19 Burst results for "Staff Scientist"

IGI Researchers Are Using CRISPR to Reduce Cyanide in Cassava

CRISPR Cuts

02:09 min | Last week

IGI Researchers Are Using CRISPR to Reduce Cyanide in Cassava

"Like everyone took wrestler guts. Today's episode we're not covering medicine or science communication. It's something different but also equally important will covering chris boden agricultural. So today with us. We have jessica lions and michael gomez and they're going to talk about their work gain casella so when come guys please introduce yourself stewart audience. Hi i'm just. lions staff. scientists. In dan rockstars lab at uc berkeley and the pi of our project at the innovative genomics institute to use crisper to engineer. Cassava without sign wants michael gomez. I'm a postdoctoral scholar in the fast food lab. At the innovative john institute also working jess on cassava and other crops for disease resistance. Thank thanks can you talk a little bit about how you got into this space off. You know either being interested in agriculture and also getting into crisper in agriculture. Now maybe tied with the shirt. I come at this from the end of genomic so i i'd morning on cassava listens twenty twelve and twenty fifteen or something some really interested in using modern genetic approaches to facilitate the improvement of africa crops so As christopher became more of a a more of an option for sava thousand certified segue on into collaborating with golden brian. On using chris burton december. I entered grad school in dozen twelve really strong interest in diseases. How they work how that plays host and at that time crisper urge and it has been a roller coaster. seeing how this technology has been applied. It's been a lot of fun. And i'm excited to apply for disease resistance but also poor consumer safety space.

Michael Gomez Chris Boden Jessica Lions Dan Rockstars Uc Berkeley Innovative Genomics Institute John Institute Disease Resistance Casella Lions Stewart Jess Golden Brian Chris Burton Christopher Africa
"staff scientist" Discussed on Data Skeptic

Data Skeptic

09:11 min | 1 year ago

"staff scientist" Discussed on Data Skeptic

"So here we are four months in give or take to our data skeptic interpret ability theme. I've learned a lot. I'm also at the stage where I'm GonNa Pause and maybe think carefully about what I mean by certain words like interpret -able or explainable or trust trustworthiness. In fact I feel ven diagram coming on but I'M GONNA keep that at bay for just a little bit on some levels. Interpret ability is just a formula do a logistic regression on some simple analysis. Tell me Your coefficients. Oh you have a strong positive waiting on history of employment. You have a large negative. Wait on bankruptcy. Small negative weighed on late payments positive weights on these intuitive ratios. You came up with okay. Yeah I see how this works. But for the more complex model the deep learning models. Those learning a mapping function that is not so easily compressibility. Our best solutions to these types of problems today require massively parallel arithmetic computations. So can you describe how Computer Vision Works? Sure it's a bunch of layers of convoluted ends in pooling and Yada Yada but what I'd really like to do is ask that network a question. You know maybe even start with childlike questions wide. Everything I mean asking why everything eventually gets you to physics. But let's start with. Why do you think that's a panda? We've had some progress in that direction. But I don't think we're near the end of the line. In fact the word. I really need to work into that. Ven Diagram is conversation. So thanks to deep fakes. Seeing is no longer believing. Maybe conversation is the truest test of the mall this week on the show notes. Not The imitation game. I'll be talking to Dan Elton about his paper. Self explain ability as an alternative to interpret ability for judging trustworthiness of artificial intelligence. This paper presents a novel framework. That has really got me thinking more about interpret ability and what I mean. My name is Dan. Elton and I'm a staff scientist at the National Institutes of health working on deep learning for medical imaging and I drift to add a disclaimer though that nothing is eight year represents the views of the National Institutes of health or the federal government. And there's been a lot of I would say. Advancements were in maybe a renaissance era of computer vision for medical purposes. Least what's your perspective on it. Yeah I sort of an inflection point. A kind of breakout moment here. Because there's a lot of systems for medical images that are reaching these level. The average radiologist are clinician. There's a lot of activity in start ups and a lot of things being looked at right now by the FDA. So I've always been curious about. I guess the difference between the Data Science for fun. You know you go get a data set off some website and sometimes it could have medical data and you solve something which is great. But it's really there to learn machine learning and it seems to me that's probably different from what happens in practice. Do you have any to speak to some of the nuances? That are different for a real practitioner working on m. l. in the medical domain. What I found was moving from working with small data sets and basically tabular data to medical image data is. There's a lot domain knowledge that you need to do it. Well so there's a lot of implicit biases that have to be fed in so you have to know how to pre process the data outer remove noise and it gets very technical as opposed to just applying off the shelf models and given the I guess consequences or seriousness of using M. L. with a medical applications from my point of view. Amazon can do whatever they want when they're trying to sell me a product. If they make an error it's loss of their revenue. Perhaps we can't make the same flippant comments about medical techniques. Do you notice that the adoption slower or more practical or are there any things that make yellow brick road? Accessibility FOR NEW TECHNIQUES. Yeah while fielding system in the medical imaging domain is I think much harder than other domains because it has to go through a very Langley approval process at the FDA. Then the key thing they look for is that actually enhances clinical outcomes so actually having the system actually improves doctors decision. Making and that's pretty hard to show so. There is a lot more work involved in actually getting something market in medical imaging but there are companies that are doing it as you'd mentioned you the FDA. I don't know if that's their official mantra. But they're trying to increase clinical outcomes that makes a lot of sense to me on the surface but it feels like maybe lying underneath. That could be a concern about over fitting and stuff like that. Are you aware of any of the techniques that whether it's the FDA or the industry as a whole has to take on extra protections beyond the typical things that machine learning practitioners use overfeeding is a huge concern and one of the challenges is that in real world? Data can change so for instance if you have a cat scanner and you upgrade it or you start using different parameters year data can change and one of the big problems in the field is actually alive. These models don't transfer between like images from different scanners right now. People are trying to figure out. How DO WE BUILD? Good test sets that cover the wide range of types of images that may be encountered in the wild. It's still an ongoing challenge. The paper you authored that I most notably want talk about on today's show is titled Self Explaining. Ai As an alternative to interpret will a? I I guess. Let's start with interpret ability. Do you have whether it's formal or not some definition that you work with for what makes a model interpret will? Yeah well. I actually differentiate who types of interpretation so the first one I just call like an accurate interpretation which just tries to reproduce the input output mapping of the model so this is sometimes done with a post Hawk model like linear model bad reproduces the input output of the network the other type of interpretation or explanation. I call mechanistic explanation and that attempts to explain. Actually how the model is functioning internally in my experience. That's much more difficult than much rarer to find Gotcha but presumably more desirable. Yeah Yeah I think it's very desirable to ensure trustworthiness because for instance in medical imaging. It'd be really useful to know that the way the model is operating is a way that is known to be robust radiologists or ideally it would be similar to how radiologists to do the task which we know is fairly robust. But what we're finding though. Is that the way these deep neural networks are operating is actually very different than the way radiologist would analyze a medical image. And I think they're doing largely interpolations which means they're not going to extrapolate to new circumstances the way Radiologists would that's kind of my big concern about learning right now. What do you mean exactly by? They just interpolate this ties into the phenomenon of double descent which I think it's critical to understanding how deep neural networks function. I don't think our my listeners know the term what is doubled descent double descent is basically a breakdown of the bias variance tradeoff that you find in a lot of textbooks on statistics machine learning. And so it's really interesting because what has been found recently. Is that normally as you? Increase the capacity of a neural net like by adding more layers or more neurons. The test era will initially decrease but then at some point you sir over fitting and the test era will start to increase and so that's like the classical bias variance tradeoff which. I'm sure a lot of people are familiar with. But what's been found recently? Is that if you keep increasing the network than Stops increasing actually peaks and then starts decreasing again. And that's what they call a double descent. So what happens? Is that at a certain capacity threshold the network actually becomes able to interpolate the training data almost perfectly and without like the undershoot or overshoot that we often associated with over fitting and so it's believed that most deep neural networks actually operate in this regime of interpretation and I think this is a really fundamental thing to understand because if a neural network is functioning purely through interpolations that means there's no guarantee it's going to extrapolate and so we have to be very careful when we're applying these models were not going. Outside of the domain was trained in in other words. We're not trying to extrapolate outside of the domain of the training data. I have seen this problem firsthand in medical imaging. Where did you neural? Networks cannot deal with anomalies that might be an image which would not cause any problem for radiologists so for instance implants say like the hip or spine. Ken Confuse these deep. Neural networks. Even if they're trying to do something which is trying to identify something in a very different part of the body just the presence of this thing in the image that it hasn't seen before is can be enough to disrupt the models functioning

