you. How did you go about reporting so these strange times as we already know and The nature of the trial was that only two reporters could be inside the actual courtroom and so they were doing pull reports and in the courtroom the in the courthouse The media were watching the proceedings on a bank of televisions and so the communications person for the courthouse literally fed. It's no different than you watching it in your living

Derek Chauvin Minneapolis Chauvin Johnny Cobb George Floyd Helen Helen Dante Gilani New Yorker
What It Means When Children Are Under Fire

Red, Blue, and Brady

02:08 min | 1 year ago

What It Means When Children Are Under Fire

"We have a full house today though. Chris ted and john can you introduce yourself. Hi everyone. i'm chris brown. I'm the president of brady and hi everybody. My name is ted bonar. I'm a clinical psychologist and the director of an family fire and then sort of our man of the hour. Is it strange when you walk into a virtual meeting space and everyone just holds your book up with notes and says okay. Let's get started on delighted. Delighted actually see it in the world. I've been living with it for the weird thing about a book. You know you finish it so long ago and then you wait and you wait and you wait and then suddenly you actually see it out there so now it's it's always a thrill to see waved around admit meetings okay. That's that's a relief. I'm glad we didn't scare you. John and would you mind telling your listeners. A little bit about yourself as well as your great buck children under fire. Sure my name is john. Woodrow cox. I'm a staff writer at the washington post. And i'm the author of children under fire in american crisis. The sort of the short summary of the book is it's meant to be really an intimate account of the way that gun. Violence devastates this country and anna anna. Also a bit of a path forward in ways that we could make some small differences to help those kids both before and after they suffer trauma from gun wiles. I think intimate is a perfect word to describe this book as you detail. The ways in which children are impacted by gun violence through stories of a handful of children. What i'm wondering is what prompted you to write. Not just about the physical effects of gun violence in what that effect is on children but the psychological ex i think that so much of the coverage around the way that kids are impacted by gun. Violence focuses on the kids who get shot. We have such a narrow focus. And this really applies. I think to adults as well. There's this really narrow focus on and that's the headlines. I mean we can look at what happened yesterday. As an example. There's a school shooting all the cable news. Networks make a calculation to say. Let's wait and see how many people died right. One person died they move on. That's not an high enough death

Chris Ted Ted Bonar Woodrow Cox Chris Brown Anna Anna John Brady The Washington Post
Barb and Star Go to Vista Del Mar

Slate's Culture Gabfest

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Barb and Star Go to Vista Del Mar

"Me to talk about barbara star. Is rachel sign a staff writer for the new yorker. Hey rachel her so thanks for joining me for this one. I really was excited to talk about this one with you because you wrote something about it a little view in appreciation of it for the new yorker that i really love and i felt really tapped into some of the things that are special about this movie. I'm going to read a tiny bit of it back to you. Maybe that can inspire conversation so this comes early in what you're writing about it when you talk about the transition from what i would think of as the setup the first twenty minutes or so where we beat barbara starr in their hometown of soft rot nebraska and how it then it then transitions to town of title of vista del. Mar in florida. And so you're right. There solid jokes from the get-go but it's not clear right away. What the movie is up to our. Wigan molo denizens of los angeles where they first met as part of the l. Sketch comedy troupe. The groundlings taking the piss out of flyover over forties then skipping ahead of bit is talking about the the that transition you say but as barbara starr unfolds. It's quirky heroines fuel. Less and less like stand ins for certain kind of tj maxx shopper. Instead the film goes for something far more specific and silly loving often lovely. Where so many comedies are either retreads old ideas or feel designed by committee to hit newsy talking points. Barbara starr is the rare film. That feels sue generous in both conceit an execution barbara starr or such finely drawn characters that they could be nobody else but themselves so that really spoke to me and exactly what i love about this movie and this was going to frame it to you. Is that this movie gets compared a lot to bridesmaids which of course was written by the the co writers and co stars of this movie and malone christian wig and another movie that sprung to mind was spy which is this wild sort of a spoof of james bond films. That's also a female friendship bonding movie with incredible performances by melissa mccarthy and rose byrne i love both bridesmaids an spy but i found this movie far more original than either one and in a way more exciting i mean i can see why bridesmaids changed comedy history. It's an important movie. it's still a very funny movie. But this sui generis quality that you point to i think is is so much more vibrant in this movie which really could only have come out of the imaginations of these two women who are friends in real

Barbara Starr Barbara Star Rachel Vista Del Wigan Molo Nebraska Los Angeles Florida Malone Melissa Mccarthy Rose Byrne James Bond
Should you buy your grandma a robot?

Reset

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Should you buy your grandma a robot?

"This pandemic has made it harder for everyone to spend time with friends and family and that solitude can have real health consequences particularly for groups that are vulnerable like the elderly or those who live alone. But what if there was technology say a robot that could keep grandma company. Would you buy it. Seagal samuel tried to answer that question. She's a staff writer at vox and the host of the future. Perfect podcast seagal. Thanks for being here. Thanks for having me so right off the bat. This seems like a very futuristic. Almost tech utopian idea you know robots keeping us company in our old age but like this actually exists right. Can you give us a sense of what this looks like in just terms. Yeah sure so. There's basically i would say. Two categories of the social robots any robot that is playing a social role of role that normally a person would be playing. We typically call a social robot. So i you have the ones that are just designed to give you company companion robots. They might come in the form of a cute dog or a cat or a baby seal or they might come in a more humanoid form a robot that will talk to you in english. But they're designed to keep you company the others are designed for personal care actual caregiving activities. Like bathing you or say lifting you out of bed and into a wheelchair and those tend to be a bit more high end and expensive

Seagal Samuel
The Rock Doc Who Prescribed 1.4 Million Pain Pills

The Experiment

01:54 min | 1 year ago

The Rock Doc Who Prescribed 1.4 Million Pain Pills

"Once. You found the right doctor and of told him or her about your pain. Don't be afraid to take what they give you over. Twenty years ago pharmaceutical companies began to market the use of a magical pill. Often it will be an opioid medication. These drugs which repeat our best strongest pain. Medications should be used much more than they are for. Patients in pain opioids would be a new kind of painkiller to treat not just acute pain. After event like surgery but also paying that was more mundane like chronic back pain. That patients would complain about for years but which doctors didn't have a clear cure for some patients may be afraid of taking opioids because the perceived as too strong or addictive that is far from actual fact pharmaceutical companies marketed. These drugs aggressively to doctors. They don't wear out. They go on working. They do not have serious. Medical side effects at the there wasn't a lot of limits. On pharmaceutical company is being able to tell doctors that oga. Hassan is a staff writer at the atlantic whose been covering the opioid epidemic for the last seven years. So doctors were kind of like a lot of them unfortunately went with it and now we see the result the result is that more than four hundred and fifty thousand people are dead from overdose in the last twenty years. And what part of the crisis were you most focused on so ridden a million stories about this but one thing that i was really curious about is how you actually went. From having opioids being a thing that existed to having opio being a thing that existed in people's medicine cabinets.

Hassan Atlantic Opio
A Year Into The Pandemic, The Incarcerated Among The Most Vulnerable

Short Wave

02:26 min | 1 year ago

A Year Into The Pandemic, The Incarcerated Among The Most Vulnerable

"I called up desire bates a staff writer at time for this conversation. He covers criminal justice and race and when the pandemic was declared immediately pivoted to that with questions about how this would affect inmates and the first place he looked was rikers island in new york. The jail complex holds thousands of individuals and he wanted to know how a respiratory virus would play out there. Once it got inside the first person i spoke with for that story was a corrections officer at rikers. Who's just explaining. The circumstances like jail administrators. Weren't giving them a lot of information and they weren't giving them any real guidance on what to do Inmates started getting scared and weren't sure what to do how to protect themselves. So i basically just wrote a piece looking at how it was just a warning sign for what was to come and unfortunately that came true. Where you have you know. Prisons and jails all across the country that were greatly impacted by the spread. Yeah can you describe what conditions are like in jails and prisons. So i mean and the way they're set up is basically. Inmates typically live in very close quarters with one another. There's not a whole lot of space for people to spread out. There's some common areas but it's really a tightknit space and more than that in normal times jails and prisons aren't typically cleaned consistently enough where you would feel just like you're in a clean space and then also you know. Inmates wouldn't typically have access to cleaning supplies And people aren't able to practice social distancing so you know prisons are a little different because some of those you know. Inmates might have their own personal room. They're usually bigger than like a city gel Where people are supposed to just be kind of in and out like waiting to go to court or whatever records for example like people don't have their own rooms like people. There's there's areas where people are just sleeping in like one big room in the beds are like maybe a few inches away from each other. So of how much space you know. Inmates have in prisons. Jails because it's so confined and people aren't inmates themselves aren't going in and out. It would be easier for the virus to spread

