20 Episode results for "Spondylitis"

M 32 Running Fundamentals

A Doctor's Perspective Podcast

05:43 min | 2 years ago

M 32 Running Fundamentals

"Doc perspective minnesota episode thirty two. Thanks for tuning in a couple of weeks ago. I went to shanghai <unk> again the same place where if you notice on the graphics for the minnesota it was my face in words for like the first fourteen and then now i've got pictures so during those those pictures that's what i went to shanghai same hospital for ankylosing spondylitis did a presentation <hes> went back and this guy's great. I mean so much hospitality. I don't think they use me as well as they could have while i was there for doing consoles and things but <hes> you know is their first time just doing it solo but they're so hospitable and for like lunch we just did it with <hes> dining and is my last day. There and i was like oh man. I saw a subway sandwich shop the other day. I was telling you about subway pizza and everything. I want to get an early one this now once a month would be great but before that once every six months so i think oh man i want one of those one of their sweet soft cookies yes. He's a sure oh yeah. We still ordered me. Their chinese fried noodles with some acumen beef it was let's go to i took a couple of bites and thought it was somebody else but they share food anyway so it really wouldn't matter but it wasn't that it was just me him and other guy and he ordered three those plus my subway they do. They just throw it away. I was just like i'm eating full like trying to tell you so anyway <hes> looking forward to doing that again like i said very spittle people especially in in food culture. They order more food. If they run out of food it makes them look bad. So the rather waste <hes> did a fun instagram video because they had all the king crabs and p._b. Shrimp running around a mantis shrimp. Have you wanna call it and he's aquariums and you pick whatever you want. Oh man the mantis shrimp by the way peop- shrimp if you haven't had that you get a chance order it trust me so salacious. Okay okay okay get episode art of manliness long distance running so i'm not a runner not a big fan don't like so this was definitely a podcast. I don't want to hear about what are the myths so. This guy said hey look you need. A goal with running have recovered as and running days and you have a program. That's the best way to do it. So a lot of people go out there. I must start running cool so for like ten minutes in the next twenty minutes and then they go from one mile the jump into like three miles and five mile then like a month and that's way too fast so his ideas look. You only need to run three times a week or so start slow. You know if you're slow. Stay slow. Oh you only do half a mile. Do half a mile for like a week or two then you add ten or fifteen percent more distance and you just keep doing that until you get to that level that you want. I mean there's more to it but the most important thing is like having consistency and having rest days so remember you thirty three. You're not sixteen okay and a lot of people like i used to do this and that when i was in high school yeah yeah that's been ten years or more tone it down there champ so endurance sports like a marathon and beyond you will lose muscle lemass if you don't include strength training so some people are worried about. I'm bulky and already want to run. I wanna lose my book well. If you actually wait train while you're doing the marathons you won't lose the muscle mass you not gonna gain because running that much as catholic but you'll at least stay the same you also get faster finishing better economics comics in your recover faster if you do training along with your running and let's heavy because you already got endurance runners say well. I'm going to do lighter way but like like twenty of them to build my nurse. I know you already got the endurance. You run so much. You're good you need to build some heavy lifting and work out those tendons and everything a little bit more and keep your core strong. That's the one of the big things he was talking about. Was working your core lot. Let's finish without being overly fatigued those last couple of miles you really tired you get really your reform. Gets bad your time drops but if you actually were working on your core and you're strong you can actually finished strong to a lot of people get injured. He couldn't say that's a myth seven seven percent. We'll get hurt in a year so it's an impact sport you know and a lot of people do too much too soon and so they heard some are. They don't stop when they feel something's off.

minnesota shanghai spondylitis shanghai same hospital seven seven percent fifteen percent twenty minutes ten minutes six months ten years
Should You Produce An Episode About COVID19 (Or The Next Crisis)? [Episode 276]

Podcast Pontifications

09:18 min | 1 year ago

Should You Produce An Episode About COVID19 (Or The Next Crisis)? [Episode 276]

"Does your audience expect you to say something about the pandemic I mean. How do you balance out your compassion as a human being with your content production plan because you're a strategic podcast or right or maybe you should just stay silent? Let's find out hello and welcome to another podcast pontificate with me. Yvo Tara. If you're like me your inbox and I hate my inbox. By the way your inbox has been flooded with every single company. It seems like you have ever given your email address to letting you know what they are doing about. Cova nineteen and the corona virus. Of course some of those are good to know. I want to hear what the airlines are doing to keep us safe in that collective environment that we really can't escape from for several hours at a time. I WanNa know what the local businesses that I might still need to frequent as long as. We're not on lockdown. Might need to are doing to make sure that I am safe if I have to go inside of their. Some of those are helpful. Yes some aren't likely right because you know we just get overloaded by these things And it's not the kind of business that we really have to go to but those people who put out who are work at the businesses who put out those emails are struggling with the same question. Lots of podcasters are struggling with right now. And it's should you say something? Should you let your audience know that you acknowledge the fact that this thing is happening to the entire world and even though you're a podcast her most podcasters like me sit alone or remotely with the other people who are in other locations and social distancing as great in the podcasting world. We still have audiences out there. Who wonder what's going on. And we're still human beings and we feel a desire a question like whether or not we should say something during this time listener. Jason Sacco. He does a podcast about. Oh my goodness I can't even pronounce it Ankylosing spondylitis Guinness. It's he's wondering what he's supposed to say to his audience now for his audience that are immunosuppressed. And so. That's definitely something you want to hear about. But I had another client of mine over the weekend to doesn't do a show about current events who doesn't really do a show about what's happening in the world today at any given time ask what they should do. Should they say something? Should they let the people know out there? What's going on? And we went back and forth on whether or not that was a good idea or not. One of the things that we worked on was increasing increasing adding. Now what's what I'm looking for? Let's go with reducing the timeless factor. That's one of the beauties about podcast content. That's not news. Current events is there's an evergreen factor and the minute you put something in that makes it non evergreen. It's odd say merry Christmas because it's you know a merry Christmas time. Podcast putting him Moore on December twenty fifth and someone decides to listen to it on June sixteenth That seems a little weird because their time shifted from when you actually record the content so if you do record something now and put it in your episodes is it. GonNa make sense later on. Also you run the risk of putting something in there and people go wait a minute. You're a current events there on a new show should I? I don't WanNa hear this from you to struggle. What if you're doing a series? You're doing a six part series and it's week three right now. Do you put. I'd a little note to your audience about how you're doing and hope that you're there all okay to beginning of your fourth episode of this series which has nothing to do with pandemics. I mean it could really impact your content from now on if you do something like that so these are all questions that you have to answer for yourself. And I've got a couple of suggestions that seems to think about one thing I want you to think about is maybe not replacing your current podcast Episodes maybe not putting a note at the beginning of your next episode now. Obviously if you already do something like that if it's if that's part of your normal format and if it's an easily great but chances are you're not asking the question if you already have an easy solution for him. It's those of you that don't so they just keep this in mind We now have bonus podcast content episodes. We can put out a bonus episode to our audience whenever we want and yeah still most listening. Apps consume content in a linear fashion. So whatever we put out as a bonus episode will be. We'll go to everyone and there is a chance that somebody brand new to your show will grab that episode and assume you're episode is about this current pandemics tone to that. Make sure you let people know that it's a bonus episode but I would totally put out a bonus episode. Oh and here's the deal I've seen some mistakes in bonus episode. I've seen people make some missteps with bonus. Episodes bonus. Episodes can be whatever they need to be. They do not need to follow the format of your show. If you normally do forty five minute episodes of an audio drama with nine different people you don't have to write an episode about the corona virus recovered nineteen. You can put out a thirty second hand. A Ninety second bonus episode. That's just about that. The say I'm here. We're here we're okay. Maybe we're not okay. Here's our issues going on. Just keep people updated informed or just. Let them know that you're that you're thinking about them. That's okay I think. Silence is worse than nothing at all if you feel. Here's your guiding principle. Here's your North Star. If you feel like you need to say something to your audience either to let them know how you are. Let them know that you're in this together. Let the no changes to your production schedule. Whatever I think you can do that. I think you should do that now. How you do that is up to you. Obviously don't forget your podcast as more than just the audio you put out. You got a website. Probably right social media content right but chances are you have more people who are listening to your words and reading the other things. I shared the audience. Numbers might look bigger on your social properties. But let's face it most people don't see your posts so make sure that you do say something if you want to say something but it's okay to say that something just as a bonus episode. I may talk a little bit more about bonus episodes because I think that they are under under utilized but yeah kick out a bonus episode and I know it takes time and effort but make sure that it takes less time and effort. Hopefully if it works for you then a regular episode you have to invest some time the put it out there just to keep your audience updated and I think that's actually a good thing. That's one way I'm thinking about doing it. In fact I guess I just did it by letting by putting this episode out. I didn't do it as a bonus episode for me. It's a little different because I do. Four episodes week gets a little tighter. When you're on a daily schedule you know. Maybe then it matters for you to do it actually as a full episode decisions decisions decisions so one thing you can do during this time of crisis obviously is keep communicating with your fellow podcasters. The people that are in the same boat with you struggling through. What are you going to do to tell your audience? I'm have a conversation strike up a conversation and a slack group on facebook group. Wherever AND ASK THE QUESTION. Tell Hey Edo says we should be telling our audience even if we're not a new show what's going on with the Crowbar so at least what's going on with us a cove in nineteen and how we're impacted now these things. What do you think about that? Short conversation tell him. I did it that way. You're not take all the heat. All take the heat for you. I hope you're doing well during this time of Krahn virus. We're okay on this side. Doing the social distancing quarantining methods on our own. But you know it's GonNa have tomorrow. I'll do it again. That's right I'll see you tomorrow for another podcast pontificates.

spondylitis Cova Jason Sacco facebook Edo Moore North Star forty five minute Ninety second thirty second twenty fifth
M 17 Cart Abandonment and Lifetime Back End Sales

