25 Burst results for "Stacey Vanik Smith"

"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:24 min | Last month

"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The country celebrated all Aaron could feel was relief. There He is in a 2016 w Abe interview. It was 2.5 years problem. Told this story many times was probably the saddest 2.5 years I ever had in baseball pressure on myself. Aaron eventually hit 755 home runs a record that's stood for more than 30 years before it was broken by Barry Bonds. Aaron was inducted into baseball's Hall of Fame in 1982. After his career, Aaron made Atlanta his home and became a fixture in the community. Hank Aaron. He was a part of the Braves coming from you're walking to Atlanta to prove that we were sitting too busy to hate. Atlanta Native C. J. Stewart, who once played in the Chicago Cubs organization, says Erin was not only a transformative figure in the city's history but was also a mentor. We can hold our heads up high black men and black boys. Like people that love this game of baseball. Knowing that he was a man that used this game to do a lot of amazing things for his contributions to the game of baseball and his community. George W. Bush gave him the presidential Medal of Freedom in 2002. Today, another president, Jimmy Carter, was among those honoring Aaron. Party called the baseball legend, a breaker of records and racial barriers whose remarkable legacy will continue to inspire countless athletes at admirers for generations to come for NPR news. I'm a meal Moffett in Atlanta. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. The international space station cost hundreds of billions of dollars to build for astronauts living on the space station. Though money is essentially abuse lists, there's nowhere to spend it. But that does not mean there isn't an economy for the handful of astronauts living on board. From our daily economics podcast, the indicator from Planet money. Stacey Vanek, Smith and Cardiff, Garcia explained the economy aboard the international space station is all about trade. This is according to astronaut though we lock Actually, everybody at NASA calls me wheels. I'm one of the old grizzled veterans. So the early career astronauts call me Papa Wheels. Doug Papa Wheels served as the commander of the International Space Station and lived there orbiting the Earth for six months. That interesting thing is with food. Of course. Doug says that aboard the space station Most of the food is actually pretty bland. But every three months a big event would happen. Doug and his crew would get a shipment from Earth just before they closed the hatch on the launch pad they would throw like a bag of Fresh fruit like oranges, lemons, apples, vegetables as well. Everybody would only get one or two pieces of producer just wasn't that much of it. And so here is where the trade comes in. Doug knew that the Russians loved onions, but Doug loved fruit Theater. Your chicken was my commander. And I said, Hey, Theater, want trade? An onion for do you have? Ah, like an extra orange goes all You don't want your onion. Of course, The space station economy was not just about food, though. Services were also a big part of it Dug, for instance, has an engineering background and he says for him, one of his least favorite parts of life aboard the space station were all the scientific experiments. They had to do Whatever their background, this was just part of what they did every day. Way out of it. Economics. Doug discovered this a couple of weeks into his mission. When one of the scientists aboard the space station told him that there was a big problem, she said. Hey, the party's broken know what you want to hear aboard space station that's for sure. No, But Doug's background was an engineering, so he understands systems and he says, fixing things comes really naturally to him. And the scientists This woman named Shannon knew this about Doug Shannon looked at me, she said. If you fix the party Do all of your science for the rest of the day. I'm thinking like that is a deal and a half. I'll take that deal. So I got my bike tool belt and called Houston and said, You know, Houston, we have a problem. The party is broken, but the real commodity on the space stations is Doug. Was Earth itself. For example, Doug says, you just want to see and talk to other humans. Even if you don't know them. You want to drop in on other astronauts video chats and see their families and talk to their friends. You don't care. Yeah, because in space, humans are a precious commodity. And I asked if there was ever bartering around this like, hey, you can join my video chat with my family for an apple. Indexes. Actually, everybody needs human interactions so much they don't really trade it because it becomes sacred when you get back to earth, Doug says. Your idea of what's valuable is changed forever. It's completely changed my whole perspective. Especially especially rain. I am just like fascinated by rain now. I bet I just The smell of it the sound of it and just to feel against your skin I took for granted before you know. Stacey Vanek Smith. Cardiff Garcia NPR news s support for Planet money comes from tableau providing analytics designed for people to find the insights needed to solve today's complex challenges and the resiliency to drive business forward. Maura tableau dot com slash NPR. You're listening to all things considered from NPR News. Traffic trouble in the Santa Cruz Mountains continues at 5 48 with the details. He was Julie Depp ish. Julie with that wreck on highway 17 South Bend a redwood is states. A good news is it's all the shoulder now. Do you have the backup? Did Bear Creek Road San Leandro? Those who crashed South 8 80 before to 38? Three vehicles all out of the lanes now heavy backup to Marina If Fairfield eastbound 80 after Cordelia truck Scales stall big rig in the right lane as.

Doug Hank Aaron NPR News baseball Atlanta Doug Papa Wheels International Space Station Doug Shannon Stacey Vanek Smith commander apple Barry Bonds George W. Bush Hall of Fame Julie Depp Braves Santa Cruz Mountains NASA Stacey Vanek Chicago Cubs
The Economy Aboard The International Space Station

All Things Considered

03:29 min | Last month

The Economy Aboard The International Space Station

"The international space station cost hundreds of billions of dollars to build for astronauts living on the space station. Though money is essentially useless, there's nowhere to spend it, but that does not mean there isn't an economy for the handful of astronauts living on board from our daily economics podcast, the indicator from Planet money, Stacey Vanek, Smith and Cardiff, Garcia explained. The economy aboard the international space Station is all about trade. This is, according to astronaut Doug Wheelock. Actually, everybody at NASA calls me wheels. I'm one of the old grizzled veterans. So the early career astronauts call me Papa Wheels. Doug Papa Wheels served as the commander of the International space Station and lived there orbiting the Earth for six months. That interesting thing is with food, of course. Doug says that aboard the space station most of the food is actually pretty bland. But every three months a big event would happen. Doug and his crew would get a shipment from Earth just before they closed the hatch on the launch pad they would throw like a bag of Fresh fruit like oranges, lemons, apples, vegetables as well. Everybody would only get one or two pieces of producer just wasn't that much of it. And so here is where the trade comes in. Doug knew that the Russians loved onions. But Doug loved fruit. Cuter. Your chicken was my commander. As said, Hey, theater. What trade An onion for do you have? Ah, Like an extra orange. He goes all you don't want your onion. Of course, the space station economy was not just about food, though. Services were also a big part of it Dug, for instance, has an engineering background And he says for him, one of his least favorite parts of life aboard the space station were all the scientific experiments. They had to do whatever their background this was just Part of what they did every day, the way out of it Economics. Doug discovered this a couple of weeks into his mission. When one of the scientists aboard the space station told him that there was a big problem, she said, Hey, the party's broken not what you want to hear aboard a space station, that's for sure. No, But Doug's background was an engineering, so he understands systems and he says, fixing things comes really naturally to him. And the scientists This woman named Shannon knew this about Doug Shannon looked at me, she said. If you fix the party Do all of your science for the rest of the day. I'm thinking like that is a deal and a half. I'll take that deal, so I got my bike tool belt called Houston and said, You know, Houston, we have a problem. The party is broken, but the real commodity on the space stations is Doug. Was Earth itself. For example, Doug says, you just want to see and talk to other humans. Even if you don't know them. You want to drop in on other astronauts video chats and see their families and talk to their friends. You don't care. Yeah, because in space, humans are a precious commodity. And I asked if there was ever bartering around this like, hey, you can join my video chat with my family for an apple. Indexes. Actually, everybody needs human interactions so much they don't really trade it because it becomes sacred when you get back to earth, Doug says. Your idea of what's valuable is changed forever. It's completely changed my whole perspective. Especially especially rain. I am just like fascinated by rain now I made I just The smell of it the sound of it and just to feel against your skin I took for granted before you know Stacey Vanek, Smith. Cardiff Garcia NPR news

Doug Stacey Vanek Doug Wheelock Doug Papa Wheels International Space Station Cardiff Garcia Nasa Doug Shannon Smith Houston Shannon Apple Cardiff Garcia NPR
Lego Fans Tricked By Counterfeit Kits

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:24 min | 6 months ago

Lego Fans Tricked By Counterfeit Kits

"Lagos, are more than a toy, their investment, the company that makes those little plastic building blocks pulled in more than five point five billion dollars in sales. Last year, they often sell legos in special kits, sometimes depicting famous movie scenes and they retire those kids after a while making them collector's items for fans and upping their value. But where there's money to be made, there are also scams. Let's go into the world of counterfeit. Lego sets with Stacey Vanek Smith and Sally herships from the PODCAST, the indicator planet money. Tom glasco lives in Dayton. Ohio is three kids and they all love Lego, which is how he got into trouble. He'd been looking for a LEGO ray resistance fighter for his son and so perusing facebook one day I saw an ad for it for what seemed to be a low. But maybe not too low of a price. The exiting was half price just thirty bucks. The pieces weren't the same quality and they didn't go together quite as nicely as regular legos Tom had bought what turned out to be a knockoff. Lego set a counterfeit on their own legos are just these little plastic bricks. You can see why it would be tempting to make. Counterfeits chronic air pot or an apple watch or something the biggest and most notorious. These counterfeiters is a Chinese brand called Leppin. It operates completely openly I mean you can visit the company's website Leppin, world dot com and you will see that its logo and Legos logo are almost identical. But if you end up buying a knockoff, you don't just risk getting a flimsier product you could also ended up costing yourself money down the line if you're planning to resell your legos later on to understand how the LEGO scams work I turned to a superfan Steve Elliot he is thirty eight and lives in Albany Wisconsin if someone posts like a big seven, hundred dollar. People will zoom in and look to see if they can see the legos stamp on the top of a brick, which is called a stud. They don't see it. They'll accuse them of it being a knock off products. The lego community is enormous. There are whole websites like brick picker, dot, com brick link, and facebook groups like star. Wars Lego collectors USA, and if you buy fakes even accidentally and try to resell them, you could get yourself banned in two thousand seventeen something unprecedented happened in the Lego aftermarket, the secondary market, the prices of big sets, those giant boxes with thousands of. Lego pieces they started dropping, and this is according to brick picker. One of those Lego pricing and investment guides unprecedented here here's a clip from the brick picker youtube channel. Now, elephants in the room of course, is the Millennium Falcon and take a look at legal Millennium Falcon Graph when the Lego Millennium Falcon was first released over a decade ago. It was the most expensive legos ever four, hundred, ninety, nine dollars, ninety, nine cents, and then the price shot up to almost five thousand dollars but a couple of years ago it dropped by more than thirty percent in less than a year. By this set was one of the worst decisions that I made in my entire collection brick picker said. In Alkan started cropping up all over the Internet from places like let's knock off Millennium Falcon sets, which, of course, sell for much less a Lotta the Lego fans I talked to you were pretty upset about this. So be careful out there the next time you are shopping make sure you are getting the real thing