Rikers Island Bates New York
"staff writer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"staff writer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"With staff writer Amanda Petrus Itch who just spoke with the songwriter. Camera, Lindemann. Lindemann Records as the weather station and her new record is called ignorance. So you didn't start out your career as a musician. You're a successful television actress during your high school years. I know you acted in some HBO dramas. How did that happen for you? It's such a young age. It was all just by accident. I really love singing. I was in a choir and then that led me to Community theater. Um, I knew I met a couple other kids who had gotten agents and gotten into TV. And I was like, Well, I'll try that. Why not? Um so, Yeah, I just I just sort of fell into it when I was 13 and Really hated high school, So it was very attractive to me to not have to go to school. As much. You know if I got a job, um but, yeah, it was a strange It was a wild ride. I mean, you know, I feel like their ways that I'm still like recovering from being an act. Um, but there are ways in which you know, I learned things from it. And I gained a lot of independence from it. Well, where some of those things that you feel like you're still sort of working past are still metabolizing some of maybe the bad things that were associated with that career that inspired you to, you know, take this left turn. Well, you know, I think most of all having no agency, you know, as as an actor, you are a tool. Um, you know, for someone else's imagination, which I think is Beautiful, you know, And and as a bandleader, for example. Now, I ask other people to do the same for me to bring their talent and allow me to direct it. Um, but, yeah, for me. Being an actor was just strange. And then I had no boundaries. And, you know, people touch you all the time and move your body. And you have no you have no personal space and you're not allowed to, you know, assert yourself, would you have to literally in body Someone else. So I think for someone you know it Zaretsky for disaster in terms of like finding yourself would and being able to, you know, have boundaries. Right, Especially at that age, especially that he thinks he s a teenager. Yeah. You've been pretty open on social media about how the income from your work in television. The early work in television made it possible later on for you to have really establish the career in music that you wanted and to sort of stay afloat in that way. You think it would have been possible for you to make it to this point? If you had not had those early work experiences that may be allowed you to get a little money in your bank account? Well, I think that's a really important question. And that's why I wanted to bring that up on social media because I feel like people have Don't have a lot of knowledge about how how dire the financial situation is for artists in general, and and, Yeah, for example, for me, you know, having that underpinning of You know, income and savings from working in TV like allowed me to When I started becoming a musician, I had all this freedom that my friends didn't have. Because they were working, You know, debilitating jobs in bars and restaurants. And I feel like people look at artists and think like, oh, they must be. Making tons of money and they're not like you know, and it's only gonna get worse. You know, if we don't figure out a way to monetize our, you know, it will increasingly be that on Lee. Artists who have like a trust fund basically can be musicians and I don't have that obviously, but But, you know, even just having that little safety net of like I can pay my rent. You know, like I'm not gonna, you know, be homeless. If if this tour doesn't go well, you know, is a huge huge safety net that a lot of artists don't have. I'm so grateful to you for being open about this because I think you know any kind of talk of money. And I don't know if this maybe functions a little bit differently in Canada than it does in the US, But any talk of money is sort of considered very I don't know, Taboo or or sort of. It's just ground upon which none of us should tread. And I think you know, in the end that protects people other than artists on from what I understand about streaming revenue and tour economics that seems as you were saying, kind of borderline impossible for a new artist to really make a living if they don't have some Outside income stream on. I'm curious if you've seen that kind of play out from within the industry, you know, folks who have had to maybe abandoned this as a gig because it just was no longer feasible. Yeah. I mean, I think most people I know, you know, I mean, In Canada. We do have like some grant money that does come into the system, so it's a little less insane than it is in the U. S. But, yeah, for sure. I mean people once they have kids, or once they No need to make a better living and live less hard. It can be very difficult to be a musician. And the thing that I noticed, too, is like I was like a middle of the road actor like I didn't You know, I was never famous or anything. I was just like a middle class actor. But the, uh you know, I made enough money to like, save some money you know, and musicians even when they're doing so well, I mean, I know a lot of musicians who've been very successful and well known. And and all that That really amounts to is, like two or three years of being able to pay their bills, you know, and that's kind of crazy, and I feel like it. It seems especially kind of acute and urgent. Right now, in the midst of a pandemic, when when so many musicians, touring musicians and their crews have been grounded, and I'm curious with touring off the table. What is your sense of how you know kind of smaller emerging artists are Finding ways to survive these days. Is there another path? Or is it kind of the sad reality that you know they're just gonna have to get different jobs. Yeah. I don't know why. I'm definitely worried. I mean in Canada. We've had a pretty decent um, you know, government benefit for during the Corona virus pandemic, So that's been really helpful to a lot of musicians. I know. Um And actually, for some people, it's been their first downtime where they've actually had time to work on music because of this benefit, even though it's extremely meager, um You know, it's not enough, but it's It's almost like a you know a good argument for basic income. But, um, it's hard to know what the future will hold, like, Definitely. I see. I personally see little bright spots like like band camp getting so popular. Maybe you could speak just a little bit about what they've been doing and sort of how they have maybe taken. More equitable arm or ethical approach to, you know. Kind of dividing revenue between the organization and the artists who make the music..

Canada Lindemann Records Lindemann HBO staff writer Amanda Petrus Community theater US Lee
Freelancer won't let cerebral palsy sideline his sports writing career

It's All Journalism

08:39 min | 1 year ago

Freelancer won't let cerebral palsy sideline his sports writing career

"Blake. Bombed gardner is a freelance journalist from naperville illinois just outside of chicago. He's trying to get established in the journalism industry but faces mobility issues due to living with cerebral palsy. Welcome to the podcast blake. Thanks michael happy to be here. Yeah i'll i'm having heavy on the podcast so so first of all. Tell me a little about yourself. Where'd you grow up and How'd you end up getting interested in sports journalism. Well i've been a sports all my life and grew up in naperville so unfortunately early left left talent as much as i would like to a group of sports fan and obviously you'll could play because of because miserable palsy. So you'll just try to get involved in any way that can. I grew up to be kinda encyclopedia of sorts growing up. And that's how. I got acceptance. You know much by peers growing up in school innocent. So you're the the writing acumen kinda came later in high school and stuff like that and wanted to try to pursue journalism as a as a college major but my background in sports and my passion for it has run deep. Since i was young. And just trying to learn. You'll every fact. Savior stat. That i can and just kind of tried to soak all that so-called so tell me about the freelance gig will what sports are you covering now is the lead prep for naple son. Which is the local paper here. For off periods from march two thousand. Ten until let's call it March of two thousand and nineteen was Football boys basketball and baseball. So i was in effect doing what a staffer would be doing covering those. Those three beats you'll features. Gamers notebooks all area packages. You any recruiting stuff you know. If we had a certain certain athlete commit to commit to a school would do stuff on that so just basically doing what a staff writer would be doing. Just without title that goes with it in the cash comes with view approached us reached out to us talking about being a man with cerebral palsy. Trying to find a job in the journalism industry. Did you encounter any difficulties in doing your freelance job. I guess the only difficulty was or would be like for example football. You'll you got some reporters who could you watch from the sidelines. I can't do that one. I can't stand for long periods of time to far the bigger issue is being able to grip something in my left hand and obviously being able to to write with right hand so i football. I'd have to be up in the press box. Computer keeps my own. Stats with an excel spreadsheet. Keep a play by play an steno notebook and then obviously you're not being able to drive so i'd have to look enough you my mother's kind of saint so she would be able to drop me off at your whatever high school i'd be covering a gay matt and obviously picking me up then you'll with the pay per bidding sunday wednesday. Friday paper deadline wasn't as big of an issue. So i'd be able to file once. I got back home and then just file with my editor and then it would go online and probably late friday early saturday morning and then it would run for brit on something as far as the deadline issue. Goes you know you were say a staff reporter. Do you think that you'd be able to find ways to adapt so that you be able to meet deadlines. I think it would depend on. If if it was y'all we talk seven day week paper. We talk in your six days a week three days. I think that number one would depend. Beware you covering something. And how far of a distance do you have to go because again. I'm not somebody who who would go to like mcdonald's or starbucks your to file on a pitch to use your wifi so i've never really done that so i think it would just depend on the type of publication writing for and where where you're covering something in relation to where you live. I think that's probably the biggest the biggest impediment that i've encountered just from a standpoint of applying for fulltime work with papers. Because you're the sun was kind of a nice set up because you're only dealing with six school. So like the daily herald in arlington heights. Illinois you could be dealing with twenty or twenty five schools with dupage county. And i could never do that so. The son was a good setup just because of the limited number of schools and they're all relatively close by the some of the challenges. You mentioned you know such as going to the mcdonalds or whatever the file. I mean you know there are adaptations to that. You know you can. You can get a sort of a mobile wireless thing that you can set up. You could sit in your car or you could find a space where you could write something up and file in a shared some of your clips with us and i was looking at your your stuff on medium. I mean you're really good feature writer. Do you have a real sense of how to tell a story. And engaging story you know he had a number of interviews some sports people talking about you know the challenges they faced. I can't remember which one it was. It was about a A pitcher from creighton. Who went on and talked about a big league game. That was his first big league games. And that's a real human sports type feature that you know then. I thought you did really well. Yeah mcnicol shortstop maple central grad. Which is where. I went to school. Full disclosure that he. He played baseball three years at creighton and got drafted in thrown by the royals in two thousand and sixteen made his major league debut with the royals in may of two thousand and one thousand nine. Yeah i and also you had some stories up there about your experiences. I guess you you were pursuing job at espn in their stats department. Concerned told me about that experience. You'll couple years before that of this kind of full around twitter and peter vesey started. Follow me at twitter. So then i started engaging with pam kinda explaining your my story my journey. What i'm trying to do. Would you be willing to to look at somebody stuff. And then the all august of two thousand eighteen after a previous interview with the spn. Two phone interviews. It didn't go particularly well in terms of making the next step and really no fault of my own or at least i didn't think there was any fault on my own. So he said why. Don't you put your story out there. You'll we could put on facebook twitter. He was writing on patriotic at that point doing some work on his own so he was gonna try to help me get it out there. No so we did that august. Two thousand nine hundred got got some nice nice feedback back. Although the only person i really heard from wanted to actually meet with me was mark boyle the radio play voice of the pacers and he and i met in chicago in october before bowls. Pacers preseason game. The festival would six months. We did a follow up the wwl two thousand nineteen by bringing caught wind of it. And then he forwarded onto norby williamson. Who's a it'll bigwig executives peon and then you'll that eventually led to meet talking with a recruiter. Espn by the name of stacey williamson and then we. We got the point where i went out to bristol interview with. Espn for today's april third and fourth two thousand eighteen for job in their stats and information group and you know unfortunately a couple of weeks later found out that i was making it to the next step in that process but i made a strong enough impression with the giro up that i met with on the second day of an interview. And we've kept in touch. And i ended up applying for and interviewing for their production. Assistance program called. Espn next at a couple of interviews in march of this year and then found out in. May that i wasn't making it the next step that process which would have been an in person interview out bristol but obviously with covid nineteen that process. I'm sure got put on. Hold on that. You're what happened with that. So you kind of kept in touch with her the jar up. So we're still you'll let door. I don't think it's completely closed. But she's she's one of the few advocates that i have and i don't have a lot of them so you know trying to keep that door open as best. I can

Naperville Cerebral Palsy Blake Football Gardner Baseball Creighton Chicago Illinois Royals Michael Peter Vesey Daily Herald Dupage County Basketball Pam Kinda Arlington Heights Twitter Starbucks
Calculating the social cost of carbon

Science Magazine Podcast

05:03 min | 1 year ago

Calculating the social cost of carbon

"The new biden administration announced on day. One has plans to recalculate the social cost of carbon. It's basically a way of estimating the economic toll of greenhouse gases produced today on future generations staff writer. Paul discusses why this value is so important and how it will be determined next up researcher in barker talks about the sounds of naked mole. Rats you may already know that these amazing mammals are pain and cancer resistant. But did you know that they make these little chirps to identify themselves. As members of their colony as a new administration comes into power in the united states. We're seeing some swift changes in certain scientific areas rejoining the who the paris climate agreement. A new director of the office of science technology and among these early moves the biden administration has also asked for a recalibration of the social cost of carbon staff writer. Paul loosen is here to talk about this change. Hypo hello high. So this was announced on the first day biden was in office that the cost of carbon to future generations needs to be looked at. What exactly are they counting here. This gets pretty pretty quickly. But the social cost of carbon essentially is used in all the big regulatory decisions that the government makes it essentially takes the economic damage which really reflects the damage to our everyday. Lives will come with a policy that allows more greenhouse gas emissions or less greenhouse gas emissions. Now runs it out through the future then comes back to put a number on what those emissions are going to cost us so it's like a price on carbon except it's not it's not a carbon tax or anything what was happening under trump. So obama had put this all together under his administration when trump came in they may to small changes that drastically decrease the number so i instead reflecting the damage done to the entire world. It looked only at the damage. Done the united states in the future and it increase some as called the discount rate which is essentially how we value future generations. And what we can do with when we get wealthier to kind of a combination of those two you increase that enough. You essentially go far enough in a future. You don't care what happens. There was basically a devaluing down to a dollar per tonne of carbon. Co two in some circumstances before. Gets you what it's going to be potentially in the next Four years how will this carbon cost be calculated. Now what are they gonna take an how. What are these numbers that we just mentioned about discount and how far into the future. We look how those going to be calculated before said they'll go back to the global damage feel bama administration news and they have to timespans here. I a rapid thirty day revision and then a year long final update that rapid thirty day revision. They could either go back to the obama era policies or they could even set the discount rate lower. Which many economists think is appropriate and new york state actually in their own calculation late last year. What might devalue be then for this short palpitation. The thirty day one or the yearlong. How would it compare to that one dollar amount that you talked about. Possibly within thirty days it could go up to one hundred. Twenty five dollars per tonne. That discount rate is a powerful thing on its own so that's moving from three percent to a two percent rate everything staying the same including global damages. There are a lot more changes that could happen for that year. Long update that could reflect a lot of new signs and new methods are now going into the bottles that form this number. What are people looking at with respect to climate. Let's take that first. How might that be different than what was considered under the obama administration so these economic models scott integrated assessment models that you're used to produce all this you know they have lots of knobs the climate models like this very simple climate models are built into them didn't really reflect the best science particularly. They warmed to slow compared to more complex models. Now there have been a few new simple models felt by climate scientists that more accurately reflect that consensus so those can probably be used and one big change is. There's been a group of economists and climate scientists who've been putting together these econometric estimates of the future damage of climate change damage from climate pile uncertainty onto uncertainty. They take these massive data sets from as many countries as they could find globally and look at short term variations over a couple of decades or shifting weather use that to try and extrapolate out into the future to some extent so there's more data informing is policies even if they are ultimately uncertain