A Doctor's Perspective Podcast

05:58 min | 2 years ago

M 17 Cart Abandonment and Lifetime Back End Sales

"Take. Doc, his perspective. Minnesota live in the Shanghai airport did my presentation at the inclosing spondylitis Asian conference officially called the for so long. Let's see international symposium on ankylosing spondylitis pain, classification anti-inflammatory in pain treatment programs by the Asia Pacific federation of pain physicians. Shanghai active. Yeah. The conference went well gave a little speech, and these will the meals were good. Get some meat the president of the hospital that kind of put it on specialize in. Yes overall. Good experience. Look forward to something like that again. This week is perpetual traffic episode one, sixty six talk in review, optimization. A lot of times that podcast though ball, conversions out of sit ups click here is so that you can make the purchaser, get the Email, but this time, it's like, hey, if your business sales revenue opposition is important, we're talking not just the free. Sale, but the sale follow emails cart abandonment in recapturing and retargeting. Those now most people just focus on leads and conversion rates, but you've got gotta be able to capture their money. That's why you're in business. There's only three ways do that get more customers. Get them to spend more or getting the buy more often in recent stats show is seven times more expensive to get a new customer, then to keep them when you have what they mentioned was that initial sales just one piece a lot of people. Try to everything the one sale in. That's more like a quick promo. The money is made in the back through your Email sequences. Optimizing, your Email list and resell them on other products that they've already purchased. Now, the lifetime value is the most important, and that's the whole, maybe the only purchase them for seventeen dollars front. But then three months from now, sixty days from now, they buy some this one nine and another two months now forty nine so if your lifetime value customer ends up being higher, you can actually spend more than the next guy to acquire the customer Fernan won't thing that you optimize everything is. Decrease your bounce rate just in percent this way, if you paid fifty cents per lead, and you got a thousand leads great, but we start checking Google analytics you notice while all but one hundred didn't just bounce in the first thirty seconds. Well, now you didn't just fifty Cincinnati. It was five bucks of so I and you might want to do is tiny P and G or kingdoms speed test try to optimize like images. See what's slow in your page down. People are just bouncing all the means they from Facebook or Lincoln or wherever click your page, it doesn't load fast in the form, and they leave or worse, they get your page is not what they're looking for. They click also if you got we're, we're pressing. You've got plug ins. You don't use action Toledo that also hopes that speed up your page. Now abandonment cart up is probably the biggest thing you can do to just recaptured. We're talking seventy percent fifty percent more sales type of thing. Now, some people say starts page and work towards check out this guy recommending thirty checkout page thirty or Clark. Get that optimized. And didn't work to forward because no point you know these lease. Your boss. So they're recommending not only Email, and you're only male figure out an app plug into your shop afar because they're you know, for card is not good. Also using Facebook messenger that increases your repurchase a lot and then text messages. So you get a catcher all that before they place, the order, you have it. You follow up some nice thirty minutes three hours, twenty four hours and forty dollars. And you have to stop think something like after that, you're breaking some rules or something, something in that category. But you can make fifty to seventy percents more income by doing some you were saying, oh, I made five thousand now you making seventeen thousand and just when people who banned in their cart, and you've got him back in a typical pace conversion one to three percent is actually quite good. You might make it up to five percent and fantastic also believes in the order bump. So when you had your check out for glasses, you know, an upsell you have one click up, so underneath that, that might be for glasses cleaner or an eye glasses. Are the tools to fix your glasses or something like that, where you can add value immediately? They're already high on the making a purchase, who you can ask them, though, something extract their offices were doctors. So you gotta really think about what's up. So maybe they bought your health book, and you added a digital download or audiobook, top of that, for a few extra bucks. Or if your vitamin vitamin now, you can offer them on new plan every day to our two bottles at discount, and also plug ins upsells inbound sales. Definitely Russell Brunson stuff. If you talk about Justin, the best thing, you do get expert secrets dotcom secrets is do you don't have to click funnels per se? But all the order bums the Email sequences the up so bound sales. Like that's kind of what it was like they put information contact information. They click next go next. You put your credit card information dares order bump the click that button. Now, you get the regional were plus that extra money, then it goes to like another site. Another page and you can up selling on something else at a higher rate in the twenty percent of the people click that they click note, and I go to a downfield say, okay. Well, you didn't want this would you prefer it on a monthly plan pay pay it out to ninety nine Bill over three months or it could be you didn't want this? But what about this, and some a little different, but similar at a lower price, just to get them? Keep committing to they're already buying stuff. They might as well just buy some more, we're talking ten to twenty percent extra. That means you went from like a forty seven dollar cart out, sixty seven now. Maybe two ninety nine it's pretty amazing. When you look like a thousand people who buy just how much difference in yourselves your bottom line, so that the just of that episode duct Justice, bringing you pass tech behind the curtain.

Facebook spondylitis Shanghai president Asia Pacific federation Doc Minnesota Cincinnati Russell Brunson Toledo Clark Justin Lincoln twenty percent three months forty seven dollar seventeen dollars twenty four hours
active CEO Podcast #96 Christian Boucousis Leading Out Of The Danger Zone