Lego Tom Glasco Facebook Lagos Stacey Vanek Smith Leppin Apple Dayton Ohio Sally Herships Steve Elliot Albany Wisconsin
"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

08:15 min | 7 months ago

"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on Planet Money

"Planet Money Summer School the supply for intellectual demand. This is class number five trade and Santa Claus. I'm Robert. Smith by now you are in the educational groove, you're sitting the front of the classroom. You're raising your hand even though I can't see you and the final examined graduation day are in less than a month start planning those parties joining us on the educational microphones today our planet money resident economists. Yeah yes. It seems like just as a little bit further off the mic, then betsy. Oh. Okay. I don't know whatever best he's doing is perfect. How you how you oriented toward the Mike she is told that quite a. Window competitive. Justin Wolfer Special Stevenson. Welcome back. Great to beard today. Excited talk about tried excel. Let's talk about trade because so far we've talked about a lot of market phenomenon, but we haven't really talked about on this on the whole country level. What should we think about trade as we listened to this episode? Will the easiest way to get to the whole country level is to go back and start at the simple level of two people. So. Let's take betsy and I we trade a lot Family. She does the Texas. She's much better at that. An I do all the it. In so we reassign those tasks to the person who can do the most efficiently. And the fact that. Runs more efficiently when she's doing Texas when I'm running it, we call that gains from trade. Now, I want the listeners to just think about one thing what is suddenly someone drew an invisible line down the middle of my household bits. He's on one side of that invisible line and I'm on the other. The kinds from tried didn't go away. What if we called that invisible line a border. The gains from trade didn't go away. But now when I'm doing betty's IT and she's doing my taxes, wait a minute, Justin land and betsy land. Yeah. That's right. when Justin Land is providing it support for Betty Ville. That counts as an export from my country to hers and then when Bitty. Helps with my income taxes that count as an import from betty land to Justin Land and fence. This imaginary world is a world of free trade, you both benefit and that invisible border in your home doesn't matter, but in the real world borders do matter. I. Mean. Once you have a border, different countries can make different rules guards at the border and and one thing they love to do is. Is Charge tax on everything that goes back and forth across the border, a Terrif- Justin. Give us a quick definition of tariffs at tariff is a tax on imports, but a lot of people get confused and they think that just the people in the foreign country are paying those taxes, but we're GONNA learn is no tariffs are really just a way for us to collect revenue from ourselves from ourselves. Tariffs are all around us all the products you have that are made in another country. You might have paid a tariffs import and not even know it or maybe the US government negotiated with another country so that that product has no tariff. This is a huge subject of international law and negotiations and there so many fights over who pays what? Today. To illustrate this weird world of tariffs, we're GONNA play parts from an episode that first aired two thousand fifteen. He was hosted by Jacob Goldstein and Stacey Vanek Smith I agreed to help them start off the episode by meeting with Jacob, in Brooklyn on Saturday morning dressed. As Santa Claus. Here's US having fun with that. Ravaged with. I am wearing red pants, a red overcoat, black belt on justice center. What am I waiting? You are also say suit. So I never thought I'd see. Mr Goldstein me neither but we are surrounded by. A thousand people dressed as Hannah. I'm trying to get my belt to work you having trouble. Yes. On I'm like a fourteen dollar doing Santa Castle. This is Brad Foul. Pantsuit. Good. A hood over it. Wrong. Sleeves some embroidering here. Yeah. The embroidery is beautiful bribery and. A real belt that's actually holding in some girth Oh. Yeah. This is Santa con new. York City Two Thousand Fifteen, an annual tradition just. Get drunk you Ho Ho. You March in the city dance a little. Yeah. I'm not here to do that. No, you're here. I'm sure for eight Nerdier economic reason. I'm here I. Think is actually a more exciting reason. There is this international dispute on over this. These question. What? Is a fantasy. Today and Planet Money Summer School. We consider a lawsuit over a fantasy. It gets to the heart of how International Trade Works and the strange taxes known as tariffs and stay tuned after the story when our economists show us that there is a whole universe hidden fights over tariffs, the sheep almost everything we buy the Santa's going into this bar right here and I'm going to go join them. I'm going to go back to the office into the story. Fun. This message comes from Western Governors University WG. You was a nonprofit university committed to helping you reach your academic goals at an affordable price. They charge a flat rate tuition for every six month term meaning the more courses you complete each term, the more affordable your degree becomes offering online bachelors and Masters degrees in business it education and nursing learn more about their offerings at Wvu dot edu slash planet money. The past is never passed and every headline has a history on Rom teen at Louis I'm random. And we're the hosts of through line. NPR's his podcast each week we go back in time to better understand the present, bringing lesser known stories and perspectives to the surface subscribe and listen to through line from NPR. Jojo seems a little on the knows. What do you think is a good fit. So good luck for me. It's I mean. Stacey, Robert disappeared into Santa Con has not been seen from since you graciously. Close to show with me, what do you think? You look very sharp. Thank you. So let me let me tell you about the same. Okay. Yes. Tell me about the I. got it at a place called rubies. It's a costume shop out on Long Island. So you got some Santa costumes. That's where we're going. This is Mark Beige. He runs rubies. You got the Star Wars I. Kiss me not to stop at the star. Wars. Nice steak. Yeah. These are like really spectacular star wars causing like there's this big old darth vader suit looked like it was actually what the Darth vader war. Anyway. Right around the corner from vader where we stand now, what are we looking? To Quiz Customs. A lot of a lot of different different qualities, different price levels. This fight over Santa suits plays out on this wall, right in front of us on this wall of Santa suits right in front of us, and it's a fight over tariffs. Most of the suits are made overseas markets, ports, them, and of course when he imports them, yes. To bring him through customs and depending on what he's importing. Sometimes, he has to pay a tariff. He has to pay a tax and whether he has to pay that tariff and how much he has to pay is laid out in deep harmonized tariff. Tariff schedule of the United States Armas tariff schedule. It is ninety nine chapters long and it lists tens of thousands of specific items, but it doesn't list everything. There is no line item that says costumes or Santa suits. So there has been this long running fight. Where do costumes belong in the Tariff Code Mark? Beige has an answer to that question. He says, there is a section of the code section ninety, five, oh five to be precise. That is perfect for Santa's is called festive articles I. Printed out the page here. You can just read some of the stuff in there. Okay. Christmas ornaments of glass of would typically scenes and figures thereof artificial Christmas trees isn't that just Christmas stuff. The section also includes stuff like party.

Santa Stacey Vanek Smith US betsy Jacob Goldstein Justin Land Texas Justin Wolfer Robert Santa Castle Money Summer School Betty Ville NPR Mike Planet Money Summer School International Trade Works
"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:45 min | 10 months ago

"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on KQED Radio

"By the listeners of KQED increasing clouds today that means it's for were preparing for some rain that'll happen tonight in the meantime today's temperatures from the low sixties at the coast of the low eighties tonight late at night after eleven well at forty percent chance of showers and tomorrow we've got a fifty percent chance of rain on and off around the bay it will be partly sunny as well good morning the time now it's eight forty six this is morning edition from NPR news I'm David Greene and I'm Rachel Martin for many hospitals preparing for a surge of covert nineteen patients cost a whole lot of money some hospitals built the capacity but the surge never came and non COPD patients stayed away Stacey Vanek Smith is with our daily economics podcast the indicator from planet money and she's been tracking one hospital trying to convince people it is safe to come back about a month ago we spoke with Dr Patrick Kali he heads up the medical university of South Carolina health has over seventeen thousand doctors nurses and other health care workers and hospitals throughout the state when we talked with him last month he had just laid off nine hundred people but I was it was the hardest decision I've ever had to make my entire career to prepare for the corona virus pandemic hospital had to shut down the parts of its business that make the most money the elective surgeries like hip and knee replacements and the procedures like Colin Oscar bees is in March we lost twenty million dollars in April with one of lost a little more than thirty million dollars the Patrick how to get the hospital ready for a surge of coronavirus patients which she was expecting to hit in late April and yet the worst.