FDA Dan Elton National Institutes of health m. l. Amazon Langley Elwin vertebras official Ken staff scientist navy programmer
"staff scientist" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"staff scientist" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"With today as Dr Walter Keefer Planetary Geophysicist Walter is a staff scientist at the lunar and Planetary Institute Houston Texas he studies the Geophysical Goal Evolution of the Moon Mars Venus and even I o Walter has been a member of the science team for NASA's grail mission and that's the gravity gravity recovery and interior laboratory and that explored the structure of the moon welcome Walter Hind. It's nice to be here thank you. Today I want to talk about the sub surface of the moon whilst of our spacecraft always just look at the surface overland. Pick up a few rocks but you know we don't go very deep. So what are the ways that we really have that. We use to look inside the moon so one of the things that we've done and this goes back to Apollo. Oh actually is that the Apollo astronauts left a set of seismic stations on the moon at most of the landing sites and they were used to study the inside of the Moon from nineteen sixty nine until nineteen seventy seven when the stations were shut off and that provides a great view of the internal structure of the moon but it's located specific places on the men were were the landing sites were when they deploy seismic stations. What are they really look like. Each of the Apollo missions put down between five and eight different experiments. The seismometers Mamata were on almost all of them. It's a box it doesn't actually look like much on the surface in the photograph because you want to protect it from changes in temperature during the lunar Dan Handler night so it's got a thick insulating silver blanket over it basically and what we've done since then is the grail mission which study study the gravity of the Moon Walter wanted grail launch and how long was it in Orbit Braille launched in September of two thousand eleven. It took actually about about three months to get to the moon now. You can get to the moon much quicker but they chose very long path so they could get their with very precise timing because they had to have two spacecraft. They're going orbit separately so they went into orbit on New Year's Eve and New Year's Day of two thousand and twelve it took about two and a half months it's to get the spacecraft lined up exactly the way they needed to be exactly the same orbit and then they they map for three months and then they had to take a pause because of the geometry geometry between the Earth and the moon and then later that year the geometry came back appropriately again and they did another three months of mapping between September were and December of two thousand twelve when we look at a plan or or a moon you know the our first thought is that the gravity is uniform in all directions. Is that that really true now. It's actually not true I mean even on the Earth as you walked from place to place the gravity a little bit different and it's a small difference. It's a small fraction of a percent so you wouldn't necessarily notice it but with good instruments you can measure it and learn about the variations of of the density inside of the earth and it's an important and powerful tool and and on the moon it turns out. That's all the variations in gravity are actually substantially larger than they are on the earth it. It seems to be a rule from the places. We studied that the smaller the planet planet the bigger. The variations are yeah. That's really neat so then as a satellite orbits the moon those little gravity differences based on that additional channel mass were reduction amass at certain locations tug and pull on the on the spacecraft in so we can measure that different yes so so we're basically flee measuring the differences in the speed of the spacecraft. GRAIL had to spacecraft and we were looking at measuring the speed to a fraction of a micron per her second now a micron is one millionth of a meter so imagine in the course of the year imagine the two spacecrafts separating by about three meters or we're about ten feet. That's the rate that's the speed that we could measure the differences with grail and that's why we were so successful at mapping the moon is that they could measure very very small aw Las differences so as grail orbited the moon these two spacecraft were in the same orbit but one would feel tug or pull based on the gravity in and around it as it was orbiting and then move away or composer to the other spacecraft exactly so so one spacecraft would get there just a little bit before for the other and thirty or forty five seconds and so you would see the change in velocity as one would get pulled and then the other would get pulled and so sometimes they'd pull apart sometimes sometimes they they come together and and we measured those very precisely using the same technique that that cops used to determine if you're speeding it's just that we could do it like a billion times better than the police to when they're trying to find out if you're speeding on the freeway so what's really neat then is if we then take the orbit in change over time. I know we had an opportunity towards the end of grails mission to reduce the altitude in so then those changes in distance between the two spacecraft was even more pronounced exactly so at the end we were down to about ten kilometers on average above the surface but that meant that we we were flying in some cases only two kilometers above the surface of the highest mountains. We were flying over so we were really down in the weeds. Almost I really wish we could have had a camera Mariah to to to take video picture of of that view would have been a amazing they eventually crashed and that ended the mission so so so they're laying on the surface of the moon somewhere right and that was done on purpose we were out of he'll they actually deliberately picked place and and it actually had a science value because they burned all the fuel and they needed to know the mass space craft as they were making the measurements so by burning all the fuel at the end. You could tell how much was left over and it actually improved the analysis as well. You know we're pretty sure that the moon was once completely molten as it was forming once it cooled enough to be solid then what's the overall history of the heat. What happens to that heat. being dissipated in the men we do think that the moon originated in what we call a magma ocean that that it came up initially actually with the rocks from Apollo eleven that that theory came about within six months of the the first lunar samples coming back we think that the moon it would solidified from this magma state in probably less than a million years after that he'd still keeps coming out the interior of the moon would have been what we call convicting investing infection is is a process in which we move heat because material physically moving and so there are places inside the moon or inside of the earth that are hotter than other places and just as we say that hot air rises hot rock rises as well The Rock is if it has if it's hotter. It's thermally expanded banded. It's a little less dense than the surroundings so it wants to rise other places that are colder or more more contracted. That's denser. Those places want to the sinking so that motion of some places wanting to come up at a place as wanting to go down creates a flow inside the mantle even though it solid it's moving on as a very very viscous fluid at a rate of potentially few centimeters per year. Let's why place get moved around why the Atlantic Ocean splits splits apart and North America and Europe separate for example how he put push up mountain belts on the earth is because it's solid but it is moving very slowly at a rate of a few centimeters the meters per year the moon would have done exactly the same thing at least early on it would have been conducting eventually the moon would have cooled enough that that now it it really isn't moving very much inside mostly the heat is simply coming out by conduction which is a very slow process so so it's still cooling it creates scarfs tarps and actually even earthquakes mooncakes on the moon even today by scarf what I mean it's a rigid structure where it might kind of look like a hill on the actually drove over one of them on Apollo Seventeen on purpose. It's a small hill. Let's created where one part got pushed up in one cart pulled down by the motions on the fault actually there there are plenty of places on the moon where.