active CEO Podcast

59:05 min | 1 year ago

active CEO Podcast #96 Christian Boucousis Leading Out Of The Danger Zone

"We're off right on that pig stress curve you have to be able to. Bay Road at the top there. If you're if you're over the top performance drops or if you're under house then yeah you're unable to execute what you need to do. And it certainly wasn't a case that we now that every time and again with age and looking back more purposely could see how I could have done a better. But the but the methodology that we we used that sequence all planning briefing executing their mission and daybreak things so in the plan we started out FICO so we planned a team. We were in the same room team. And we we roughed out what we're GONNA do and that would normally be the eighty percent plan then we move into the briefing stage where we communicate the plan to the team based on my car information. And it's through that briefing way focusing that little bit more than something that organizations do terribly. Until be brutally honest sports teams helping see ours and pieces latest discover the energy to perform exceptional brilliance and positively impact. The lives of those around them be inspired by world leaders. Game changing influences and next level. Gary's these these the active see our podcast where the ordinary daren't belong and now you'll highest cer and founder of energy to perform international speaker and ladyship performance coach Craig. John's on this episode of the active senior podcast. We speak with a high performing leader. Who was born to fly fighter jets thrives on Hani Complex and demanding environments and is the author of on time on target? He started his career as a fighter pilot for the Royal Australian Force before founding the Christian Thomas Group which provides humanitarian support to developing nations and directing W E johns and sons his current roles including founder and CEO of Mir- Developments Property Company publisher of Australian Aviation and high-performance coach in speaking of after burner Australia and New Zealand. I'm honored and privileged to introduce to high achiever who focuses on flawless execution successfully transferred his Hollywood skills of flying thousand kilometers and out to the business world and has a thriving entrepreneur Cristian Bu Kucice Christian. Welcome to the Shari next Craig. Thanks for having made a real pleasure to be SA- flying in the skies mean a passion since you were very young. We use that kid at school that would grab a sheet and jump off things to see if he could fly all the alternate route from the outset. I don't remember anything else at flow or made noise. I always in interruptions of just ever really nine anything else so I guess. Interestingly idei Shen has shocked every part of my Lafon I find it fascinating Nearly four years lighter that in some way shape or form On still involved in the community and sharing lessons off learned. It's a it's a really. It's it's an amazing industry in amazing life and creator of to have had to be still having. Yeah look at an all time when of jumped out of planes and you just kind of. There's something about this being up in the sky and wither. It's actually an appliance or or outside the PLANO. It's just a fascinating experience to sing the world's getting out of the view and the security of being in them and I think I think what boils down to and it's something that is getting more traction in the business world now but this whole concept of a fresh set of is a different perspective and I think it gives you that different perspective. Because you're bob everything and and you say context and I think one of the really unique things about aviation is you're you're really see the fragility of the world and really how many people there and perhaps some of the things that way Tyke on board a little personally really meant that Y. That world is small pots of a very very big machine. That is humanity differently so going back to your younger years you know. Did you fit into the picking order school? When and how was that time fee? I think because I had this sense of purpose and vision and on a Ni- from going to school reunions and saying a friends and colleagues from school now that they are much more much older just always the normally just they just knew that that attack. Chris just wanted to be the autopilot. Wanted to be a pilot and everything. I did shapes my school years I studied size. Not because good at it in fact I was terribly terribly terrible academic and everything really but everything I did was always about becoming a pilot and in my part time I read everything about. Ib reading books about wool. Two when I was eight years old and my entire bedroom was just coveting I I should pastas and every minute could get away out to. Ambulance would work experience on. Go to an army base fly helicopters. My uncles were helicopter. Pilots gone spent time with them. Everything I did was amazing myself innovation so I was not in the cool school also not bad at school probably define myself as being the most average human being on the planet. A the most average at everything can do sport. I KAI academics a flu. Ak jack-of-all-trades so I think School was formed. I didn't have any real bad experiences. They But but I definitely I definitely productized sport school. I Ice Iran Plays volleyball a below was also in in my spare time at Taif Learning ISOLATION THEORY. And just yet wanting to accelerate that. Janney to being a pilot as fast as I possibly could until Spain. Oh all kind- from school stripe poss- Recruiting Center for the Air Force and once a week on popping. I'm sure like it's got so I seek of me walking in that door every day just to say saying what you post were available. What's what's the latest and greatest came first name basis with mice of the recording stuff? They so you moved into the rule aviation so the air force Aaron Australia and what was involved in preparing yourself for that sole I fly in a fodder plant and you know what was going through your head when you sit on the runway preparing to launch on your look. I think that's the realization of a dream that moment and twenty two at the time to realize that dream then and there is pretty amazing. A lot of people diner ceva the law. Ambition look a lot of people. Don't really get what they want out of life. I think statistically hype people that shave will they want to achieve in Lhasa so I took shape that at twenty today was pretty cool? Note that I had that full price in my mind but I definitely had the emotion inside of the didn't get to enjoy too much because the speed of the aircraft and the amount of information I had to retain get the damn thing able and back again without having an accident in the office all with was particularly battles are saying you're always is a Fatah pot and as a pilot in general I think you just always have this degree of apprehension you. You're in this flying machine. You hurdling above the earth. So you always have this very respectful relationship with the aircraft. Because if you're not on your game but can you? Yeah it was. It was super amazing But if is very clever and what it does is an incremental price so by the time you guys. I all in Hornet. You're already done it in the simulated I. You've got hundreds of hours flying Mike mackey a small legit pacey nine the whole process from the planning the briefing the execution of the mission that debriefing the whole methodology. In the why of why we think as autopilots was imbued into us from from Taiwan so it was really just the next step like it's probably the biggest one that e the biggest small. Step that you Mike. But it's something that you're quite comfortable in doing that. I just have a mess. It's every fiber of your being so you really you really just get on with it and you can feel the passion passion in your voice. The lie that that ruled love flying. And there's nothing nothing like it and as a coach now an executive level conscience and people that that do really amazing things when you see a lot of the world working with football teams first grade a football teams when you look back on it. You'd still realize no one's ever done it. No one else has done this. Four hundred Fatah pilots flew the Hornet in. Its in its in its whole history. It's more people play test cricket for Australia than a flying as fodder pilots in the Air Force. And and you really do look back fondly now and appreciate that. How lucky walls to have that opportunity? It's a very grateful and has shown as a as a person so yeah I do feel and emotional visceral attachment with flying fodder jets. And how what? It's done the doors at subsequently I've for me as well so going into battle was is a whole different ballgame then doing tastes flights other emissions that really stand out as executed. They're perfectly and the outcome was favorable interesting. Use of the word perfect because we don't use that word as fought applause way fundamentally understand for fictions unattainable but we'll get as we get as close to Pacific as we can and we we like our execution right around that ninety eight percents whatever we say we will achieve at times. That's as close as we can get On Him affliate. Crafty battled the questions. I'll go up to that. Was Up flying a Hornets tonight. I when I was in the disip some Russian in Crush Mike. I Guess Battle Experience Move to Afghanistan a civilian when medically discharged from the air force. We have the sighing trying to fight. I think it's something we don't do very well in business in business. We treat every day every meeting every opportunity as I was the first one we had. But we always knew that if we trained the way that we were. GonNA EXECUTE IN BATTLE. It would guy fairly seamlessly and and the guys that did fly combat operations so that they generally said flying. Combat operations is easier than the training missions. Because of the amount of pressure. We put ourselves on on the expectation we said in China. I think that's very telling and it's a very fought upon culture is it doesn't matter what the environment you always try to full to the best of your individual ability and when you're up writing as a formation and his team that everyone is everyone is is ultimately trying to achieve and when you do it collectively as a team than amazing things happen and really. That's the crux of a high performing team. Whether it's a full same executive time off performing team is still about individual accountability and when the age individual and the team takes ultimate accountability. You're able to work much more effectively as a tame particularly when it comes to trust integrity credibility and really understanding that when someone says they're going to do something going to do it and and for me. That was the biggest surprise. When I when I moved into the business was how often people say something that never gets done. It's mind blowing even today on still struggle with because from where we came from. If you said you do something you do it. And it was just a given so since the long the short version of that story is whether it's battle whether it's training it doesn't matter up the keys you treated exactly the same. You put the same amount of IFFY. And it's Gordon seeing you kind of touched on something there that took a lot of. Ceo's around as well as your in performance with your dancer singer actor athletes That you spend more than ninety five percent of your time planning training preparing and listened five percents time actually performing or executing in for real outcome. And when you look at see yours is complete opposite the kind of own the whole time as though they're trying to perform ninety five percent of the time but they're not really preparing planning for syncing to hear that you've got that same Since when you're working in that executive oh another thing is they fault. It's that old saying that. Not Emit businesses is totally reactive and there is an element of of being reactive. Obviously where the world is very fluid a bedlam oi plan the betty arrivals to react and take advantage of that. I think organizations that are very Haka. Formats very adaptive very agile. They're able to do that because they assistance. In prices a very established but the site not very onerous that they provide or a framework in which to move and maneuver up the business. And when I do my embedded coaching where I worked for a minimum of ninety days with with an executive team. It's amazing that within it actually takes organizations up to ninety days to really figure out what they're trying to achieve and by default. You realize how over optimistic mystic The average leadership team with setting goals and I think that's the real challenge goals that are unrealistic People LOSE INTEREST. Then we become reactive because we create an excuse matrix where we say. Well Hi. It's no my fault. That account achieved the goal someone else's Some created this problem not may now which is the complete opposite way in which politics think which is well. The weather was bad. The talk was covered but did I did the best them ability to deal with that situation and did we have a policy and procedure in place which we call that standard operating procedures. Did we already have something in place that enable up to us to deal with that when it happens and when it happened even though we weren't expecting it with Conon you ought to do gonNA comes out of your memory and you figure out what to do so I think that's that's the cane in business is understanding everyday? Is the same business essays. How he prepared for the seasonal fluctuations that is is business Do we pay for the for the talk Tom. That is pick season for us as a business. And that's inevitably in retail spice. You Christmas as you've father's Dimas die. Valentine's dies or gear and in the offscreen industry at some say anything we call it the execution read the battle rhythm and and organizations often fantastic at that only make assumptions around that rhythm which is all every Christmas at slice. I let's not putting if it but when you when you sit down and you do the analytics on that you realize well actually it's different These ingrained behind it starts to become a more obvious. It's like people believe the story of how the business works. Not The facts so so again. As as a fighter pilot very uniquely thought Apollo it's create the strategy that they then go out and execute. It's it's a very strategic military acid you can cross multiple countries in one mission. You can engage the army. The Navy Air Force assets. You'll speaking to too many many different stakeholders with with the amount of capabilities but at the same time as a fodder Pala. You're also operating a piece of equipment that is going out there to deliver on that strategy so thick we value in fodder politics working with businesses to help manage this optimism. Bias this expectation of late is that the team might have can can deliver simul than I than I really can. And because I was late. His aunt died at executing frustrated and disconnected from the team. So I think that's A. That's a case potholes all building strategy. That's the only falsely executed up opposite sex in the first place is something that kind of have with Fatah politician. You have this same with someone. Say who's delivering a major event. A one day event. Is You kind of do? What a very short period of time. They see much like a whole year or two years to go through the highs and lows and the real big challenges but when you're a Fatah Paula. You moving at one hundred miles per hour. Hundreds of calmness Barat. You've got to be able to react sensibly and calmly you know. What sort of strategies do you put in place to ensure that you can actually cope and deal with those changes at a really really fast speed and Kenley Trans? How do they translate across the sea is? It's an interesting point. You might thought apologize operating in a small windows. I fly fly mission but they fly missions every day. I have a cycle of of activities I need to do is my spot apologize. I'll the jobs and activities I cool signing in as as all been an entrepreneur now for fifteen years. I'm by the that this cop out that people make which is all what you do is very different. It's not a slaughter policy. Something has stopped middle name so does say oh say has a dia cycle that the business operates in. It's just I don't think that necessarily think that way entrepeneurship do entrepreneurs have have a far more. Prijic Focus Because I typically upright on a capital cycle where they know they're going to send him in a couple of for sitting peered that needs to get done whereas within the it's a slightly different more administrative mindset but it doesn't it doesn't have to be so. I think what what what do you land from? Fatah pilots thought pilots make a lot of decisions. That's part of what you do have to. Because the aircraft was moving forward that I'd have to be all good. They just have to a decisions. That kit you alive. And and Upright Upright Year Kraft and when you have to make decisions a lot of decisions at high spade it gives you a framework in which you can use to my list decisions at the lowest paid. It still has to be a decision so the key is and this is a bad credit. Situational awareness situational awareness clarity that enables you to make better better decisions. What's going on around made? And how can I? E The optimal is what's going on all survive in an environment where Bailey capable of of exploiting. The methodology fought apologies. It's what we would call the Hutu leap. It was developed back in the sixties at the talk on academy and what the leap is all about and I think it is more as I got older. No one else have fought apologised told to do it. I didn't really understand it but now I kind of understand this. It's all about observing environment around you. Orientating yourself into a position to take advantage of that what you've just observed making a decision then acting on it and then observing again. What what just happened. And then and then maneuvering ourselves into another position to take advantage of it. So it's a decision making Sokoll when we use that as as business owners or