David Greene Rachel Martin Stacey Vanek Smith Dr Patrick Kali KQED NPR COPD South Carolina Colin Oscar
State unemployment offices overwhelmed amidst covid economic crisis

Morning Edition

03:16 min | 10 months ago

State unemployment offices overwhelmed amidst covid economic crisis

"Many state unemployment offices run on tiny budgets they have out of date computers and sometimes just a few dozen employees and suddenly these little offices are a lifeline for thirty six million Americans who are out of work Stacey Vanek Smith from our daily economics podcast the indicator brought us the story he won Ellison and her husband were laid off from the Subaru factory in Lafayette Indiana back in March they played for unemployment right away and then they waited a week one Brian right okay I have some savings save the two weeks went by on line okay start to get a little bit ridiculous now and now it's like okay it's Maine now we're gonna have to take right next month it's been more than six weeks since they applied and killing her husband still have not gotten their unemployment checks meanwhile kills husband got sick with covert nineteen some of her kids have been showing symptoms so she is trying to quarantine people care for people cook clean and keep the kids doing their school work keep everybody inside and on top of that she is spending hours on the phone every day with Indiana's unemployment office just calling the one eight hundred number which I you're just waiting and waiting and waiting okay let's try to email thought maybe that would be faster email ninety different claims eight and I only got a response back from one of all the ninety people online what is going on my name is Josh Richards and I'm the chief of staff at the Indiana department of workforce development we operator states unemployment insurance program Josh has been working there for more than a decade he was there during the Great Recession when things got so bad they had nearly thirty thousand people applying for unemployment in one week so when Indiana announced a state wide shutdown there's this one thought that went through his head how do we possibly staff out to process benefits that people need and the time frame in which they're going to expect them and need them just a few months ago in the end it was seeing record low unemployment the staff was lean but was more than adequate to handle the two thousand odd people filing for unemployment every week and then the claim started coming in three thousand people five thousand people ten thousand people Josh couldn't believe what he was seeing and the numbers kept climbing yeah I was like a hundred twenty hundred thirty hundred forty eight hundred and forty thousand people filing for unemployment in one week that's almost five times with Josh had seen it during the Great Recession this was just really different than what we are expecting and what we were built for in last week's Josh's brought on hundreds of people you now is roughly six hundred and fifty people working with him but they're trying to assist six hundred and forty thousand Indians who've lost their jobs people like Kayla to go from being not only backbone and our only source of income Sir just waiting you don't know when it's coming I was I was very light I was at my lowest yesterday I was over I quit Josh Richardson says his team are working as fast as they can he says he knows that for a lot of people people by Kayla it's just not fast

"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

04:59 min | 10 months ago

"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on Planet Money

"Would would? Would you have loan the money? I wouldn't have loan the money and nobody that I know would have loaned me the money I mean I know guys who are criminals. Wouldn't lend me that money and they break unique half. Yeah I'd bank last week. We called up Alex Bloomberg to ask about this clarence moment. That question of sort of would you have lent you the money I think in some ways as a blueprint for a certain kind of ethos of planet money which is like to know the big structural context but also to be talking to the people in the middle who are most affected by that context and getting their honest authentic non-judgmental reactions thoughts observances of what. It's like to be at the center of these large forces. The secret to a great planet money episode is to find that clearance that amazing person who happens to be at the center of everything and sometimes they find the person who you know. Accidentally emergency landed in Iran. So everyone was like what we're going to run a real. I really to do that or that. Doctor who intentionally paralyzed himself for his startup and Phil said well. We could paralyze you and then if the nasal spray works and then there's just like some guy trying to catch a cow thief that's Zoe Chase and Stacey Vanek Smith found so we met up with special agent Jerry Flowers in the parking lot of the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture. And he was there with his team and they're all dressed alike and they look just ready for action. Jeans Start Church and wore boots and clean white hat. Good guys wear. What is that true? It is out here. We call this walk on tape. It's the way the character walks into the story into our lives. We spend a lot of time thinking about how to introduce people to you. Cowboy introductions apparently are relatively easy economists on the other hand you may have to work a little harder for the walk on like this guy. I'm Robert Schiller professor of Economics Yale University. Can you add your Nobel Prize winner and you predicted the great recession me to say that you're supposed to say that I just did okay. So you found your Clarence. You've done your walk on. We are now at the body of the story part after the shoulders bodies under the shoulders make sense but now we have to do some actual work at some point. We have to explain some big economic concept. This is where we earn our paychecks. This is where we have to get creative to explain. Things like dramatic shifts in year over year parcells Pacific housing prices. Yeah real example. Which I know doesn't sound enticing. But but back in two thousand eleven the case Schiller Home Price Index was going bananas and it was fascinating. There was this incredible graph. I have it right here. It shows the booming and then collapsing home prices. Oh Oh you can't you can't see this graph on the radio. Oh problem yeah but you can take numbers on a graph. Turn them into musical notes and then bring in an opera singer to sing the graph Oh so that's the national number and you can definitely you know hear the boom and bust but like we wanted to go big right so so we got him to sing Miami the city with the biggest housing boom in America Oh you kind of rooting for in the way and then you like no no no. That's how it was to live in my area okay. Now some economic concepts are are still big are still global that not even a room full of graph singing bear tones could really bring you along like supply chains or financial markets or the entire oil industry yet. Like what do you think of when we say oil industry? So sometimes we've learned. It's better to just throw ourselves into the middle of the industry in the case of one series to by transport and processed one hundred barrels of oil ourselves. This way we can bring you in the room when an oil deal goes down. We can tell you what it looks like. Smells like feels like. Oh my gosh. It's it is the color of coffee. It looks like a good lot. Can we touch that cool? You can't oh it's cool. Oh that feels really weird. This is this is our oil right right now. It's like this was like handshake country. It is haven't shook hands yet. And then when we wanted to explain the commercialization of outer space we shot satellite into space with our logo on it. I don't know why everyone's whispering.

Jerry Flowers Alex Bloomberg clarence Robert Schiller Nobel Prize Iran Oklahoma Department of Agricul Phil parcells Zoe Chase Miami Stacey Vanek Smith Economics Yale University professor Pacific America
"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:28 min | 10 months ago

"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"New normal masks in some parts of the country face masks are just as essential issues when you leave the house Stacey Vanek Smith in Cardiff Garcia from our daily economics podcast the indicator from planet money explore the rise of the facemask Valerie Steele is an historian of fashion in New York he's also the director of the museum at the fashion institute of technology we called Valerie to ask her about masks the masks that people have been increasingly wearing since the start of the corona virus pandemic the idea of masks as personal protective technology like medical mass that's something that goes back to the end of the nineteenth century where in Europe surgeons realized that they could help prevent germs and bacteria from their mouth entering into people's wounds as the corona virus pandemic tragically lingers on a lot of people in the U. S. are gonna continue to wear masks out in public as time does go on will more people start thinking of masks as just part of what they wear every day a part of their outfit value says that has happened before in other parts of the world when they had to deal with earlier outbreaks of contagious diseases with a variety of pandemics like sars and mers over the past fifteen years or so people in Hong Kong China and Japan started increasingly to wear masks to protect themselves but also to protect the people around them and not only was mask wearing ubiquitous this is a part of the world where people are very interested in fashion and so quite quickly you also saw fashion masks being worn now it's early in the trends but Valerie does suspected something like this is also happening now in the US and Europe as a response to corona virus but there is more to this story than just business in fashion right now for example wearing a man ask has become part of a culture war here in the US yes it's a part of the country people are protesting against being ordered to wear a mask the protesters say they are trying to protect their personal freedom yeah and the advocates of wearing masks are saying that it's about science they point to evidence showing that if you wear a mask there is less of a chance that you'll infect other people if you have coronavirus Valerie says for her wearing a mask can send a message of solidarity I think that this idea of fashion Ising masks is a good way to normalize them and to say that this is you don't need to be scared you just need to be part of this we're all in it together and a bunch of fashion designers.

Stacey Vanek Smith Cardiff Garcia Valerie Steele New York director Hong Kong China Japan US Europe Ising fashion institute of technolog
"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In the slayer if you heard there's a bathroom on the right you're wrong but you're not alone mon degrees or mis heard lyrics are a strange and often hilarious part of being a music fan they've even spawned a whole TV ad she burning out his fuse up here alone Elton John's rocket man is just one song that's been misunderstood over the years but there are hundreds of others and sharing them can be great fun for proof check out a show from our archives on Monday greens for mis heard lyrics at Nick Saban's dot org five no one morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king and I'm Steve Inskeep China is working to return to normal whatever that means the government lifted restrictions on movement in Wuhan where the corona virus outbreak began and Beijing sees small signs of improvement after six weeks of lockdown Stacey Vanek Smith in Cardiff Garcia from the NPR daily economics podcasts the indicator from planet money report on life in the Chinese capital Dan want lives in Beijing and he works for gas cow dragon omics which does economic research one day in early February Dan noticed some government workers stationed outside his Beijing apartment complex he thinks they were from the municipal government someone set up a tent with a table and a pen and paper the sort of taking down everyone's temperature as they came in and out of the apartments and their temperature checks like this taking place all over the city before Dan can enter his office building going to stores going to restaurants he has to get a temperature checked when I'm out I would have my temperature tacked around four or five times when I'm just walking around dance is a lot of his friends had hardly left their apartments at all travelers arriving to China from abroad now I have to go into quarantine either at home or in a government facility for two weeks when they arrive China has also been forced to severe restrictions on travel within the country China can do all of this dance says because it already has a big security and surveillance system in place and people are kind of used to it but here's the thing China actually has managed to slow the spread of the virus last week as the weather got nicer Dan noticed that life for the first time was gently returning to Beijing and I would say that this is the first time in about six weeks or nearly two months for so that there are a lot of people walking around you know wonder to the shops that I used to go frequently that have been close for the last several weeks are now opening again Dan says.