Dr Walter Keefer GRAIL Orbit Braille Walter Hind NASA Atlantic Ocean Planetary Institute Houston Te Geophysical Goal Evolution Geophysicist staff scientist Mamata Mariah North America Europe three months forty five seconds ten kilometers two kilometers
"staff scientist" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

11:23 min | 1 year ago

"staff scientist" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Let's talk about what that research is. GonNa look like that because he knew when you were working for NASA as a staff scientist yea you were doing things you were interested in but they were projects that probably you were assigned to right or did you get to actually create your own projects there there for my own research. I guess to my own research time. I got to create my own problem. You did okay very cool and then you also worked larger missions and things like that which is most of your time yeah yeah so your own research your own interest area. What was your PhD actually in my PhD was in broadly Galaxy Aleksey evolution so how'd you galaxies form and evolve we live in a massive galaxy the Milky Way and trying to figure out when you study galaxies they evolve over incredibly long timescales and so we can't really watch one evolve instead. I said we just get a bunch of snapshots of different galaxies and so it's piecing together. What did this type of galaxy evolve into this one or are they completely. We separate evolutionary tracks. How do you get this kind of galaxy a if it's particularly weird and so trying to understand how aw ultimately how we got here in this galaxy how galaxies formed. I just had the weirdest parallel in my mind like I've you know I studied psychology and neuroscience science but I always grew up with a deep deep passion for Paleontology. I didn't end up pursuing it in academia but I still am obsessed with it. I don't know my books aren't organized but at some point in time you'll see that there's massive dinosaur section asylum and I know that there's a big part of Paleontology. There's actually really beautiful series at the Natural History History Museum here in L. A. With treatise rex growth series where there's like an juvenile and then or maybe it's actually like an infant like a very young. Rexona a sub adult and then a full grown adult and for a longtime paleontologist didn't know if those were completely different species they didn't because when you have so few examples and you can't watch them change change you have to kind of forensically piece this back and I'm drawing this parallel with galaxy formation that at any given time. You're just seeing them as they are. You don't know what they used just to be like or where they're going. You have to kind of take information from the other bones served the other evidence that you can find and start to sort of approximate somme the life cycle of galaxy. Yes how do you do that while we have so one of the things that we can do in astronomy. You can't reach out and manipulate what you're studying. He usually and so what you have to do we tend to work. Observers like myself who take you observe the sky and take data from that have to work with theorists who simulate the formation of the universe and we sort of act says act as checks on each other so are the simulations predicting what I'm observing. If not will then we need to adjust them and then what what we're finding when we look out in the sky can help us figure out how we need to adjust and what tweets we need to make and so one of the things that I study in particular is so we think that massive galaxies like the Milky Way that we sit in were formed from the merging together of smaller ones okay a lot of thanks for him in the universe like this and so we think that you you just get these little guys merging together and building and but this is a very complicated complicated process because you add like one in one small galaxy together to get to like a a two times what you started with yes sort of you got something totally different like you add one one and you get Jay right like it's it's just because The act of slamming galaxy into another one as you can imagine creates a whole bunch of cool physics like you get intense star formation you can grow Kohl's that way things like that and so even like at the at the atomic level. There's like all sorts of weird stuff happening. There's like fusion happening and Fisher happening like you don't you don't put in what you get out right. You don't get out what you put in and I studied for awhile what happens when you slam to massive galaxies sexiest together because massive galaxies like our own pack a big punch. It's real they make really pretty images and you learn how you can study them. Come up close and also at a distance because they're very big. They're very bright. They're easier to see and do you mostly look at them with like what where on the electromagnetic spectrum are. Are you mostly studying. These galaxies all types of astronomy. They are telescopes that you're using yeah. I run the gamut okay much and that's because you learn about at different pieces of the galaxy by looking at different wavelengths so if you look in at optical wavelengths so with I use the Hubble Space Telescope for example. You get to see stars so those are the pretty pictures were used to like. If you have like a really beautiful wallpaper on your laptop it's probably Hubble. Yes got well and partly because it has to do with the resolution that we just are detector technology. We can look at certain resolutions when it in optical wavelengths converses say infrared wavelengths that are slightly longer infrared is showing you the it can show you the dust in a galaxy and so that's where Uh uh stars are born out of and so it gives you an idea of when you have a really dusty galaxy and you in their bright in the infrared something in there is heating it up and show it could be star formation it could be an active black hole and so but we can't quite get to the same resolution solution as we can with optical telescopes and they were. GonNa Murky to ask because they'll look yes yeah and so and then up to do you x-rays which are super high energy and so sometimes if you're trying to figure out if you do have a dusty galaxy and you're trying to figure out what's heating it inside the dust. The optical light isn't getting out. It's it's like same if you had a film dusty film on your window or something and be able to see through similar yeah but if you shot shot an x-ray through it then you could see that and so x rays make it out of the dust and so 'cause they're very high energy because they can see right through your skin is you're all right so yeah and then. I also do radio wavelengths which are very long wavelengths and you can see the gas an galaxy and so one thing that that does is when you smashed galaxies in to each other they the gas the imprint in the gas is much more extended and it can be left it can last longer and so you can sort of trace out better her what happened you can sort of put the rewind button on that galaxy merger yes and the gas a little bit better than you can the stars and so what happened so okay. This may be a silly question but what comes up for me when I talk about all the different types of electromagnetic kind live what's the word I'm looking for detection so telescopes that can measure xrays radio waves visible light spectrum germ all that good stuff that's kind of the the type of astronomy that we've been doing for a very very long time. It's it's dominates astrophysics and now of course we have gravitational wave astronomy which is totally different way of looking at the universe so but from what I gathered Lego so far has been able to detect only things that are like several solar mass black holes colliding galaxies are obviously much much bigger than that ray and are we looking at black holes colliding through Lego within our own galaxy or farther away from the Milky Way like could you use gravitational wave physics to learn more about galaxies or they too big too far so what's for right now. The the black hole mergers that were looking at cities are in the tens of solar masses so astronomy uses solar masses a unit. The massive assign is one solar mass and so we because we're you know egotistical. we mean pair everything torn because there isn't an astronomical unit the distance distance from the earth to the Sun. That's very ego centric well. There's a lot of suffering astronomy where like a dude named it this hundreds of years ago and never thinking king that we would expand beyond this knowledge and then it's like. Oh crap well with call this forever so so that's how you end up with the English system of measurement where nothing L. things like divisible by ten. We just arbitrarily say yeah anyway and someone was like well. We're stuck with this because we don't like change. Yes so actually one of the things that I'm trying to understand is with You have black holes. We have black holes that form out of the deaths of stars so they're like stellar corpses at the end of the stars life it runs out of fuel it collapses in on itself and you get this incredibly dense objects all the black hole and so those are like stellar mass black holes in the middle of galaxies what I'm talking about. When YOU MERGE GALAXIES. There's things called supermassive black holes and that is the official astronomy term supermassive and via. We're talking billions of black solar masses because this is I mean and when you think about like a son so our our star is somewhat typical. I would assume it's totally Everett holy average there are how many like even in our own galaxy estimate about two hundred billion stars in our galaxy so when there's a black hole lake that's like a dying one of those one of those two hundred billion or does it have be bigger than our sun. It has to be bigger than ours time correct but we estimate that there's about a million million black holes in our galaxy so that's and that's not counting the supermassive black hole in the middle of that's not that's not counting the supermassive black hole so we have these leg supermassive things which are billions of solar masses and then we have these stellar death remnant things that are you know tens yeah and then we don't there's like a gap in between and the the crazy thing to me is that we don't know how supermassive per massive black holes form there there's one in the center of our galaxy with as one in the center of most galaxies and they're pretty ubiquitous but we don't know how they form and so one of the things that I'm trying to do with my research is looking for black holes in the middle intermediate mass black holes because so like hundreds words of solar masses or thousands of sides ten thousand to a million that range and.