Biden Administration Office Of Science Technology Paul Loosen Hypo Bama Administration Barker United States Biden Barack Obama Paris Paul Cancer Obama Administration Government New York
"staff writer" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"staff writer" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Oh, viruses mutate. But most of you mutations don't lead to any changes in characteristics of the virus. But certain key mutations that we've been keeping our eye on. Ken lied to Increased transmission potentially increase death, and that's what we're seeing with some of these various joining us now is Sarah saying staff writer at the Atlantic. Thanks for joining us, Sarah Good to talk to you. We're all you know, hoping that these vaccines get distributed fast, and they're very effective. I know we've seen some stumbling blocks already. But there's a lot of talk about these corona virus variants that are popping up. We have three main variants right now, one coming out of the UK, South Africa and Brazil, and there's a pattern kind of coming out around them. So you wrote an article kind of exploring some of this. Tell us a little bit more about what we're seeing with these variants. Yeah, these variants have some of the same mutations and you know that in itself is not necessarily concerning the virus has been beating this whole time since it's been in humans, and you can't just expect that given sighting of people, you'll say mutations will show over and over again. It's what's really unusual is that these three variants All seem to be becoming more common, so it's possible that might be a bit more transmissible in the case of the South Africa. Brazil variance, maybe being might road previous immunity like if you had the virus before pretty, like previous version, the virus before this new version, maybe a little bit better of eating. That means system. I would say it's this is like not a reason to freak out by the vaccines. Right now. There's no evidence to say that the card vaccines are going to be totally ineffective. But it's something that vaccine maker should watch. And they should probably think about dating vaccines at some point. You talk about how often these mutations happen. We usually get something like two mutations per month. But these latest three variants have had, you know, a ton of new mutations happen all in a very short little bit of time. Away. Some scientists have described it. If you think of like all these viruses, as like, you know, in like a tree of how they're all related. These three variants there on very, very long branches. They're quite different from the other viruses that the most related to so that's the just that something maybe not typical is going on and how quickly we're getting their mutations. So one hypothesis is that it's possible they arise in a long term or chronic infection. Someone who's immuno compromised. So what this means is that you know normally, if you get the virus, your immune system, what kind of clear within two weeks. But if you have a weakened immune system, maybe you're living with his various for several months over that time, your immune system like you know, that's a name, you know, compromise person. That's kind of almost like a training ground for having the virus bill, but better at dealing with the human name system. So it's possible that these cases he's like, probably pretty rare cases my end of have a pretty big impact on the trajectory of pandemic. There are some commonalities to these three variants that we have right now and a lot of it with everything with Corona virus that has to do with that spike protein and this mutation. They call it in 501. Why, and it could make that spike protein stickier, which lets it get into sells a lot easier. So this particular mutation is on a part of B spike protein. That kind of comes directly in contact with yourself when I was trying to enter ourselves. So that tells us that this is a pretty pretty important part of the protein. We know Spike is a brilliant part protein on the corner virus, and it's on thing tip that is really important for have enter self so that kind of gives us some idea that Maybe impacting how easy it is for this virus is stick on to whistle. You might think of it as Maybe in a normal case, like, you know, it's kind of like a loose fit onto the cell, and this is like a slightly tighter fit in Brazil. We're seeing people get maybe not necessary reinfected, but cases rise and places that already had a huge number of coronavirus cases. That's kind of an interesting one. And that's why it leads people to believe that these things are more transmissible These new variants. We don't have enough data yet to say that this new particular strain is causing the second outbreak. But it is kind of unusual situation where as you say, the region in Brazil the had a huge outbreak already last year, so you would think even if it's not her immunity. It has like some substantial portion. Maybe 30 40 50% of the population has already been infected yet it's seeing another huge surge right now. So you know, there are a couple of reasons I could be helping right one maybe is just fewer people actually got sick in the first wave than we thought. Another reason could be that maybe immunity to this virus, even without limitations does start to wane a little bit after several months. A third possibility is that maybe this variant is just a little bit more transmissible. So even though you have a little bit of union up, there is just so much more transmissible that You're still seeing it. This huge wave. The fourth is the possibility that these particular mutations in this variant, maybe helping the virus escape a little bit of that previous immunity. I want to be clear that this doesn't mean that the second infection is going to be as bad as the first infection. It's very likely that the second infection, maybe ease into medic, or you might be a lot less stick the second time and just because immunity is not like all or nothing things. It's just better to think of it as like kind of aggregation, So any time you've had some sort of beauty, it's going to be a little bit protective. You know, it's no 100% protective. The thing is like when you're talking about, you know, kind of thousands of people, Lance people at scale, even like a slight advantage for the virus. If it's just a little bit better be infecting people. We're going to start seeing it become more common. So hopefully over the next few weeks, we'll get a little bit more data on exactly what the reason for the second search. Maybe Sarah's saying staff writer at the Atlantic Thank you very much for joining us. Oh, thank you for having me again..

Brazil Sarah Good staff writer South Africa Atlantic Spike Ken Lance UK
Trumps Legacy in the Media

On The Media

05:02 min | 1 year ago

Trumps Legacy in the Media

"A status report on the condition of forty fifth. President left journalism in turns out being called enemy of the people and scum of the earth for five years was sometimes scary but it wasn't all bad. It offered some of us especially those from elite mainstream outlets covering the white house some lucrative career opportunities the fact that donald trump was trying to turn reporters into villains made them heroes to half the country. I say this as somebody who benefited however inadvertently from it mckay coppins is a staff writer at the atlantic. How did he benefit. Well when i would write a story. That was skeptical of donald trump. I would get invited to go on the daily show. I would get offered speaking engagements. My stories would be re tweeted and travel all over the world. You basically had this huge global cheering section. You had this great line in your piece that once obscure correspondence where recast in the popular imagination as resistance heroes. Yeah i mean that was i think. The strangest part of it right honestly journalists tend to do their best work when they're not seen as you roic figures when they're actually kind of obnoxious little too nosy and a little bit on the fringe of whatever world. They're covering and they're not glam up instead. They're kind of just these rumpled observers of american life. i think that's kind of the sweet spot for journalism and so it was kind of uncomfortable went in the imagination of one half of the country. It's almost like we had cape on right that i don't think is actually where the best journalism is produced and i think the best reporters and journalists of this era did all they could to resist that you quote new york magazine's olivia newton these saying that she could write in a piece quote. Donald trump is the biggest a whole to ever live and he is a terrible human being and a bleep president and like he's ugly mad at me except the same people who are mad at me anyway for existing right. That's the other thing that was happening here. Which is that. In the trump era a lot of the conservatives who had spent time in the past criticizing the mainstream media for being biased. And who had a certain amount of poll among frankly editors at washington publications a lot of leaders of newsrooms really cared about conservatives complaining of bias that changed in the trump era in part because a lot of those conservative critics went so fully off the deep end frankly where it was no longer debate about whether something was biased. Restoring should have been framed a different way instead of became just dismissing every inconvenient story as fake news inventing facts wholesale. What happened. Was that a lot of reporters. And editors got desensitized to these criticisms and kind of stopped paying attention. You know what. I think of libya was describing there. Is that when you have conservatives who are going to be mad at you no matter what you write every day you end up kind of tuning out. What they're saying and you pay more attention to the rest of the country which exists somewhere from the center to the left. There is a kind of direct language where you're actually not just trying to convey clearly what's happening you're trying to preach to the choir but it's only your audience. It's not the whole country. And i think that making our audiences uncomfortable is often our job right. We have to reflect how they're feeling and what they're thinking but also present them with information and stories that will challenge how they think that's something that we have not always done well and i hope we can figure out how to do it. What lessons will stay with you now. That trump's gone. I'm going to be better about not letting the political figures i write about set the terms of my coverage right one of the things about the past five years is that donald trump wanted a culture war with the media and too many of us in the media gave him one we kind of centered ourselves in this story in a way that a lot of readers and people out there in the public found insufferable and i think rightly so look. It's hard because all the audience incentives again in all the book deals and the cable news contracts and the twitter followers flow to reporters who are at the center of political drama. But we've hopefully realized. I know i have that. Placing myself at the center of every story is not actually usually a service to the reader and. I hope that we'll all be a little bit more self

Donald Trump Mckay Coppins Olivia Newton White House New York Magazine Atlantic Libya Washington Center Of Political Drama Twitter
Social Media Site Gab Is Surging, Even As Critics Blame It For Capitol Violence