see is what allows us to do is learn will quickly from out decisions and and also when we make a bad decision to revisit and sometimes battle West decisions. Sometimes I'm just on any good decisions And allows us just to to make it and sometimes an answer as a business owner making a decision? Whether that's making someone redundant having performance issues is is people or rotting off a bad debt. Sometimes to make those decisions more quickly means we can move forward in a way that's more purposeful and and business and say is there always struggling with the methods and cautious approach to running a big business and being impulsive will make rash decisions so what you learn is a thought upon it with the situation a little way in its has fallen that sweet spot in between much quicker where we're making quicker decisions but not rash and wait considering enough but not too much that it gives us analysis paralysis so arousal is associated with the performance of a human being. What was your Connor? You retain prod age mission flights and show that you had the right level of arousal focused mental clarity and performance we off right on that pig stress curve. You have to be able to bait right at the top if you're if you're over the top you performance drops or if you're under ails them. Yeah you're unable to Excu- what you need to do. And it certainly wasn't the case that we now that every time and again with age and looking back more purposefully I could see how I could have done it better. But the methodology that we we used was that sequences all planning briefing executing the mission debriefing so in the plan we started out fugger so we plan as a team we were in the same room. Same and we we roughed out what we're GONNA do and that would normally be eighty percent plan. Then we move into the briefing stage. Roy Communicate the plan to the TAME vice car information and it's through that briefing with focusing that little bit more than something that organizations do terribly until early on a set of sports teams. This is the lost opportunity for organizations to really focus the people and to do that. You've got to communicate the same every top you've got to be in a sequence that builds a habit for people to switch brands on into the execution vice. We're leaving the execution phase for me. Particularly why ultimate FICO WANNA start at the jet and we fly control chick flick a switch and the and the and the aircraft would check all the flight controls `electronic connection between the flock controls and the Dada computers. And when you do that point comes to life and all the all the flood control stop during around the aircraft bouncing around on the undercarriage and the politics you'll doing nothing. You're just a passenger and for me. This thing went to life with Yoga. Come come come to life now like responsible for this asset and that really helped me focus but what it did was help me understand that tonight. I wasn't focused today. I'm not. I'm just not switching on. I need to more proactively become funniest they move out to the area we carry out a weapons Chiklis. We turn the weapons on. We know that. The aircraft's gone from a from a doorman stike to a lifestyle so all of the explosives on the aircraft at one stage close to Gang Bang and they were in the in the fight. We knew that at a distance from another aircraft we had more time but we knew on this marching Tomlin at a closing velocity of three thousand kilometers per hour. There's a critical window we really had to switch on so all of that's mapped out and all of that is trying to and it never changes that. It's the same sequence the same prices every single time. It's just tweet based on the threat on the Diet as situational awareness at the time so eighty percent of what we did as mapped out which meant the twenty percent. We had to make critical decisions. We're able to do that because the basics role. Dafa like that. You know you have that whole process around beforehand and going into routine. Not You. Don't always see that in the executive vote or the corporate world where you see people trying to get into that rhythm gins that routine so that people will used to rob people. Don't like change so if you can get into that Constan retain. It's much easier to prepare for the die. Hato prepare for that project. Isn't it absolutely lodge organizations. They do have any element of that. But it's always in a crisis response. Disaster Response Element of the business and mock mo. We might coaching absorb of saying well. You can't do it anyway. So why don't we just bring a bit? I didn't you die tonight. And you certainly in business. It's it is slow. I heard it's a slow base. You don't have to move at the pace that apologise. Maybe it's a fifteen million dollar investment to be fought policy a business kind of fold that sets unrealistic to sit in. Bob But what we can do is just use the price you'd have to be just you don't have to communicate as well but if we just tweak that a little tiny bit because the baseline is is much lower the increase in performance that you see the first three months old size is actually quite happening to People Watch. We watch movies and involve fought politics in it. And I'm sure you get into top guys a little bit different real insights into the world of auto. I'm sure so. So we see a lot of testosterone. We see the EGO. Come out the superhero. Come to surface win. They have finished a mission especially if this if they determine as being really successful. So what emotions would you feel the individ- kind of what would follow policy? You know generally what was it if emotions so they go through a mission. And how do they control him? You thought Apollo partners that's either that must emotionless robots on the planet bigger. Fod Is Very. It's a very clinical role. If everything is dealt with very very factually assist and because we debrief off the every mission where we proactively review our individual performance. It's it's all quite calm. I mean obviously there's Times women lie on exercise or you're more operational environment is a bit more emotion to it and if you have a great mission obviously has a lot of happy faces when you when you come off. The the behavior is very controlled. And it's like that. It's built that wipe purposefully in in that culture because we have the husband that pig stress growth and if we husband that pigs stress graph walking back from the aircraft taking off out kid the way we talk to each other then when we really have to rely on it. We're ready to go. You can't you can't teach yourself to operate on the peak of the stress curve. If you only do it when you need to do it you have to train yourself to do that to think. People more empowered to speak out about stress overwhelmed burn out in the workplace and I can imagine you know. We talked a little bit of time. They were there are high levels of stress in the air force. I'd do anything around to attempt that will prevent that stress and burnout where reactions decision making it. Spada is an understatement. We we look after each other and we because we do aviation medicine component as pot about training you learn about the queues of fatigue. Learn about stress. You learn about the body's responses we do tend to look average other and we manage that but equally throughout our training. It's it's about pushing our ability to deal with stress and pressure on every single mission. We never thrown in the deep end. Your every mission has just incremental increase on the one before and the instructors taught to coach the pilots and pushed to the point. Where you start to make mistakes then bring back again so you have this conditioning to stress that that very rarely do you see a Fatah polit. I'm burned out or or or stressed tip. Typically we would. We would manage the program so if y'all doing highly complex and involved missions you normally have sought to every second die but in the routine training environment you'll fly once twice a day because retained and that's your job and it's just what you do your fought upon it so it's not stressful. Someone else just becomes your flat line and again that's a fifteen million dollar training program to do that and I think with athletes Particularly in team sports more side than individuals because as an individual if the much that goes on inside you as an individual in the way that you prices things and it's very complex but when you operate as as a team is a law that we can learn from that fought pollen. Environment in terms of managing stress is a time and in terms of building this positive p grid where we always daybreak as a pair. The minimum is always to autopilots to aircraft in a formation. You know what you do. There's always going to be someone critiquing And that's great because what it teaches us to critique yourself where where single say so you could take yourself first than if you miss something your your body. Wingman helps debrief you. And then that just leverage opping to intermissions where you might have sixty seventy aircraft where you debrief aircraft and you break down from eighty to forty and then forty two twenty twenty to ten all the way down till it's just two of you and you take lessons all the way down through the organization and it's really interesting when you look at organizational reviews. Just how Poli that connection exists. It's it's done at a very high level or it's done at a very granular level but infrequently rolla connecting pots exploiting that. And it's it's multi. What did we do organizationally? Rather than ordered we do individually. And what can we learn? From our individual performance and this huge potential vote for teams and organizations to enhance their performance. They but by building that positive peak regret culturally we accept filings mistakes. We learn from them and we celebrate them and we very rarely pastels on the back in a Fatah scudder. We're always looking at the things we could do better and we reward the fodder pilots that learned from those mistakes. That that's that's the key here not the stuff you did. Well that's your job. You're you're here to shave ninety percent of the time when you do that. That's that's your job. What we WANNA do is learn from the two percent and by doing that we might tie on the site percent. We never push it further than that. But we don't allow cells to drop below ninety percent either. So we're GONNA. We're just going to go off on this a slight change here. And then we'll come back to how the the the fauna polit and what they learn how that applies into the business so good things come to an end at some point. What was your career as a fodder Pala cut short. The age of thirty is on was diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis. And that's an autoimmune disorder with your body just gets a little bit confused attacks The healthy tissue in your body and ankylosing spondylitis typically affixed a young man and attacks the spine primarily and when you fly the aircraft with a heavy helmet on you hit while he's up to forty kilograms when you're pulling seven off Jay and the compression on your spine. It's not a great environment. And eventually I just couldn't fly anymore medically medically discharged and when I left. I guess there are two things I I probably needed to do. In Life. It was good timing because steady says Bitam Neda Day stuff and make some mistakes. So one thing I'll really wanted to do was withdrawn. Remind business will set up my business in the second one was to really go and see how could handle a real combat or or hostile environment. And that that's what encouraged. May In my best night at the time. Tom Ought to go into Afghanistan. And start a business and that was that was a fascinating journey from. Am Much from that. I learned a lot about being accommodating of different cultures the complexity of human beings doing multi entering and Delivering multi-million dollar contracts at night business background at all the art of negotiation and everything. I've earned in that. Part of the world isn't structured life here contracts. There's no framework of water enforce anything. Everything is genuinely needed. And you genuinely have to deliver and if he died then you don't get paid to win the contract so it's a really roar environment to learn about business and I learned a lot day some great lessons and some bad lessons and that really set me up by adhd unfortunately means. Every time. I started about three years. I sell it on move on. So I I saw that moved into property development and moving into modular construction built a hotel which is still lying or the company set up with that Stein's moved into publishing on the back and then part of that journey in mice fascinating pop in the bid on enjoying the most was falling into off Bene- and a group of autopilots around the will deliver programs Iran how fought politics can help businesses and to dive at twenty five years? We've seen a three thousand companies run through the programs of the is. Three thousand is a few hundred that have continued to utilizing employees alphabet programs. I've at ten twenty years and really it comes down to that different perspective. I'm people struggle to talk about. Performance performance in saw organization is a very sensitive sensitive subject. so what does it it. It really takes off the shelf. His ultimate human performance. It's got nothing to do with the individuals way just products of system but the product. That system delivers is something. That's that's very very hot performance. So if we take the system and we help companies implement it then by default they should also have the benefit of having harmful individuals. And that's what happens I'm running a program for supermarket China and a couple of weeks during the phone. Call the the person organizing it. Saddam couldn't remember the name of your company something about politics we used utilized you. Seven years ago. She's on the left that company and she said after seven years. We still use that language. That fought Apolo language in in everything that we do and to me to to participate in a three hour experiential private learning program and for it to take hold in an Organization for seven years rainfalls for me. The content and the and the methodology the flex methodology floor execution method is been really works and I get those stories and that feedback all the time and I've only been doing this for for for five years. I guess we're my my Junie. Dot Very is a little bit from the after dinner. Jenny is is my my experience. Personally with business outside of being a polit and bringing those those two worlds together. So that's allowed me to probably look at it. The whole constructive business and fought apart from from a slightly different perspective and to see where the world's overlap and it is areas they just not going to overlap. So it's been it's been a really a fascinating journey and boils down to psychology and the psychology of how people hide and how difficult it is to take accountability for actions but signed Tong. How liberating it is when we do. And that's the crux of it is really funny. Working inside an organization at the at the level of executive executive level. A lot of a lot of the first couple of months is therapy. It really is about well. I thought this is what we're going to do now. That was what we're GONNA do. I thought we were going to do this. We'll also we're going to do that. And working and massaging for what? Everyone thought that we're going to do around. What are we actually going to do? What is one thing we can do in the next three months? And you know we language after six weeks or so. That's the mice cathodic experience wherever bins for Rainier had such clarity before and for the people in the in the room. It's a journey but food for me and for the other foreign policy. It's just what we do. It's just the way we think it's it's actually did easy for us. But that's what you get from all of that training it becomes second nature to commute elaborate. there around the flex methodology. Can you elaborate on that and and what it does so i. Flex IS THE WAY OFF. The banners packaged up. What fought upon us do And and it's hinges on this methodology called payback which is planned brief execute daybreak and what effectively says his whole Agile Movement. That's taking the world by stole now. It was all based on planned break. Fix Keep Daybreak is based on the Joan Sutherland is a Fatah pollen and he was one of the authors of the of the Agile Manifesto. That's that's taking the worldwide home but really what it stays bro. You need to plan and have a common objective that you will understand and you will agree can be shaved then every day. We're going to talk about it to make sure still on track. Nothing's changed or if something has changed. What are we going to do about it? Not as an individual as a team because what we start to say inside and human nature is every day when just move off on a tangent because we're hauling complex individuals even we've we we don't know we're doing half the time so it every day we don't come together as a team diverging away from that common goals so why briefing we come back and have a bit of a think about a bit of a conversation around what's happening tonight and then execution paces will now that we have the clarity objective? Now that we've spoken about it said I am on maintaining a focus on that and I am. I avoiding distraction. And all these ten gentle things that happen every died Which happened as a byproduct of not having clear objectives knock communicating effectively so the default function of typing in an organization. Is I two steps economy missing? Or if they. They're not missing their just to like all expectations online. So so what we talk about. An execution is Israeli. Just do something. And if you haven't got a good objective and you're not communicating effectively. We're going to learn on the Knicks. Dip that's debriefing. Debriefings sells three really simple questions. What's the result tonight with? Where do we WANNA be relative to the plan Arabic? What's the reason we're achieving this result and it's all about a gap performance in businesses? We get very in any human endeavor. We