NASA staff scientist Natural History History Museum Hubble Space Telescope Fisher Kohl Jay official ray
"staff scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"staff scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

"DNA to fit human needs now if you are like me a certain kind of headline it keeps you up at night I have brown in Mexico during the summer retail store freakish hail storm the freakish weather temperatures were in the eighties just before the city got buried in the story of the freak hailstorm in one of a kind is the most recent story giving me the creeps but really any story those potentially link to climate change launches me into a spiral of despair gray whales are dying this year at least twenty five have long we polar bears and their cubs rummaging through a landfill Poland and the Czech Republic have already recorded their highest June temperatures ever it's actually impossible to link any single weatherman sole leader will warming but we do know is that climate change exacerbates natural disasters like hurricanes or wild fires and that is scary okay it's really scary but it turns out I'm not alone in being stressed out about climate change the two thousand seventeen study out of he'll show that that the nose in the U. S. R. quote much more engaged with the issue of global warming and the non that the notes seven out of ten of the nose bleed global warming is caused by humans and fifty percent believe they are currently being impacted by it so if you're a fellow freaked out at the you know you're probably also desperate for information about what can be done or what is being done to curb carbon emission and even potentially reverse global warming and that's how I came across the work experience yet nothing I am a staff scientist at Berkeley national lab I'm also the lead for quantitative mentally mulling a day joined by an engine used to do.

Mexico Poland Czech Republic staff scientist Berkeley national fifty percent
Rise in suicide rates in U.S. youth, especially girls

First Light

01:02 min | 2 years ago

Rise in suicide rates in U.S. youth, especially girls

"A new study in the journal of the American Medical Association reports suicide rates among preteen girls are rising Combo's, Carleen Johnson spoke with an expert this morning. Horowitz is a pediatric psychologist and staff scientists at the National Institute for mental health, like a young person's going to say to their doctor, I am thinking of killing myself. If someone doesn't ask, them directly, are you having thoughts of killing yourself, and they most likely aren't going to talk about social media influences? Dr Horowitz says and the prevalence of bullying too, the culprits for why many teams str-. With depression and anxiety, which can lead to suicidal thoughts, even children as young, as ten or having these thoughts some following through preteen girls have seen a thirteen percent increase in suicide doctor Horowitz authored a recent study in the journal hospital. Pediatrics, they screened ten to twelve year olds who came into the are and from thirty percent screen positive for suicide risk nearly eighteen percent had previously attempted suicide, some of the signs to watch for include isolation anger, anxiety, and

Dr Horowitz Doctor Horowitz Journal Of The American Medica Carleen Johnson Depression National Institute Eighteen Percent Thirteen Percent Thirty Percent Twelve Year
"staff scientist" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

11:22 min | 2 years ago

"staff scientist" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Welcome back to coast to coast, George story with you in our dear friend, Russell targ back with us physicists, author who has been a pioneer in the development of laser and laser applications was a co founder of the previously secret Stanford research institutes investigation into psychic abilities back in the seventies. And eighties in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven he retired from Lockheed Martin was missile and space company as a senior staff scientist where he developed airborne laser systems for the detection of wind shear, which is very important when you're flying in he now pursues ESP research in Palo Alto, California. Teachers remote viewing worldwide his new documentary. Just released called third eye spies. We've got that link for you at coast to coast AM dot com in the highlight reel Russell targ back on coast to coast, Mr. targe, always a pleasure has yours. You're very happy to be with you and tell you about what I've been up to she's mainly making ESE. Researches on secret as possible we had a top secret program for twenty years, and then ten years ago, I got declassified. So I could tell you about it without having to exert harsh penalties. So we've spent the past five years making you film, which is really a compilation of work twenty five scientists engineers and psychics and put this all together to a two hour movie. That tells you everything that we know about psychic ability and our goal is to disseminate the information which keeps getting forgotten the psychic abilities a bit understood and used for two millennia, but every few years, it seems it becomes forbidden, which is why we call it. A cult called. You know, me hidden. And the goal is film is to make it no longer hidden protect all this amazing information from being down upon by the government, the church and sakes. I have my aunt would've loved this documentary. Russell shafiqa. She really would have gotten into this Ingo Swann would have enjoyed it too. When he he's certainly would ever Ingles in this film. We ended we view dingo. Awhile ago. One of the reasons we made this film is we realized that the pioneers are dying as time goes on. We lost Ingo and path price and Hella hammer who are three outstanding famous psychics. And recently we lost Edgar Mitchell. That's right. There's no time to lose. Are we replacing these people Russell? Well. With a shortage of psychic people. I mean, the angle and Hello price, where wonderful outstanding talented people. And what our contribution wasn't that. We gave them permission to make use of their psychic abilities. So there's no lab like SRI. We had anomalous league great success for a decade or two we fell we talk about the all time favorites, the the big hits of the decade that I was there and people say well, did you have any failures in the answer? We had very very few failures. That's remarkable. Russell isn't. It is remarkable. We had very good conditions. We had we had plenty of dough. And we had very experienced like. So we're quite fortunate for example with half price early in the program. We had a kind of psychic hide and go seek we're every day for nine days, my partner help put up with Gordon hide somewhere. And I was sitting in our dark room with patch. And he would try and describe what looked like we're how hiding and and those nine trials seven of them where mashed first place that's remarkable. What that means is that if he was kidnapped by terrorists nine days in a row price would have found in the first place. He looked seven out of the nine times, and you could have gone and get them and send some seals to pick him up or something like that. That's right. So our our hit rate in our success rate was amazing. And I had a lot of experience in my life. As I and we were. Doing the thing is remarkable about this film. I should tell you up front is that we we've I've written a number of books now talking about the second exploits. And I tell people how it works. And what happens last book, I wrote is called the reality of ESP. And that describes how you can develop here on psychic ability, and what we think is going on. And you believe me or not believe me. But I did my best to reveal what we had done for my psychic decade Stanford wasn't a film is in addition to my telling you what's going on. We have two of our retired contract monitors from the CIA that is to senior CIA scientists who are part of our program overseeing house, and I got them at the right time after they retired from the CIA and before they died. So these two thousand four men what this share? The very eventful moving part of their lives that pertain to doing magic with us. So the thing that makes us feel remarkable as we have to CIA scientists sending out looking into the camera and heartfully telling us that they were there. They saw what happened and what targe said is true, and they can vote for it. They were probably graft and it really happened. We found the down submarine down there. Down bomber the Russian submarine. They missing house to just and it's priceless. And. The only time ever that we got high level top secret contract monitors the CIA on camera saying they were there, and it really happened. So that that's the best thing that drove this film. Why Russell do you think the government through the CIA the defense intelligence agencies stopped the remote viewing program? Why didn't they just continue it? Well, kit green things, they did continue it, for example. It doesn't make sense. That is where we have Jimmy Carter talking on camera about how we found a down Russian bomber the CIA could out fine because it was buried in the jungle and he's a medium in California located at that's not exactly true. But it's worth it was with a chat here his autobiography that some people in California's somehow found founders bomber Russian bomber buried in the jungle. Could not find it. But somehow psychics in California found us. So we have a lot of very high level people saying, yes, this is actually going around. So I think it would be ridiculous to think that after two decades of support the CIA would quit doing has. And we have kid green on camera saying he doesn't think they did quit Russell give us the cliffnote version of what remote viewing is to some people who don't know what it is. Well, the good news is a remote viewing is it ability. We all have to quiet your mind and describe and experience what's going on in a distant place or even in the future. So there's no mumbo jumbo no meditation. No drugs. Doughnut thing is my job and talking to you, for example to give people permission. To quiet their mind and see into the gist of the I know that there are lots of classes, costing thousands of dollars. Doing exercises doing all sorts of different things to learn how to be psychic. And people wanna know could I how do they learn to be psychics and the answer? Is you sit down quietly give yourself an objective. Usually the first time that people learn to be psyche is where they're looking for their diamond bracelet. They can't find their car keys carcase. So remote viewing is the ability to experience and describe what's going on under this to your viewing remotely, and we show a lot of that. In the film is we show people doing remote viewing you get an idea of what the. Up ration- is we've been found some vintage say Hamid isn't a good store. She's old friend of mine and she had never done this before. And the CIA said can't you bring in somebody who's a control? We know. The Pat price in Ingo Swann are very psychic. The control and Hella who is a professional photographer, not a psychic. So that would be basically fun to work with me at SRI, and and be paid for being psychic that just tickled her? And it turned out that she was the most reliable person that we ever worked with. So she came in. We sat down at a very first trial. She said, okay. Well, what do I do rest? I've never done anything like this. So I gave her a five minute rundown by breathing. Quieting your mind that help put off his hiding someplace what are you? What are the surprising images that come to your mind earning how and he she then described that place, and we have a whole segment of the film from the original archives with Hellas describing we're how is hiding and the website for the documentaries third is spies dot com. Everybody you definitely need to take a look at the documentary. It is truly remarkable..

