35 Burst results for "Stack"

93: Find What Tickles the Soul - burst 03

How to Live A Fantastic Life

07:59 min | 5 d ago

93: Find What Tickles the Soul - burst 03

"I think a lot of I think a lot of the, you know, at a certain point, I think we reach a place where, you know, listen, I don't need any more character. Life can take it easy on me now. And so I think I had a lot of the grit again just rural Tennessee and especially rural Tennessee where I was, I mean, I wasn't in the absolute deep, deep, deep, deep, deep Woods, but in the 70s and Tennessee where I was out by Hendersonville and gallatin, not like it is today. There was not a whole lot around. So I had quite a bit of what we would call character building and grid just growing up in a single parent home. By the time I got to Los Angeles, the LA part was just trying to build a career in an exceedingly difficult profession where I didn't have I didn't have any nepotism. I didn't have anything, I didn't show up here with anything on my side for lack of a better phrase. Yeah. Well, national was a totally different city back then in the 70s than it is now. I mean now it's the home and hard of a lot of productions, both movies and radio and television. That was not happening way back then in the same way. Now it's Nash Vegas. First of all, it's the number one bachelorette weekend destination in the south. It's number one, even more so than Atlanta. And number two, I mean, yeah, my mother was a country singer, but there's a very famous train station Alan in Nashville called union station that actually country songs have been written about it. It's beautiful. They refurbished it. When I was in high school, it was boarded up in dilapidated. So yeah, you didn't go past, you didn't go past 20th or 21st street towards first street to downtown. When I was a kid or you were looking for trouble and that would be just past Vanderbilt. So it's a very different city now, yes. Yeah. As I say right now, I mean to Nashville and there are many areas that you would stay out of. I mean, it's a totally grown up city and it's safe. It's prosperous. It's really become uptown. Whereas it used to be a hole to begin with. You are correct. There were distinctly places you did not go. That is correct. And now it is. It's just, it's just blown up in the last 15, 20 years. Unbelievable. Yeah. For sure. So do you remember any stories along the way that you can tell the audience? About that journey? Several of them depends on which ones we can allow on air. No, I think we, when we tend to use the word journey, doctor leica, we, a lot of times, as a country that we're very result oriented and I respectfully understand that certainly as an athlete, your result oriented, taking tests where result oriented, and so when we look at journeys, sometimes we wind up just looking at the end of like, oh my gosh, that person is so and so they've gotten to it doesn't matter what industry it is. And so when I tend to look at some of those years, I tend to look back at some of the moments when I should have looked at myself and gone, what the hell are you doing? And one of the key ones for me would have been what I chose to go to Atlanta for two years. I won an event in New York. And I could have gone to New York, but similarly, New York back then, Manhattan back then is not the Manhattan you see today. I mean, people who have not seen Times Square from a perspective of the early 80s to where it is today, Times Square was a place after one or 2 o'clock in the morning, you would just get killed. And so I had been there and for this event and as a guy who grew up in the rural south and who also was a golfer, I didn't really see myself hanging out in Manhattan trying to haul my sticks on the subway somewhere to go play golf. So I chose Atlanta, but I also went to Atlanta with a very old car, $200 in my pocket, and the only person that knew I was coming was the gal who was to be my agent. So I had to I slept in my car for three days in this abandoned Sears parking lot. That is in really upscale Buckhead at the time. It was just this big abandoned building. And it was kind of downhill and there was behind the building thing and I thought, oh, that seems safe. And I literally slept in my car for three days, and then my agent had a client that was in the catering business. And she had a couple of kids that they had moved out. She was an empty nester. And she was kind of a whack a doodle. She might have been kind of a functioning alcoholic. She was funny. And she didn't live that far down peachtree. And I rented a room from her for $50 a week. For about 6 or 7 months and then one of her neighbors was a lawyer and he knew somebody who worked at this really fancy restaurant downtown and he helped get me a job. And once I had a job for 6 or 7 months, I had enough money to finally move out and get my own place. So that's the beginning of a journey right there. That is the beginning of a journey and how did you get motivated? A lot of things were stacked against you. You know, a lot of things, you know how many actors try and never meet their dreams. How did you stay motivated during that process? You know, that becomes the intriguing part about that question for me, which ironically, I've asked a number of people on my own myself. Is we get into the we go the direction in my opinion of nature versus nurture. And I'm someone who believes, I don't think that it's 50 50 personally as a guy who was almost a psychology double major. I do believe we're a little more nurture than we are in nature personally. I think our environment of how we grow up has a little bit longer lasting effect on us and maybe the nature part of us remains a little more a little more hidden, but not always. I think that the way I grew up with just a sister and a mother who was not home very much and was sort of a latchkey kid who learned a lot on his own and had to grow up pretty fast. I think there was just a nurtured part of me that quitting wasn't really in my vocabulary. I don't know if you want to put words to something like that such as stubborn or cocky or defiant or I don't know. It doesn't much really matter. Even just going to the event that I went to in New York that I won, we didn't have any money for me to go to that. I literally had to go around and raise the money to be able to even go on that trip and when I wanted and that's a trophy that sits right

Tennessee Hendersonville Gallatin Los Angeles LA Vegas Atlanta Nashville Alan Manhattan Times Square New York Vanderbilt Sears Golf
Britain: Russia wants to take Mariupol before Victory Day

AP News Radio

01:14 min | 2 weeks ago

Britain: Russia wants to take Mariupol before Victory Day

"They they they they were were were were suspended suspended suspended suspended three three three three police police police police process process process process trying trying trying trying to to to to gain gain gain gain full full full full control control control control of of of of my my my my are are are are you you you you pull pull pull pull before before before before it it it it mocks mocks mocks mocks Russian Russian Russian Russian victory victory victory victory day day day day local local local local municipal municipal municipal municipal workers workers workers workers sweep sweep sweep sweep the the the the streets streets streets streets are are are are you you you you cool cool cool cool as as as as heavy heavy heavy heavy machinery machinery machinery machinery this this this this is is is is where where where where the the the the problem problem problem problem caused caused caused caused by by by by recent recent recent recent heavy heavy heavy heavy festival festival festival festival Bodman Bodman Bodman Bodman to to to to the the the the Ukrainian Ukrainian Ukrainian Ukrainian port port port port cities cities cities cities the the the the clean clean clean clean up up up up operation operation operation operation took took took took place place place place in in in in the the the the city city city city center center center center even even even even as as as as he he he he cranium cranium cranium cranium prices prices prices prices hotel hotel hotel hotel to to to to cancel cancel cancel cancel some some some some trips trips trips trips in in in in the the the the cities cities cities cities overall overall overall overall I I I I still still still still plans plans plans plans the the the the rest rest rest rest of of of of the the the the city city city city is is is is now now now now under under under under Russian Russian Russian Russian control control control control of of of of one's one's one's one's here here here here named named named named Dennis Dennis Dennis Dennis told told told told a a a a pizza pizza pizza pizza unless unless unless unless the the the the effort effort effort effort was was was was to to to to tidy tidy tidy tidy up up up up the the the the city city city city ahead ahead ahead ahead of of of of Russia's Russia's Russia's Russia's victory victory victory victory day day day day will will will will help help help help with with with with this this this this humanitarian humanitarian humanitarian humanitarian mission mission mission mission to to to to restore restore restore restore parks parks parks parks and and and and monuments monuments monuments monuments ahead ahead ahead ahead of of of of me me me me the the the the night night night night citizens citizens citizens come come come all all all day day day Russian Russian Russian historian historian historian in in in the the the as as as an an an in in in says says says that that that many many many Russians Russians Russians are are are justifying justifying justifying Russia's Russia's Russia's invasion invasion invasion of of of Mar Mar Mar you you you pull pull pull and and and you you you crane crane crane that's that's that's something something something that that that needed needed needed to to to be be be done done done which which which is is is to to to get get get us us us there there there are are are those those those in in in the the the Russian Russian Russian federation federation federation he he he believes believes believes that that that the the the situation situation situation in in in Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine is is is a a a situation situation situation in in in which which which the the the Russian Russian Russian federation federation federation was was was full full full stack stack stack the the the way way way it it it was was was it it it was was was a a a defeat defeat defeat the the the nationalist nationalist nationalist islands islands islands that that that became became became the the the head head head of of of Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Britain's Britain's Britain's defense defense defense ministry ministry ministry believe believe believe a a a complete complete complete Russian Russian Russian takeover takeover takeover Mar Mar Mar you you you pull pull pull is is is linked linked linked to to to Putin's Putin's Putin's decide decide decide to to to have have have a a a symbolic symbolic symbolic success success success in in in Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine I'm I'm I'm Karen Karen Karen Thomas Thomas Thomas