Elton John Nick Saban Steve Inskeep China Wuhan Beijing Stacey Vanek Smith Cardiff Garcia Dan China NPR
"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:46 min | 1 year ago

"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"Almost exactly a year ago. Stacey you and I were in Atlanta yes and while we were there we visited the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as you do and we were there because we wanted to meet one woman. Her name is Dr. Anne shook it. She's currently the deputy director of the CDC but for years she was a member of the CDC's epidemic intelligence service also known as the disease detectives diseased detectives so win. There is an outbreak like the one the world is experiencing right now with corona virus. The CD Sends Out Disease Detectives to track the spread the disease and then use that information to figure out how to contain it an and did that about fifteen years ago during the SARS outbreak. She and her team were deployed to Beijing and they helped contain that outbreak. The two thousand eleven movie contagion was based on SARS and one of the main characters in the movie played Kate. Winslet is a disease detective who is based on and shook it. Don't talk to anyone. Don't touch anyone fairway from other people. We asked at the time if she thought the movie was realistic. Because it's kind of intense. It's very extreme. I thought it was pretty far fetched but she she said no. Not really you know. I think when the average person sees that movie you think it's over the top but a lot of the scenarios that they play out or based on real infectious diseases and in the last few weeks. It's been interesting because we have seen. Dr Anne shook it on TV. A whole bunch of times addressing the country about corona virus and seeing an on TV and hearing about this new outbreak. You know we've been talking about the episode. We did on SARS. Yes and you know at the time. This idea of a deadly pandemic spreading across the world. It just seemed like Hollywood stuff. I know we were making jokes about it and the kind of thing that could really happen and obviously the last few weeks have kind of put that into perspective a little bit so we decided now is a good time to rerun it. This is the indicator from planet money. I'm Stacey Vanek Smith and Dr Raphael on Today on the show the story of how an shook it and her team dealt with and eventually contained the SARS virus and what we can learn from it about Krona Virus. This message comes from. Npr sponsored show. Bonnie Haute made to taste just like milk. It's creamy frothy and great with coffee and cookies. But without the dairy because it's not milk it's almost milk new Shabani owed support also comes from colour. Intelligent toilets with smart features ranging from warm water cleansing to automatic air freshening color intelligent toilets are designed to provide an elevated experience more at Kohler dot com slash intelligent toilets. So this movie contagion. It was actually based on a real disease outbreak. One that started on February third two thousand three when a man walked into the sun. Yat Sen Memorial Hospital in Guangzhou China. He bad cough and a high fever. His lungs were rapidly filling up with fluid and everything. The doctors tried just proved to be useless. They couldn't bring the fever down. They couldn't reverse the pneumonia he just got worse and worse and worse and what was even more troubling about this strange new disease. It was spreading within two weeks. Fifty employees of the hospital were sick with the same stubborn illness. One of those employees Dr John Loon was already showing symptoms. When a few weeks later he checked into the Metropole Hotel in Hong Kong. He was there to attend the wedding of his nephew and he could not have known at the time that he was carrying one of the deadliest. Most contagious diseases in modern history. This was the beginning of the SARS outbreak SARS or severe acute respiratory syndrome would go on to infect more than eight thousand people in twenty nine countries killing nearly eight hundred and while the seeds of this global outbreak were being planted in Hong Kong disease detective and shook it was at CDC headquarters in Atlanta trying to make sense of all these reports. She was getting about this mysterious fatal pneumonia that was spreading across the world. We had a whiteboard like that and we had Vietnam. Toronto Hong Kong trying to understand. Is this the same thing as it connected? What is it? The disease was spreading with alarming speed. We didn't know what the cause was. And so there wasn't a drug to treat that virus there wasn't a vaccine against it. The Epidemic Intelligence Service Sprang into action more than one hundred disease. Detectives were deployed all over the world and was sent to Beijing. Were by far. The worst outbreak was occurring by the time an arrived in the city. Things were already out of control. The schools were closed. University was closed. Businesses were closed. I mean the Chinese actually developed soap operas for all the people that were stuck at home. It was just like an abandoned city. Think about that for a second. This is Beijing. A city of fourteen million people at the time brought to a complete standstill and similar scenes. Were PLAYING OUT ACROSS ASIA. As fear of this disease began to spread faster even than the virus itself hotels and airlines a huge dip in bookings people postponed vacations or cancelled conferences. In fact so many restaurants closed that it actually caused the worldwide price of fish to plummet the economies of Hong Kong Singapore and Taiwan went from growing to shrinking almost overnight and her colleagues were essentially on an international manhunt for a microscopic serial killer. That's true and and honestly the job doesn't seem that different from actual detective work. I mean she was. She was interviewing patients testing blood samples pouring over medical records. Trying to trying to trace all the points of contact and eventually the search led back to Dr Liu and the ninth floor of the Metropole Hotel. It was there that he got into an elevator with chinese-american businessmen on route to Hanoi and seventy eight year old grandmother from Toronto. It is believed that it was a sneeze from Dr. Look in that elevator that spread this virus turning everyone there into unwitting hosts for SARS two weeks later when Dr Lou was taking his last labored breath in the isolation ward of a Hong Kong Hospital the pandemic he'd unwittingly set in motion had already spread to seven different countries. Meanwhile and was in Beijing watching society was crumbling around her. As all of these frantic local health officials were looking to her like. How do we stop this thing? You're the expert. We had to try to institute control measures but they didn't have a drug to treat this disease mean. There was no vaccine to prevent it so they had to fall back on the most tried and true disease. Control measure ever developed find out who has the disease and isolate them. But of course this is Beijing so it was a big job disease. Screening checkpoints were set up across the city teams of medical workers. Were roaming the streets with thermometers taking. Everyone's temperature they ran across just trying to ferret out anyone with a fever. Entire hospitals were devoted to just treating SARS patients and when they filled up. When that wasn't enough room the government mobilized the military to build a one thousand bed quarantine hospital in an empty field in less than a and ultimately it worked. I mean less than a month after an arrived in Beijing the World Health Organization declared the city safe and this is by all accounts a success story a timely coordinated response averted. What could have been a much bigger disaster and at one point in our interview? I made an offhand remark to and something to the effect of you know. Wow isn't it great that we've got all these infectious diseases under control and now we don't have to worry about it and everyone in the room. Visibly tensed up. We may think we've been ready for the one that was going to stop society and that a future pandemic wouldn't be life altering you really need to recognize that when opinion occurs with a severe strain the availability of modern medicine and vaccines and viral and stuff is not such that it's necessarily all going to be slam dunk. Everything's fine and pointed out to us that just last year. Which was you know a bad flu season but by no means a pandemic more than sixty thousand. Americans died of the flu. That is more than gun. Deaths more than car crashes and to me this highlights the fact that we don't really think about infectious diseases when we go about our day to day lives. We just take for granted what we don't see an effective prevention is pretty invisible and prevention. Doesn't stop just because the disease is contained. Eventually after years of searching scientists found the source of the SARS virus actually where it began and it was a colony of horseshoe bats in a cave in southern China more than eight hundred miles from where Dr Lu I came into contact with it now as for the origin of the current corona virus. Nobody really knows where it came from. Most scientists think humans contracted it from contact with some kind of animal. It does seem to be similar to virus. That's also found in bats another strong possibility is the penguin a small scaly ant eating mammal Which is eaten prized for its scales? Which are thought to cure illnesses? In the meantime it seems like there might be a silver lining to corona virus right now. South Korea just announced that the number of new cases has been dropping and people hope. This is a sign. That containment efforts are starting to work for now. Though the number of cases here. Us continues to grow. This episode of the indicator is produced by Darius Rafi on VAT checked by Britney Cronin edited by Paddy Hirsch and the indicator is the production of NPR..

SARS Beijing CDC Stacey Vanek Smith Metropole Hotel Dr. Anne Atlanta fever Npr Hong Kong Toronto deputy director Winslet Dr John Loon pneumonia Hong Kong Singapore ASIA Yat Sen Memorial Hospital Kate Vietnam
Planet Money: Single Women Are Shortchanged In The Housing Market

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:15 min | 1 year ago

Planet Money: Single Women Are Shortchanged In The Housing Market

"Buying or selling a home is difficult. Even if you are very savvy with money but academics have discovered. It's even harder if you're a single woman. Sally Herships Stacey Vanek Smith from our daily economics. podcast the indicator from planet money. Explain what's going on. A new study just came out of Yale School of Management. It looks at how well single women do versus single men when they buy home or when they invest in the housing market housing is probably the largest purchase. It's made by most Americans. That's Kelly shoe. She teaches finance at the Yale School of Management and she says we invest more in our homes than in the stock market so when gene her colleague Paul Goldsmith. Pinkham recently bought houses around the same time they were paying a lot of attention to the transactions. Kellyanne Paul ended up looking at data data from over fifty million housing transactions. And here's what they found. On average single women buy houses for two percent more than single men but they also sell those houses for two percent. Less women are losing about one thousand. Three hundred seventy dollars per year relative to men because they tend to buy the same house at a higher price and sell for a lower price just knowing the gender of the other party can affect the sale according to Kelly shoe when women make low offers the are treated differently differently than men who make the same low offers. It is an unfortunate consequence of perhaps our culture and the fact that We may I expect that women are more willing to share the pie and share the surplus from negotiation. This is called gender expectations. It's the possible that women are expected to be nicer to be more generous to be more thoughtful. It's the idea that everyone should benefit from. The sale of this House both buyer higher end seller. But no matter what the reason is that is not exactly what happens. When single women houses remember single women buyers they are already spending more buying it higher prices and they also sell for less and guess who they give the biggest discounts to we find that the largest richest discounts tend to occur. When it's a female seller and mail buyer single? Women also do worse when it comes to. What is called market timing? Kelly says that could be because single women tend to be more tied down and in case. You're wondering Kelly and her co author accounted for all kinds of things education. An income age type of home listing agent ethnicity. They adjusted for all of these things and the results stuck so this is kind end of distressing but there was a silver lining there some good news depending on how you characterize a silver lining women on average do better when they are transacting with other women. So there's a tip for single women if you are buying or selling a house like look at doing business with a woman you might get a better deal and Kelly had some other tips. She says single single women are able to. They should try to think long term to become long-term investors because every time a single woman buys or sells a house. She is likely to lose two percent cent compared to a single man. Stacey Vanik Smith Sally Herships N._P._R. News.