CIA Russell Ingo Swann California Russell targ SRI Mr. targe Russell shafiqa Palo Alto Hellas Edgar Mitchell Lockheed Martin George senior staff scientist co founder Hella Jimmy Carter Stanford partner Gordon
"staff scientist" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

11:19 min | 2 years ago

"staff scientist" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"With the people's one. Big sale starting Friday. Get an extra fifty percent of almost everything with your coupon. Score mega doorbusters till like seventy five percent off fine, jewelry and sixty percent boots for her plus nine hundred ninety nine pajamas. Censor Rove's your coupon. Even gets you fifty dollars off any fragrance purchase of seventy five dollars or more. People little things mean everything this Christmas. People's is part of our stage family offer. Exclusions apply. We are the capital region's. Breaking news, traffic and weather station. Newsradio wait ten and one zero three one WG y. And welcome back to coast to coast, George story with you in our dear friend, Russell targ back with us physicists, author who has been a pioneer in the development of laser and laser applications was the co founder of the previously secret Stanford research institutes investigation into psychic abilities back in the seventies. And eighties in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven he retired from Lockheed Martin was missile and space company as a senior staff scientist where he developed airborne laser systems for the detection of wind shear, which is very important when you're flying any now pursues ESP research in Palo Alto, California. Teachers remote viewing worldwide his new documentary. Just released called third is spies. We've got that link for you at coast to coast AM dot com in the highlight reel Russell targ back on coast to coast, Mr. targe, always a pleasure. You're very happy to be with you and tell you about what I've been up to mainly making ESE researches on secret as possible we had a top secret program for twenty years, and then ten years ago, I got declassified. So I could tell you about it without having to exert harsh penalties. So we've spent the past five years making you film, which is really event that sucks compilation of work of twenty five scientists engineers and psychics and put this all together to a two hour movie. It tells you everything that we know about psyching ability and our goal is to disseminate this information, which keeps getting forgotten psychic abilities have been understood and used for two millennia. But every few years, it seems it becomes forbidden, which is why we call it. I called I called is you know, hidden and the goal is film is to make it no longer hidden protect all this amazing information from being clamped down upon by the government, the church, and fakes I have my aunt. Would've loved this documentary. Russell shafiqa. She really would have gotten into this Ingo Swann would have enjoyed it to me. He's certainly would ever Ingles in this film. We ended we go a while ago. One of the reasons we made this film is that we realized that the pioneers are dying as time goes on we lost Ingo and path price and Helen hammer who are three outstanding famous psychics. And recently we lost Edgar Mitchell. That's right. There's no time to lose. Are we replacing these people Russell? Well. With a shortage of psychic people. I mean, the Ingo and Hello. Price were wonderful outstanding talented people. And what our contribution was is that we gave them permission to make use of their psyche. Who abilities? So there's no lab like SRI we had anomalous asleep. Great success for a decade or two the film. We talk about the all time favorites, the the big hits of the decade that I was there and people say well, did you have any failures in the answer? We had very very few failures. That's a remarkable. Russell isn't. It is remarkable. We had very good conditions. We had we had plenty of dough. And we had very experienced psychics. So we're quite fortunate for example with half price early in the program. We had a kind of psychic hide and go seek we're every day for nine days, my partner help put up with go hide somewhere. And I was sitting in our darkroom with patch. And he would try and describe what looked like we're how hiding and and those nine trials seven of them were matched first place. That's remarkable. What that means is that he was kidnapped by terrorists nine days in a row price would have found in the first place. He looked seven out of the nine times, and you could have gone and get them and send some seals to pick him up or something like that. Right. So our our hit rate in our success rate was amazing. And I had a lot of experience in my life. As I as we were. Doing the thing is remarkable about this film. I should tell you up front is that we we've I've written a number of books now talking about the psychic exploits. And I tell people how it works. And what happens last book, I wrote is called the reality of ESP. And that describes how you couldn't develop your own psychic ability, and what we think is going on. And you believe me or not believe may. But I did my best to reveal what we had done for. My psychic Stanford wasn't a film is in addition to my telling you going on we have two of our retired contract monitors from the CIA that is to senior CIA scientists who were part of our program overseeing house, and I got them at the right time after they retired from the CIA before they died. So these tooth off man what share? The very eventful moving part of their lives pertain to doing magic with us. So the thing that makes us feel remarkable. It'd be have to CIA scientists sending out looking into the camera and heartfully telling us that they were there. They saw what happened and that what targ said is true, and they can vouch for it. They were probably graft and it really happened. We found the down submarine down. It down bomber the Russian submarine. They missing house too. And it's priceless. And the only time ever that we got high level top secret contract monitors the CIA on camera saying they were there, and it really happened. So that that's the blessing that drove the film. Why Russell do you think the government through the CIA the defense intelligence agencies stopped the remote viewing program? Why didn't they just continue? It. Well, kit green things, they did continue it, for example. It doesn't make sense. That is we have Jimmy Carter talking on camera about how we found a down Russian bomber the CIA could out find because it was buried in the jungle and he said this medium in California. Located at that's not exactly true. But as a was with a chapter your his autobiography that some people in California's somehow founders bomber Russian bomber buried in the jungle. The say could not find it. But somehow does psychics in California found so we have had a lot of very high level people saying yes, this is actually going on. So I think it would be ridiculous to think that after two decades of support the CA which quit doing that. And we have kit. Green on camera saying, he doesn't think they did quit Russell give us the cliffnote version of what remote viewing is to some people who don't know what it is. Well, the good news is remote viewing is an ability. We all have to quiet your mind and describe and experience what's going on in a distant place or even in the future. There's no mumbo jumbo no meditation. No drugs. No, nothing. It's my job and talking to you, for example to give people permission to quiet their mind and see into the distance. The I know that there are lots of classes, costing thousands of dollars. Doing exercises doing all sorts of different things to learn how to be psychic. And people wanna know could I? How do they learn to be psychic? And the answer. Is you sit down quietly give yourself an objective. Usually the first time that people learned to be psychics is whether looking for their diamond bracelet. They can't find their car keys case. So remote viewing is the ability to experience and describe what's going on on the disk, your viewing remotely, and we show a lot of that. In the film is we show people doing remote viewing you get an idea of what the. Up ration- is we've been found some vintage say how about Hamid is a good store. She's old friend of mine and she had never done this before. And the CIA said can't you bring in somebody who's a control? Do we know? The Pat price in Ingo Swann are very psychic. Fighters the control and Hella who is a professional photographer. Not a psychic thought, it would be basically fun to work with me at SRI, and and be paid for being psychic that just tickled her. And it turned out that she was the most reliable person we ever worked with. So she came in. We sat down at our very first trial. She said, okay. Well, what do I do rest? I've never done anything like this..