Russia Bodman Bodman Bodman Bodman City City City City Center Cen Dennis Dennis Dennis Dennis Russian Russian Russian Federa Ukraine Islands Islands Islands Britain Defense Defense Defense Minist Putin Karen Karen Karen Thomas Thoma
The January 6 Commission Is a Staged Theatrical Production

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:57 min | 2 weeks ago

The January 6 Commission Is a Staged Theatrical Production

"Axios has an article, which is about the theater, the theatrical aspect of the January 6th hearings. Apparently the January 6th committee views these hearings as a not only a kind of propaganda demonstration to the country, but probably a way to advance the democratic prospects in the midterm election. And so what they're doing is they've been collecting all this information, apparently 900 depositions, a 102,000 documents. Wow. And so the idea is to sort of put it all on TV, of course they know the media is going to be there to cheering and jumping up and down. And the idea is to begin the hearings in June and sort of have the culmination of this, the report comes out later in the summer. Now, as you can imagine, our movie is a major inconvenience to all this, and I'm going to come back, come back to that to that. But they discuss in this article that their little worried that people are sort of not that interested in this committee in this report. Because I think, first of all, they know it's propaganda. It's a stacked report. It is going to ignore, and it doesn't even investigate questions like, what did Pelosi really know? What was the role of the FBI? How many FBI agents infiltrated these organizations and put them up to it? How many what did the FBI do to move this forward? Who let these people into the building? What kind of force did the police use and was in proportion? Don't expect to get any kind of a full or balanced picture at all. And I think what I find a little bit, well, not a little, very offensive about this idea of putting on a stage, putting on a performance, is that your trampling on people's lives and acting like this is a recruitment for a theatrical production.

FBI Pelosi
SCOTUS Leak: What We Learned About Chief Justice Roberts

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:50 min | 2 weeks ago

SCOTUS Leak: What We Learned About Chief Justice Roberts

"The Supreme Court's decision in the Dobbs case was evidently not due to be released for another two months. But a leaker somewhere in the court. And by the way, this could not have come from anywhere. There are very few people who know. Not only about the courts in their deliberations and the outcome, the kind of votes stack between on the decision 5 to four, but have a copy of the decision draft itself. The draft document, in this case, written by Alito. Now, let me explain why Alito, you might think, well, why not, why not justice Roberts? Well, the way these decisions work is that if the chief justice is in the majority, he typically writes the decision. So what this means is that the 5 four majority does not include Roberts. Now I'll talk about Robertson a minute because evidently Roberts has been reported. Again, I'm amazed this information is even coming out. That Roberts actually wanted to uphold the Mississippi law. So he wanted to find that past 15 weeks Mississippi could in fact outlaw abortion, but he did not want to overturn roe versus wade flat out. He didn't want to just return the matter to the states because remember, if you return the matter to the states, the state can pass a law, heartbeat bill that makes abortion illegal after 5 weeks. So after 6 weeks. So Robert seemed to be drawing the 15 week line of demarcation and saying that beyond that, you can regulate abortion, but before that maybe he was going to argue I say maybe because none of us have seen his dissenting decision, but apparently he was not dissenting flat out. He was in partial agreement with the majority, but he was not willing to go all the

Roberts Alito Dobbs Supreme Court Mississippi Robertson Wade Robert
Elon Musk and the Greatest Show on Earth With Darren Beattie

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:02 min | 3 weeks ago

Elon Musk and the Greatest Show on Earth With Darren Beattie

"Here is the great Darren beattie from revolver dot news if you are not supporting revolver news you should be. They're one of the few organizations that actually does journalism in our country revolver news. Darren, welcome back to the program. So great to be back. Thanks for having me. So Darren, there's a lot of different stories we can address here. But I do want to talk to you about the Elon Musk story. This is being met with enthusiasm from most base conservatives, populists, and nationalists, the maga types, if you will, the establishment Republicans seem to not love it or they're just kind of glossing their eyes over at it. Now, help us walk us through this because Elon is not necessarily team right. He's socially liberal on certain things. Pro China in other ways also the Neuralink stuff. We are not a big fan of. But you seem supportive of this and I am as well. Tell us why. Yes, I'm incredibly supportive for the simple reason that Twitter really is as Elon characterized as the global public square. And the question of who controls information flows on the global public square and whether or not there's free speech on the global public square is an existential one. It's existential from the point of view of the stakeholders in our regime, which I believe will do everything in their power possible to prevent this from happening. And it's also existential for us because if we're not able to have free speech at scale, we're never going to be able to have genuine political victories. And so I support this because even though probably a realistic and fair assessment would be the odds are stacked against Elon. Now he's already done an incredibly impressive job for how far he's taken it. But this is just the start. And so, you know, he's up against a lot. Maybe he won't succeed. I hope he will. If anyone can do it, he can't, but what's important is that this is the greatest show on

Darren Beattie Darren Elon China Twitter
Donald Trump Has to Be the Center of Election Integrity Debate

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:05 min | 2 months ago

Donald Trump Has to Be the Center of Election Integrity Debate

"I mean, Trump has a record four year record of accomplishments that we could stack up against any Democrat in the last 50 years. In this country. Greatest president of my lifetime and yours. And the left knows it. They know this Ukraine monstrosity wouldn't be happening with Trump at the helm. They know we wouldn't be paying $7 a gallon for gas. They know these things. But let me tell you why Trump needs to be the reminder, the poster boy for election integrity. If he stops beating that drum as Carol put it, here's the biggest fear we all have. The issue's going to go away. And they're going to do it again. If dissipates because nobody's talking about it again and believe me, they won't, then we may never win another election again in the history of the country. That's why he's got to stay the course.

Donald Trump Ukraine Carol
Sen. Ted Cruz: Putin Built Nord Stream 2 to Eventually Invade Ukraine

The Dan Bongino Show

01:46 min | 2 months ago

Sen. Ted Cruz: Putin Built Nord Stream 2 to Eventually Invade Ukraine

"Tragically a tragic at this point I mean the hilarity of the Biden's administration's their messaging campaign just never ends It's like a clown show They just got over a 6 month cycle of telling us why we need to stack the court and get rid of the filibuster because they're Jim Crow relics of racism Yet you put a bill out there to sanction Nord stream to which would have done significant damage to Putin's war machine and they literally Democrats filibuster your Bill using this quote racist tool and now that where's the media coverage of that center Nowhere Zero That is exactly right And if you look at for your listeners it's important to understand why Russia invaded Ukraine Ukraine used to be part of the Soviet Union Putin as long wanted to invade Ukraine because Putin wants to reassemble the old Soviet Union And he did invade Ukraine in 2014 invaded Crimea the southern portion of Ukraine but he stopped He didn't invade the entirety of the nation Why Because Russia's major source of revenue is exporting oil and gas in the natural gas goes on pipelines right through the middle of Ukraine And so Putin couldn't risk damaging that energy infrastructure because if he did if those were damaged or destroyed he couldn't get his gas to Europe The next year in 2015 Putin began building what's called Nord stream two and an undersea pipeline that goes directly from Russia to Germany It circumvents Ukraine It skips Ukraine altogether And the reason he started building Nord stream two was because if it was completed and turned on then he could invade Ukraine and not need to worry about the energy infrastructure because he could get his gas to Europe using Nord stream

Ukraine Putin Biden's Administration Soviet Union Jim Crow Crimea Europe Germany
'Yes, we need hands': Kitchen pops up in Ukraine's capital

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 2 months ago

'Yes, we need hands': Kitchen pops up in Ukraine's capital

"A makeshift field kitchen has popped up in Ukraine's capital Kiev a woman identified only as Oksana whose husband is fighting in Ukrainian army got word that they needed help in the kitchen I just lost the power of all the fact that a bottle she says I came and asked and they said yes we need a hand that's it and we are not sitting and reading terrifying messages on news channels the kitchen is in a tent village that sprung up between a multi story building and a barrier made of stacked tires and sandbags and William was simply because don't want here Alexei Shevchenko says we are cooking soup porridge for our military four civilians and for everyone who needs our help including hospitals volunteers chopped red peppers and boiled potatoes at the kitchens various stations men in camouflage uniforms inspected canned foods with messages scrawled on them in black marker one can read thank you darlings we pray for you god with us I'm a Donahue

Ukrainian Army Oksana Kiev Alexei Shevchenko Ukraine William
Lee Smith: People Are Searching for the Truth on Social Media

The Dan Bongino Show

01:07 min | 2 months ago

Lee Smith: People Are Searching for the Truth on Social Media

"One of the things that we've learned from social media as rotten as much of it is but then you and I saw even on an assessed pool like Twitter how many Americans there who are searching for the truth they want real information and also they provide it I mean you and I can go through a litany of all the rush to get people that we learn from I mean it's just great But right now the American people need information And look even if that's doing something like reading Kremlin websites to find out what's going on Right Yes Reading RT or creme Kremlin website as God's truth But to continue to collect information and to understand what's going on But again they've used this as an opportunity our own officials are our own big tech oligarchs right Americans have used this as another opportunity to shut down communications I'm so I should say I should say thank God for thank God for rumble And thank God for thank God for the social media platforms that are so stacked And