Here & Now

05:12 min | 1 year ago

Social Media Site Gab Is Surging, Even As Critics Blame It For Capitol Violence

"The amount of election-related disinformation online has dropped dramatically at after several media platforms band president trump. Almost two weeks ago. Facebook twitter pinterest instagram spotify twitch suspended trump and several of his allies on january eighth two days after the deadly insurrection at the capitol and since then misinformation on those savings as plummeted by more than seventy percent. This according to the research firm signal labs dr thompson staff writer at the atlantic joins us from washington as he does every monday and derek. This should not be surprising. Studied by cornell in october showed that globally around the world. President trump was the largest driver of false information about the coronavirus. Still your thoughts on this ban. Reducing disinformation by seventy percent. I think it's pretty straightforward Donald trump is the former in chief. He has been missing former chief for all four years of his presidency. He has tens of millions of followers. So anyone else who was similarly dishonest or similarly disinterested in truth Gonna reach nearly as many people because they don't have tens of millions of followers on twitter and so of course banning him from the site is absolutely reduced this information. It's it's made it harder for him to put stuff into the public waterways of of information and it's been hard to re tweet him or to jump on conspiracy theories and then embellish them as as we have seen so often on twitter on facebook across social media so it's not surprising at all and this is i think exactly what a lot of social media critics have then predicting for years. They've said if you directly. Take on the leading mongers of disinformation. You're gonna be able to erase it from the site. Yeah okay but quite couple questions. Zig no found that twitter mentions election fraud. Went from two point. Five million to just over six hundred and eighty thousand it reports that hashtags related to the insurrection at the capitol dropped a core across platforms by about ninety five percent. Twitter by the way also banned seventy thousand accounts affiliated with ridiculous and baseless cunanan on conspiracy theory so first question given how immediate the impact was. It doesn't show that these platforms could have done this sooner. I think this is tough. So social media has in the last decade banning. What i acquainted with the wild west in terms of its regulation they haven't exactly applied laws evenly. They don't necessarily even have laws. The kind of regulation that you need to apply across social media platforms facebook twitter etc doesn't exist at the federal level yet and as a result there was a little bit of a lese sayre anything goes sort of feel like and if you've ever seen a television show removing about the wild west in the middle of late nineteenth century that's essentially what you had Online now we're starting to see the law creep into the proverbial wyoming's of twitter and facebook. They're starting to really take action against people that very clearly violated terms of service. And in this case you know incite violence basement conspiracy theory. So i'm not surprised at this happened I think that the incident of one six the insurrection. The capital siege Essentially served as a litmus test And you saw a lot of social media companies essentially act around that. But i think we need rules going forward because hopefully fingers crossed. You're not gonna have moments like the capital siege or that insurrection every single week but you still need some law going forward determine who stays on the site and who violates the terms of service so much. They have to be platform. Well wait a minute. Isn't this though. Whack-a-mole i mean doesn't this mean that president trump and his allies and white supremacists who follow him and average voters will just gravitate to or create other forms. Really interesting question. So on the one hand i totally agree with you If they're kicked off of facebook kicked off of twitter they're just gonna go to some place like gabar parlor but with parlor for example we saw that parlor itself was somewhat d. platform. Or at least unserved. You had companies that were providing both its servers technology and discover ability. Essentially say you have proven yourself beyond the pale and we don't want to work with you anymore. So we'll see where these people go because they're going to go somewhere right now. I think they're probably going to this other social media site called gab But it raises the prospect that today you know you look at a place like facebook and twitter and it is inclusive of a huge wide variety of ideologies. Far left to far right. But what happens when social media sites essentially. Start to buy kate by ideology. Where say you know. The centre-left is on twitter and conservatives are on You know gab And then the leftist go onto some other platform. It means that are already fractured already. Somewhat shattered sent to the shared reality in america is going to become even more fractured an even more fragmented

Twitter Dr Thompson Atlantic Joins Facebook President Trump Cunanan Donald Trump Derek Washington Wyoming Kate America
Google, Alphabet employees unionize

The Boxer Show

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Google, Alphabet employees unionize

"Valley this week, employees and contractors and alphabet Google's parent company announced they'd be forming an unconventional union. This isn't tradition. Colonel Union for a lot of reasons, but one of them is that they're hoping to organize around ethical issues. Lauren K. Or eagerly is a staff writer and motherboard, she says The idea has been brewing for several years. In the wake of a few high profile walkouts. Employees are feeling like they have very little say in, you know the types of technologies that their engineering, she says. The alphabet Workers union could spark similar movements in the tech world. Sort of really experiment in some ways, because this this you Onion without a contract thing hasn't really been done much before, But if it goes well, I think you could definitely see Amazon Microsoft. Other workers sort of copying this. This model alphabet has not officially recognized the union with tech trends about like Stone,

Colonel Union Lauren K. Alphabet Workers Union Google Amazon Microsoft
Health venture led by Amazon, Berkshire, JPMorgan is ending

Squawk Pod

05:02 min | 1 year ago

Health venture led by Amazon, Berkshire, JPMorgan is ending

"The joint healthcare venture between three of america's most powerful companies amazon j. p. morgan chase and berkshire hathaway is disbanding after three years high profile. Ceo's jeff bezos cheney diamond and warren buffett had teamed up to tackle one of corporate. America's thorniest problems the high and rising cost of employee healthcare and the initial announcement of this partnership was dramatic shares of other healthcare companies tumbled on fears about how these leaders might find a way to make it all less expensive and more efficient in june twenty eighteen. Becky quick spoke to warren buffett and jamie diamond about their shared. Goals are water of ideas out there. A lot of things will be done better. We know the fraud. The administrative 'cause we overuse underuse of of of various drugs and specialized procedures. We know the end of life is often costs. Far more than should and is far more painful should be So there's so many and big data there's so many things to do but the goal is better satisfaction for employees and eventually we can learn a lot of things and maybe help inform america. How we can improve some of these things. Have you heard from aaron place. Yeah i i Addressed a group of about one hundred and thirty or so of the various. Cfo's from all our subs Just a couple of days ago and and they're very interested in the subject and the interesting thing is as we went around interviewing Large number of perspective. ceo's we didn't run into one. That didn't think that improvement was both possible At important nobody disagreed with the the mission. The importance of it or or Feasible only but it's also a very very tough nut to crack havens initial. Ceo was dr a tool galante new yorker staff writer and surgeon. You've heard him on this podcast several times. He's an expert. In how complicated and tangled the american healthcare system is. It's a maze of doctors. Shirts drugmakers guerande. Step down as ceo to become chairman this past spring as the covid nineteen pandemic grabbed the day to day. Attention of the medical community. As haven shudders most of the firms fifty seven employees are expected to be reassigned to amazon berkshire hathaway and j. p. morgan chase. Here's joe kernan. W toward toward healthcare is hard. It's hard to solve health care. I don't care who you are. I don't care if you're talking about. Yeah i don't care if you're warren buffett jeff. I just hope it's not that you know what we lost a couple of million dollars. We'd better shut this down on those three guys. Diamond was that all three of the companies. Were doing some of their own things That they had taken out of the story tapeworm. That's really tough to when you're talking about more than seventeen percent of gdp versus five percent back in one thousand nine hundred sixty san right james warren buffett and jeff bezos saying. Forget it. we can't fix this problem then. Yeah i mean we talked about how many pay three years this is going to be it. This is going to be. Our problems are over right hi talked. I talked about this on the phone yesterday. Try to understand what happened. And i think becky's right i don't think it was that they shut it down entirely because they were losing money or something. I think in many ways it was designed. I don't want to say it was designed to fail but it was it was it was designed number challenging way which was the big lesson of this was actually insurance is local. These health systems are local. And trying to do it on a national basis with with employees in all different types of locality. all kinds of different systems may very. Well be too hard. I think a lot of the lessons were learned. Have been implemented are being implemented at j.p morgan in areas like new york in columbus ohio. For example. i think you're seeing what amazon's doing remarkably actually in seattle. They're their program therefrom -ployees which also include warehouse workers not just not just executive employees. So i think there are some things that will come out of this but obviously not Not the big headlines that that had been expected three years ago when this began. Let's say amazon has rolled out a lot of different initiatives over the last year or two. I was looking at a store yesterday. That kind of laid out some of those things just the idea of amazon health. The they do it for their employees as you mentioned andrew and i think they have thoughts of of selling that other companies too so i i don't think we're going to see the end of any of these companies or any of these actors trying to get healthcare costs. I guess it's just a question of how you do that. And you're right. It is local. You you've got to do this on a local basis but healthcare costs are are not going down. You know they rise faster than inflation. It's a. it's a huge huge issue More than seventeen percent of gdp and we do have to continue to try and find a way to tackle this

Morgan Chase Warren Buffett Jeff Bezos Cheney Diamond Becky Quick Jamie Diamond America Galante New Yorker Amazon Berkshire Hathaway Berkshire Hathaway Joe Kernan Amazon Warren Buffett Jeff James Warren Buffett CEO Aaron Jeff Bezos P Morgan Diamond
"staff writer" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

08:33 min | 1 year ago

"staff writer" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"I'm here to help out a bit while the team takes a much needed and well deserved time off, and we're hitting on it all from the big news of the day to Thanksgiving preparations and One issue. A lot of Americans gonna be facing this Thanksgiving is a smaller gathering and a smaller dinner, which could be challenging in its own unique way. So for a little help with that I'm joined by Becky Crystal, Staff Writer for Beret Cious Lee, part of the Washington Post Food section, Becky Thank you so much for taking a few minutes to step us through. This 2020 is throwing all kinds of different curve balls at us. Over the past couple of months, and Thanksgiving doesn't go unscathed, so lot of people doing things differently this year when it comes to hosting a smaller Thanksgiving. What are some of the things that you recommend in your piece in the Washington Post? Yeah, I don't think for having me personal, Ryan. Um it Z It's really a lot about size, right? Where are probably cooking are fewer people so immediately you want to start thinking smaller dishes, smaller turkeys, even a turkey breast. I did a recipe for Turkey legs. You may not have that, like Norman Rockwell perfect, huge roasted turkey on the table unless you want to kind of leftovers. So I think making that adjustment is the Take her step. It's fine. Whatever you decide, you're even if you do a chicken with you the recipe for that and then trying to scale down your sides so that you don't have a kind of those over. So it's really just about managing expectations. I think in the amount of food that you're going to be putting on the table and for the inevitable instagram picture of the turkey could always just you could zoom in a little bit. It'll look bigger than you know, Or maybe put it on a small table and say, Look, how big that Turkey is. We could. I actually did this slow roasted turkey breath recipe Where you bro sit overnight in the oven. It's great for smaller groups, and we shot a beautiful picture of it where you just be a little bit of the breasts and the slices in front with proper framing. You can make anything look good, regardless of size. Exactly Now, when it comes to how people typically prepare their Thanksgiving dinner, I'm sure they're used to preparing it for a big group and therefore Maybe their recipes or set that way. And then now you're getting into math and all of that. So talk about making those side dishes and all of that a little bit smaller. I'm assuming that could probably be a little challenging right. It can be, especially if you're someone like me who has the family recipes or it's like two cans of potatoes. Like all these recipes that were built around the you know, proper canned goods. I mean, you can You can do the math. You can use half Can the partial cans or whatever. Um I think the most important thing to keep in mind is not just how much of the ingredients were using, but how you're cooking them. So if you if you do manage to scale down your casserole or whatever think about the size of the pan, right? So use a smaller pan so that you don't get this really thin layer of, say, Mac and cheese or super stated that got a big fat so adjust ingredients eyes and also used your smaller dishes so that it takes at about the time that you would have with more ingredients and a bigger dish. Boy, you know, there's gonna be a lot of Thanksgiving dinners that they just don't come out like they know, too. Okay, 20. You know I'm right. It's attitude. I'm joined by Becky Crystal staff writer for Voraciously, which is part of the Washington Post Food section, and we're talking about how to host a smaller Thanksgiving. You lay out in your piece in the Washington Post leftovers and making a plan for that, too. That's obviously a big part of Thanksgiving as well. Yeah, I mean, must have been the bigger groups or we just basically Good people and walk out that door. You're not gonna probably be able to do that. I know I'll probably be eating a couple of days. The leftovers, But when you the time to deal with left Her leftovers. So, um Up. Freeze. Um A lot of things Freeze. Really? Well, you're gonna love having those Week or two or months later. They're just Just have a plan even before you start cooking. What am I gonna do with this? Am I making too much? If I have extra how'm I gonna deal with it? It's just about thinking at and then finally you explain that you know it's 2020. Things aren't necessarily gonna be the same as every other year. Just like pretty much everything else we've dealt with throughout the course of this year, and you recommend giving yourself a break? Tell us about that. It is okay. You should do as much of what All of you feel like this Thanksgiving. I know. I'm someone who spends Probably several days of cooking for a big family take meal. I'm not going to be doing that this year, and it's almost a relief. Do that. If you want, get take out. A lot of restaurants are hurting. It's okay to outsource it, and they'll really appreciate it. If you do what you need to do to make it through this day, I'm joined by Becky Crystal, staff writer for Ferree Cious Lee, which is part of the Washington Post Food section. And speaking of the Washington Post Food section and Thanksgiving. I didn't realize this. You've been publishing Thanksgiving recipes and tips for 143 years. Yeah, I did this really fun, deep dive into our archives of it's probably longer than that. I only had access Too, as far back in 18 77 working from home, Um We were talking about how to cook Turkey, basically, as long as people been talking about Thanksgiving, which is is that long? So you rest Look Back then. But, yeah, I'm doing the same thing that people have been doing for a century and a half, which is Kind of funny and comforting at the same time. It's really great because I'm looking at the peace now, and there are pictures from these old newspapers back in 1937, and you got pictures of politicians like President Franklin Delano Roosevelt at the Thanksgiving table. It's It's amazing that this tradition really hasn't changed all that much all these years later. Yeah, I know in really try to think of new ways to write about things. Obviously, this year's unlike basically any other year in 143 years, so I looked at, but it It's a lot of the same stuff presented slightly differently, and that's okay. People love tradition on Thanksgiving, So if that gives you comfort to know you're carrying on a long held tradition of it, I think of for it. Was there anything final question for you Anything going back 143 years to some of the past Thanksgivings that That stood out to you that you thought to yourself as you're looking back at the Washington Post pieces, okay, that I hadn't heard that before. Um I mean, I think a lot of the alternative people suggested I was finding Recipes for, um Like you should just do some pork Paquet stuff like that, and some of the things One of the things I focused on was how people cook during like Times of crisis kind of similar to this and s some of the stuff that people were cooking back like during World War two. It was sobering. We know this year's gonna be bad. But back then people didn't have access to ingredients and they're like their beer, like, have a salad, You know for Thanksgiving, so it really makes me appreciate Also what we have today. A fascinating piece again. You can check all of this out at voraciously, which is part of the Washington Post Food section, and you can find Becky on Twitter. If you wanna check out the 143 years of Thanksgiving coverage in the Washington Post or her tips on how to do a smaller Thanksgiving at Becky. Crystal. Becky. Thank you so much for taking a few minutes to talk to us about all of that. We appreciate it. Thanks, Ryan have a great holiday. You, too, So I was looking at some of the most Googled questions on Thanksgiving. Seeing what people are Googling is always fascinating. Some of the top questions are what's.