CIA Russell Ingo Swann Russell targ California SRI Censor Rove Russell shafiqa Edgar Mitchell Palo Alto George co founder Mr. targe Lockheed Martin Jimmy Carter Hamid partner senior staff scientist Helen hammer
"staff scientist" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"staff scientist" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Africa thank you so much for being with us Thank you so much for helping us Seven counties along Florida's coastline are under a state of emergency in response to a red tide that is killing marine. Life and devastating tourism in the state the red, tide is caused, by toxic algae bloom and so far two hundred sixty seven tons of, marine life including twenty, one foot whale shark have washed. Ashore since the bloom began last month the state of emergency was also declared for a blue-green algae bloom that began in lake Okeechobee state officials have now allocated more than one. Million dollars towards cleanup and restoring tourism Tracy phenomena is a, staff scientist at the moat marine. Librarian, Sarasota and she joins me. Now Tracy thanks for being with us Hi great great to be here thank you and so what's happening in the Gulf this red tide and what's happening inland and lake Okeechobee are considered to be toxic algae blooms can. You tell us what the difference between these two, are that's a, great question and it's something really important for people to understand so. Red, tide is a harmful, species of phytoplankton we get seventy. Percent of our oxygen from phytoplankton but some species are harmful meaning that they release a toxin now saying oh 'Bacterial are a it's kind of an umbrella term for photosynthetic bacteria. Meaning that they make their own food using sunlight their son, ObamaCare. That are absolutely imperative for. For, the health of the Everglades And is this something, that, for I I'm, definitely not a scientist so I'm trying to understand, how this is being why is it growing is, it because the temperature in the oceans are rising pollution what's what's forcing this To really sorta take over the, Florida waterways great so I have a hypothesis about that so we know that if a bloom, red, tide bloom, although initiated offshore if it's close enough to. Shore at can use, surface water nutrients to sustain or even exacerbate we just don't know to what level because we don't have the data as far as saying oh bacteria. Blooms, go there a direct response of nutrient loading so, urbanization fertilizer use even even dog poop that people choose not to pick, up that all adds to the nitrogen phosphorus and, our surface water runoff and feeds that cyanobacteria now in addition to this. Being obviously an environmental concern they're also which Florida as you know is also. Battling on many fronts and we've reported, on this here on the, takeaway but it's also starting to affect people's lives. And people's wallets last? Sunday there were a few hundred people in thirty spots across? The state that join Hands along the beach to protest. The, quality of the water, and I wanna play a clip from a resident of. Stuart. Florida her name is Kelly west it's. Been worse than ever we're seeing like you know all, the manatee the, dolphin the turtles everything is just washing up all the bait fish for miles and miles so, why these events are important is that we can contact our leaders and let them know in, a, very vocal, way that we opposed what they're doing to. Our waterways what's your, reaction to that my reaction is is that it's not just in the hands of regulators it's in the hands of the of the citizens as well. And, an ethics of of industries, in agriculture it's not, only a community problem it's a it's a national problem worldwide problem that, we keep on building and building and worrying about, economics without worrying about the environment at the same level Tracy phenomena as..

Florida lake Okeechobee Hands Tracy moat marine Sarasota Africa staff scientist Everglades Gulf scientist Kelly west Stuart two hundred sixty seven tons Million dollars one foot
"staff scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"staff scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

"South Africa thank you so much for being with us Thank you so much for helping us Seven counties along Florida's coastline are under a state of emergency in response to a red tie that is killing marine. Life and devastating tourism in the state the red, tide is caused, by toxic algae bloom and so far two hundred sixty seven tons of marine, life including a twenty, one foot whale shark have washed. Ashore since the bloom began last month the state of emergency. Was also declared for a blue green algae bloom that began in lake Okeechobee state officials have now allocated more than one. Million dollars towards cleanup and. Restoring tourism Tracy phenomena is a staff scientist, says, the at the mote marine. Librarian, Sarasota and she joins me. Now Tracy thanks for being with us Hi great great to be here thank you and so what's happening in the Gulf this red tide and what's happening inland and lake Okeechobee are considered to be. Toxic algae blooms can you tell us what the, difference between these, two are that's a great question and it's something really important for people to, understand so red tide, is a harmful species of phytoplankton. We get seventy percent of our oxygen from Fido plankton but, some species are harmful meaning that they release a toxin now cyanobacteria are a it's kind of an umbrella term for photosynthetic. Bacteria meaning that they make. Their own food using sunlight there our son, ObamaCare, that are absolutely imperative for. For, the health of the Everglades Is this something that. For, for I'm definitely, not a scientist so I'm trying to understand how, this is being why is it growing is it. Because, the temperature in the oceans are rising as it pollution what's what's forcing this To really sorta take. Over the Florida waterways great so I have a hypothesis about that so we know that if, a, bloom red tide, bloom although initiated offshore if it's close enough. To shore can use surface water, nutrients to sustain or even exacerbate we just don't know to what level because we don't have the data as far as saying oh bacteria of blooms go there a direct response of nutrient loading. So urban is Asian fertilizer use even even dog, poop that, people choose not to, pick up that all adds to the nitrogen phosphorus, in our surface water runoff and seeds that cyanobacteria now into this being. Obviously an environmental concern they're also which Florida as you know has also you. Know battling on many fronts and? We've reported on this here, on the takeaway but it's also starting to affect. People's lives and people's? Wallets last Sunday there were a few hundred people in thirty spots across? The state that join Hands along the beach to, protest, the quality of the, water and I wanna play a clip from a resident. Of. Stuart Florida her name is Kelly west. It's been worse than ever.