Kelly Sally Herships Stacey Vanek Sm Yale School Of Management Stacey Vanik Smith Kellyanne Paul Pinkham Paul Goldsmith Sally Herships
"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

08:44 min | 1 year ago

"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"The Nobel Prize in economics. It's a big deal right. I mean I've heard of it. You know it's it's not not a big deal. They announce it once a year. It's been They've been giving out since nineteen sixty-nine and the winner gets a lot of money to get about a million dollars. Yeah unless more than one person wins and then the winners split the money and this year. It was a kind of three way tie economists. Micheal creamer estrogen flow Avid Banerjee. All won the prize together and they all all work in a branch of economics known as developing economics. They do a lot of their work together. Actually and basically what they do is apply economic principles to problems in the developing world and between the three of them. They figured out how to improve school. Attendance Children's house crop yields and social conditions for millions of people across Africa and India. In fact the Nobel Committee Committee estimated that the work these three economists have done has impacted millions of lives. Plus Esther diplo is the youngest person ever to win the economics prize. She's only forty-six Yup and only the second woman and her fellow Nobel Nobel avid energy also happens to be her husband and they both oth teach economics at MIT. This indicator for planet money. I'm Cardiff Garcia. And I'm Stacey Vanek Smith Today on the show Estra do flow and Abba Cheat Banerjee talk about their work work and what happens when you win a Nobel prize support for. NPR are comes from national car rental. Who wants you to know that with a membership in our complimentary Emerald Club you can skip the counter and choose any car in the aisle at participating national national locations? You can even select an upgrade without paying extra learn more at national car dot com slash. NPR My name is Estella. How'd you flew? I'm a professor of economics at Panaji and professor economics at Mit as well Nobel Prize winners to well. Congratulations thank you thank you so much. How did you guys find out? Where were you when you found out? You'd one considering they call you at a quarter to five. We were in our bed. Then we put it on speaker phone and I said free bad in in our house and we are not awake so we fumbling with revolt human. They couldn't hear us that we couldn't hear them and we hang up on them and whatever that but by and by hi we got of God to the destroyed pretty quickly than the past phone to someone who said he was very happy to inform me that I had being awarded the Nobel Prize in economics. And then my question was with whom and said always for southbound algae and I I said Oh great. Do you want to talk to him. It was so they said yes and I I give him the phone They instructed us that since Estero it was a woman and they wanted a woman to be the spokesperson. She would be the one person who will be depressed conference. They said it like that there were like we would like the woman to be the spokesperson resting. Okay and given that I went back to sleep and there was a way said it is. Let's go back to three like no. The man said I have to make some tea to be ready for the last one is that you have to make some D- psychot- up and since I'm like nothing but a diligent student. I made some team your co-winner Michael Kramer said that. He celebrated the news by upgrading. From Diet. Coke to regular coke. I'm curious to know if the two of you did something similarly extravagant no no no no we would never uh-huh neither of US drink coke okay. We didn't really have Easy option do you mind talking about your branch of economics of Vertical Development Economics. How do you describe it? Well It's economics off for countries in a sense it's sort of asking questions it's like. Why are some people very poor wire countries pork? Is there something we can do to help them. Get Out of it. It's kind of dancing around this question of off the origins and responses to poverty for a long time One of the criticisms of economics six was that the mathematicians the theorists were the ones who were sort of dominating the field It seems like your work was a shift in a different direction and that that shift is being rewarded by this prize. Is that an accurate characterization. In the last twenty twenty five years in general has been in economics and move to world a much more Regards geller ports to problems boosts in developed countries and in developing countries so libor economists. Study issues like you know. The impact of the minimum wage or the impact of migration on the wage of native eighteen workers. Always these kind of common concern that we also have notwithstanding the theory is what are the facts on the ground saying and if batons out that the facts are totally inconsistent with your Eden is probably the theory that needs to be rethought. Not The fact that you you should change one of the questions that you have. Tackled tackled is about absenteeism among teachers. Do you mind just talking about what the problem was. And some of the different solutions that you try absolutely to this. The problem is that you find in many developing countries that are the absence of teacher is very high so on average country which been measured. It's about twenty ninety five percents or every day that you go to a school. The teacher is absent so one of the early project I was involved with is to set up a Honda Honda mice controlled trial of. Make any him to try to improve teacher present. We give the teachers a camera and ask them to take a picture of themselves in the key twin to come to school so we get to school. A camera on one of the kids took your to every day at the beginning of the class and At the end of the class. And where was this. We did that in rural area in the Indian Hudson in district they will and what what we're finding is that is very simple. Conceit of asking not just to take a photo of themselves and tying their payment to the number of days did increase his presence it did increase effective teaching. That didn't just come and sleep and then go home. It has altered in to increase TESCO's the Nobel Committee also noted did that. The two of you are part of kind of ongoing conversation in economics about the uses and the limits of field experiments and randomized control trials. And a lot of times what that debate centers on is whether the results of randomized controlled trials or these experiments are generalized whether they can be applied to you other places except where they were specifically performed and whether they can be like scaled up to a lot more people so that for example something that works in a a sub Saharan African village will that work in you know all of India or in parts of the developed world that kind of thing. Can you just kind of give us your thoughts on like how you see the path forward. What you're learning from any particular experiment is rarely or never ooh tag that program and do it everywhere just to wait was what you're learning is potentially some locally useful a knowledge for example this particular and you can decide to scale that puck come up to keep it which is something that they I did? And in term of what's marginal useful for the world is oh this is an important problem. Absenteeism is fixable Saburo because teachers are sensitive to incentives attorneys in some context This is something that we could explore with different programs in different places. We'll thank you both for talking with us. Thank you so much. For having a Esu flow in Apogee Banerjee are both economists at Mit they just won the Nobel Belt Prize this year and they have a new book out called Good Economics for hard times. Today's episode of the indicator was produced by Jared Marcel. Back Checked by Nadia Louis. Our editor is Paddy Hirsch. An indicator is a production of NPR..

Nobel Prize MIT NPR Vertical Development Economics Nobel Committee Committee professor of economics coke Micheal creamer Nobel Committee Africa Esther diplo Stacey Vanek Smith Emerald Club India Estero Cardiff Garcia Apogee Banerjee Paddy Hirsch Panaji Jared Marcel
WeWork And The Future Of Coworking

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:54 min | 1 year ago

WeWork And The Future Of Coworking

"This message comes from NPR sponsor xfinity some things are slow like simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply after investors took a close look at the company's books and lost confidence in what they found there here is Stacey Vanek Smith and Cardiff Garcia from NPR's Daily Economics podcast. The came we work we work was not boring or beige it was this whole new way London earlier this year the company was estimated to be worth forty seven billion dollars Sir look at we works books and investors freaked out the companies rolling company I'm all Sarda is the CEO of a company called Motel which he would basically no tell does compete with we work yeah though Amal does say that they have different companies and it will probably benefit from we works implosion though a mall says probably L. Answers or working for tiny startups most of us just worked for big boring companies enterprises. They believe they're big oh in the last couple of years we worked did start to target bigger binny's on the other hand tend to make for more stable tenants and also they just have more money five hundred dollars a month and that is just for access to the lounge common area if you want in extremely price sensitive and they have much cheaper options and if those

NPR CEO Stacey Vanek Smith Daily Economics Cardiff Garcia Amal London Forty Seven Billion Dollars Five Hundred Dollars
"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on Planet Money

"My name is leo susser. I'm thirteen. I'm in seventh grade. I'm wondering about the inverted yield curve because it just inverted like i'm worried that there could be another recession. Okay well listen <hes> as it happens. Leo planet money has a spinoff off podcast called the indicator. Have you ever listened to it. I've heard of it. We have actually done a bunch of episodes about the yield curve already so i'm gonna make you a deal. I'm going to send you episodes of the indicator to listen to and then after the show. I'm gonna give you a call and see what you think. That's sound good yeah. This is a great topic to be asking about right now and actually leaves not the only one a lot of people have been e mailing planet money to ask what is up with the yield curve and does it mean. We're about to have recession now. As you'll hear my co-host stacey vanek smith can vouch for the fact that i am kind of obsessed with the yield curve. I find find it fascinating. I find it mysterious and i'm amazed by the fact that for the past six decades when the yield curve invert it has anticipated every single recession so today we are putting together our two favourite indicator episodes about the yield curve and we're going to dedicate them to liam. Hello welcome to planet money. I'm card garcia and the show the yield curve. What is what it means when it in verts what it means that it doesn't for an interview with the guy who discovered the inverted yield curve as a recession predictor and finally are answered the question of whether you should be scared and nervous and panicking when you see those headlines about the yield curve in verdict. You shouldn't by the way real quick short answer. This message comes from n._p._r. Sponsor principal principal understands you may have big plans for your money and sometimes life has something else in mind twists and turns. You never see coming twists like job. Transfers and turns like rising college tuitions principle can help you plan for that learn more. We're at principal dot com principal life insurance company a member of principal financial group demoing iowa support also comes from the walton family foundation nation where opportunity takes root more information is available at walton family foundation dot org greg.

principal leo susser stacey vanek smith walton family foundation walton family liam iowa garcia six decades
Selling Dinosaur Bones On eBay