Washington Post Becky Crystal Turkey Ryan Ferree Cious Lee Staff Writer Norman Rockwell President Franklin Delano Roos Mac staff writer
"staff writer" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"staff writer" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Trainer. What, Uh and, uh you know, um, we have to, you know, just with this out really quick. And, um, no talk about Jeffrey to bail? Yes. He got the shaft yesterday. He did? Yeah, I know. It's Zoe. Part of what? Got a minute. This it was this pretty stiff penalty, actually. So if you don't know the New Yorker staff writer Jeffrey Toobin Um oh, God, this story, you know, it's easy to make jokes at somebody's expense, but it's not hard. It's not hard. No, Like I said, you know, it's well. He did it to himself. Okay. That was good. Um, it was a self inflicted experience is what you're saying, Right? Any okay? Get all your puns out. Wow. Got any more time to be mature now for the rest of the segment, Okay? Yes. Because we're talking about the New Yorker. It is The New Yorker. After all, it's Jeffrey Toobin. OK, So for those of you who don't know staff writer Jeffrey Toobin Did something very Nasty, Um, which led Conde Nast. To let him go Sunday. Nasty e. I mean, the thing just writes itself unfortunate. It's very unfortunate. Now. This all happened because there was this An election simulation. Right? Try to be mature. I know. Election simulation election yes, simulation that the New Yorker held over zoom with top staffers. Unfortunately for Jeffrey Toobin, he chose that opportunity Toe also make it an erection. Stimulation. Oh,.

Jeffrey Toobin Um staff writer Conde Nast
"staff writer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:57 min | 1 year ago

"staff writer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We were joined by McKay Coppins, a staff writer at the Atlantic and Kaleil, a Brown dean. She teaches political science at Quinnipiac University Conference is a staff writer at the Atlantic. And Kaleil A brown dean teaches political science at Quinnipiac University. Welcome. Thank you so much. Let's go to Sheila from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. She like you see a real divide in the country. What's on your mind? Yes, I do feel we'll divide first of all this symptom in Harrisburg in many respects in the belly of the beast, as follows the counting of votes and such concerns. And what I've seen in Harrisburg with consensual P A is a place where there really is truly a divide. I harped about one moment during the campaign, which to me was most emblematic of it. And it wass When Donald Trump was at Valley I believe it was in Michigan. There were none inhabit standing at the very front and going along with the chant to lock her up. Meaning Governor Wittmer that to me was such a symbolic moment. In our nation's history, and it was frightening because you had this conversions up religion and politics in a very ugly way coming together. To work against someone who was an elected official by an elected official who was the leader. So we've talked a lot about socialism. We have not talked enough about fascism. That's the first point there were many touchpoints. Throughout this election, and throughout the past four years, such as that one. The other point is that we just the Democratic Party of all time apart must be much more introspective and less this Ed We have to get there. Joe Biden and Senator Harris will have to do two things. They will have to heal the nation. Two or more things heal the nation. Kill the party and also governed. Thank you, Sheila. Thanks for that call. Let's take one more call before we get to our panel. We've got Ed in South Florida and you want to talk about the urban rural divide? What's on your mind? Hi. Yeah, I think that was one of the most striking results from looking at the tally of this election. You can see that, really? The Democrats completely failed. To reach out to those rural communities. You could even looked back at 2018 and see better or work in Texas. He had a much closer margin, even though he's still lost. Don't go buy it and did to Donald Trump and part of his success came from reaching out to those small communities. And that's something that we just didn't see Enough of. I think from the Democrats this time and they're gonna have to improve going forward. Thanks for that call. Well, McKay I wouldn't come to you because things are changing constantly and will impact what we heard from most callers, but first give us the latest. What do we know? Yes. Oh, right now, all eyes are on a handful of battleground states where they're still counting votes. The votes are coming in. Biden is depending on Which calls you're going by, You know, various news organizations have called various states, but he's within within 270 reach of 270 electoral votes. If he can hold Arizona, our win Arizona and one more state s O. That could be Nevada. Could be Georgia could be Pennsylvania. Those are kind of the states that everybody is looking at right now. You know, I have a lot of sympathy and on gratitude for the civil servants who are kind of very carefully counting these ballots in these states, while everybody in the world basically is waiting for them to get their work done. But I do want to stress and I know that your show has been good about this, but I do want to stress that this is normal. We expected that it would take a few days for us to know the result of this election because of the overwhelming number. Of mail in ballots due to the Corona virus. So Biden does seem much better position Trump could still win. If he basically runs the table and wins. All of the remaining states are of most of them. But Biden is a much better position than Trump at this point. Let's talk about turnout and demographics. We heard from ad about this urban rural divide. What's notable this time around for you? You know, I'm so impressed by the number of young people who have registered and voted this year, often young people who said neither candidate neither party represents my interest, but they were invigorated because of what they were doing the summer, taking protests to the streets and then bringing that to the ballot box. And we hear a lot in terms of turnout and engagement about what a candidate needs to do or about what a party needs to do, and what we're seeing with turnout across the United States is really what we collectively have to do. How do we tell the story of where we are as a country and how we got here and to keep in mind? It's not just about the presidential election. We were seeing these trends. Those down ticket races, which were most much closer that many people expected can also foreshadow what we should be looking for next year when so many state houses and governors races will be Oppa's. Well, Were there any surprises for you? You know, I was surprised by the surprise over the diversity amongst the Hispanic electorate in the United States, you know its political scientists. We've long talked about the importance of country of origin and how that shapes the issues. But I think the story out of that as well and why some people were surprised is because it affirms the diversity that exists within communities. And the need to approach multiple issues. You cannot decide unilaterally that immigration should be the defining issue for community when you have Hispanic voters, saying, We also are concerned about access to health care and the economy and how issues happening in our local community, don't get addressed and rules Suburban and urban communities. McKay. What about some of those down ballot races? How do Republicans and Democrats do this week? Yeah, you know, Actually, Republicans outperformed expectations down ballot. You know, most of the election forecasts heading into Election Day said the Democrats had a Pretty good chance. I saw his eyes three out of four chance to take control of the Senate. It does not appear that that's going to happen. They lost ground in the house and a lot of the district's where Democrats thought they could flip control..

Donald Trump Joe Biden Harrisburg McKay Coppins United States Sheila Quinnipiac University Atlantic Pennsylvania staff writer Democratic Party Quinnipiac University Conferen Governor Wittmer Arizona Kaleil Senate official
"staff writer" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