Twitter
Caught on Tape! John Solomon Describes 2020 Election Ballot Box Stuffing

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:14 min | 3 months ago

Caught on Tape! John Solomon Describes 2020 Election Ballot Box Stuffing

"So John, I want to also ask you, you guys have done a great job covering this at just the news dot com. Also this there's a new movie that's coming out with dinesh de Souza 2000 meals and you've been involved in helping cover this and helping publicize this. Tell us about what we think might be in this movie. I don't want to try to tip the hand too much. I'm actually going to be with dinesh tomorrow. I'm going to see the footage myself. Tell us about it. Yeah, so there is a complaint pending in the state of Georgia before Georgia Secretary of State Brad raffensperger. He says the information is credible and deserves to be investigated. That complaint alleges, it comes from true the vote, an election expert a conservative election expert named Katherine engelbrecht. They obtained the video footage for all those dropboxes that were distributed for the first time in the 2020 election. Before 2020, we didn't use dropboxes deliver votes. But they put all these boxes out and often unsecure areas. And the only thing we had for protection was video surveillance cameras. Katherine's group went and got those video surveillance camera. And what they show, what they appear to show is people walking into the dead of night. When I mean the dead of night, I mean, midnight to 5 a.m. dropping in large stacks of ballots into the ballot boxes. Why is that a problem? It looks like ballot box stuffing is what we would have called it in the old days of tammany home. Well, in 2021, it's called harvesting. You are not allowed under Georgia law or Arizona law, Wisconsin law, Michigan law, to gather other people's ballots and deliver them for them. The person themselves has to go and deliver it. The only exception is for your immediate family. You can take your wife or your children to their ballots with you when you go. Any stranger, it's illegal. It's called harvesting in Arizona that begun prosecuting people for this. Well, these videos show what appeared to be harvesting, but Catherine's group went further. They went and got one of the people who participated in this scheme to admit he did it and described the large network of people 242 people were told that he described who participated this in Georgia both during the general election where Joe Biden allegedly defeated Donald Trump and then in the runoff where the Democrats won the two seats in captured the United States Senate, that there were 242 people making regular trips delivering these

Dinesh De Souza Secretary Of State Brad Raffen Georgia Katherine Engelbrecht Dinesh John Katherine Arizona Wisconsin Michigan Catherine Joe Biden Donald Trump Senate United States
Rep. Andy Biggs Proposes Path to Fight Campaign Ad Censorship

The Dan Bongino Show

01:53 min | 4 months ago

Rep. Andy Biggs Proposes Path to Fight Campaign Ad Censorship

"But one of the things that worries me most about big tech I was talking to another congressman the other day former they'll leave his name out of it And he was telling me that his campaign ads used to be censored by both Google Facebook and YouTube that he would get denial You can't run this idea and they weren't controversial ends at all Congressman the guy I was talking to some pretty mainstream guy And I said to him how is that not an FEC violent We have the federal elections commission designed to give us fair and free elections right It's supposed to be conserving again freedom and fairness in elections And yet you have Republicans who can't run ads due to what Facebook says and in Democrats seem to get free reign I mean we do have tools to fight this stuff No yeah we do And we certainly we should be using it Maybe you do have an SEC violation But the problem and you identify just a second ago is the FTC Federal Trade Commission the FTC federal elections commission these folks that get stacked with and they're not regular Democrats These are the less spring Democrats that hate that the professor tolerance but they're so intolerant to us And so I'll tell you there is a way to do this So it's the antitrust law to fix it You do the amendment that the ambition and I worked on a few months back And you take it out of the FTC's head and you take it so there's a cause of action right to the courts itself without having to go through the FTC first And if you do that you're in a full on litigation mode And that's going to be a lot cleaner a lot more transparent It's going to be you're not going to have bureaucrats getting in the way and intervening this I mean there's ways to get at this But it is censorship I mean there's no other way

FEC Ftc Federal Trade Commission Ftc Federal Elections Commissi Facebook Youtube Google SEC FTC
Christian Toto: Hollywood Creatives Are Being Left out Simply for Being White Males

The Dan Bongino Show

01:58 min | 4 months ago

Christian Toto: Hollywood Creatives Are Being Left out Simply for Being White Males

"You know I read a piece this weekend I think you cited it on your social media feed or was it this weekend or less But I think it was by Barry Weiss on her sub stack but it was a different author And the gist of the piece was that this isn't just about actors you know Christian you and I think Hollywood like you say you think Scarlett Johansson and Brad Pitt and all these famous actors that's actually a very small sliver of Hollywood You got gaffers lighting people foley artists sound engineers I mean not all these people are died in the world liberals Matter of fact a lot of them believe in liberty and freedom like we do And the gist of the piece was that these writers and script writers that they're being subjected to these de facto racial quotas and you've got a bunch of middle aged basically white men who've done nothing wrong of dedicated themselves to the crap submitting scripts and stuff and being told straight out Christian they're not hiding it Hey sorry man We've got to hit some kind of quota for black minority LGBT or artists and writers and you're not it I mean that's the textbook definition of discrimination right there It is it's a great article I recommend everyone check it out to Barry Weiss's subsect page And I have some of that in my book as well I've also recently spoken to a comedian he's a straight white comedian very funny fellow and he played me an audio clip that he saved from one of his agents or reps basically saying you're a white male I can't do anything for you I'm so sorry It's happening It's real And part of this is Hollywood has done a terrible job of being diverse in the past I think the shame they have is real And they should have some guilt But this is a massive overcorrection It should be about the artistry and gifts and talents of the creators not the skin color So let everyone on board Any minority any group if you've got a great story a screenplay you're a great actor We want you That's what it should be Not this we've got to overcorrect and just an absurd way That's

Barry Weiss Hollywood Scarlett Johansson Brad Pitt Foley
Oath Keepers head charged with Jan. 6 seditious conspiracy

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 4 months ago

Oath Keepers head charged with Jan. 6 seditious conspiracy

"The the leader leader of of the the far far right right oath oath keepers keepers has has been been arrested arrested in in connection connection with with the the capital capital right right Stewart Stewart Rhodes Rhodes and and ten ten others others are are the the first first to to be be charged charged with with seditious seditious conspiracy conspiracy by by the the justice justice department department in in the the investigation investigation Rhodes Rhodes was was not not in in the the capitol capitol building building on on January January sixth sixth last last year year but but is is accused accused of of helping helping to to put put in in motion motion the the violence violence that that disrupted disrupted the the certification certification of of the the presidential presidential vote vote the the indictment indictment alleges alleges oath oath keepers keepers acted acted like like they they were were going going to to war war forming forming two two teams teams or or stacks stacks that that entered entered the the capitol capitol one one went went to to the the house house the the other other to to the the Senate Senate road road has has said said in in interviews interviews there there was was no no plan plan to to storm storm the the capitol capitol and and anyone anyone that that did did went went rogue rogue at at Donahue Donahue Washington Washington

Stewart Stewart Rhodes Rhodes Justice Justice Department Dep Rhodes Rhodes Capitol Capitol Building Build Capitol Capitol House House Senate Senate Donahue Donahue Washington Was
Pancakes And Sausage  (MM #3945)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 4 months ago

Pancakes And Sausage (MM #3945)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. For some odd reason I have been craving pancakes and sausage for about three or four months now. Now I know I can make pancakes and we've actually had pancakes at least once or twice, but it hasn't covered the craving, and I don't know if that means I'm really not craving pancakes and sausage, but I'm craving something else. There aren't a lot of places to go out and get pancakes here in Nashville we do have the famed pancake pantry. Now with two locations here in Nashville, but those are just big old fancy pancakes that aren't that good. They're not that filling. I don't know what I'm looking for. I don't know what I want. We have IHOP and I'll be the first to admit I hop today. There's nowhere near what it was back when they were the international House of pancakes. But for some reason, just a stack of pancakes, okay more than a stack, maybe a couple of stacks of pancakes. And some sausage. That's what I want. I think it's just the experience of what it was like to go out and have a big old Saturday breakfast filled with pancakes and sausage and everything that came with it. Yeah, that's really what I'm craving because those were good memories and their old memories because I can't eat like that anymore. I probably shouldn't eat like that, even if I tried. Pancakes and sausage sound real good right now. I just don't know what to do.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Ihop Nashville Nasa
Pancakes And Sausage  (MM #3945)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 4 months ago