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:32 min | 2 years ago

Selling Dinosaur Bones On eBay

"You can list all kinds of things on EBay, right? Secondhand books. Vintage clothes couches, but dinosaur fossils. Yup. You can make good money selling fossils online. But that does not sit well with some scientists Cardiff Garcia and Stacey Vanik Smith. They are hosts of NPR's podcast, the indicator from planet money, and they've got the story of one guys attempt to e sell a tab Ranna Storace. Rex here is the specific EBay listing for the T. Rex it. Reads young baby t Rex dinosaur fossil the price two point nine five million dollars. So first question who has a T Rex to sell on EBay? I I'm Alan Dietrich. And I'm a professional dinosaur hunter in the US. If you find a dinosaur on your property you own it. It's yours so Fussell hunters like Alan go to fossil country. I went to where they would find the big p Rex's Garfield county, Montana and carting county, South Dakota. The find the person who owns the property where the dinosaur is Andy says, let me look around your land for dinosaur bones. And if I find one I'll give you a cut, Allen's found a lot of fossils this way, including the baby t Rex binding dinosaur bones and selling them to museums and private buyers is how Allen makes money one of the pioneers of this business is Pete Larson. Larson runs. The black hills institute of geological research in South Dakota. So far, we've collected ten different trying to source. Rex skeletons partial skeletons, and that's kind of a record. I guess okay. Pete is being modest there around forty t Rex skeletons that have ever been discovered and Pete has found ten of them. When Pete started out in the fossil business in the late seventies. It wasn't really a job that people had but that changed in the mid nineties when a couple of things happened. I. That's such a good ROY even Spielberg happened. Yes. Even Spielberg happened addressing progresses. Huge hit. And suddenly everybody was super individuals and wanted to hunt for them a number two one of the T Rex is that Pete Larson found a T Rex named sue fetched more than eight million dollars from a buyer and people thought, whoa. There was real money to be made in dinosaurs. And suddenly Montana and South Dakota. We're just like crawling with fossil prospectors and fossil hunting win from this kind of sleepy shoestring academic pursuit to a pretty hot little business. Allen Dietrich is hoping to get a premium for son of Samson because it's the only known baby t Rex. So I'm looking at it. Now, it's two point nine five million approach to cheap. You probably it's priced to move. And sale. Yeah. Now, the for profit fossil business has caused a lot of controversy among museums and the academic community because some of the people hunting just have no qualifications. So they can end up easily destroying priceless fossils. But Larson says the fossil market has to evolve with the times without these private collectors. Most museums would not be able to get real fossils for exhibit, the EBay place seems to be working Allen dietrick says he's got an offer. Who is it a good offer? Well, I'm gonna use a double entendre with you. Okay. It's a bona fide. Stacey Vanek Smith Garcia NPR news.

Pete Larson T Rex REX South Dakota Ebay Alan Dietrich Montana NPR Stacey Vanek Smith Allen Dietrich Allen Ranna Storace Allen Dietrick United States Cardiff Garcia Stacey Vanik Smith Spielberg Garfield County Fussell
"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on KCRW

"Stacey Vanek Smith. Constanza NPR news. Support for planet. Money comes from Baird for one hundred years. Baird has partnered with individuals businesses institutions and communities working together toward their financial goals. More information is available at Baird one hundred dot com. This is NPR news. And you're listening to morning edition on KCRW. Now this from KCRW news for the first time in more than eight years, California is officially drought free. That might not be surprising to you, given all the rain this year. You also might think about all that rain has state officials breathing a big sigh of relief and you'd be right. But as KCRW Steve to your tickets reports, those officials also concerned about getting lulled into a sense of security. A nationwide college admissions scandal with roots right here in southern California this week on KCRW news. We're looking into the allegations that sent shockwaves through campuses and probably your social media feeds what does it mean for your family and your children? Tune in every day for your local news morning edition, press play and all things considered right here on KCRW. Olney onto the point seventeen years in Afghantistan, America's longest war. How did that happen? They fell into it. Because so much of the State Department done so much a torn policy establishment type dot news to the nineteen nineties mission of humanitarian assistance of law and globalization next time on the to the point podcast. You're listening to morning edition on eighty nine point nine KCRW NPR news for southern California serving Thousand Oaks and the Kanawha valley add one or two point three..

KCRW Baird NPR California Stacey Vanek Smith Kanawha valley State Department Thousand Oaks Olney Steve Afghantistan America one hundred years seventeen years eight years
"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin the ongoing trade dispute between the US and China is clearly having an economic economic impact on both countries. But tariffs can also affect people on an individual level. Nowhere is that more. Parent than in America's agriculture communities. Stacey Vanek Smith and Cardiff Garcia hosts of the podcast, the indicator from planet. Money spoke with one farmer whose livelihood is now on the frontlines of a trade war, David Reid farms, more than two thousand acres of peanuts and cotton here in Pinehurst Georgia and with his crop started coming in last year, he says it was glorious. We had to bisque crop. We ever had in years. And then starting over the summer a couple of things happened. I a trade war broke out the US impose tariffs on Chinese goods and China retaliated with import taxes of its own among the US goods at China. Started taxing were peanut butter and cotton, basically, everything they grow in this part of Georgia. And then a couple of months later this happened. Are there in Brooklyn live here in Destin, Florida where we are covering the official landfall of hurricane Michael feel Rossi? I'm sorry. I. Gory for. David lost about a third of his cotton crop and a couple of fields of peanuts to peanuts. Grand? That's what was left after the storm peanuts. Grow underground like potatoes. And this field has peanuts all over the dirt. David picked a couple of. But they were rotten from all the water from the storm show kind of soft partners hands. That was a good peanut when it came to just math. We didn't get picked to at stone. He the peanuts and cotton that did survive walk straight out of storm and into a trade war, China's peanut butter and cotton orders from the US collapsed overnight and the price that David was getting for his peanuts and cotton both fell by about thirty percent. And what had been shaping up to be one of the best years in David's entire farming career turned into one of the worst years ever seen? You know, we had planned to make a lot of money this year, but lower didn't see fit, but hopefully, we're going to break even break. Even and David says, he is one of the lucky ones, they sometimes just worried, you know, I've heard him say, I don't know if I'm gonna survive this or not, you know, is is heartbreaking David says the economic effects of the storm the tariffs haven't just hit the farmers. They've hit the whole area is hurting the whole community and equipment dealer in the guy down. Treat with the hardware store and everybody suffers in spite of everything though, David actually supports the tariffs at that. Well, that's not good for the farmer now. But I think it's the right thing to do, you know, and I think President Trump done, right. Thank in mafia union. I think he did a good thing. David thinks the macro economic issues between the US and China are important enough. That the sacrifice bills worth it to him. Now, the government is providing millions of dollars in aid to cotton farmers and supplementing a lot of the peanut losses. It doesn't make up for everything doesn't make up for all the losses. But David says he is not going to switch to another crop. Neither is anybody. He knows they're going to continue growing cotton. And peanuts just like always why is that? You know, it's what they've always done..

David Reid farms US China Steve Inskeep Pinehurst Georgia Rachel Martin America Stacey Vanek Smith hurricane Michael Florida Trump Cardiff Garcia Rossi President Brooklyn official Destin two thousand acres thirty percent
"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. A new fad in crypto currencies is making some people rich and leaving lots of other scratching their heads. Stacey Vanek Smith and Cardiff Garcia, the host of NPR's daily economics podcast, the indicator. Tell us about the thriving marketplace for adorable cartoon cats called crypto kitties. Are you looking at founder thirty two right now. Yeah. How does it feel to look at founder thirty two? Now, I just put my face every time. I look at it. This is witty kitty is he's known in the crypto kitty universe. We agreed not to use his real name because it would have outed him in the secretive crypto kitty community founder thirty two is his prized crypto kitty for the uninitiated crypto kitties. Are these one of a kind digital cats? You buy them with theorem cryptocurrency, and you can trade them with other users or breed them to make new crypto kitties crypto kitties made headlines earlier this year when one kitty sold for a hundred and forty thousand dollars at an art auction. Witty kitty owns more than five thousand crypto kitties. We asked him how much he paid for his favourite kitty, founder thirty to ten thousand or something. That's that's yeah. Did it feel weird to spend that amount of money on e cartoon picture cats? Oh, yeah. He. It took me a lot of willpower to click the button he started breeding founder thirty two with other cats and selling the offspring I've sold over two hundred so. Around one hundred and fifteen K one hundred and fifteen thousand dollars on crypto kitties like selling your crypto katie's. I actually haven't cashed out. So I actually so I believe in the game Sivan reinvesting all of it, except what I need to live. He's a believer. So for him. Yeah. It's a game. He loves playing it. He loves the cats. But it's also an investment. Do you think like buying crypto kitties is like the equivalent of buying apple at like, eight bucks a share? I think jen's zeros. Yes. Not everybody agrees. I don't know. I don't know about that hunter Horsely is the CEO of bit wise asset management investment fund for cryptocurrency. I think it's a little bit like buying a beanie baby or a piece of your friends, art work. But he says there is something really exciting and really groundbreaking about the crypto kitties themselves. And that is because it crypto kitty is what hunter calls a non fungible token. So this means it is not interchangeable with something else. Like it. So a ten dollar Bill, for instance, is fungible it does not matter which ten dollar Bill. You have in the world. They're all the same. They all have the same value things that are not fungible wine paintings cars property or in the case of crypto kitties. A drawing of a particular cat. Hunter says this could have huge implications. So we know for example, that things like our emails are online documents and photos are all really valuable to us, and they feel like they belong to us. But actually, we don't own them. And it's really hard to price all that stuff. There's. Never been away, for example to price in individual Email or a photo. We haven't had a good way historically to represent that value. What non fungible tokens represent is the ability to put a price on every specific unit. It represents an entirely new kind of property. In the meantime, witty kitty is still making money selling his crypto kitties. But his investment has lost a lot of its value. A theory of has been dropping against the dollar all summer, which probably.

founder Cardiff Garcia Sivan hunter Horsely NPR Stacey Vanek Smith apple katie jen CEO ten dollar fifteen thousand dollars forty thousand dollars fifteen K
"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:58 min | 2 years ago