06:18 min | 1 year ago

"staff writer" Discussed on KPCC

"We were joined by McKay Coppins, a staff writer at the Atlantic and Kaleil, a Brown dean. She teaches political science at Quinnipiac University. Viki Coppins is a staff writer at the Atlantic High. McCain. And Kaleil, A. Brown dean teaches political science at Quinnipiac University, Kelowna Welcome Thank you so much. Let's go to Sheila from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. She like you see a real divide in the country. What's on your mind? Yes, I do feel we'll divide placed a ball symptom in Harrisburg in many respects in the belly of the beast as as far as the counting of votes and such concerns. And what I've seen in Harrisburg with potential P A is a place where there really is truly a divide. I talked about one moment during the campaign, which to me was most emblematic of it. And it Wass when Donald Trump was at a rally, I believe it was Michigan. There were none inhabit standing at the very front and going along with the chant to lock her up. Meaning Governor Wittmer that to me was such a symbolic moment. In our nation's history, and it was frightening because you had this convergence up religion and politics in a very ugly way, coming together to work against someone who was an elected official. By an elected official who was the leader. So we've talked a lot about socialism. We have not talked enough about fascism. That's the first point. There were many touchpoints throughout this election and throughout the past four years Touches that one. The other point is that we just the Democratic Party of China part must be much more introspective and less this Ed We have to get there. Um Joe Biden and Senator Harris will have to do two things that will have to heal the nation. Two or more things heal the nation. Well the party and also governed Thank you, Sheila. Thanks for that call. Let's take one more call before we get to our panel. We've got Ed in South Florida and you want to talk about the urban rural divide? What's on your mind? Hi. Yeah, I think that was one of the most striking results from looking at the tally of this election. You can see that really that Democrats completely failed to reach out to those rural communities. You could even look just back at 2018 and see better or work in Texas. He had a much closer margin. Even though he's still lost and don't go buy it and did to Donald Trump and part of his success came from reaching out to those small communities, and that's something that we just didn't see enough of. I think from the Democrats this time and they're gonna have to improve going forward. And thanks for that call. Well, McKay I wouldn't come to you because things are changing constantly and will unpack what we heard from most callers. But first give us the latest. What do we know? Yeah, So right now, all eyes are on a handful of battle grown states where they're still counting votes there. The votes are coming in. Biden is depending on Which calls you're going by, You know, various news organizations have called various states, but he's within within 270 well reach of 270 electoral votes. If he can hold Arizona, Irwin, Arizona and one more state s O. That could be Nevada. Could be Georgia could be Pennsylvania. Those air kind of the States that everybody is looking at right now. The you know I have a lot of sympathy and on DH gratitude for The civil servants who are kind of very carefully counting these ballots in these states while everybody in the world basically is waiting for them to get their work done, But I do want to stress and I know that Your show has been good about this, but I do want to stress that this is normal. We we expected that it would take a few days for us to know the result of this election because of the overwhelming number of mail in ballots due to the Corona virus, so Biden does seem much better position Trump could still win. If he basically runs the table and wins. All of the remaining states are of most of them. But Biden is much better position than Trump at this point. My little. Let's talk about turnout and demographics. We heard from ad about this urban rural divide. What's notable this time around for you? You know, I'm so impressed by the number of young people who have registered and voted this year, often young people who said neither candidate neither party represents my interests. But they were invigorated because of what they were doing this summer, taking protests to the streets and then bringing that to the ballot box and we hear a lot in terms of turnout and engagement about what a candidate needs to do or about what a party needs to do. And what we're seeing with turnout across the United States is really what we collectively have to do. How do we tell the story of where we are as a country and how we got here and to keep in mind? It's not just about the presidential election where we're seeing these trends. Those down ticket races, which were most much closer than many people expected, can also foreshadow what we should be looking for next year when so many state houses And governors races will be Oppa's. Well, Were there any surprises for you? You know, I was surprised by the surprise over the diversity amongst the Hispanic electorate in the United States, you know its political scientists. We've long talked about the importance of country of origin and how that shapes the issues, But I think the story out of that as well and why some people were surprised. Is because it affirms the diversity that exists within communities and the need to approach multiple issues. You cannot decide unilaterally that immigration should be the defining issue for community when you have Hispanic voters, saying, We also are concerned about access to health care and the economy and how issues happening in our local community..

Donald Trump Joe Biden Harrisburg Sheila Quinnipiac University McKay Coppins United States Democratic Party of China Pennsylvania staff writer McCain official Atlantic High Arizona Atlantic Governor Wittmer Kaleil
"staff writer" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"staff writer" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Orlean is a highly lauded staff writer for The New Yorker and award winning author of several books, including the Library Book and the Orchid Thief and has received both the Neiman and Guggenheim fellowships. Meryl Streep was nominated for an Academy Award. For portraying or lean in the movie adaptation adaptation. The movie about the making of the movie of the Orchid Thief. Orchid Thief is about as good a book as you'll ever read, but the one I've enjoyed from Susan the most of late anyway is the library book. A single greatest library fire in the world that you've never heard of because it was concurrent with another great fire. It's a wonderful story about libraries about books and about this one particular blaze in Los Angeles. That's Susan Orlean. I'm looking at my phone on. What was it Saturday night? And the word drunk pops up on my Twitter feed. And then another tweet from Susan Orlean. I am sure my neighbors did not notice she tweeted at all that I was stumbling drunk, leaving the casual neighborhood get together. Yeah. By the way, I'm editing out all the cuss words that she put in there. Turns out she's not only a good writer, she's a good Custer. Then she wrote, Seriously, we went to my neighbours to see their newborn colt. I was born like five minutes ago, and we had some wine. The next tweet is OK. A newborn colt rocks it totally And he thought my hand was his mom. It was not. He has tasted life's infinite tragedy. As I mentioned earlier, I'm inebriated. You guys do you think my neighbours think I'm a Oh, never mind. I'm going to bed and then a short while later she tweeted. You know, I'm currently trying to write a memoir and feel like a clown because who cares about my stupid life? All caps? Later, she tweeted. Maybe I'm drinking too much during the effing pandemic. A lot of people related to that. That one got a lot of little hearts underneath it. Then she tweeted. I'm falling down drunk first time in ages. Where is my kitty? He is my drunk comfort animal. She read she tweeted Then I just read all of this and shuttered. A short while later she had several tweets about Candy coated fennel seeds and her desire to find candy. And at the very end, she tweeted. Actually, this would be the next day There's a serious of tweets and you sort of follow her is she gets born Mohr inebriated. In fact, at one point, she says, proud. Today My husband is embarrassed by me and factually tweeted. I am being shunned by my family because I'm drunk. Yes, OK, I am Find with that bleep you, You bleeping bleep er's She started to shout out and her family But the next day, she tweeted. I have a horrible feeling. I slandered fennel seeds last night. And then the word coffee. A nice book end of the first one, the night before, which was drunk, and then a little while later, she tweeted. I have just been nominated by Hangover magazine to be its 2020 spokesmodel. I tweeted or retweeted one of hers and said she's doing it right. You know, in the safety and comfort of your own home, and I think she was a kind of comic catharsis for a lot of people. Susan Orlean is on the phone. Hi, Susan. Welcome back. How are you? I'm I'm good and recovering. But I'm great, actually, and it's so nice to talk to you and I'm still able to hold my head up high. In spite of my performing my misdeeds in front of a large audience. I was wondering when people do that, because people sometimes drunk tweet your you turned it into an art. But are they doing it for themselves? Are they doing it for the world? They realize how drunk they are. I mean, what's the mindset when you're doing that? For me. I wass essentially talking out loud. I had gotten in bed because my head was spinning and I really felt totally wrecked first time in a very long time, and I was typing on my phone in the semi darkness. And essentially kind of talking out loud without really thinking about The fact that people were reading it really felt like a note to self essentially and kind of rambling. I mean, when you think about it when people are drunk, they often ramble sort of purposeless Lee and that was a little bit of what was going on. In fact. I read the tweets the next day, and I was kind of marveling at them because I don't remember what triggered a few of the tweets. I I just was stream of consciousness, which Felt kind of liberating, and I blanked out on the fact that it was going to be read by a lot of people. One of them was forgot. I made yogurt yesterday or earlier today. So it did feel stream of conscience. You were in your room by yourself. Was your family? Not then in that room, and were they not come on the door every non san. Hey, Han, where you're turning? Oh, I was in my bed. My husband and the rest of the family were watching a movie in another room, and I was Both happy to be by myself and slightly perturbed that nobody was paying attention to me and making sure I was okay in my drunken state. At one point, they and I'm of course, exaggerating a little. But at one point my husband came in and said I just got a message from a friend asking if your Twitter account had been hacked. And I said No, it hasn't been hacked and he said, are you tweeting and I said, Well, yeah. But are you sure you want to be tweeting in your condition? As I said, it's fine. It's fine. I'm fine. And Harry will be won some water. You need anything. And I said, No, I just.

Susan Orlean Twitter Meryl Streep Los Angeles Academy Award staff writer The New Yorker writer Mohr Hangover magazine Custer Harry Lee spokesmodel
"staff writer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Just word them up with a single close, like two cucumbers, a single clove of garlic, raw garlic. That was like really nice. How hot it was plenty for the whole thing. And then I just threw in a bunch of yogurt. And that was enough. Yoga was like soupy. Yeah, No, I'm really pleased to hear that You are cold soup in because I'm also a huge cold soup then and I think that cold soups, especially in this Era of the widespread smoothie, Get a lot of pushback from people who are just like it's just a smoothie. And I guess it is cold soup before it was a smoothie. Yeah, if we want to get into these sort of like taxonomic questions like where is the line between this movie and a cold soup? And I don't think there is one like I think like I have a very generous and inclusive definition of this sort of thing. But I think that cold soup for dinner sounds more substantial than smoothie for dinner, eh? So I'm willing to call it a cold soup. One of my super favorite favorite favorite meals is a gazpacho and like again, I sort of very generously to find miss macho with some cold poached shrimp. Maybe, like dangled over the side of the glass is if it's a shrimp cocktail, or just sort of on the side, but I feel like cold shrimp and cold soup. It's just it's have it. It's one of the most fabulous, stupidly low effort, Teo High elegance pay off kind of deals you can possibly have. That's Helen Rosner, staff writer for The New Yorker. Help me.

Helen Rosner Teo High The New Yorker staff writer
"staff writer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"No I loosen the truckers a staff writer for The New Yorker the receipt you talked recently to AB work what's going on here ABC has volunteered to be subject in a vaccine trial a particular kind of high risk experiment called human challenge trial and his mother is pretty worried about it I I totally admire and respect your desire to help people as they eat I just don't know how safe it is right but you just have your kidney out in July I can't imagine that would be safe I mean but basically I want to put my name down and yes the trial comes about and experts deem that I am fit actually to be part of the human challenge trial and then I want to do it well I'll I follow you and and I understand that you want to help and that's the way you always spend less it's I think I feel sort of broader sense of obligation or almost like a principled obligation is that I know that there need to be people who are willing to step up and and I just feel this urge to me one of those people or frame the other way I guess you know why shouldn't it be me I guess having one kidney is a pretty good reason yeah this is like you're doing this for the universe but you are my universe well it's a little bit hard to yeah I guess I just need to know more now I just who's doing the testing how much CO within exposing used to and are there other any other people who volunteered besides you yeah yeah there are sixteen thousand people over sixty people now who have volunteered more than there were people in my home town of Carlisle that's a good sign I've got a lot of questions for us about first.