got caught up about the individual performance. Todd at why don't you achieving target But as far too often the targets wrong or it's overly ambitious. We wasn't clear enough so we investigate that gap in performance in. Sometimes you bring the target Dan. Sometimes we're going to push the performance and that's the that's the final question. We asked the response at school. The three to daybreak thing and the responses. What am I going to do tomorrow to? Close that gap. Am I gonNA sit in a more realistic target or am I going to do something that will increase my output? Oh performance and when you get into that cycle of thinking and for me and for my spot apologize not a die by thing. It's a owl by our thing. We're constantly reviewing every decision that we might in the copy. You'll be reviewing that decision on a second by second basis decision. Action the happened. What am I going to do about it? What's the next decision on Mike? So when you find is when you think that why you kind of ahead of everyone else. You're you're you're always hate of the conversation. You're always investigating you doing your analysis on the run analysis in something that sits itself self where we do. One Week of analysis make a decision wide awake and see what happens. Analysis Decision Making is in perpetual motion and that allows us to the edge that allows us to to to change our course of action quickly and in small steps that are reversible rather than these huge investment decisions in big chunks of time where we make a bad decision and we wait too long to review it and it sort of spirals a little bit out of control so that that's the fullest execution is about. It's not perfect execution. We're not going to be perfect. But since the planes hit the target infotainment is going to be part of the execution team to deliver on it. Deliver on it and stay focused on it. And if it's not going to I wanted to. Let's debrief it and figure out how we're going to China that object you and the Saga Continues. That approach one. Do you think people spend such little time around? Debriefing PROJECT MISSION GOAL typically. Because there's no time it's not important as Fatah policy say debriefing the missions more important than the mission. And that's that's how much we prioritize this this meeting and that it's excuses almost to sit down talk because everyone makes excuses iman response to that is the reason that everyone's making excuses is because the leadership hasn't clear Jennifer to deliver on. You've you've created the ambiguity which allows the excuse matrix to be brought out and that's really what it what it boils down to and and and a soda site is people look. We camped from one to one hundred without even thinking about it. Said I wrote you. Brush your teeth without even thinking about it. The fact that you can do those very simple tasks is the product of years of training. You lent to count to one to one hundred. I refuse there. You Brush your teeth over a few years yet. We WanNa go and implement some incredibly complex strategy where we need one hundred thousand people to execute it and we we. We explained in words. No one understands yet. We expect it to happen and it's just never going to happen so it's coming back to that. Simplicity helping leaders to think simply and use efficiency in their language. What's one thing that you can say that can enable hundreds of people to go into the job? That's that's what this price has helped people do. And it helps spread the workload and spread the targets particularly lodge organizations down into every executable element of the business so what happens will retain you do everyday that allow you to execute flawlessly for. May It's distraction from having a cheaper in my mind which is look you distracted. Things aren't going the way you want to do what what's happening right now And and what that boils down to as. I don't really have a clear plan for tonight and personally. I'm going through a cycle now where bitten off more than I can chew. I'm suffering mine. Optimism boss in terms of up to many businesses to run too many opportunities pursuing the mole. Saying yeah I'm doing exactly what I tried to catch people what not to do. So I'm proactively going through a phase of what we call task shitting which is A. I am removing distractions from my life and pot of at his is selling my publishing business. Which I'm currently undertaking and once down that I can go back and fight us in the coaching world. And guess what happened to me was off the developing mcnicol approaching. Canine speaking it became easy. I was looking for another challenge but that all the challenge meant that my what I found easy befall is now starting to also become a challenge because my attention to detail was was being loss. I once again since I always learned in the video about is prices is. It doesn't matter how old you are. Experienced. You are how much you think you've got things under control. It always comes back to that. Might you might loft complicated again. Not Keeping things simple. Sit down. Plan very skewed. Debrief said objective. Maitha Twenty twenty nine particular. Tom was to consolidate into my my vehicle. Which is all about thought. Apollo stuff and flying. I've gotten back to flying. I've got flowing job which is as a pretend fought apolo flying threaten aircraft against Fodder pilots and concern and consolidating that experience in into my speaking and coaching business. Now Seif that that's how I applaud. I bit off more than a Jew. I was not achieving always not executing flawlessly on achieving goals and applying. That method AB- strategically. I'm I'm slowly getting myself back to where I need to be too. How important is exercise nutrition? And helping you lay your businesses and what you do to say you know you wanNA focus on what you're doing. It's incredibly important and I didn't really probably appreciate that until five years ago. One of the challenge of the ankylosing spondylitis as it's very much how you got your immune system reacts to nutrition And I was fairly blase in what I through my thirties but Got to a point now where I'm GONNA plot by side of gone through price of understanding the food proteins that react willing my body my body metabolize sugars amino acids and what. I need to need to wait. And I've also learned that don't need to eight much at all to be functional and actually the the the better the more energy I have so nutrition has been a huge part of of my journey and a new product of the Jenny. But that's been a a brief debrief as well and it's all about bringing expertise to figure out certain elements like for me. It was expertise around. My body aches and pains. I had a lot of issues with ankylosing attacks. The tendons the college the soft tissue in your bones and a three year. We're beat Brigham. Bill Tyson project with a string strength and conditioning. Cajoles physiotherapist background That taught it all of that up up gone from from probably having twelve thirteen touch points on my body down to one or two that I haven't been able to resolve but I can. I can manage now. Sleeps incredibly important in one of the things I started to lose as a result of being overtaxed with these businesses was Weiqing over three four o'clock in the morning if my my levels too high thinking and pricing information and just had to doing that holidays as well as during the workout. So the net obviously inhibits your ability to be to be fit to go to the gym the energy levels and getting cycle but the beauty of this again unquote flex Just thinking at the White House told is a Fatah polit and it just teaches me that. Something's not right here. I'm not. I'm not achieving this wellbeing oldest lot contentment goal offset myself? What is it an end holidays to come inside? It's it's your business. It's something that some of the decisions you might as entrepreneurs houses hot as it is to to to to do that and to sell business before it's probably as mature as it needs to be. You just have to do it. You have to get back to health and we'll have to get back to lot contentment as as the goal. Otherwise everything is we don't always smart. People have great answers but success. Will PEOPLE ASK RIGHT QUESTIONS? When was the last time you did something for the first time? That's a good question. I think in some respects every I mean one of those people that's lived a very fulfilled locked in probably at an age where I appreciate that. I've done everything I wanted to do. A qualified skipper on how to Saudi odds? I have a bite law since I'm appalled civilian pilot as well of rice. 'cause I've lived in the Middle East. I've skied escaped my whole lifestyle skate off of There's not maybe it's real relatively selfish existence. But there's really nothing ever wanted to do that. I haven't done in terms of Look for me. What's the first thing that don it's it's my first job? My son say taint as he does all of his fists as the first time. I've done that as a parent and I find the evolution as they grow from being kids into into main that you'll roll becomes more complex and and a little bit like I remember back when I was leaning for my instructors. What feedback and how I took things well and when I took things badly every time I guess there's a friction porno every time I feel myself not being. The best filed is is a first for me an. I've got to figure out how to do that. And with this business as well with the publishing business for eighteen months. What really well. When I could put the effort in and then I started to see myself crushing under the pressure. I haven't done as well there so I'm probably the point where that's the first time of sold and unloaded business. That hasn't gone as well as I want to do. And it's a bit touch and go. So they're all fast as well but again in the beauty of this way of thinking is when it becomes emotional ICAN rationalize it and and and I think when I came back from Afghanistan but a little bit of PTSD and and and whip with a psychologist cognitive behavioral therapy. What I realized was the the white throat as a fought policies. It's it's a cognitive wine. Which modify your behavior and manage your emotions because it always comes back to this rationality and logic around a goal and then reviewing rationally your performance. I saw a really. I found a great in high stress moments under this current business to get back to a rational place in. You've been here before you've been in high stress situations you've been in in areas where your performance events outside your control. Haven't been what you wanted to A. You'll you'll get in the worst case. Scenario is not the worst case scenario. It's not known is GonNa die now even if even if completely employees and ending in couldn't be a worse outcome that you can imagine for a business it's business and that's what I love about the price as grounds you back in reality. What was the one question that you would love to solve? Why people are the best versions of themselves. What why do we make excuses? Why DO WE HAVE TO CREATE CONFLICT? And and and hold onto belief systems that other people believing and the the the inability to to say to the store the story and for me the people in my life experience that are able to do that. Are All well traveled. They've all experienced different cultures. They understand the INS and out the ex pat community enough spent a Lotta time as an ex pat flying in the sky living in the Middle East living in Europe Living in Dubai. You just learn to be very accommodative and everything that you do an end for me. I guess you know. Spend too much time on this because it's just end up in a spiral it's why can't we just be more coming? Just why can't we save the planet swap? Why do we have to destroy and use plastic? I guess that's it and for me. That comes back to that. Question is well. If we're truly the best versions of ourselves We we were able to manage our insecurities and manager Al Al the things that were not so proud of then surely will bet applies running the planet in in living together so final question. What is your definition of living? An extraordinary life being average I think bing contempt with average and and when you content with average everything is a bias at signing. A kind of rebel. Hurt heard from somebody but it's stuck with me and it's nothing's ever as good or as a nothing's ever as good or as bad as things and for me that's been wonderful. It means that you tape your emotions and he tempa behind you. When something's going really well in terms of practice hoover's you'll you're prepared. That's not always the way and then when something really bad it's not that bad either as his bad right now so I think I think for me. That's that's K- that you don't have to be super happy. You don't have to be super miserable. Just content is a really powerful. I think it You have you shit some wonderful inside today. So how can people learn more about what you do? And what does it base wife? People connect with you look at this point in time. The best way to connect with maize on on my on my linking. I'm sort of building programs in the personal development spice but from a corporate spice whether your sports team a corporate entity you'll an NGO if your work with groups of people and you want to better as a group of people without doubt after the and the immersive experiential programs that we run Otherwise go and if you're ever in the world we can get fought pilots and those programs into your organization and I take it from me you can see on. Google reviews the rankings. Four point nine out of five in the US. The net promoter score for off. The banner is World Class Events Wolf KLOSS programs and your teams and your individuals will be using this language. Well after after we leave. We've taken teams to the Super Bowl we've got NRL teams off the bottom of Valetta. Everything that an Optima program touches you always see an increase in performance up to the organizations to how far they WANNA take it. But but there is a guarantee so so the finest Google auto parts after Bene- Raft Ben Dot Com. Are you here to try out off the bench dot com anywhere else in the will and was just happy to have a chat? We'll ask you embrace simple question what you really want to achieve. Would you like to get quicker yet? We can help you with that. Christian has been absolute pleasure speaking with you today of thoroughly enjoyed learning about your your whole life fascination with aviation diving into the world of being a fighter pilot and thriving in that environment where every day is just going to take you a little bit step further the nixed further and it's a constant gradual improvement in performance. I liked how you discussed the process of how to put together a mission. That analysis of the debrief afterwards and how important the debrief is and how important that is to any company or CEO Performing Person. It's awesome to see the work that you're doing inside companies and helping them realize what the rule target should be done to narrow the focus a little bit so easy to get expand out and try and take on the whole world but staying focused and having the whole team together thinking about one thing and how they can implement. Every single day is really really important. You've had an extraordinary life so fine. We look forward to seeing how you progress over the next few years. Especially this year as you look to consolidate down to. What's really important to you so that you can be back on your game every single day. So thank you very much greg. It's been a real pleasure. I had a wonderful time. All the best on this week's active performance tip talking about create a ripple effect with purpose. Have you become too focused on yourself? And you don't feel fulfilled. Try focusing on something bigger than just yourself. You determine what your company's all your unreal purposes in life. You're Y or your company's. Why not what? Can you do to serve the that purpose and leave a positive? Mark with dint on the world here are three questions to ask yourself number one. What makes you come alive number? Two what are your in night. Strengths number three witty. You had greatest value now. If you're still struggling to identify Wi- here are three more questions to ask yourself number one. What do people come to us for? Help on and thank you for number two. What would you do that you love doing that? You would everyday without a paycheck and number three. If you found out the only had one year left to live. What would you imagine yourself doing? It's now time for you to do some self reflection and find your clarity on your war thank you for listening to next level leadership conversation with Christian becouse on Episode Ninety. Six leading out of the danger zone on the active. See Your podcast now. The chaos and frantic nature of the past few weeks in covered nineteen has passed. How you planning your productivity performance of the next few weeks and months I've found the productivity performance planet to be highly effective in providing clarity keeping you on task and forecast each day in an excel spreadsheet you can create columns for planned activity area of business desired outcome urgency impact. The number house will take stop date target date column for completion and then debrief nuts. This provides structure allows you to easily project manage and quickly. Identify your top three things to do each day of uses effectively as an athlete. And as a see your business owner if you'd like a copy of the productivity performance planner or you would like some support with your leadership performance. Please contact me at Craig at in G The number to perform dot com or click on the contact page of the www dot in a number to perform dot com website. I'm Craig Jones. This is the active. Ceo podcast with ordinary law. Join the active see eye movement by visiting. Www DOT enegy to perform dot com that's N. G. NUMBER TO PERFORM DOT COM Chevy's podcast on linked in and be show to tagging energy to perform lever of you on I choose. Drop us a line with your feedback and questions. Anchor connect with us on the energy to perform facebook and instagram pages. Be sure to check out the next active. See Our podcast where the ordinary dunk belong.