"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"Put that into perspective that is slightly smaller than the economy of the state of Texas and about the size of New York state's economy. California's economy more than fifty percent bigger than the Russian economy. And in a lot of ways, it seems like Russia's economy should be a lot bigger than this, especially given some of its natural resources. Russia is one of the. Top three producers of oil in the world. It's one of the biggest producers of natural gas and it has huge reserves of nickel, aluminum, palladium, yes, rush again, be Biegel. Russia should be Sergei Alica Shanka is an economist with the Brookings Institution. He also served as the deputy chair of Russia's central Bank in the nineties and circuses to understand where Russia's economy is now, you're actually have to go back to the nineties Cold War had distended. It was a new chapter for Russia's economy. The transition from plan centralized socialist economy to a more open economy was wrenching in chaotic and full of cronyism and corruption. But eventually companies from all over the world did start coming into Russia, like Pepsi Dannon, BP, McDonald's, and starting row nineteen ninety nine. The Russian economy also started benefiting from oil prices which started going up and up and up and Russia's economy followed. This was just as a young ambitious official name. Vladimir Putin became the prime minister. The beginning of the twentieth century was maybe the best of the most successful period old Soviet Russia, economic history between nineteen ninety and two thousand eight Russia's economy tripled in size, and then the global financial crash happened Russia's economy tanked, and it's bounced around a lot since then. Now the Russian economy though is about the same size as it was a decade ago, did that's may be the most painful side of the story that Russian economy lost momentum. This momentum. Meanwhile countries like the US, Germany and China have recovered and grown since then. So what happened to Russia? Sergei says there are three major obstacles that have held Russia back from the global economic party. Of course, the major problem for the Russian economy was they declined oil. Prices. Oil is Russia's biggest industry by a mile. It's the government's biggest source of revenue. So when oil prices fell during the financial crash from a high of more than one hundred, four. Eighty seven dollars a barrel to about thirty dollars a barrel. It devastated Russia's economy. An oil prices have fluctuated a lot in the time since and they are pretty high right now, but selling oil has gotten more complicated for Russia which brings us to the second reason that Sergei says that Russia's economy has stalled, wisdom, sanctions below, can access to financial markets and imposing something on foreign direct investment going to Russia western sanctions. These were put in place in two thousand fourteen after Russia invaded Ukraine. The US and other western nations tried to get Russia to pull out of Ukraine by blocking it from doing business with many foreign companies. Putin refused to negotiate the sanction state in place for the last four years. Russia has been cut off from a lot of foreign trade and investment investment. These, like if you'll for your car, if you have fuel, you may dry. Your engine will walk. If you have no investment, economic will grow. But circa says the biggest thing holding back. Russia's economy is not oil prices or even sanctions. It's something a lot closer to home elect of pro property right protection, a lack of proper property right protections. Sergei says this makes doing business in Russia, very uncertain. Even for Russians, you might have thriving business doing really well and making lots of sales, and the state could just take it or someone with connections could just take it and there's not that much you can do. So it's it's worries about corruption that it's actually these corruption is only

Russia Sergei Alica Shanka Russia Akers Soviet Russia Vladimir Putin US Exxon Mobil FBI president California Garcia cronyism Brookings Institution Russia. Stacey Vanek Smith Moscow New York
"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:58 min | 2 years ago

"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"Russia. It has been looming very large in the news while they're indication tonight that Russia's attacks on the US election system are continuing of homeland security and FBI detailed a two year multi-stage effort by Moscow Russia Akers have infiltrated key power grids and can shut down any of them at any moment. They're coming for the lights. I lost it from having listened to that. I know. I know it's it's scary and weird and crazy, and a lot of politics, but you know, politics aside. It's interesting to think about, you know, who were dealing with here, like, who is this country that is looming so large in her headlines right now. There we hear so much about the political situation in Russia, but what about the Russian economy? This indicator Garcia and Stacey Vanek Smith today on the show. We take a look at the Russian economy. Support for this podcast and the following message come from fixed the easiest way to know exactly what's wrong with your car. When your check engine light comes on and how much repair should cost get ten percent off fixed at listen to my car dot com and enter promo code indicator support also comes from Exxon Mobil. The company that's helping cars go further with less making cars, more efficient and helping to reduce emissions, learn more at energy factor dot com. Exxon Mobil, energy lives hair. Today's indicator is one point, six trillion dollars. That's the size of Russia's economy and just put that into perspective that is slightly smaller than the economy of the state of Texas and about the size of New York state's economy. California's economy more than fifty percent bigger than the Russian economy. And in a lot of ways, it seems like Russia's economy should be a lot bigger than this, especially given some of its natural resources. Russia is one of the. Top three producers of oil in the world. It's one of the biggest producers of natural gas and it has huge reserves of nickel, aluminum, palladium, yes, rush again, be Biegel. Russia should be Sergei Alica Shanka is an economist with the Brookings Institution. He also served as the deputy chair of Russia's central Bank in the nineties and circuses to understand where Russia's economy is now, you're actually have to go back to the nineties Cold War had distended. It was a new chapter for Russia's economy. The transition from plan centralized socialist economy to a more open economy was wrenching in chaotic and full of cronyism and corruption. But eventually companies from all over the world did start coming into Russia, like Pepsi Dannon, BP, McDonald's, and starting row nineteen ninety nine. The Russian economy also started benefiting from oil prices which started going up and up and up and Russia's economy followed. This was just as a young ambitious official name. Vladimir Putin became the prime minister. The beginning of the twentieth century was maybe the best of the most successful period old Soviet Russia, economic history between nineteen ninety and two thousand eight Russia's economy tripled in size, and then the global financial crash happened Russia's economy tanked, and it's bounced around a lot since then. Now the Russian economy though is about the same size as it was a decade ago, did that's may be the most painful side of the story that Russian economy lost momentum. This momentum. Meanwhile countries like the US, Germany and China have recovered and grown since then. So what happened to Russia? Sergei says there are three major obstacles that have held Russia back from the global economic party. Of course, the major problem for the Russian economy was they declined oil. Prices. Oil is Russia's biggest industry by a mile. It's the government's biggest source of revenue. So when oil prices fell during the financial crash from a high of more than one hundred, four. Eighty seven dollars a barrel to about thirty dollars a barrel. It devastated Russia's economy. An oil prices have fluctuated a lot in the time since and they are pretty high right now, but selling oil has gotten more complicated for Russia which brings us to the second reason that Sergei says that Russia's economy has stalled, wisdom, sanctions below, can access to financial markets and imposing something on foreign direct investment going to Russia western sanctions. These were put in place in two thousand fourteen after Russia invaded Ukraine. The US and other western nations tried to get Russia to pull out of Ukraine by blocking it from doing business with many foreign companies. Putin refused to negotiate the sanction state in place for the last four years. Russia has been cut off from a lot of foreign trade and investment investment. These, like if you'll for your car, if you have fuel, you may dry. Your engine will walk. If you have no investment, economic will grow. But circa says the biggest thing holding back. Russia's economy is not oil prices or even sanctions. It's something a lot closer to home elect of pro property right protection, a lack of proper property right protections. Sergei says this makes doing business in Russia, very uncertain. Even for Russians, you might have thriving business doing really well and making lots of sales, and the state could just take it or someone with connections could just take it and there's not that much you can do. So it's it's worries about corruption that it's actually these corruption is only one element. I would say it's it's lik over appropriate institutions because when we say that they there is no independent court. There is no rule of Loyd when we say that the president keeps control over the talent. It's about institutions says, results says, Sergei. It's hard to build something in the Russian economy. Why invest in a business that could just be taken away circuit says. When people make money, they try to cash out quickly or even get their money out of the country in some cases. Now, this is something that Putin has direct control over and Putin has talked about wanting to grow the economy, but circuses Putin is not going to change the situation for him. It's it's a choice between keeping power or economic growth. Are those two things so closely interlinked the more than much more than you think Sergei says any independent institution, independent courts or independent elections would threaten Putin's hold on power and circuses no matter what happens with sanctions or oil prices. The unreliable institutions will keep Russia from really interacting with the global economy which is moving towards a new selection. And if Russian corn the Russian business findings place in international global chains, Kate India's from cloud will be too late. Even if a new president will come to Russia and he will change. Political institutions be if you out of the story, if you do not with us, what? What? What can you produce matter? How small rest is Connie gets Russia will always have the leverage of much wealthier country. Sergei says people kind of have to play ball with Russia for a very specific reason Russia's this second biggest military power into world as the only one. Yes. Right, right, right. Yes, she hasn't taken nuclear weapons. All the rest is is peanuts and. Russia's only one of two countries in the world that may destroy the global lives. The life of us completely. Yes, this being US is correct.

Russia Sergei Alica Shanka Russia Akers Soviet Russia Vladimir Putin US Exxon Mobil FBI president California Garcia cronyism Brookings Institution Russia. Stacey Vanek Smith Moscow New York
What's holding back Russia's economy?

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:58 min | 2 years ago

What's holding back Russia's economy?