staff writer The New Yorker ABC Carlisle
"staff writer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:59 min | 2 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A staff writer for the Atlantic is new articles called the dis information war deep fakes anonymous text messages but tempting local news sites an opposition research on reporters a field guide to this year's election and what it could do to the country so we've been talking about how the trump campaign is using social media and using it in part to so dis information the person presiding over the trump campaign digital effort as Brad Pascal who was also the digital director from twenty sixteen campaign what are some of the techniques that you think he came up with well you know it's interesting Brad park scale is not somebody with a background in politics in fact in twenty sixteen the way he got into the campaign was he was hired to design a simple landing page for the trump presidential exploratory committee which you know seemed at the time like it if anything was a publicity stunt maybe a lark but did not seem like a serious thing but because of parts gal have this history with the trump family he had worked for them in the past and because he was cheap and didn't have a lot of the pretensions that other political operatives had from kind of liked him and and brought him into the inner circle but when you talk to people who worked with him on that campaign they say that his political experience was actually an advantage because he was really willing to experiment with new tools that other presidential campaigns kind of looked at disdainfully or thought were kind of generally untested around proved and one of the things that he got really good at was using Facebook ads and particularly micro targeted Facebook ads to raise money and fire up the faithful and target persuaded by voters and so micro targeting is the process of basically you take the electorate you slice it up into very small distinct specific images and then you create ads that speak directly to those images and Facebook allows campaigns to create these ads and serve them to very small groups so where is in the past a presidential campaign would have to create an out and put it on TV and all kinds of different people would see it now they can create an ad let's say that calls for the defunding of Planned Parenthood which is you know a divisive political issue or stance and rather than kind of blasting it on national TV they they can serve it directly to eight hundred Roman Catholic pro life women in Dubuque Iowa and they they know that it'll probably get a more positive result that way and the Republican Party has information on just about every voter to help them figure out who to target yeah it's been reported that the the RNC and the trump campaign have compiled an average of three thousand out of points on every voter in America and so that that means everything from what you like to watch on TV what kind of stories you shop at whether you've been to a gun show or own a gun you they they've compiled all this data and they can use it to carefully tailor messages just for you and I should say that this is not unique to the trump campaign this isn't something brought parts callin vented Brocco bombs campaign famously dated in two thousand twelve the Clinton campaign did did as well in two thousand sixteen but the trump campaigns after was different both because it was much more extensive and also frankly a lot more brazen one example I gave in the pieces in twenty sixteen the trump campaign in the final weeks of the race tried to depress black turnout in Florida by micro targeting ads to black voters in that state that said Hillary thinks African Americans are super predators so drawing from that famous controversial comment that Clinton had made in the nineties but obviously taking it out of context and generalizing it a bit more than I think the average stock checker would say is okay they they Michael targeted these two black voters not even really to win them over or get them to vote for trump but to to keep them away from the polls and we only know about that specific case because the trump campaign official boasted about it at the time and said this is one of three major voter suppression efforts that we have that are under way but the campaign puts out so many Facebook ads that it's a really difficult for journalists are watchdog groups to to Wade through all of them just as an example in the ten weeks after the impeachment proceedings began the trump campaign rants fourteen thousand ads on Facebook containing the word impeachment so as as a comparison between what Republicans have done and Democrats you right there from June to November during trump's campaign in twenty sixteen trump campaign to get five point nine million ads on Facebook Hillary Clinton's campaign took out sixty six thousand so again that's five point nine million ads versus sixty six thousand ads on Facebook what does that say to you and do you expect that this time around those numbers will be similarly disproportionate well probably not I mean part of the reason that the trump campaign was willing to go so heavy on Facebook ads was frankly because they didn't have the money that the clean campaign did to put up TV ads which are more expensive and more difficult to place and so this was actually kind of something they stumbled upon that really worked for them in twenty twenty Democrats seem much more attuned to the realities of our information ecosystem and realize that to reach voters they're going to have to be on Facebook and Google and and really go heavy on online advertising but I will say that the president still has a distinct advantage in part because he has so much more money than any of the democratic candidates he formed his reelection campaign immediately after he was inaugurated and they started raising money right away and so they have a huge war chest and so it seems likely that the trump campaign will still come out ahead my guess is McKay Coppens a staff writer for the Atlantic his new article is titled the twenty twenty disinformation war after a break we'll talk about how trump allies have scraped the social media accounts of hundreds of political journalists searching for embarrassing post to be used against them when the story is deemed unfair or politically damaging I'm Terry gross and this is fresh AIR the nuclear family foundation supports W. H. Y. Y.'s fresh air and its commitment to sharing ideas and encouraging meaningful conversation.

staff writer Atlantic
"staff writer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:26 min | 3 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"New Yorker staff writer geo Tolentino in her new collection of essays she writes from the perspective of a millennial about subjects like social media and politics feminist sexual harassment and her time in the Peace Corps in Kerr's extent where there was a dangerous level of sexism you know I couldn't let these cab drivers take me to their house and put me in a room for two hours and talked to me about making me their wife she grew up in a southern Baptist megachurch Christian bodybuilders would come to chapel and rip apart phone boxes sort of proof of that righteousness that you could acquire through Jesus also lingers Jeff number considers the use of the word day as a gender neutral pronoun and jazz critic Kevin white had reviews the new album from south Africans pianist and composer Abdoulaye Ebrahim first news live from NPR news in Washington I'm lecture me saying president trump's expected to visit el Paso and Dayton tomorrow following the mass shootings over the weekend that together claim more than thirty lives and injured dozens of people drums visit is likely to be met with anger by some residents who believe trump's rhetoric against communities of color is partly to blame and your summer keep says el Paso's Republican mayor de Marco is walking a fine line in welcoming the president to the heavily Latino border city in announcing the president trump would be visiting el Paso on Wednesday the city's mayor de Marco who has had something of a back and forth with trump about false claims the president had made earlier about the crime rate in el Paso mayor de Marco he was very careful to say that the office of the mayor of el Paso will be welcoming the office of the president of the United States in an official capacity being careful to point out this is not political and this is about the office of the presidency that's an pierced hammer Keith reporting the democratic mayor of Dayton Ohio nand Whaley says she plans to tell the president that she is disappointed in his response so far to addressing gun violence it's a sentiment driving a renewed push for gun control legislation in Congress and with the national rifle association facing infighting attorneys general probes the NRA's opponents are poised to take advantage and here's to mac has more internal power struggles in numerous financial misconduct investigations may be hampering the NRA's influence John find what is the president for the gun control group every town for gun safety the NRA is completely dysfunctional right now but despite the honorees issues other off schools remain for gun control legislation senator Pat Toomey is a Republican who has championed expanded federal background checks if we force a vote tomorrow then I think we probably the vote probably fail and we may actually set back this whole effort to me believes he needs time to Marshall momentum and that he doesn't yet have the support for passage to mac NPR news Washington the president's ambassador to Russia is resigning and P. R.'s Michele Kelemen reports Jon huntsman is returning home to Utah possibly with plans to run for governor in his resignation letter published by the Salt Lake City Tribune huntsman says after two years of service he wants to reconnect with his growing family and responsibilities at home the former Utah governor is said to be considering another bid for that job his resignation is effective October third giving the White House time to nominate a new ambassador to Moscow huntsman right to the U. S. must continue to hold Russia accountable when its behavior threatens the US and its allies no reset or restart is going to help the ads just a clear understanding of our interests and a practical framework for dialogue Michele Kellerman NPR news Washington this is NPR news national security adviser John Bolton is warning that Washington is prepared to inflict financial sanctions on any government that sides with Venezuelan president Nicolas Maduro Bolton's remarks in a democracy conference in but will come a day after the trump administration announced more sweeping measures to pressure my little to resign international aid groups are angry about the Saudi led coalition's three year closure of the airport in the Yemeni capital sanaa the coalition has been leading an offensive in Yemen to fight the who the rebels since twenty fifteen and they've blockaded all ports to the city of San now which is currently held by the rebels we have the latest on this from NPR's llama a lot in the Norwegian refugee council on the aid group care say that the Saudi coalitions closure of the sun on airport amounts to a quote death sentence for many of those sick in Yemen the aid groups are appealing to both sides in the Yemeni war to reach an agreement to reopen the airport at least for the commercial flights to alleviate the humanitarian suffering according to the World Health Organization Yemen is dealing with one of the worst cholera epidemics in recent history and the country is also facing with the U. N. cleans is the worst humanitarian crisis in the world lemon audience and pure news fatal turning to wallstreet where we see stocks rebounding from yesterday's major sell off the Dow is now up one hundred forty three points or more than half a percent at twenty five thousand eight hundred sixty four S..

geo Tolentino staff writer three year two hours two years
"staff writer" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

06:25 min | 3 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"To create meatless burgers show for meat lovers who may have been interested is eating let me this is a great option for them according to these companies some possible food can be on need have a product that include burger that kind of new products that really imitate the hearer of meet the texture of needs that burn quality of meat Wall Street journal reporter heather hadn't on the threat to the veggie burger she's here in about twenty minutes in two thousand five caught in a spiral of urban decay and a falling population a Michigan city embarked on a bold experiment to save itself it would give local students free college tuition the program funded by anonymous donors who pay the bill each year kicked off our free college movement that has gained traction across the U. S. has it worked Josh Mitchell staff writer at the Wall Street journal Washington bureau has been examining some data just give us take aways there's a question about free college would help what would happen if the country as a whole move to pre college well we have some clues from the city and called cal Kalamazoo Michigan about two hours left which right they started having a pre college program back in two thousand five so it's been about thirteen years now and there have been some good things to come up that you know one of the one of the biggest changes that have occurred since the pre college program went into effect there is people who were going to college all of a sudden started going to work with he did colleges so maybe if you would have gone to a community college before this program went to a place or to a regional college you that all of that and start going to maybe the flagship college so that was one of the biggest attacks the the other factor is I just that there was a there was a surgeon college enrollment overall after the program went into effect so you know whereas before it that way you know what sixty percent of students in Kalamazoo who were enrolling in college with their six month of high school graduation now it's about three quarters of the events are going to college so yeah one of the biggest factors that people are just more likely to actually enroll in college if they are told that it will be free well what about finishing graduating right so that's one of the issues here that makes this picture a little bit mixed there is evidence to suggest that if you compare apples to apples the team the same type of students that were in Kalamazoo before the program and then the same type of students after the program into a fact you did see comping college graduation rates more students across the board were more likely to get a bachelor's degree or a college certificate after the program went into effect than before two issues though one issue is that the demographics of the city changed a little bit at the current wind up back there was this big surgeon people moving into the Kalamazoo to to take advantage of the program so you know that the student population right now the little different yeah operation beforehand and so if you just look at the raw numbers there wasn't really a big increase in college graduation rates number two even when your account for the changes in demographics yet there was a significant increase but with a lot of one and so you know right I think one of the big takeaways of this story is that free college will do some good saying that won't do it why it's not a panacea a college graduation rate that we're all are still pretty low I think the six year graduation rate their bachelor's degree payment rate is that there are students who graduate and that getting a bachelor's within sixty years and so that that that pretty well in the grand scheme of things and fill it later the issue okay if three colleges and going to you know solve all these problems that it could be like how they want well what will someone there compared with like an onion you know you you take up one layer of the onion which is a cop come and then you realize there are these other layer the young man but you have to figure out where you can get to the core yeah I thought his analysis was good with that speak with Josh Mitchell Wall Street journal staff reporter in the Washington DC bureau is in a deep dive entitled does free college work Kalamazoo offers some answers do they plan to make any adjustments going forward with some of these data that they've now collected yeah it's interesting so one of the things that actually did this this past year what they changed the marketing of the program so you know there's been this big emphasis indicate through twelve school district there and immediately when the program started which was you know you could go to college you can become college ready yeah that district there's a lot of minorities in the district I think white students are about a third of forty percent of the students so most students they are either black or Hispanic there's a small Asian population and a lot of them are first generation isn't that the message to them up to that point had and go to college go to college and they were it was kind of the idea that you know you you should try to go for four year degree well now what's happened is they've actually change the marketing in there saying oh by the way you don't have to get a four year degree you can actually get a you can go to a trade school you can you can **** the Greek Ameritrade you can go into you know some type of like skilled blue collar work and what the main reason why they've changed the marketing is because they are trying to you know match people up with what they are most likely to succeed and I think they've come to terms terms with the fact that you know something might not be ready or might not even want to go to the traditional or your route yeah so at third if they're going if they're going down that route and end up dropping out well Hey what it let's let's try something else please Josh Josh Mitchell Wall Street journal reporter in the Washington DC bureau thirteen minutes now.