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Joint or Arthritis Pain

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

30:56 min | 2 years ago

Joint or Arthritis Pain

"Hello, and welcome to this week's edition of the green wisdom health show. I'm Janet Lewis. And I'm Dr Lewis here to bring you an exciting show about joint pain and arthritis, and osteoarthritis, and any of that I'd is's that you may be suffering from mother-in-law office s today, we will educate you about whether you have it had an no, the difference what to do about it. What you can eat in anything in between that six siding to learn about it as well as questions from our wonderful audience. That's listening to us. We appreciate it very much. But we have a lot to talk about. We have some very good information for you. And, you know, the, the one thing that I'm wondering when somebody says, do you have joint pain, or arthritis, can you tell me, Dr Lewis, what the differences between joint pain and arthritis? Well, it's really the same thing think the miscommunication is that it doesn't imply whether it's degenerative or not. So technically speaking arthritis means inflamed joint oddest main simplification. So if it's mother-in-law Addis that means your mother-in-law, in-flight, inflames me somewhat in read between lands on that one, there's a lot of different types of arthritis, which I'm gonna go through bravely, the, the two major ones that I like to talk about his osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, but there's others, there's juvenile arthritis. Gout ankylosing spondylitis house in court testified one time and there's always a smart Aleck Atari that's representing the insurance company, although even though they say they want the whole truth. They don't let you know that he's representing the insurance company, and he thought he was gonna trick me says, Gina, what dish syndrome is said, yes. Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hopper us. Does this and he turned red and sit down said no further questions in that his ankylosing spondylitis, then you've got the systemic lupus? You have the bursitis tendinitis mile factual pain. There's a lot of that going on. You know, even the carpal tunnel, you've got infectious arthritis S meant when you need to go the hospital immediately. And I cannot tell you how many sweet women look at me and said, do you believe in fibromyalgia, so, yes, ma'am? And then there's a look a relief because apparently they've been to plenty of people that didn't believe in it. Sewri attic arthritis, rheumatoid, though is almost always auto immune slash, gut problem, osteoarthritis and some macabre primary, I was very familiar with that, because that's more of a mechanical structure function or structure dysfunction. I guess there's about. About. At least fifty million people in America that suffer from arthritis. So just because you have pain and stiffness in the joint, does not imply that it's degenerative. But if you don't do something about it and take action it can become degenerative. And did you know that the people that take the end sets the non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs like Advil, aspirin Tylenol that actually speeds up the joint degeneration, most people don't know then they said, well, it gives me relief us, as well roller joint drink coal beer. Give you relate. But it won't do anything for the underlying call. So we have to look beyond that. Janney. Gimme a weird. Look on that one. So arthritis is real common. I mean, archaeologists found evidence of arthritis disorders and skeletons. You know, as far back as the Neanderthals in even dinosaurs they've seen signs of arthritis, and that's I think, probably more osteo arthritis, the neck and back is what I always specialized in is a compact or although you know, you'd get into the extremities quite a bit this annot Bill joints, actually, they would lack the lubrication or the. Well, the ability to lubricate would be diminished when you would develop scar tissue, they call it collagen cross linking but the fluid would stop being secreted sometimes because those membranes would be damaged, and there are many things that you can take, we're gonna talk about a few products today, but and I went out in the yard, I think I said this on previous podcast. We went out in the yard was going to do about ten minutes worth of work, which is about all I wanted to. Did that one time? So we have to bring that back up again. The same the same yard work story. Right. Because Janet won't let me do the yard generally, but we did about three hours worth of work, and that normally would have been very very devastating on my back because of a previous injury gunshot. And the next day I thought I was just going to be absolutely devastated. And I said, you know, my bag doesn't hurt it all, what's the deal? She so all been putting this collagen in your drink, and you didn't know it like I don't know what she puts him I drink, but it it's a good thing. One of the N, Kalenjins everywhere. Now I mean, that seems to be the big craze is collagen. Even my nail lady is trying to sell me collagen I'm like, you know, a half college, and we have the really good college in the type one and type two that he's talking about. Yeah. And, you know, a smart person that's probably not true. Smart probably, not the right word educated. Well, a discerning person may that's better discerning person can know the difference, whether it's by feeling or just by their, their spirit tells them, they can they know the difference between good and bad rheumatoid. You know, I said was an auto immune disorder and it more likely generally, it's, it's more prevalent in women and girls in us when the body's immune system kind of identifies the synovium membranes as foreign, and there's a lot of evidence that you need to just detoxify your body man. I don't think I have time to get into that with my talk about it a lot. But if you don't stop it or slow at down the inflammation, and pain will eventually destruct the cartilage and those are usually the women. And sometimes man, you'll see their fingers beginning to get very, very crooked over the course of the disease and several years. Sometimes they have white loss, swelling favor in the joint, sometimes in it's pretty crippling. So he want to be sympathetic to these people. They really are suffering. There are plenty of studies that talks about fish oil or cod liver oil. That increases the body's ability to move and allow much much less medication to be used because the fish oil slash cod liver oil is very, very anti inflammatory, the thing about it is, you have to watch who you listen to, because there's a lot of information out there that's being spouted about, and even the person spout. And he usually doesn't know which half is wrong because it's usually only fifty percent Ryan fifty percent wrong, and that's why I tell people listen to me, whether discerning spirit, I try to be as correct as possible, but I've heard and read how ficials bad for you. Well, what are you gonna do nor the several hundred studies? It says it's good for you. And there is a difference in visual inequality to I'm a big fan official because it's anti-inflammatory and helps work against the bad fats. That ten environment like soybean corn. And soy canola nasty. Sometimes arthritis, can actually be viral or bacterial or fungal. And that's why it's very important. I, I tell people for the most part, just fixed the yeast and you have to dissolve the bio film to make these things easier for the supplements to kill them off. One of the things you have to take a lot of incidents in it can be as simple as taking Brahma line if you're not allergic to pineapple, it can be that simple, most of the microorganisms, you know, it can be a strip or a staffer, Donna Kakai, but many, many times, I think most of the time, it's just Candida, which were mostly full of because those books were written thirty forty years ago and they're still very appropriate. I've had people say, well, your program made my psoriasis and my sore yada. Our throttles much, much better. Not say we'll wanted you quit. You know, trying four different things beyond that, and my program worked better. And I said, you didn't give it long enough and that's the key. We've become very impatient society. And I tell people look at my Scott might take Scott nine months to make a baby for goodness sake. Give your body a chance. You know, it it's a pretty big battle, you know, give it some time and be patient with it. You can't usually get this instantly. And we did the podcast last week on, you know, side effects of leptin, and. Lecterns and oxalate s- in not shade. I'm here to tell you that. I think if you wanna go low-carbon gluten, like, get a low carb, gluten free salad. I think that equals bike, and so, you know, you can take that and run with, and do whatever you want most of the time arthritis is reversible, if you get it fast enough, and sometimes it is the not shades, or the oxalate, s-, etc that are bad for you, and you have to find out, what does that we're working on, that is finding a actual food sensitivity tests, that works because there's a lot of smoke mirrors and baloney out there, there's some of these people are spouting off that they have all the answers, and I'm not found all those to be true. So the Brahma lane can be very, very good is generally better to take it on an empty stomach. And that does a lot of things low as you chance on attack. And stroke just because it's anti planetary also but. When I put that. Give people Brahma line further CRP. They said, well, you know, my joint pain has gone too. I said, well, it's the Bromley talk about a CRP. What, what is that? Exactly. It's the c reactive protein this about his response to inflammation. It's more cardio, vascular specific, there's a general CRP, and then there's S or high sensitivity or cardiac specific that's one way run. So when you're talking about that's the one we run. That's a part of your comprehensive lab panel that you're talking about, 'cause I've mentioning this because there's a lot of new listeners coming on that don't know exactly what you do. So in addition to being so intelligently spill spoken, we also do lab work, so that you're not guessing, what's going on when he saying CRP. It's one of the thirteen different tests that we run on the comprehensive lab panel, and a very low cost so that you're not guessing it, what? Throng. It's supposedly four times more important to predict cardiovascular disease than your cholesterol numbers, you know, not a big fan of worrying about cholesterol because usually it's bad cholesterol ratios. It's more about your liver, your gut, or, you know, your thyroid function. And, and, you know, when you're talking about joint pain, or arthritis is there anything that would be on lab panel that could benefit that doctor to see to help understand why that person may have arthritis or joint pain. Is there any kind of panel that's on that, that testing that says, how, hey I bet your your creaky in achey? Generally speaking, you know, you can look, alcl, Vosper tastes, whether it's higher low, and that's delivering Sam. But it has a lot of gut function influences there, you can look to calcium, whether they're tired low, and you can look at, you know, your liver enzymes, and you can again, if you have that much inflammation, that's going to spill over into the HSE our p. So it kind of goes together you kind of need different panels to, to be able to assess exactly what's happening Yana. Explain that. You know, you get a thirty minute consultation for free and people that complain about our price and say, it's too expensive. I just very polite said, well, you need to go to another functional medicine doctor, and then they come back, minus Bob to ten thousand dollars and say jeez. I'm so sorry. I was disrespectful. Dr lewis. I said, nobody does it less expensively than may. Because I care that deeply about your health, and I really want you to get. Well, it's always the people that get a good answer, and stick with it, that get the great results, though. So when you see, like you said, a high alkaline phosphates on someone's lab is that something that their regular medical doctor would also notice, or is that something that's more like you're looking for optimal numbers that, that kind of thing, we're looking bra to Molin you know, your average, medical doctor and osteopath you know, they're very good people. But they are trying to take care of you. A real bad crisis. And they're very very good at that. And of course, they have a good support staff with their nurse practitioners p as and, and just the regular nurses are the ones that are the conduit to keep, you know, keep you from being killed from our does. I love nurses. But now they don't look at it that way. Although I've seen some that actually do, but there's just so much. It's so involved that no one doctor can know at all. And that's why when somebody wants me to get outside of our system. I said, that's not what I do. And if I get out there, I'm not going to be that effective. Addy you need to go see somebody that specializes in what you're looking for. And so when you find this on, on lab work is their products that helped bring those numbers back in range, that are natural, or is that, like they need to go to their doctor and get some of the prescriptions that many people get for arthritis and that kind of thing or. Mcconnell Proctor I don't it's not that I'm against drugs. I'm just very, very conservative, and I've had the medical profession saved my life. At least once if not a couple of times they do really good job. So, you know, you have to give them that kind of the respect they deserve, and they