Pancakes And Sausage (MM #3945)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. For some odd reason I have been craving pancakes and sausage for about three or four months now. Now I know I can make pancakes and we've actually had pancakes at least once or twice, but it hasn't covered the craving, and I don't know if that means I'm really not craving pancakes and sausage, but I'm craving something else. There aren't a lot of places to go out and get pancakes here in Nashville we do have the famed pancake pantry. Now with two locations here in Nashville, but those are just big old fancy pancakes that aren't that good. They're not that filling. I don't know what I'm looking for. I don't know what I want. We have IHOP and I'll be the first to admit I hop today. There's nowhere near what it was back when they were the international House of pancakes. But for some reason, just a stack of pancakes, okay more than a stack, maybe a couple of stacks of pancakes. And some sausage. That's what I want. I think it's just the experience of what it was like to go out and have a big old Saturday breakfast filled with pancakes and sausage and everything that came with it. Yeah, that's really what I'm craving because those were good memories and their old memories because I can't eat like that anymore. I probably shouldn't eat like that, even if I tried. Pancakes and sausage sound real good right now. I just don't know what to do.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Ihop Nashville Nasa
Pancakes And Sausage  (MM #3945)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 4 months ago

Pancakes And Sausage (MM #3945)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. For some odd reason I have been craving pancakes and sausage for about three or four months now. Now I know I can make pancakes and we've actually had pancakes at least once or twice, but it hasn't covered the craving, and I don't know if that means I'm really not craving pancakes and sausage, but I'm craving something else. There aren't a lot of places to go out and get pancakes here in Nashville we do have the famed pancake pantry. Now with two locations here in Nashville, but those are just big old fancy pancakes that aren't that good. They're not that filling. I don't know what I'm looking for. I don't know what I want. We have IHOP and I'll be the first to admit I hop today. There's nowhere near what it was back when they were the international House of pancakes. But for some reason, just a stack of pancakes, okay more than a stack, maybe a couple of stacks of pancakes. And some sausage. That's what I want. I think it's just the experience of what it was like to go out and have a big old Saturday breakfast filled with pancakes and sausage and everything that came with it. Yeah, that's really what I'm craving because those were good memories and their old memories because I can't eat like that anymore. I probably shouldn't eat like that, even if I tried. Pancakes and sausage sound real good right now. I just don't know what to do.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Ihop Nashville Nasa
Pastor Luke Barnett Describes the Dream City Church Fasting Challenge

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:43 min | 4 months ago

Pastor Luke Barnett Describes the Dream City Church Fasting Challenge

"Tell us about it. Okay, so we challenged our church at the beginning of the year to from every Tuesday to Wednesday. It's called the John Wesley fast. It was the longest. It's the fast that held the longest revival in history. And so it's a 24 hour fast. And what we've asked our people starting today at lunch, eat breakfast, eat lunch, then after lunch, don't eat dinner tonight or breakfast tomorrow morning, but pick up eating again at lunchtime tomorrow. It's 24 hour fast, but just two meals. And that was the John Wesley fast. And then come tomorrow night for our midweek church experience where we are going to. We've gathered hundreds, thousands of prayer requests for people who need breakthrough in some area of their life. Maybe they need healing for their body. Maybe they need a financial breakthrough for their business. Maybe their kids are far from God and they're praying for their kids to come back home. But they're going to have thousands of per request. So we're going to meet here at 6 30 tomorrow night. You're all invited to come and be part of this. And for 15 minutes, we're going to sing some songs of worship. Then we're going to teach you for 15 minutes. What prayer is, how to pray. A principles are prayer. And then we're going to turn the playlist on and hundreds of people are going to just walk around the auditorium here and pick up these prayer cards and be in stacks of three or four. And you're going to pray for other people's kids who need the lord. Other people who need healing for their body. You're going to pray for them. They call their names on just saying, would you touch their lives? And hundreds of people are going to be doing this to the people and their prayer request. And by the way, if you need a protocol, please don't leave tonight. If you need in your life, feel all those cars. We'll pray for you tomorrow night as well. But so we're

John Wesley Midweek Church
'American Marxism' Is Back on the New York Times Best-Sellers

Mark Levin

01:49 min | 5 months ago

'American Marxism' Is Back on the New York Times Best-Sellers

"Amazon is helping you drive the New York slime's nuts And all you're doing Is buying copies of American Marxism on Amazon at 50% of $14 In such large numbers we're back on The New York Times list Now here's the dirty little secret The New York Times list is crooked Every position I've had on that list I've had to fight like hell for Number one ten weeks in a row wasn't even close Then they start to work you down the list then they knock you off the list So out of 20 weeks I've been on the list now 18 weeks On one week off one week on one week off one week Because they say they wait the sales So if you buy from an independent bookstore they waited heavier than it if you buy it from Amazon Why Well how many of these creepy little nerds do you see in these independent stories Who do you think runs not all of them Some of them In and around Manhattan Right These guys at where these corduroy jackets these taxi driver hats old taxi driver hats and don't shower for four days Those guys as they sit you know in the with the book stacks reading one book and an after another because the cheap then they buy one and go oh I bought one Okay And then there's regular Americans like you You go online you go to a major store Barnes and noble or Walmart or whatever you buy a book because you're there They count you less just so you know They count you less So it's all again so to wait it toward the left and where they shop All right so we have to sell an overwhelming number in order to be number one for two and a half months That is Mark What's this I just thought you'd be interested in knowing about it

Amazon The New York Times New York Manhattan Barnes Walmart Mark
"stack" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

04:31 min | 9 months ago

"stack" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"At jobs in all the images and stories. That are coming out of. Afghanistan are not only shocking. There've been taking by local african journalists and photographers. Many of whom are currently risking their lives and have been doing so for the last few months. One of them is the photo journalist. Masoud saini born in afghanistan masud has been chief photographer at the associated. Press and a photojournalist at funds oppress his won the pulitzer prize for his work in the country and a couple of days ago he and his colleague. Lena donna were in afghanistan covering the taliban takeover of the country fearing for their safety they flew out of kabul last sunday just hours before militants entered the african capco. He's safe in the netherlands. Now and he spoke to monaco's emma nelson who spoke to he. Now new show the globalist earlier in the week. Let's welcome to monaco. twenty four. it is good to know that you are alive and well and safe. Just tell us what happened to you. Well unfortunately i am experienced immediate trustful week when i was in kabul awhile before that we were Me and my colleague over covering Herald war and I so i feel that the war was really really a clothing to people. Our life and the government was completely disabled and already was broken and failed from inside. They couldn't fight and resist with taliban and we were witnessing a lot. And a lot of the things. And when i get back to kabul i and my colleague. We both decided to leave afghanistan soon as possible so we booked a flight and while in the night before our flight Kind of takeoff Taxes talked at around kabul. And i unfortunately because the government of any was really unprofessional and ignorant team in the palace so on weekday never listened to any people any community and inked weist and we were just insisting that the palace but again i need needs to reorganized akeem and pro now employ professional people not people who are relatives or friends or whatever but unfortunately they didn't listen and Taleban before that they take over the cities they were. They won the propaganda war and myself as the personal and as a citizen. I tried my best to duet but unfortunately when heroic and other cities fault and the day the night before that we wanted to less leave afghanistan so propaganda work against talk at at a around two. Am and then a read a news and every information which was attacking to the social media in afghanistan was so disappointing and I i could hear a boom being around kabul as well that night so early morning i decided to drive to Airport and to the in the way that was no police are tall. And there was no government. Security forces or anything related to government can could be seen in the street. So i i realized that the kabul already are fall has fallen and i kind of was under Really really stressed when we got to the airport. Eight airport was a mess. You know a lot of foreigners a lot of people who had the ticket Wanted to leave and it was a lot of nerve and the angry people around and when we live than when we stand our passport and got into the turkish plane and then when we took off it was a really hard emotional moment for me..

kabul afghanistan Masoud saini masud Lena donna Taleban emma nelson monaco pulitzer prize weist akeem Afghanistan the netherlands
"stack" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

04:13 min | 9 months ago

"stack" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"The stack. Thirty minutes of print industry analysis. And i am fitting was to questionable foreign observers of brazilian politics. Maybe surprised at the profusion of arabic surnames. Among the nation's leaders from leftist dodge to former president michel temer they have played a big role on the national stage. Why in the past twenty five years. Sao paulo brazil's largest city has had three mayors of a rabbit descent experts estimate that between seven and ten million lebanese people emigrated to brazil in the twentieth century. A number greater than lebanon's current population and new book by the journalist and writer job to bruce immigra- associated lebron is and but as you look at their stores as king why lebanese brazilians have done so well in fields such as politics. Here is my chat with job. That was always interested in the middle east. In general i was always interested into. He's trees of the waste. I did a master's in arab studies. When i was giving in spain that ended another one here in the us. I studied arabic have been studying arabic for more than ten years. Worked as correspondent in jerusalem for awhile evening baru in cairo. So i had a connection with the region but then concerning the book started could realizing who said we have so many people. Don't follow we. Have you know. The former mayor of paulo for another dodge was the son of lebanese migrants. The same thing and other mayors you. Benfica saab is also descendant. We have another mayor bottle. Model was also the senate we head. Of course. the president michel.

michel temer bruce immigra associated lebron brazil Sao paulo dodge lebanon middle east spain cairo jerusalem Benfica saab paulo us senate president michel
"stack" Discussed on Stack Attack Podcast

Stack Attack Podcast

01:52 min | 11 months ago

"stack" Discussed on Stack Attack Podcast

"Welcome to stack attack the pi public library services podcast on books culture and everything related to the world of libraries. A in june two thousand nine canada's house of commons voted to declare the month of june as national indigenous history month a time for canadians to celebrate honor the history and diversity of the country's indigenous community this past.