four year thirteen minutes thirteen years three quarters twenty minutes forty percent sixty percent sixty years six month two hours six year
"staff writer" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Taylor. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you for having me, very excited to have you. It's a little bit different than are. You were usually just like deep into the business side with CEOs and stuff like this talking about pivots and whatnot. But I wanted to have you on to talk about your very weird. Interesting beat because it interests me quite a bit. How do you explain it? Well, I cover broadly, internet culture. So I'm a staff writer covering internet culture that you know, internet culture can kind of take a lot of different forms. But my main beat is kind of like how users use social platforms. I guess everything. I read about this from the user perspective. So that can be at twelve year old teenager, or a, you know, massive influence, or, but I basically just write about like user behavior and emergent user behavior on the internet. Okay. So that can be everything like how teens are using these platforms. But also the Instagram husband. Yeah. Explain what an Instagram husband share. So and Instagram husband was a term that was sort of popularized by a a YouTube video that went supervisorial back in two thousand fifteen and it's basically well it used to me in back, then sort of like any man that was grudgingly. Taking you know, his wife or girlfriend Instagram pictures. So, you know, you always see the model on Instagram and supposed to be the man behind it now. Instagram, husbands, add as a lot of these women have become super successful influencers, you know, running. We'll be million dollar businesses have hired their husbands. So Instagram husband means more of a employees kind of. So whoever's the one doing the work taking the photos, but now he's often paid. Okay. So this is the rise of sort of influencers, micro influencers, maybe proto influencers of people who just want that that perfect Instagram shot. Yeah. Yeah. An Instagram enables all of this. I I was amazed. We were talking about Los Angeles. But I I was miss out in Los Angeles. How many places hotels, restaurants, etc? Have Instagram installations in them like they're made for Instagram? Yes, it's crazy. How much Instagram has affected like architecture and our physical space. There's a writer at the rear Elissa bresnik who's a good friend of mine like she's she's amazing. But her beat overlaps a lot with mine, but she's written a lot of good stuff on sort of how Instagram is transforming physical spaces. And I am always so shocked by it. You know, people have a Instagram wallet parties now to take pictures in front of and, you know, obviously, the famous Paul Smith while in L A, and yes everywhere. Everyone wants a good backdrop for their. So I'm moving to the crotchety phase in my life. Explain why this is not all terrible. Well, it's terrible. I mean, it's it's just a way that users are expressing themselves. I actually was thinking. I know. Yeah. I mean, it's so terrible. Because it's I mean, it's giving these people in new way to monetize, which I think is really interesting, you know, living life like life seems to be lived more often now to sort of show show off like, you know, a life that you might not really lead and to and I just wonder how I don't think we fully, and that's what I really want to get into. I don't think we've really fully. We don't know all the impacts these things are having on on all of us. Yeah. I mean, it is obviously like these big sort of like broadcast-based tradition systems have made it so people are very performance active. I mean, the goal is to get as many followers as possible kind of. And so people will do a lot of crazy stuff in pursuit of that. Which I agree. It can be very negative. I would say they're also really positive places for self expression, and for creativity. And I mean, I do think I do think that a lot. Of that stuff. Yeah. Maybe it is these lifestyle influencers seemingly being really cringe. Taking a lot of these pictures changing outfits ten times in front of the same wall. But they are also building a new business model, and,.

Instagram Los Angeles YouTube Taylor. staff writer writer Paul Smith million dollar twelve year
"staff writer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Staff writer at the Atlantic dot com an Adrian let me turn back to you here because in the in the series. You would you rank the fifty moments that you chose admittedly? You say it's a very subjective ranking. But number one on that list is family the family separation policy that the administration enacted in March of twenty eighteen and before we discuss why he put that one as number one. I wanna play a little bit of tape because in March of two thousand seventeen then department of homeland security chief. John Kelly spoke to CNN's wolf Blitzer about the plans to implement child separation. And again, it was implemented a year later in March twenty eighteen and here's what Kelly said on CNN. If you got some young kids were coming in Spanish, the sneak into the United States with their parents are department of homeland security personnel going to separate the children from their moms and debt. Yes. I am considering an audit to deter more movement along this terribly dangerous network. I am considering exactly that they will be well cared for as we deal with their parents. That's John Kelly when he was the head of the department of homeland security in two thousand seventeen so Adrian, LA France, this was a huge issue in the presidency. And so you put it as number one. Tell us more. So I think you could make the case that many of these. All within say, the top five of our less universe. One through five could be considered number one. And I guess I should talk a little bit about how we think about in the ranking. So something about the series. It was very important to us was making sure that the idea wasn't to make a value judgment about the presidency, but more to take a step back, and and really look at the consequences of these shattered norms. And so as we thought about how you know once we had our pilot fifty moments as we thought about how to organize those. We we wanted to really wait consequence, and and sort of gravity, and you know, I think for family separation just the the more moral aspect of it. Just very clearly made. It seem like it was the most consequential norm shattering thing that we've encountered so tells more about that because I mean, I would agree. There are many other things on the list, and they're all they're all significant moments. But but some of them can be. I've seen through purely the lens of politics, but but the family separation policy, I think was one that perhaps even for some of some of the president's most ardent supporters because it did venture into this question of the moral comportment of the United States and and beforehand. You know, I think it was presumed that there was moral agreement that separating children from their parents was not something that, you know, sophisticated humane democracy does. And and and yet it happened. Right. So so this I think it does make it slightly different or very different from many of the other startling moments of this presidency. Right. And I if I may read a line from actually fetters piece, she's the person who wrote this essay that I found to be really salient as it is an axiom of moral life amongst sliced humans that two separate young children from their parents is an offense against not just nature, but society, and then she goes on to say forcibly Yanqing children from their parents is of a piece with some of the dark. Moments of American history, the internment of Japanese-Americans the forcible separation of American Indian children into special boarding schools, slavery. And so I think the interesting thing is that there is this there are these historical echoes and yet you you pause. And you say it's twenty nineteen like how can this be happening? Well, McKay Coppins on the flip side of that. The the family separation policy was brought to an end through the institutions of United of the United States government here. So as we're talking about me through court order, right? So as we're talking about norm shattering shouldn't. We also be talking about the ways in which the the established institutions the United States are responding as well. That's a good point. And I don't think that it was ever our intent with this package to forecast, you know, a complete abandonment of hope in American institutions, I do think that actually there's a case to be made that while the president is breaking norms left and right..

United States John Kelly Adrian president CNN wolf Blitzer Staff writer McKay Coppins LA France Japanese-Americans
"staff writer" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Exactly what you're doing. He says it's callous, and it's cruel because President Trump says that if I don't know if I open up the government, you won't give me what I want. But Democrats are saying the same thing Democrats are saying if I don't open up the government, then I won't get what I want right. If Democrats if Democrats give him what he wants, then he'll have what he wants. And the government will be. So they can't have both of those things it takes two to Tango in all of this. Now, some of the arguments that are being made against President Trump on this score come courtesy of members of the media. Of course, George Packers a staff writer for the Atlantic has a piece today about ABRAHAM LINCOLN. And he talks about visiting the Lincoln Memorial. He says Abraham Lincoln's eloquence touched levels of morality and high resolve that preposterously out of reach in the first days of one thousand nine hundred and the third year of the Trump presidency a constant theme runs throughout Lincoln's writings from his years as young Illinois politician to the last great speeches of his life. The supreme value of self-government everything depended on this idea are ancient faith, which itself was absolutely eternally. Right. But it's endurance was never guaranteed from the. Start of his career Lincoln foresaw. How Americans democracy might not through foreign congress. But by our own fading attachment to its institution self-government requires that the union should live, and it also negated slavery. And then it talks about ABRAHAM LINCOLN. I this is the best is during the civil war. The government never shut down. Not even when the capital was threatened by confederate troops. You know, what the president did not shut down the government during the civil war the president arrested journalists who opposed him the president conscripted hundreds of thousands of people. The president blatantly violated civil liberties, none of this is to say that ABRAHAM LINCOLN was wrong. But if you're going to use an example of a president who held the government open. In the most democratic fashion Lincoln is not the guy you want to look to because Lincoln didn't do that. He used his War Powers, which is exactly what Trump is threatening to do. Right. This very second. The second. We're gonna get.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN President Trump government Lincoln Memorial president George Packers Atlantic staff writer Illinois
"staff writer" Discussed on IRL: Online Life Is Real Life

IRL: Online Life Is Real Life

04:07 min | 3 years ago

"staff writer" Discussed on IRL: Online Life Is Real Life

"We are not inherently a species that wants to read fifteen hundred word articles every day all days of the week. We are species that from time to time gets curious about reading long articles. And it's our job. It's the all it's the journalism Kennedy's job to do our best to essentially write that piece that punches that ticket. Derek Thompson is a staff writer at the Atlantic. Okay. Here's something to consider neuro. Scientists have made it pretty clear the human brain cannot multitask. We may think we're doing many things all at once. But actually, our brain is just switching attention very fast from one thing to another. So trying to understand everything read everything at once not possible. Chapter two an anti tab manifesto. I think that people often as Tennessee and keep all the stuff open because they don't really have any self control. This is Ernie Smith. He writes, a newsletter called tedium, and he wrote a call to arms to those of us who make reading promises we cannot possibly keep. I mean has this happened to you? You're reading a column on how to create new habits for the new year. You're also on a Wikipedia page about net neutrality. And you're also browsing Listrik explaining why scrunchy are back in style. I mean, are they please tell me the jury's still out on that? Anyway. And all these posts, they have invented links leading to other interesting things, so you open a tab, and then another tab, and then another and pretty soon. Yeah. You know it the tabs are breeding like bunnies. And you can't close them 'cause they're to important and interesting. So they sit there taunting you keeping tabs open is the informational prevalent, scheduling fifty. Doctors appointments single week. There's no way you're going to be all of them. And you're going to drive yourself nuts. Trying tab clutter is the overstuffed closet of the reading mind. And Ernie says, we need to let it go. I'm aware that the next important. You jailed might be hiding behind the next tab like the world's smallest unit. Win the world's largest bump by keeping everytown open up the haystack win because I give every piece of information the same amount of value once in a while something will happen like your laptop will crash, and you lose all those tabs at once freak out, of course. But then this feeling of relief said San and maybe that feeling is worth replicating on purpose. Anything? So the thought process had was that if I wasn't necessarily looking at something was saying say a twenty minute period, I would set up a pug, and so that I would automatically close at tap, your, well, if I leave that open, I'm just probably becomes the digital pack rat situation, you know, like at some point you're just like letting the idea of reading the story later beat out simple desire to do searches and find and find information that you use. It's like the word rove rule if you haven't worn it in the last two years, then you need to donate that stupid blouse that you bought on holiday when you thought you were a new person, I think that the key Matt reading from the expectation that you're never going to get through everything kind of freeze you a little bit to simply say, hey, this is something that I could have control over. In life. You can't have it all and you also can't read it all find a link to Ernie's manifesto in the show notes at IRO podcast dot org and sign up for his newsletter..

Ernie Smith Kennedy Derek Thompson Tennessee rove Wikipedia staff writer Atlantic San Matt twenty minute two years