"Put that into perspective that is slightly smaller than the economy of the state of Texas and about the size of New York state's economy. California's economy more than fifty percent bigger than the Russian economy. And in a lot of ways, it seems like Russia's economy should be a lot bigger than this, especially given some of its natural resources. Russia is one of the. Top three producers of oil in the world. It's one of the biggest producers of natural gas and it has huge reserves of nickel, aluminum, palladium, yes, rush again, be Biegel. Russia should be Sergei Alica Shanka is an economist with the Brookings Institution. He also served as the deputy chair of Russia's central Bank in the nineties and circuses to understand where Russia's economy is now, you're actually have to go back to the nineties Cold War had distended. It was a new chapter for Russia's economy. The transition from plan centralized socialist economy to a more open economy was wrenching in chaotic and full of cronyism and corruption. But eventually companies from all over the world did start coming into Russia, like Pepsi Dannon, BP, McDonald's, and starting row nineteen ninety nine. The Russian economy also started benefiting from oil prices which started going up and up and up and Russia's economy followed. This was just as a young ambitious official name. Vladimir Putin became the prime minister. The beginning of the twentieth century was maybe the best of the most successful period old Soviet Russia, economic history between nineteen ninety and two thousand eight Russia's economy tripled in size, and then the global financial crash happened Russia's economy tanked, and it's bounced around a lot since then. Now the Russian economy though is about the same size as it was a decade ago, did that's may be the most painful side of the story that Russian economy lost momentum. This momentum. Meanwhile countries like the US, Germany and China have recovered and grown since then. So what happened to Russia? Sergei says there are three major obstacles that have held Russia back from the global economic party. Of course, the major problem for the Russian economy was they declined oil. Prices. Oil is Russia's biggest industry by a mile. It's the government's biggest source of revenue. So when oil prices fell during the financial crash from a high of more than one hundred, four. Eighty seven dollars a barrel to about thirty dollars a barrel. It devastated Russia's economy. An oil prices have fluctuated a lot in the time since and they are pretty high right now, but selling oil has gotten more complicated for Russia which brings us to the second reason that Sergei says that Russia's economy has stalled, wisdom, sanctions below, can access to financial markets and imposing something on foreign direct investment going to Russia western sanctions. These were put in place in two thousand fourteen after Russia invaded Ukraine. The US and other western nations tried to get Russia to pull out of Ukraine by blocking it from doing business with many foreign companies. Putin refused to negotiate the sanction state in place for the last four years. Russia has been cut off from a lot of foreign trade and investment investment. These, like if you'll for your car, if you have fuel, you may dry. Your engine will walk. If you have no investment, economic will grow. But circa says the biggest thing holding back. Russia's economy is not oil prices or even sanctions. It's something a lot closer to home elect of pro property right protection, a lack of proper property right protections. Sergei says this makes doing business in Russia, very uncertain. Even for Russians, you might have thriving business doing really well and making lots of sales, and the state could just take it or someone with connections could just take it and there's not that much you can do. So it's it's worries about corruption that it's actually these corruption is only

Russia Sergei Alica Shanka Russia Akers Soviet Russia Vladimir Putin United States Exxon Mobil FBI President Trump California Garcia Cronyism Brookings Institution Russia. Stacey Vanek Smith Moscow New York
"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is morning edition from NPR. News I'm Rachel Martin and I'm no king, the US economy. Seems to be, doing well unemployment is low we're adding jobs but there are other key indicators that might better tell us how the economy is doing NPR's planet money. Has a daily economics podcast called the indicator it digs. Into numbers in the news and the host Stacey Vanek Smith in Cardiff, Garcia have to indicators that might, make, economists nervous indicator number one, that does yes show a slightly worrying trend. And, that is very understandable by normal. Humans now this, is the personal savings rate so right, now Americans are only saving about three point two percent. Of their incomes after taxes are taken out and that is only about half as much as Americans were saving just three. Years ago before the saving rate fell sharply, and then for the last couple of, years it's, averaged about. Where it is now three point two percent so low savings rate, in. Some ways, makes a lot of sense right? I mean unemployment is Low and. People do, tend to save less money when they're feeling good when they're confident about where the economy is going when they are confident they're going. To be able to keep their job. Or maybe even get a better job. Really soon with a higher salary at plus, the population is. Aging and a, lot more people are retiring now and some of the money that retirees are spending comes from their earlier savings things like pensions and 401K's rather than. From new income so that might be skewing the personal. Saving rate a bit lower but for a totally normal and not actually, that worrying reason but still we, are, keeping our eye on the, savings rate because in historical terms a personal. Savings, rate of three point two percent. Is pretty low, and in the past the savings rate, has tended to be low right before the economy starts. To slow down now there's no particular reason why this should be the case we're not exactly sure why this happens but. That is how it has happened that's how, it's been for example the savings rate, now is, just about. Where it was back in two thousand five and two thousand six. Right. Before the, last recession The second indicator is negative zero point two percent real wages have fallen by, point two percent in the past year and when we say real wages what we mean is wages adjusted for inflation so wages have gone up people's paychecks have gotten bigger but at the same time the prices of the things, people by have gone up even more a big part. Of the reason that inflation climbed as much as it did in. The past year is it all and gas prices really shot. Up so Americans were paying a lot more to fill up their cars and trucks, with gas and oil prices are notoriously, volatile so there's a good. Chance that spike was, just temporary and that inflation may not be as bad going forward and also this is. Just one measure of real wage growth specifically it's the one. That comes from the bureau of labor, statistics and it covers people who are. Not executives or managers. Most people, real people but other measures might be slightly better still what's clear from the past year is that a lot of Americans got higher Wages but didn't really get to. Enjoy them because the. Amount of stuff they could buy with those wages stayed roughly the same in fact it was slightly less than. What they could buy with those wages the year before just. To. Be clear these indicators do not guarantee or even suggest that, we're headed for catastrophe don't pay a recession or even a slowdown we just, wish that they were a little bit. Better and we wanted to share them with you Cardiff Garcia Stacey Smith.

Garcia Stacey Smith NPR Stacey Vanek Smith Rachel Martin bureau of labor US Cardiff two percent 401K
What’s the Yield Curve? ‘A Powerful Signal of Recessions’ Has Wall Street’s Attention

Think Realty Radio

01:55 min | 2 years ago

What’s the Yield Curve? ‘A Powerful Signal of Recessions’ Has Wall Street’s Attention

"Showers and thunderstorms are likely for the new york city area today some of the storms could produce gusty winds heavy rain and frequent lightening highs near eighty five degrees but then clearing tonight and it goes down to around sixty five degrees in a beautiful weekend tomorrow saturday sunny highs near seventy seven degrees and then on sunday it'll be sunny with a high near eighty three degrees right now seventy seven degrees light rain falling in new york city from wnyc this is money talking on charlie herman recently it seems there's been an increase in people talking about this thing called the yield curve yield you'll curve wonderful yield curve the socalled inverted yield curve likes unless you work in finance you may be asking yourself what in the world are they talking about and do i really care well the answer is yes you should because this economic indicator has for decades predicted recessions and right now while we all should be paying attention and i have the perfect people to explain to you just what the yield curve is i'm stacey vanek smith and i'm cardiff garcia there the co host of npr's the indicator from planet money in cardiff would it be saying bit too much that you're kind of obsessed with the yield curve now i believe the question is directed at me amazing indicators so important here's the deal it's possible that you can say that i'm obsessed with the yield curve but the better question you should be asking yourself charlie is why isn't everybody else obsessed with the yield curve is a phenomenal economic indicator in one that i think has gone underrated for far too long okay but what exactly are we talking about here it's interest rates but it has to do with a very specific type dealing with government debt that's exactly right so these are interest rates on government debt that debt is also referred to sometimes as treasuries the government can issue this debt with different maturity and that just has to do with how long it takes for the government.

Charlie Herman Garcia NPR Cardiff New York Wnyc Stacey Vanek Seventy Seven Degrees Eighty Three Degrees Eighty Five Degrees Sixty Five Degrees
"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

NPR's Business Story of the Day

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

"Support for npr and the following message come from synchrony providing the payment tools and technologies promotional financing and retail insights to help you put your ambitions in reach what are you working forward to learn more at synchrony financial dot com dollar for dollar california as the biggest agriculture economy in this country and lately farmers in that state of in struggling with a new kind of problem they don't have enough workers to harvest crops cardiff garcia and stacey vanek smith of our planet money team went to a celery farm in ventura county california to find out more we went to oxnard california to talk with tom gear door his family his own farms in this area for decades there's probably eighty acres of celery here in the field that we're at right now every single stock celery needs to get cut by hand in the middle of the ocean of salary there is a crew of about thirty workers they walk in a row in fig straw hats hacking off celery stocks and tossing them onto this motorized platform which stretches across the field and chugs along behind it is really hard and dangerous work ten hour days swinging and knife in the hot sun and win the job market's strong like it has been for the last few years these workers have a lot of other options they move into whether it's landscaping jobs construction jobs food service jobs so tom dear door i had to compete for workers he's raised their pay by actually quite a lot back in two thousand six working the celery field paid about eight dollars and seventy cents an hour.

npr california stacey vanek smith ventura county california oxnard eight dollars eighty acres ten hour
"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"stacey vanek smith" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You're listening to planet money i'm stacey vanek smith edward how are you put together but not secretary socially swamped because you've made a big deal how he was socially awkward and like i was a pretty socially awkward teenager myself so i thought you know i don't have to be like cool i can just be like charlie anyway i was watching this video one of his tours of his room feel comfortable having you around so i think it's about time i shaved round and he said oh look that's a world record certificate right there behind me because i have a full on you it's pretty nettie i have the world record for typing the alphabet in the fastest time on an ipad was like well he's even cooler because i thought rockets are pretty cool i had i had the book that would be the guinness book of world records edward had a copy and the idea of being in this book seemed amazing so everyone online see what charlie's typing record was it turned out that his time was six point thirty one seconds and we're thinks i'm a fast typist just refined he tries typing the alphabet on his own ipad and he's really fast and in fact after practicing for an hour he is faster than charlie he is beating the world record so i was like okay i have to i have to do this and i thought you know he would probably find out about it and it would sort of always make us like equals in some sense right call you up or i o sort of have totally edward goes to the guinness website prints out the rules for attempting record his mom to film it like on her phone but you know sometimes you tell your parents about something and they start make a really big deal out of it and they wanna like invite your families are filming it and all of a sudden you just wish you'd never told them at all this happened to edward but like times a million i don't know if i should get into the president thing but should i get into it oh that your dad was the president of georgia edwards dad was the president of georgia and like dads are he's super proud of his son and he he's excited about this thing that he's trying to do but he's also the president's we thinking about national presidential issues one.

charlie president georgia stacey vanek secretary edward guinness thirty one seconds