"stack" Discussed on Stack Attack Podcast

Stack Attack Podcast

01:52 min | 11 months ago

"stack" Discussed on Stack Attack Podcast

"Welcome to stack attack the pi public library services podcast on books culture and everything related to the world of libraries. A in june two thousand nine canada's house of commons voted to declare the month of june as national indigenous history month a time for canadians to celebrate honor the history and diversity of the country's indigenous community this past.

"stack" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

Full Stack Radio

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"stack" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

"Reason that we're chatting today is because you guys just put out hot wire which is like a set of tools for building sort of modern <hes>. Web applications as sort of the base camp way which is of course always contrarian and in some way shape or form and i know i had messaged you <hes>. Way back in the spring asking for the exclusive podcast interview on this tech and it finally dropped. I think like maybe the the week of christmas or the week before christmas. I'm super excited to get chance to chat about it now. I am super excited to finally have it out there. We i originally intended that we premier <unk>. Rails confidence spring. And then i mean all hell broke loose this year <hes> pandemic so the conference didn't happen and then we've released. Hey our new email service and then the million other things and then it wasn't really until coming out from under all of that to some extent that we were looking at like. Oh shit we should get this stuff ready and a lot of it really was just hearing from people not happy with how the developing apps and constantly asking you showed the stack used for. Hey which was. Just boring tech really <hes>. Plus a few things that weren't released so the release stuff and i think that was really just a motivating factor to get this. Find the out there that i'd hate for someone to embark on a new interesting app and either break their neck trying because they just couldn't get to work. I mean there's so many ideas and so many teams an initiative set of really fragile in the beginning. Where you don't need that much pushback from your main you technology before you realize i dunno. We'll do it two months. I'll push later. And if hot wires anything it's hopefully a way to have less of that have more of an experience of actually. I could do it. I could do it by myself. I can get something out there in very much. The spirit of how we originally created basecamp back in two thousand and three were. I asked the sole technical person built the whole thing. And i was thinking there were not a lot of environments where that was feasible within the amount of time with the team we had into fourth. And i've just to some ways. I've gotten frozen in that moment. To the extent of wanting to believe that it is possible to bill base camp again. If we have to with the team we had but that requires a constant fight with the complex sophistication of all the stuff that we call web development and pushing back on it and try to find new areas of conceptual compression because it's so easy to get lost in the path passed on just dalkia or everything was better in the old days. It wasn't. I mean a lot of things shit and we had to deal with so much crap when it came to development and so many things were harder so not that the past was just uniformly better. It's that there there. There was something there we can get back to <hes>. If we continue to do the work if we continue to apply these conceptual compressions where retake things that are hard but needlessly. So right i mean there's there these intrinsic complexities of making good software for the web. Did you not going to get around. But there's also just a whole lot of stuff that is needlessly complicated that isn't benefiting users to any measurable degree and isn't benefiting developers to any degree at all. Yes so that was the mission.

"stack" Discussed on Stack Attack Podcast

Stack Attack Podcast

10:42 min | 1 year ago

"stack" Discussed on Stack Attack Podcast

"Welcome to stack attack the pi public library services. Podcast on books. Call -ture and everything related to the world of libraries. My name is grace. And i'll be your host for today's episode a certain anticipation that december brings. The snow starts to fall holiday. Carol start blasting on the radio and let's not forget about that whole hallmark christmas movie phenomenon. Well christmas might look a little different this year. Due to the pandemic nothing can change our collective love of holiday. Traditions reminiscent past memories and enjoying the overall of magic but the season brings in order to help celebrate this year..

"stack" Discussed on Stack Attack Podcast

Stack Attack Podcast

06:23 min | 1 year ago

"stack" Discussed on Stack Attack Podcast

"Welcome to stack attack the pi public library services. Podcast on books. Call -ture and everything related to the world of libraries mining miss greece. And i'll be your host for today's episode halloween for some islanders october. Thirty first is their favorite time.

"stack" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

Full Stack Radio

07:00 min | 1 year ago

"stack" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

"What's up with tail you guys I've been crazy busy lately and I guess like we've released the tailwind playground since the last one I think we. . Got To see it early which, , yeah perked perks of the CO host position. . Yeah. . So we put that out, , that was like our big kind of release for the last kind of cycle of work and <hes> dot got a crazy ton of attention which is cool and <hes>. . People are making stuff with it like I'll one on a pull up the old database here and we can see. . How many things are in there? ? <hes>. . There are. . Two thousand, nine, , , hundred, , and sixty nine playgrounds, , which doesn't sound like a lot but we don't allow duplicates to be stored in the database. So . if someone tries to save like something someone else's already made or they try to save the demo, , it'll um it'll not store like a new crash. . So sure those are all unique which is kind of cool and actually a lot when you think about it <hes>. . Yeah. . And <hes> people seem to be liking a lot. . We haven't done a good job of like linking to from the dockside or anything you. . Get on eventually. . Yeah. . But <hes>. . Yeah. . It's pretty sweet <hes> it's really slick I. . Love. . The intelligence integration is huge. . I. . Think that sets it apart from every other used browser. . Yeah the live updating as you like hit up and down through the auto complete you don't even have to like hit enter to see like the change in color or padding whatever lets you just like like designing in the browser with your Arrow keys basically. . Yeah. . It's Fan. . I like the experience you get that crow to the class panel but like best because it's in the right order and And it's only 'til you know. . Yeah. . Yeah. . It's pretty good. . Pretty good. . So Great Job Team Now we this last week we started working on like our next work psycho, , which is basically. . Released when to that's like the big thing so I haven't working on all things related to that. . Of course, , I underestimated how work it would be just to like. . You know when you're hitting a breaking release, , there's so much like <hes>. . My sure. . That's every tiny little thing that I want to change because this is like my only chance to make a couple of little change is. . What it's like. . You're making A, , we're not making many changes really <hes> <hes>. . No class names are changing at all I. . Don't think except for the we changed like call gap to gap acts in roh-gap to gap Y, , but we already changed like before two point. . Oh. . But we just have brushed shipping both versions for awhile but not documenting the old ones so I don't think that's Going to be like a racing change for most people, , and it's like super define replace to change that one. . We're not changing any other class names <hes>. . So the only other breaking changes are super minor. It's . like <hes> in your configure file. . You know how you could set like a default border color by saying like default and then the color that sort of thing it. . Anyplace in the configured where we were using defaults to be like a special word that meant something like it meant like don't add a suffix to the class name. . We've replaced that with default in all caps so that it stands out and. . Johnston. . And we did it because there's some utilities where you actually want use the word default. . So like we already have class called cursor default, , for example, , that sets like the cursor to D- phones, , defaults of real value for that. . So was kind of weird that default meant different things depending on like the yeah. . <hes>. . So this felt like worth it because it's just like a go through and opera case a couple of things and most people probably won't have to do anything because. . It's surprisingly. . Like it's surprising how few people actually customize like the FIG A lot. . You know it's just me. . Yeah. . Most of the changes just like being changed automatically in the default can fig. . So if you haven't over ridden them, , you won't even change it anyways <hes>. . Let me see what other stuff we we do in here open the very, , very logical breaking change for like two data. . Yeah. . It just makes it a little bit better. . And more predictable. . I we dropped I e eleven support. . Actually that's like the biggest breaking. . Jane? ? I applaud that yes, , it's not even a breaking change in the way that. . It's a breaking change, , but it's like. . Not. . Like Oh, , now I have to do a bunch of work to upgrade to tell him to buy. . No it's like you either can upgrade and it takes no work or you can't upgrade right right or you can <hes> pitch in and build the I guess it wouldn't be Apollo but like a preset, , right? ? Yeah. . Yeah. . So I've toyed with this idea that you can totally like this precepts feature until. When . now where you can say like instead of extending the tailwind defaults extend like my own defaults and because of how like plug into the tail and stuff is you can actually take like one of our utilities that doesn't work in I eleven like transform stuff is designed in an eleven incompatible way. . You could literally just like disable those Plug Ins as part of your preset and include your own plug ins. . Eleven scale I eleven rotate I eleven translate. . That are less powerful but actually work in eleven sort of doing nothing, , which is what are currently do right. . And those could still read from like the same theme keys and stuff you know. . So you wouldn't have to you basically just be like ripping out the core plug in swapping in a poly fil instead, , and if someone just builds maintains it in, , you know it's like transparent to the end user. . So Gotcha, , we might do that or I might just say someone else do that. . If you care <hes> because I don't care about my own sites. . In smaller too because like we used to ship. . For every color utility, , we have to convert the colors to RGB as we can have a variable portion for the Passi because we use CSS variables to let you get changed the opacity on color but because that doesn't work nine eleven, , we ship the HEX code directly behind him as a fallback and. . The colors like the biggest part of the whole build. . So all of it, , every single color had an extra declaration and even with perch CSS, , it would keep it because purchase that's only deletes the whole class. It . doesn't like delete parts of the class you know what I mean. . Sure. . Yeah. . So now it'll be even smaller in that regard although it's bigger in other ways because we're adding things to it. . I A couple of extra cutler, , a couple of a couple of that. . We're actually being less colors. . So Oh, , you've extract you're you're extracting them and making them opt in right <hes>. . So that's what we've done. . The new defaults are. . Gray. . Red Yellow Green Blue Purple and pink,