deserve a lot. There's a lot of supplements that if you put the right thing in your body can take it and use it for good. You know, I'm one of those that think all things work for good. But you kind of have to look for one of the popular ones is Conroe flex, you know, it has the has potassium, and sodium, and it has glucose Amine, sulfate, conjoined sulfate in Brahma line. Well, glucose, meaning conjoint and, and there are different qualities of that to the reason it helps is because of the sulfate or the sulfur molecule, and that's one of the detoxification pathway of the liver sulfate action. So, and as why eggs and garlic and onions are very important. Because of the sulfur containing foods. Another thing that it works like, oh my God. It it's incredible combination is traumatic and nets to Merrick route and you know that's the buzz. Everybody's trying to get onto Merrick will most of them are not that absorbable is the problem he'd has trimmed to marry, but it has the Brahma lane has, of course, attuned to hydrate. And, and so that's very, very, very anti inflammatory, then we have a question, if you wanna get into that, Janet. Well, I wanted to ask one more thing about when you're when you're naming off these natural products. So, basically, what's happening, then is the body is, is robbing itself of nutrition because it's when you say, say, there's a high Auckland boss face. Isn't that made the bodies basically robbing? It's nutrition out of itself, trying to stay alive will when it starts going in, and this is a generalization, but when it starts going, high, the body says, who your GI tracks a little bit too acidic those are the people eat meat, meet me more of a Kito guy, but, you know, higher fat while you have to buffer that with the alcl, informing vegetables and fruits somewhat and most people don't do that. Is that things like gal and that kind of thing that someone one would suffer from eating too much meat? You know it, it really can be. It's like it's not so much that to eat, too much is that they don't process it correctly. Just 'cause you put it in on main your digest. And, and one thing I put him shooting straight with Dr Louis anybody. That's listening. It's not a member. You know, join up, there's really some good information. It's passed down. Put it on this morning. It says many position say that if you eat a balanced diet, you don't need supplements oil that somewhere between b and Bs and that's bacon sandwich and belief systems. And the answer this doctor gave was if people eat wild fresh organic local non-genetically modified food, grown in virgin mineral, and nutrient rich soils that have not been transported across vast distances stored for months before being eaten and work and live outside, breathe only fresh unpolluted air, drink, only pure clean water slate nine hours a night, move their bodies everyday, and our fray from chronic stressors and exposures to environmental toxins, then it's possible by might not need supplement folks, nobody comes close to achieve in that. So yes, you have to supplement to be as healthy and to live, as close to one hundred percent has gone intended, and suck. Lindley. They have to be good supplements in some people just don't understand. There's a difference. And I said, well, is there a difference in the quality of your x y versus your current wife and two men will say, oh, absolutely? I said, well, there you go. Well, the good news about our SEPLA says you can't see them working on lab. That's why we do one of the reasons we do lab aid to see what's wrong. And then three months again, we check it to see what this up laments have done in the changes you've made. So we don't carry things in here that don't move lab values. So to dis- discerning person can usually tell the difference. Well, and speaking of discerning, people, we have a new member on the shooting shooting without a g straight with Dr Lewis and like he said, if you'd like to join that, and ask questions and become part of possibly our show on the next podcast. We'll answer them. And, and they have wonderful ideas as well of things to talk about. But our new member, Lance would like to know since we are officially into summer, and this is a great question, Lance because many of you were out there in the heat, and they're working outside, and you're depleting your elect. Tre lights and he's wanting to know what do you recommend for electrolytes? And do you have any recipes for making your own smart water? I guess his he was thinking about doing it out of mushy, watermelons and his wife was grumpy at him for suggesting that and I, I can't say, I blame your wife Lance that don't really sound great. I've, we do actually have some suggestions for doing electrolytes, doctoral issue, and tell them what they are. Yeah. Well, let me put away that smart Aleck thought ahead. Yeah. Really and truly. That's the reason I like the questions is because what matters to you matters to us, and it should. And too many doctors don't listen to you. Well, Janice favorite is called electrolyte energy. It's got a vitamin c calcium magnesium. Chloride sodium potassium alpha Kito glued rate, malic acid and l tyrosine in a free form and it's real popular for people that work outside, you know, yard maintenance guys, the roofers people at sweat a lot, and I like that. And again, I don't know she probably puts it in a drink. How it on, now I like the reacted multimillion, which has the tracks, calcium magnesium, zinc. Selenium. Manganese. Chromium molybdenum potassium. A little bit of between hydrochloric acid but night also fight in boron. Boron is one of the things that missing in almost all cases of arthritis. Boron is incredibly hard to get out of your food, because it's not in the soul. In men, if you don't have good boron. You don't have good testosterone just up your won't to level right there. Didn't interesting spending everything correlates back to each other again. Yeah. Something. Two more questions Janet, I don't believe we did we, I think we answered them well, somewhat through the show. And let's you've got something else. I'd like to go little bit random get off the arthritis kick. These are notes that I took in Jenin, not tight massive amount of seminars. And I'm talking about high class once with Dr smarter than me, sometimes they're not. But some to believe, well, sometimes they really are higher Fairton can be inflammation. We have a doctor that's not paying attention to what's onus lab. His he's got eight hundred on his Fairton. Again, you're talking in code, to a lot of people out there when you what is fair. It's in store darn. There's a difference between running Sheraton and running in iron panel. Correct. Yup. Saint iron panels where it looked low low, low low, and then they had way too much stored iron. So you really stored aren't me is the cat's meow, so to speak. But, you know, you need the iron is very important, but you don't too much of it, because it auks addresses and the macrophages are the cleanup sales. They need the iron to work and that you're neutral feels. But if you get your monocytogenes too high that an acute inflammatory response, and that's what we look at on the lab, if the mantra going up, you don't have enough of your immune system to take care of this. So you're modified should be about a seven and below and most people. We sound lab. It's at ten and up on, we'll one of your inflamed CRP can go up. So you're saying that, when people think they have arthritis that it may not be are. Th- rightous at all. It could be an underlying infection or it could be high iron or calls from those that, that your wake nece there, whether it's a arthritis from joints that have been traumatized, you know, most of us men have done stupid stuff when we were teenagers while we're so wise now because we weren't many years ago, there's different in psalms, that you can take in Janet, and I have a lot of different ones. Some of them, you can't see unless you're bonafide patience because they're that powerful. But there are pro lyric enzymes that will help rebuild the system. It's a great one. It it actually helped break down the inflammation in the body, instead of a lot of the common prescriptions that people give you far thrive is like Percocet and darva set, because those things pose in themselves so many side effects, and risk, and they also create you to be actually more acidic, believe it or not. And they are also higher risk that people that take those are higher risk for heart attacks, strokes and stomach bleeding. Oh, back to Lance's question about Mike your own smart water. You know, there's this big kick about alkaline water alkaline water will there's research you really should read before you think about making yourself, totally outgunned. But all you gotta do just put a pinch of good minerals in your water, and it becomes alkaline. You know, like the electrolyte energy, or the rack. In multi-man, or even the trial Colli, we'll do that. But it's minerals. That makes it alkaline. That's why it's important for the people that like Kito and paleo, and hat have high amounts of protein and fat. It's very important. I do the alkaline forming vegetables, and again, they're not, you know ideal. They're not grounding virgin, mentally rich soul. So it's good to supplement what these men that will Alkalis your body. And there's also things that you can do naturally if you feel like you're suffering with osteoarthritis, and you have difficulty with movement in general, and doing any of the following activities like walking or climbing. Stairs swimming. Yeah. Grasping or holding objects actually squatting down lifting your legs Maine's grab your wife's hand and take her for a walk across the lake across the lake around the. Unless you walk on water. Get into a lot of movement because weight is actually a a problem with arthritis. Well, that's more wear and tear on the joints. You know, it's like I can put a ton and a half a stuff in the back of my half ton truck. And it will still go down the road. But it's gonna put extra work and tear on the bearings. And you know put ball injuries cheerleading injuries. You don't have many people come in here that are football players are were football players back in high school and oddly enough, that's where there are thrice pain has settled is where they were injured or stupid car wrecks that we had just about me back when I was young and stupid. You know, there there's so much, if you just throw it in your body can get better and butter. And one quick, you know, rabbit trail is Juneau nail the average age for mental deterioration is fifty two and as for, for, for women, but it's usually estrogen adrenals dementia. The adrenal glands or the scifi net for about fifty processes and everybody's kicked. You know, they're like, oh, thyroid thyroid, thyroid yet, but they have an access, where the adrenals entire would communicate with each other in back to the hypothalamus and brain. So don't look at one thing, folks, you kind of have to get a. Good. Look at a little bit of everything. Fifty two. Yeah. That is really young. That's just an women. Bill. It's, it's more prevalent in women because the stress of living with a husband that's not supportive in sweet tour. I think, and I think really enjoy there's a lot of trade to that. Because one of the things we're lacking in health, although Janet on talk about supplements. One of the things we're lacking in health is ability to laugh the ability to ply, the Bill to, to show up and smile. We've gotten to be a nation of information, but that's not what gets you wail is what you put your faith in and yelled the distance between your dream and reality is called action. That's what gets it. And putting noth- fine back into things that joy Janet Thome in the other day, I was very immature little six year old up. My fist on hip says 'em non I'm four. If you're not having fun year, the problem. So let's go out and have some fun, you can check with us so that you can feel. Good enough to have the fun. But folks live is about being full of joy if you're not full of joy, you're missing something, and that can be changed for the better. I promise you can. And one way you can spread your joy is by spreading our podcast around, don't keep us a secret. We would love for you to share this information with someone that, you know, that may be suffering with an issue and many times, I hear people tell us, we try to explain what y'all do, and we, we just I don't get it or they're not open to hearing it. We'll sometimes if it comes in from a different source or someone else, saying it, maybe they would. So we really appreciate it when you share us, if you are listening to the podcast, and you would like to get started with us DOE to green wisdom, health dot com. There is a health survey there that you can fill out it will recommend you a lab panel. If you would like to speak with Dr Lewis, he will generally call you pretty quickly after. That and he can discuss with you, anything that's going on with your health, because we wanna make sure that you were individualized and are taken care of. And with that being said, we'd really appreciate you listening to this week show. Please give us any suggestions or questions for next week show. We love love love it. And we hope you have a very blessed week. Once again, our show is come to an end, but you're hoping your health. It's only beginning. If you or a loved one or a need of a different outcome and are waiting for a brighter future take the first step and go to our website and fill out the health survey. Please don't keep a secret if you know someone that could benefit from this podcast. Please share the show with your friends and family. You're only one step away from a life worth living.