Florida lake Okeechobee South Africa Sarasota staff scientist Everglades Tracy Stuart Florida scientist Kelly west Gulf Hands two hundred sixty seven tons Million dollars seventy percent one foot
"staff scientist" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"staff scientist" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Walking along, the shore here at, monarchy beach there are lots of. Debt Fisher all different times the smell from the fish there's, something even more it's an acrid smell that can make you cough the smell is, terrible and. It's affecting my lungs I'm coughing not so much him but I am. And it just it's sad to see all the. Dead fish very Vance well planned to day at the, beach with her husband James they live nearby and usually go swimming but not today after getting look at the dead fish in the murky. Slightly ready shoot water they're leaving I wouldn't even. Lock along the edge of it. I just don't think. It's safe the culprit. Here is a microscopic organism called Karenni umbrellas the algae are found almost exclusively in the Gulf, of Mexico and occur naturally they're ready spoons were first noted in the Gulf by Spanish explorers. In the fifteen. Hundreds the algae produce a powerful toxin that in high enough. Concentrations can affect marine life and humans there have been several red tide events in the Gulf. Over the last twenty years But Vincent, love co a staff scientist at moten marine laboratory in Sarasota says. This one is especially intense right now we're seeing counts that come into, the category of high which is over a million cells per liter and that's. Pretty much all up. And down the coast somewhere between one hundred and. One hundred and fifty miles of shoreline being covered. Right now in manatee and Sarasota, counties more than one hundred tons of dead fish have been removed from the beaches at. Marine biologist Rebecca Hazel corn says strandings of marine mammals, and, sea turtles have spiked recently you start, to see bait fish wash up then you see larger fish than you start to, see your, your grouper. Then you start to see your sea turtles and. Your manager and the highest on. The food web is going to be the dolphins when. It starts acting those guys so far at least twelve dolphins are dead. More. Than one hundred and fifty sea turtles even a twenty six foot, long whale shark all. Researchers believe because of red tide. Another major problem is the aerosol the algae produce an airborne, toxin that can blow miles inland and causes respiratory irritation that's been a particular problem On longboat key or beachfront condos can cost millions the public works director there Isaac Brown man says his crews have removed tons of fish from the canals but there's nothing they can do about the pervasive irritating, odor you know if it's if, people have an adverse reaction we'd vise him to. Stay indoors they'd want to visit, the mainland etc, yeah that's just a matter of of waiting it out waiting for..

Gulf Sarasota moten marine laboratory Isaac Brown Vance Rebecca Hazel corn director Mexico James Vincent staff scientist one hundred tons twenty six foot twenty years
"staff scientist" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"staff scientist" Discussed on Science Friday

"That for that nitrogen and and other nutrients but as we see the length of the summer increase we might expect to see that nitrogen actually becomes more limiting because that period of time where the microbes are making it available over the winter may be getting shorter so were prepping the microbe population and the plan population uh in in in the minute i have left oh whoa do you see that as the permafrost these defrosting that there is more the carbon dioxide and methane coming out of the ground easy to study that also we do and on and collectively accra across the region it it's it's a real concern i mean the amount of carbon stored in our arctic soils is as much carbon as there is in the vegetation an atmosphere globally combined so there's this new dramatic carbon that's been locked away and indeed if it suddenly becomes thawed and the microbes began to process it produced not only co 2 but methane which is the more powerful greenhouse correct gas that's that's a real concern that could causing a further in greece and co 2 did you see the movie downsize now much the end of that movie amac hella but as house a whole lot to do with the the the defrosting of the arctic regions than the release of methane yet doesn't sound like a from a tight a lot we've run out of time mom babbling here i wanna thank you both for taking time to be with me today the matthew wellenstein associate professor in the department of ecosystems science and sustainability add to colorado state university colleen iverson senior staff scientist and ecosystems ecologist at two oak ridge national laboratory thank you both for taking time and have a great weekend the pleasure thank you you're welcome the daily they more i will be there lindemann composer theme music and if you missed any part of the per year me like to hear it again of course you can always subscribe to our podcast and we are big in social communities send we're all over facebook and twitter and instagram will those places and now you can ask amazon or gugel home too.

carbon dioxide greece associate professor senior staff scientist matthew wellenstein colorado colleen iverson facebook twitter instagram amazon gugel
"staff scientist" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"staff scientist" Discussed on Science Friday

"On exchanges at goldman sachs the firm's podcast you'll hear discussions on topics with farreaching implications like these plus much more think of it as a place to get insights from some of the world's leading thinkers on markets industries and the global economy that's exchanges at goldman sachs available on i tuned stitcher soundcloud and google play and at g s dot com slash podcast this is science friday i am i wrote plato look outside your window in many places across the country when he a seat is sia frozen wasteland oh yeah it's been that way for a lot of us in the east and midwest on the activity of springtime is still months away but beneath the soil it is a different story manek's guess study some of the frosty it soils in the world or perm are frosty is casey what i did there in the arctic tundra they are matthew wallenstein associate professor in the department of ecosystem science and sustainability colorado state university and colleen iverson senior staff scientist and ecosystems ecologist at oak ridge national laboratory welcome both sides friday thanks that the pleasure to be with you and i thought the frigid day well let me ask you matthew you'll you pick up a shovel of full of frozen soil looks like there's nothing going on in the area no winter time but really it's bustling with them microbial activity even in the end even in the winter right that's that's true in in recent years we've really discovered that even in soils that are frozen there's still active microbes bacteria and fund g and other soil organisms that not only can survive those frozen conditions but actually maintain activity so we can measure essentially their breathing we can measure gases like year to coming out of the soil and then we can use other techniques actually study of their ability to rep two to reproduce uh through replicating dna we can see that they're actually uh transforming that soil and and making nutrients available so that when the plants uh start coming to life in the spring there's actually nutrients available for them well all living life as we know it needs water so if those soil is froze.

goldman sachs global economy google associate professor oak ridge national laboratory matthew wallenstein colorado state university colleen iverson senior staff scientist
"staff scientist" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"staff scientist" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"At the new radiocom app gameused uh good advice radiocom presents not so nice advice with comedian shaath nice we really advice columns we figure out why they're wrong in the we give you the real answer that i saw untorn because i know the teenagers make the worst what you do is you teach which is how the be smart about sex and i'm talking to my son all the time about that and guess what he's like that i'm tanned advice with canadian shocking was legalised gambling subscribe at the new radiocom at seven thirty seven in our bloomberg business minute getting into china is a nobrainer for global governance and has been a brain freeze for tech company from china has long nailed itself with the socalled great firewall of china one crack in that wall has appeared in the form of eight i or artificial intelligence gugel works to squeeze through that crack not with search but a i am the spearhead his tensor flow and opensource software library for numerical computation using data flow grants originally developed by researchers and engineers working on the goodwill brain team let's get an example from the tensor flow website and jeff dean senior fellow with gugel an email we were actually able to roll out at tensor flow model that the my understanding the context of the message it is perceived we concur predict migration live four from doug ac senior staff scientist can we use something like tents if well to make music to make art until out to communicate better with ajello a possibly the fastest growing segment of the tech scene in china by do introduced it's only i toolkit called paddle paddle i'm greg jarrett bloomberg business on wbz newsradio 1030 wbz news time is seven thirty eight of thirty degrees and scattered clouds and boston.