Florida Adam Chris
"stack" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

Full Stack Radio

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"stack" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

"We are working on static three <hes>. . We announced it I think I was six. . I was I just learned to ride a two wheel like and I said. . Virgin threes, , coming. . In fast forward. . Thirty one years here. . I am <hes>. . It's how it feels as I mean at the at the one inch <hes> yard line. . That's not doesn't make sense at the one yard line fourth and inches ready to I don't even watch a Lotta sports why using sports as a metaphor we're almost done and <hes> every every Monday. It's . like, , all right. . We're GonNa Watch on Wednesday and then on Wednesday that close throat like probably, , Monday? ? Yeah we're that close like we are so close that maybe Maybe, , before this episode is live were launched. . Nice. . So you don't know what is the current status like the today is Monday three, ten , pm eastern time yes. . Is this a we're launching on Wednesday moment right now? ? No, no, , , no, , no, , no, , no, , no no. . So on Friday I thought it was this next coming Wednesday, , and then at four thirty, , I found a section of the site that had been completely missed by my redesign and. . Now. . It's not just like it's not a lipstick page. . It's like it's like a whole you X. thing. . So I, , have to spend a couple of days to work through that and <hes> when it affects the ability to buy something. . Yeah. So . it's bringing me next week pregnant next week early next week that seems like a good time to launch something. . Yeah. . Early next week sounds good I mean unless unless I like fall into a bucket adderall or something I think the only just GonNa take some more time. . Yeah. . Well. . That's cool I. . Hope you get it out then because that'll make for for some interesting podcast fodder for sure. . So I guess like, , got us this page that you discovered on Friday what else is kind of in the <hes>. . In the Tornado of launch. . Launch Madness. . So I mean there's there's a lot going into the relaunch. . So it's Not just version bumper you click upgrade you know. . We're changing the business model a little bit. . The pricing structure is different. . We're going like full open source. . We have a free version that you can use for whatever okay you want what's the pricing difference? ? I'm always always loved to talk about pricing. . So let's talk about it because it's it's too late to do anything about it. . We already announced it. . So here it is. . What is it now like? ? Yeah. . So right. . Now as of August tenth at three twelve pm, , it is a one, , hundred, , ninety, , nine bucks one time <hes> for the life of the line. . To like however long US v two. . That's what it costs <hes>. . We have a free trial. . You can use it like in Dev or for staging sites, , but to launch site on ninety nine, , that's it <hes>. . There's no other that's it <hes>. . So with V three, , we are kind of going both directions. So . we are pushing the price up to two fifty nine and we're adding an annual renewal that gives you support and updates. . So that's fifty nine bucks a year. . Per site, , but we also have the free open source version for like Solo like hobby projects, , personal site. . So like a lot of people that are like Oh God I don't WanNa spend another fifty nine even more while probably don't have to pay anything for that site and it's gone really The sites that are higher of importance or have clients have teams working on them like what's the difference between one ninety, , nine to fifty, , nine, , Yup. . That makes sense to me. . So. . What's the difference in the Free Model? ? So currently, , it's like free in development, , right? ? So like running on local host, your , building the site, you , don't need a license to do that. . But what is like the heuristic now for like you have to pay the two fifty nine People can use it for like what does it mean to use it? ? For quote unquote small sites or whatever. . Yes. . So we have like in the code, , we lock out some features. . So you get one super user account. . You can't have multiple users. . So you don't have permissions you don't have user groups you don't have all that stuff <hes>. . You don't have some of the more workflow team based features like revisions like <hes> you have different versions of content. . So you can like you know schedule and publish you know like yet. . So this version it's you've just had selective about trying to differentiate between like. . kind of simple and sophisticated customers sort of choose. . Things. . Sophisticated people with budgets need that other people don't need. . Those real time collaboration not that useful when you only have one user count, , right? ? Yeah I would just. . Turn that off <hes> also the get integration in the control panel so the assumption would be. . <hes> that if you're a solo person, you're , probably the developer right? ? Because if you only have one person on project, , you should be able to code. . and. . So you don't need to control panel get stuff. . So that will also be a pro pro feature.

Jack mcdade Jack Dato Jack Lezak Jackie
"stack" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

Full Stack Radio

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"stack" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

"Thing that you said about the test, we verifying the behavior system is totally true if you number one have well, if you have perfect coverage to the system. And that doesn't mean just line wise coverage because executing every line isn't sufficient. It doesn't mean even path coverage path coverage means like let's say you have a function with two with a conditional with two sides and an els, and then after that on related to the second conditional with two sides, you have four paths to that function because you can take either side of the first conditional on either side of the second. So. Even covering all the paths isn't sufficient because the data might vary in weird ways that 'cause you might, for example, <hes>, you never thought to test for when some arrays empty and you're indexing until you're getting an undefined out your test never tested that. So the thing about. <hes>. Let's throw away the integer versus strength and just think about like you have a function that takes a supposedly takes a string. and. You didn't think about what happens if it's undefined. Well, maybe you never pass undefined that function, but maybe you pass something that was indexed out of an array to a, and if that array was emptier, didn't contain that index, you're going to get an undefined and this is like at least in dynamic languages. This is one of the most common and annoying sources of bugs is whatever kind of knowles your language has and they show up. Yeah Yeah. Exactly. And these languages tend to have very lax with with somewhat an exception of Python. They have very lax handling of knowles. So like indexing ray with an unexpected index gives you all in undefined, her nail or whatever. It's called same thing with Hashes objects. So. One of the big benefits of a static type system. As you can say, this function takes a string and under no conditions will allow you to pass an undefined into their. except. Took mentioned, the type script was designed under severe constraints. Actually, type script does have this problem because of the type of indexing array is the type of the array. It is not union with undefined. So. This is not the greatest example, but there are lots of sort of other situations like this objects are a better example. Cause type stripped will prevent you from. Accessing a property that doesn't exist on an object and getting an unexpected undefined, and then passing that down into a function that never expected the undefined, all of that kind of weird. Stuff. This kind of weird bugs that can only occur due to run time. Data. A lot of them go away, not all of them and you know the language determines how many if you're programming Idris like really, you get pretty close to all them going away if you programming in type script like. It probably gets you eighty percent of the way towards preventing those kinds of things. But. This stuff comes up constantly with. A. So that was all. That's all of that was supposing perfect test coverage. You still have these problems that are based on run time data. They're not based on the structure of the code you wrote, would that mean that you don't actually have perfect test coverage though like that is the implication. So. I. Don't want to write I, don't want to one. Hundred Percent Path Coverage, I? Don't even want achieve one hundred percent line coverage. So an execute programs code base. The ratio of test code to should've written the actual number down, but it's something like <hes> maybe four to one production code test code is. That is that feels like a lot more production code to TESCO than what I remember seeing like the destroyer software screen casts and stuff. Like Ruby and rails stuff. Yeah, and it's a lot. It's a lot more production to test than in the destroy all software code base as well because in Ruby and like I have to. Constantly. Protect myself from from <hes> mistakes. and. With type script and play. I can strategically test. Things at just the right place. So like EXCO program has this core bit of code that handles year kind of progression through a course and the lessons and so on. That's really critical and quite complex code. All of that is like just paranoid testing around because if any of that ever goes wrong, it's going to get baked into the database and it's you know it's GonNa be there forever. But for example, our reactor components. Strictly speaking we have zero tests around the entire react. And that's there are a few points that are actually tested, but they're kind of factored out like <hes> reducer, kind of stuff like the actual. Component testing. But just like there's some areas of logic that I'd extract, it emerged test for because it was easier to write the code if I had tests while I was writing it sorta thing. Yep, exactly. <hes> and that's not to say that the front is never tested because we have some Cyprus tests drive a browser so. Are, tests actually step through every single lesson in the system just to make sure that nothing blows up, but that's more of a just a giant smoke test. So. And it requires no incremental work when I write new content or new components, just kind of works for free. So. By, having type script in place, not having to worry about all the wiring of components I can focus on. Very, complex tight <hes>, fine grain tests for the core logic. Of the system and <hes> I can have this nice high level test runs through and make sure nothing is totally broken, but I don't have to write a whole lot of just really boring like this component. When it this, it renders you know with this class or whatever I. Don't do any of that stuff and. I. Think it's worked really well, I have no regrets about about switching type script for that purpose because the overhead is quite small when programming but the test over the saved as massive, I mean, we're talking about. I wrote a blog post with numbers in it, but I think it was something like the system would be two point, five times as many lines of code. If I had done standard, what was it two to one test to code ratio?