china tech company senior fellow senior staff scientist bloomberg artificial intelligence goodwill jeff dean greg jarrett boston thirty degrees
"staff scientist" Discussed on Warm Regards

Warm Regards

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"staff scientist" Discussed on Warm Regards

"This is former kearns dialogue linking climate scientists news majors journalists and other human on the front lines of climate change on mandy rabkin pro a senior reporter for climate recording today and calls for new york where it's been in the '70s for a very long time although i from one eric holds house told us so by via twitter the first game of the world series will be the hottestever than that high 90s la area when we're recording jacqueline gil are resident panel colleges is in kuwait and eric hold house our master meteorologist and grist blogger is to whose family so is just me today by i'm thrilled to be able to have a conversation with joe climbing a longtime department of interior staff scientist in see your poly policy analyst back in july clement stirred things up by filing a complaint and a whistle blower disclosure form with the office of special counsel at the interior department why not explained in the washington post on that very day he was one of about fifty senior department employees who received letters informing us informing them of involuntary reassignments as he said in his op ed citing the letter cited a need to quote improve talent development mission delivery and collaboration and he said the letter informed him that he was reassigned to an unrelated job in the accounting office that collects royalty checks from fossil fuel companies irony alert there's other news but i think we're going to focus on this because it's so extraordinary easing he has set in motion and so jal greetings and thank you for being with us i any thanks it's good to be on.

climate change reporter new york twitter world series kuwait staff scientist policy analyst clement special counsel washington post kearns eric jacqueline gil joe
"staff scientist" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"staff scientist" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The track at the store cohen says the plane usually flies at between forty one and forty five thousand feet to collect data usually in the middle of the ocean and heal the bay is warning people to avoid the water from the la river because of high levels of bacterial pollution staff scientists say water quality samples taken this week have the highest bacteria levels that they've ever seen and have been collecting weekly water quality samples from four sites in the support of the basin and a in val have the highest bacteria levels that they've ever seen been collecting weekly water quality samples from four sites in the supporter base in an elite valley since 2015 officials with heal the base it's likely due to a runoff from thunderstorms and also a fish kill in the bible a boulevard area of the basin former la county sheriff lee bacha is put off the started his threeyear prison term bacchus lawyers filed a lastminute appeal yesterday over whether bacher should be allowed to stay out on bail while he challenges his corruption convictions from earlier this year a local judge denied the bail request toy ace appeals court rejected a similar request last month bacha was found guilty earlier this year of interfering with a 2011 federal civil rights investigation of inmate abuse lapd inspector general's found a bunch of problems with the department's equipment room and cadet program policies they report is in risk bonds to seven cadets getting arrested in june for allegedly stealing three squad cars that resulted in two highspeed chases in crashes a reports cited various problems at how the lapd operates the room where squad car keys shotguns teachers and other equipment is stored among the problem cited was the only one officers assigned the kit room at any given time but that officer may also be assigned to other duties and can't always be onsite the anniversary of the.

cohen la river lee bacha lapd officer la county bacchus civil rights squad car forty five thousand feet threeyear
"staff scientist" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"staff scientist" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"And then a lot of other people there are astronomers so the astronomers will analyze the data and do cool science about exsoap planets her asteroids sir galaxies are brown dwarfs and they'll also the astronomers are also there to make sure that the data quality is very high and you do that by testing it and you know having different hypotheses your testing on it and playing with it a lot cool so i mean it's it's actual science that's being done along with some more technical stuff that's happening and you are a staff member at keltec aipac i think it's really cool when i get a chance to talk to people who went through traditional academia and still kind of have their foot in the academic waters but are good examples of the fact that you don't have to become a professor don't half do run a lab and do grant proposals all day and like that's not the only track if you find yourself you know doing the entire course of your academic career like you're on staff you'll staff scientist and it's really nice to be involved in the did it and that sort of sense it's a little bit low pressure because i don't have graduate students to support but if i want to some resumed i can get one yeah it's it's a really pleasant environment to work at yet because you're also again it's it's at an institution is it physically on the caltech campus it is we are hidden others to buildings and one of them is like hidden behind the gym it's like very kind of tucked out of the way which is nice we get nice parking and who had as good and is there any interplay with you and j p l because j pales an interesting.

professor staff scientist caltech
"staff scientist" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

02:12 min | 4 years ago

"staff scientist" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"I just today today was a really big day so i'm recording the super late at night um right at the end before i go to sleep this'll be airing on tuesday morning for your enjoyment now for this special episode i i actually had a chance to chat with an incredible scientist her name is dr carry nugent and she i keep calling her throughout the episode an asteroid all logist with that's not a real word she's actually an asteroid hunter and a staff scientist at i pack keltec and so what she does is hunt asteroid she looks for them she plots their path and she works on the framework that will help protect us if there is ever um a potential asteroid impact guys she has a book it's absolutely fascinating it's called asteroid hunters and i really recommend that you guys pick it up but you know what before we dive in two of my interview dr carry nugent i want to thank those of you who may talk nerdy possible this week like you do every week of this week on the patriarch import all remember you can visit that by going to pay drowned dot com slash talk nerdy the show is supported by filty bear timothy glover jeffrey peres ganji keen charles pay it jonathan right christian jeffrey stewart oak the honorable husband jae f gabrielle philippe ahead a meal gonzalez brian holden and last but not least jeffrey sewell and we also had some wonderful support this week from todd eriksson and rob shrek um they supported the show with a one time payment by visiting my website care santa maria dot com and clicking through to the pay pal portal and of course many of you supported the show this week by rating in reviewing on i tuned by sharing a talk nerdy with her friends family members and colleagues.

scientist nugent staff scientist charles jeffrey stewart oak brian holden todd eriksson timothy glover jeffrey peres jeffrey sewell
"staff scientist" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"staff scientist" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"They also indicate that active galactic nuclei radi most of their energy at we links that are not observable from the ground because the energy is absorbed by water vapour in earth's atmosphere sofia flies above ninety nine percent of the earth's water vapour enabling the research group to characterize the properties of the torah shaped dust structures at far infrared links lindsay fuller graduate student at the university of texas san antonio and lead author of the published paper says evening fear we were able to obama they really detail dr razor off for dis wavering allowing us to make new discoveries on the characterization of acting director mick right either tori future observations are necessary to determine whether or not all of the observed emission originates from the toray or if there is some other component adding to the total emission of the act eclectic nuclear in regain lopez rodriguez principal investigator of this project and universities space research association staff scientist at the sofia science centre said next our goal will be to use sofia to observe a smaller sample of active galactic nuclei and at longer wavelengths that will allow us to put tighter constraints on the physical structure of the dusty environment surrounding the active glock dick nuclear sofia is a boeing747 sp jetliner modified to carry it would hundred inch diameter telescope it is a joint project of nasa and the german aerospace center deal are nastase ames research center in california's silicon valley manages the sofia program science admission operations in cooperation with the university space research association headquartered in columbia maryland and the german sofia institute dea aside at the university of stupor the aircraft is based at nasr's armstrong flight research centers hangar seven o3 in pandeo health warning to learn more about sofia visit nasa dot gov slash sofia.

nasr armstrong german sofia institute german aerospace center lopez rodriguez mick acting director obama university of texas san antoni graduate student maryland california ames research center nasa sofia sofia science centre staff scientist principal investigator ninety nine percent hundred inch