Gerry Bernhardt programmer Gary
"stack" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

Full Stack Radio

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"stack" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

"The best place to start though would just be talking about spelt itself and I. think that'll probably lead into a kind of how you think people should be building Steph for the web. Because I'm sure there's a lot. Of, you know things they're related <hes>. So so what does like the pitch I? Felt these days after you know having time to refine it over the last few years. Still working on the pitch on the it's a little bit of a difficult thing to to summarize and <hes> what I found works best is to try and <HES>. PUT IT in the context of projects that people Germany more familiar with. So little people who've used reacts a lot of people who view. And they used to this idea of building web applications out of self contained components where you have the mockup for a particular piece of you I together with the styles that with that mockup and the behavior that controls how you can interact with that markup, and what it will change into in response to changes in state of Europe. <hes> so is that is the thing that allows you to build. Applications <hes> components the difference between spelt, and there's the projects is that? It primarily things of itself was a compiler, whereas traditional framework will take your to the author components and then sort of tandem into instructions to the browser at runtime. Spelt tries to do as much as possible at bill time, so you integrate your usual bill stat using web, tackle roller, or whatever module Bundy using, and it will take. The components that you've offered and an literally writer as Vanilla Javascript. And through that, it's able to achieve typically much better performance than traditional framework, and because we don't need to carry around in a virtual bum, defend general any of the stuff that you normally expect to include. Your application will typically be a lot smaller as well which means that it gets to use a faster and it starts up faster. <hes> the the final major benefit of a compiler century designed is that we have a lot more control over the Olsen experience when not constrained by having to. Design components in a way the the <hes> is. It like it's, it's not. We don't have to be valid jobs rich. And <unk> spelled component actually isn't written into a job. Script file is written to a file which is a super set of HTML <hes>, so you're literally just writing html orienting it with <hes> the. Type cutty. Brace job expressions that you need for it to become dynamic, and because of that we can also include styles into component in the same file, and they will be scoped to the mockup. Because <hes> the compiler can analyze in the context of the MOCKUP. And you can have local state which you, which you change just by reassigning to triggering, renders in a more granular fashion than than the typical component level mandates, so it's a combination of all of those things it's framework, but it's also a compiler, and it's also a library of the things that you need when you're building an application, <hes> and <hes>. A philosophy of building APPs I. Guess Yeah

Steph
"stack" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"stack" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"And and you know, talking how she was so permanent in this picture, but also injuries kind of clover. Material. There's being a oversaw, for example, singer, Kylie Minogue finger British vogue, French thousand three a believe, and she was very kind of setting. So it's very another clinic piece for the magazine. It's sort of I call, Nick. Quotidian at the same time. It's the first thing you put on loss. You take off this that cover was great fun making that that cover Robin, Derrick, the creative director conceptualize this whole idea of her sitting in that lovely shallow champagne coupe. And it was a terrific success. And would you say, you know, you have companies like Victoria's secrets in for example in the nineties? They were so night is a notice as well there, so chronic, and I'm sure they still are. But this clearly being changed kind of a little bit of a rejection of that type of Andrew would you see that reflected in the magazine is days as well. The more say I think the chief started with the fabulous Brazilian model. She's Albion in powering down, the Victoria's Secret cat walks wearing multi-million dollar, ruby encrusted, bras and knickers. And interestingly in the nearly twenty years since then the awareness of the diversity of. Women's bodies as being much greater than just a very classic curvaceous white skinny tool girl has meant that people in their advertising campaigns of braced raised a much wider group of of models, and they all wearing the kind of underwear which now also doubles Comey warned us out to where and is much more sports orientated and comfortable intended, so gone now, I think is the excitement existed then around Victoria's Secret fashion shows, in fact, I think their fortunes taking something over dip as people broaden their horizons and expectations really of Anjou in. How it's presented because women won't stop that works for them. Not for some idealized fairy Queen walking down the catwalk executive in the same thing happened with us as well. I think women, of course, they still love us. But they don't. Wear because they're obliged to you know, they perhaps to wear because it is a beautiful piece and perhaps power, Dan somehow, but in a different way than they used to do in the past. We would you agree with that? I totally agree. I think the same thing has happened with with shoes in general in the, you know, the rise of athletes, and can I say something who thought one would ever be spending as much on a pair of trainers as you used to save up to spend on a handbag in shoes. Macci a small, smart and fabulous shoes. But now those who might be locking up to be able to force a thing. Nothing spending an enormous amount of money on a pair of trainers. Exactly says drew some. Yeah. Super comfy, and you can wear them with dress. And you can. Yeah. Newly versatile and one question the reluctance both of you. This is the stack. And of course, you just published those amazing books, I would like to more your experience in the story or the fashion market with magazines preps view to can you tell us.

Victoria Kylie Minogue Nick Anjou Andrew Comey Robin executive Dan director Derrick million dollar twenty years
"stack" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

Full Stack Radio

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"stack" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

"Slash podcast, lash one and maybe a Patrick west of maybe Senate delete request to slash podcast slash ID. So. So now, I know with this feature I need these five new points in these two new models. So I'm gonna go to my back end. I'm gonna create the two new resources, and I'll say that a podcast has many podcasts episodes, and then that's basically it. So it's it's kind of like a lot of the stuff you would do in a traditional app, you just get to derive from those the structure of the schema and again because you're building this in a way that your actions are going to be these dumb crud actions. They all end up looking the same interesting. So you said that like you're not really writing controller code when you say that do you mean like, you literally aren't creating files that going like the controllers directory, and that stuff is basically, you're pointing your routes essentially at like dynamic stuff, that's kind of handled for you by the the gem that on API resources gem. Right. So the gem would let you say that we have a new podcast resource. And so you say like, this dot resource, podcast and. Default that's gonna give you cried access to that resource. And it's gonna you're gonna define the attributes. And yet that way, and it's just gonna know like based on some convention like, okay? The you like we're saying, okay. We're cutting a new resource called podcast. So it's going to create register all the routes related to that like your standard like podcasts slash ID or podcasts for the index or delete up podcast, ID, whatever all your standard, like seven crowd, actions or five credit actions. Whatever the hell it is..

Patrick west
"stack" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"stack" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"Things up or just management. You know, how you can change your business as Joanna the first half. So that's something will start working on very soon. Miss still kind of planning and scheming. And and on top of that we will be doing more newspapers as well. We enjoyed doing some themed ones last year. We did something for slow to mobilize in. It's the end. We'll sit at a special fashion newspaper at the end of the summer. We're also looking to do more of those more specialized newspapers, which would think a nice nice to kind of dial into one set audience and. Give them something for the they can read a Farrell an event and rich besides the Monaco world. I mean, I know you're a print of sonata was well like me and are you positive for the industry in two thousand nineteen general? I think so. Yeah, I mean, I still think there's a lot of printout there. I think we saw you know. Germany's still launch new magazines France still launching new magazines. Let magazine that came out the end of this last year. I kind of interesting in nicely put together good on new stand and are nothing. We we still need to be craziest with print and believing it because I think people genuinely still still want it. And I think as long as you're making a very good product. There's no reason why we need to move on to ipads, and then he topped it. So overeat of of phones. And I think it's always been the same. I think if you if you do something, well, it will will do well, whether that's a website of radio station a piece of print. I think it's you go every chance to be successful. Richard Spencer, power Monaco's, creative director and Fernando rich. I guess like many of his colleagues in this building very upbeat optimism about the big print picture twenty nineteen exactly I mean, he as he was just mentioning to me, lots of new launches in markets like Germany fronts, but even in markets that had some difficult. The US. There are new titles. I predict a very good thousand nineteen and speaking of the US and LA we're heading electrons show, Monaco has some exciting news people may already have spotted that we've got our L A bureau space and shot up and running not a big launch in. I think around about ten days time over in California. But we'll get to allay in a moment. I other interesting and most personable creatives those behind it's nice that with their delightful daily posts, you may be familiar with. But have you seen printed pages? That's their print edition reason issues all about the bowel house one hundred years on finance. He has been busy. I really mean it invited. It's nice that senior creative Alastair Hanson for chat here Midori house..

Farrell Germany Richard Spencer US Joanna Alastair Hanson Fernando rich California Monaco LA France director one hundred years ten days
"stack" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

03:36 min | 3 years ago

"stack" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"From dory. House in London this as the stack that minutes of print industry assists with me tell my woods coming up in the program. We have Alastair Hanson from it's nice that talking about the new issue of their print magazine printed pages and author David Kippen on the book diaries and letters from LA. But I I mean welcome into the studio alongside be Finland August, shake, oh, producer of the stack. And you've been busy Fe this week. You've spoken to a number of August. So I thought we could have a little chat about what we have in store and women's views who quite often cameras actually on this program is Markle's own creative director, and let's be quite clear printer fish Nado. Richard Spencer Powell why particularly did you want to track him down? This thing reach is one of the best persons here in the office. You know to explain to us. What are the Monaco projects seems thousand eighteen and of course, tone there will be new launches if the readers think two thousand eighteen was a bit busy for Monaco. Well. Nothing yet UNC enough here and was quite exciting. Because there was some you know, when it was moving those even some publications, which I haven't heard of it, and they sing quite interesting. Specially if you like business, for example, exciting let's hear what rich had to say, he always has a trickle up his sleeve. Let's hear from him. Now, this is scripture director Richard Spencer power fake or with him a little earlier so twenty nine team we've got a lot happening charm build on what successes of last year trying some new things go some new projects I can announce which is very exciting. First thing we're doing is our March issue, which will be issue hundred twenty one so interest thirteen volumes, and it's a front special everything about France within the country also around the world's French-Speaking parts of the world. And what the French are doing out and about in the world. So that's just a special survey that within the issue as I moved on that on that country. We've done them before in the past calls for some success. So yes, it's a nice exciting. One. To kickoff the youth. And of course, you know, you plan all our Kover is. I mean, the covers lesbian is one of the most important parts magazine. Do you get a lot of feedback from readers if they either like it or not I want to know, do you have this sort of interaction of then we get some anecdotal feedback? I mean, the thing that I'm of the most important thing is issue sales and people vote with their purchasing power of the more. And we we get that feedback very very quick. So and then people after when you speak to people events and a card enough to Email people often have a favorite cover enough from me. I'm sat looking at the cover will up on the first floor here at Madari people. See me looking at it, which I don't know why they think I'm looking I'm often referencing just to see what we need to do next. What we've done in the past. But people often stop and CEO, Richard comedy. Like, can I just say this my favorite one? So yeah, it's it's interesting as a part of the month of work. It's a horrible challenge. I have to say is one I kind of love and low the measure, I like it because. It's a challenge. But it's also it's funny brief that you have to do something new, but without changing anything. So it's always a real a real tricky thing. But when you get it, right? I think I think, you know, often people kinda crowd around your desk. Oh, you catch the printer at the fresh printer and wanna see what it is. And it's knowing that good litmus test. If people kind of you know, being vocal about it. So I don't know what we're gonna do for France yet. How that will feature on the cover lots of ideas bouncing around. But we'll see which one sticks is the process different. Because of course, now, it's not only about monocle magazine. We also have you know, quite a few papers. You know, the the forecast escapist. I mean, especially the papers..

France director Richard Spencer Powell Monaco Alastair Hanson David Kippen LA Richard Spencer monocle magazine London producer Markle parts magazine Richard comedy Madari CEO
"stack" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

Full Stack Radio

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"stack" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

"Same. I have a number of their things rogue actually makes that battle star that insane roller. I talked about and yeah, there's stuff is bulletproof. It's it's pricey or than you know, you might guess, but it it's very high quality. Yeah. Awesome. Cooman? I guess that's maybe that's a good place to start wrapping things up. Do you have anything to anything else? You want to touch on or anything in terms of this stuff? Throw one of the thing out there. Sure. Which is in the last like year, I have gotten like fitter than my normal baseline. And I think the biggest component of. That is that I started a company with two friends of mine and both those friends are pretty into fitness. And as a result, we go as a company several times a week to the local climbing gym, and we do yoga or we go climbing or sometimes called like lift a little bit and just having friends around. They're like, hey, it's Wednesday. You want go do this thing. And that kind of keeping me on track has had a huge impact for me. And so if you can develop that same thing, it's really helpful. Yeah. Any sort of accountability that you can kind of create for yourself his super key. Like, one of the biggest reasons I don't lift as much as I used to as I moved from where I lived before like, basically when I've really got into lifting my parents, they're owned like a semi, right. So they had like another due to live next door sharing walls and like the same building. He set up a garage, Jim and was getting across fed and stuff like that. Which I can't I'm not a big cross but fan, but I was getting into strength training at the time. And he wanted to get better at squatting lifting on stuff too. And because he kind of like live next door to my parents. I knew who he was and we just got into training together, and we trained consistently three days a week for like four years, and that we just had a schedule like this day, these three days of the week at this time, we meet at his garage him we work out. And when you know, that's another person. Is there waiting for you to show up you kind of kind of have to show up? It's a lot harder to to skip. And that helped me a lot. And then the other thing that helped me in terms of accountability was, you know, finding like an online community where I could post like my training, log, and you know, comment on other people's workouts and be you know, just kind of motivate each other. And if you hang out in these communities for long enough, usually you'll make a little group of friends, and you kind of feel like. They're kind of expecting to see an update from me, or whatever it's not the same as like an person thing, but anything you can sort of do there and not everyone is going to do this. But the other thing that helped me was just having a competition on the calendar. To keep training. If I'm going to be. Definitely eating. But I mean, the best shape I've ever been in was when I had a boxing match scheduled. It's like, well, I have no choice as whether I'm trained or not..

Jim three days four years
"stack" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"stack" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"Newspapers can in the best sense become a medium of the past. And they are even if it might sound bit flat, a medium of decent. Ration- experts are convinced that only weekend papers and weeklies have a future. If at all people only find time to read the paper on the weekend. That's why they neatly set aside the articles they want to read on a Sunday the day before because they then have to read the Sunday paper. I they'll only be able to read a fraction of the articles. They laid out on the Saturday. So they set them aside for the next weekend. And of course, the same applies to the following weekends. You can put into together the wonderful principle of delayed gratification has been reversed and the newspaper addiction shows. It's dark side. The addict is confronted with a mountain of unread articles and has to learn to ease his guilty conscience. He does. So by declaring the pile a collection. All those are. Five's Phil apartments, in some cases. Half a room have discredited numerous newspaper, readers messy newspaper collection can be holy overwhelming. But it's never complete the idea of ever coming to the end of a semblance. Newspapers seems absurd collections remain fragmentary. But they co right are biographies. I'm still holding onto a couple of articles from a supplement of the long discontinued Bosley item written by an author named our whole Schmidt, whom I admired he never found out about this admirations, but that's also part and parcel of newspaper. Reading the silent admiration for an author this brings to mind low-tar, Baya, whom I also admired a couple of his articles are sitting in house moving crate in my basement slowly turning yellow as I rummaged around the box. Also, find a couple of ancient fanzines one of these which like the others was written on the typewriter. Cutout stuck together? Xerox is called down nasties the narcissist. Chef. Thousands biggest newspaper, of course, it's really the smallest newspaper in the town of chef written laid out and sold by a single person. And the fact that it's filled with the same old trash is testament to the humor of this secondary school pupil others rarely appreciate the value of such relic. No, one makes me more aware of that than t who are met in Latin closet university. He was not only able to understand Latin, but also speak it and relatively fluently the room of the shared flat. He could home was almost empty besides mattress and few items of clothing, he only possessed plastic bag that had a few belongings in it. I remember that he read a lot of hand care. He also read hand care on a bus trip to the south and wound up his friends by not looking up from his book, even as they were driving through the most beautiful landscapes does such behavior. Annoy us they urged him to have a look around from time to time which he did. But there went straight back to his book. T- didn't have a direct line to reality. You had to tell him. Something was nice. He then accepted the judgment incapable of forming his own opinion on a matter. He was in his own way, a person with a great deal, of empathy someone who lived for others and made them stand out. But at the same time, he was a person so devoid of opinions, but you couldn't help but see him as the worst conceivable newspaper reader, a good newspaper reader isn't someone who regurgitates an opinion, but someone who forms their own opinion through reading and yet T had a phenomenal memory, whatever he read or overheard stayed with him. He was indifferent to it just as he was towards material possessions, he'd got his hand kiss from the library. And so it wasn't surprising that his newspaper collection consisted of a single article an article about pitas attic from developed worker, which he kept in a plastic bag. The carried around with him. I no longer know why t- kept this article about Zedek in particular. He wasn't a theater goer. The fact that it was not go from developed Volker is however hardly surprising. It was a left wing liberal paper. There was very popular among students back then..

Xerox Schmidt Baya t Volker Zedek