arthritis Janet Lewis Janet osteoarthritis spondylitis Lance fibromyalgia lupus America immune disorder food sensitivity inflammation psoriasis achey Gina Advil DOE official
Using Virtual Reality for Pain Relief, Rehabilitation, and Recovery

Move Forward Radio

23:06 min | 1 year ago

Using Virtual Reality for Pain Relief, Rehabilitation, and Recovery

"Move forward radio is brought to you by move forward p. T. dot com the official consumer information website the american physical therapy association find the physical therapist near you and move forward p. T. dot com. You're you're listening to move forward radio a podcast featuring interviews with physical therapists and other healthcare experts with advice on how you can move forward welcome to move forward break yell. I'm eric ries as it turns out. There's nothing virtual about exploration rations of the ways in which virtual reality or v._r. Could be used as an adjunct to traditional physical therapy to address pain and to be used in a variety of other ways. Many physical go therapists are looking into v._r. Some already using it with patients and the future looks bright for v._r.'s expansion as an intriguing tool within the physical therapists toolbox for helping appropriate patients achieve optimal results. That's the upshot from this episode's guest sue jaylen the academic chair of the department in a physical therapy at georgia state university. He holds a pair of advanced degrees in bioengineering and as a researcher in areas such as robotic assistive technologies and wearable technologies donning both his movement science and his bioengineering hats. He's going to take us on a tour of the current research. V._r.'s real world applications occasions in today's physical therapy clinics and the technologies promise for tomorrow so strap on your headset. Here's our conversation before we get started with today's discussion about virtual chore reality as as a tool in physical therapy. Let's talk a little bit about your background and the roots of your interest in the subject. I it seems fair to say that your education and training is different from that of mini physical therapists in that you have a couple of advanced degrees in bioengineering and you've also worked in india and in addition to the to the united states. I wanted to ask you you in what ways has all of that background shaped your career to date and and your research interest in things like <hes> robotic assistive technology to improve mobility and function and wearable technologies to assist older adults and amputees of all ages. Thank you very much for that question. The first of all thank you very much for giving me the opportunity to talk about virtual reality today with you <hes> yes. I've had a somewhat slightly different <hes> career trajectory for lack of a better time in where i got to what i am today eh <hes> with all these degrees in biomedical engineering but when i started off as a physiotherapist almost twenty four years ago in india it became a pattern to me very quickly. Take that has passed. We have two very much intimately understand the <hes> the way people move how we go about interacting with everyday life and happened around us and more importantly i also found very quickly as a early <hes> career person that there was a lot lot of new technologies that were coming out <hes> and in the late nineties early two thousands computers were getting more inexpensive and to me it was very attractive in the sense that if we can bring some of these technology into the clinic to help our patients move better. I thought that might be a great application of technology in physiotherapy tapie so that's what really took me into biomedical engineering and through to that my team is steve was actually working with children settled policy where we were using ah technical functional electrical stimulation which is now widely used in the clinic where we apply electrical impulses to muscles in order to engage them to move so that's the person learns how to move so the entire motivation for me to go into technology as used technology to help people to move better and at the same time harnessed the capability of technology to help patients understand how they move better we here at move forward radio were intrigued by a personal don't health column that was published in the new york times recently <hes> written by a well-known columnists named jane brody the headline of that piece was virtual reality as therapy for pain and the summarizing descriptive immediately beneath the headline read it meaning virtual reality is more than a distraction researchers say it's more like a brain hack that occupies the brain so fully that it has no room to process pain sensations at the same time so in that piece jane brody listed fiscal therapy among the quote unquote established. I bush techniques for treating chronic pain that can be enhanced ineffectiveness by using virtual reality or or. Let's just call v._r. From from here on in <hes> before we get into all all that let's step back a bit when we talk about v._r. Sujay what sorts of devices and technologies sort of fall under that rubric is it. Is it mostly kind of the typical headset. Ah type situation that one might envision the first thing that comes to anybody's mind when we think about virtual reality. Is somebody wearing a headset because we've seen it in the movies or we have seen already in like television and media being promoted that way but a very simplistic definition is where we can think of us being transported to a world that is different to the one that we are currently in in other words. We have taken away from reality. That's why we use the word which will reality okay so that's the first thing to remember so we are for when we are in that actual environment. We are not <hes> exposed to the world around us. It's immediately around so in a room or the funeral home clinic for a moment. You're not there. You're in a different world. So that's the first thing to remember. The second thing is how much immersion does the i have by immersion. I mean do they now when they look around. All three hundred sixty degrees around them is a different world also just a screen in front of them so if it's ah three sixty degree experience everything is different than what you probably need is a headset because you then i'll wearing a headset and through the headset. You're able to view this new you world. That's around here so that's what we call it an immersive three dimensional display but there's also a children's charity where individuals can use a computer screen. I mean where the ritual display is provided on the computer screen or for that matter television so for example. If you take a gaming platforms like xbox or connect or nintendo whatever we all regularly use in our day to day life they're the individual in front of the screen and the movement is interpreted taunted by a software that catches of movement and then translates it into a we went to an avatar that we see on the screen and the avatar moves and therefore be able to interact in individual environment with the object or whatever the theme of the game. Maybe so which reality for the most part is that headset but also could be a computer screen. That's the short answer to per the headline of the new york times column that i'd mentioned earlier. There's growing recognition that the usefulness of v._r. Specifically <hes> the specifically weekly useful in addressing pain issues <hes> there's been a big shift in thought about pain in recent years with developments in pain science reexamining the definition and causes of pain and therefore the best ways of addressing it. Can you speak to that and tie it into the whole subject v._r. And and where it comes in in terms of physical therapy sure so the first thing is we have to understand. What do we mean by paying so a very simple definition is say pain has both a sensory sensation component so we feel the pain but it's also an experienced so it's an emotional component to it so <hes> in very simple times sports sensation and an emotional response onto that sensation so when we experienced pain not only do we feel the pain but it also influence how we respond how we interact and how we behave hey so it's a behavioral aspect too so we're what shall reality ties to all of this as it started off something like a distraction so something to distract somebody away from a painful stimuli for example. There's a needle procedure being done or in burns patients where they wanted to move the extremities or move the individual well and the person experiences pain. The virtual reality was used in pharma for distraction so that's one way it was started to be applied <hes> but also very quickly it became apparent that not only can you distract individual but you can also change how the experience that we to give you a good example. Let's says somebody's in a virtual environment. Now we can present to that individual their own linda for example is if it looks healthy and we can do little tweaks in the software threat whereby when the individual moves that own arm we can detect it using sensors or using a technology like connect and win they move their own arm or the lord extremity of their legs that movement can then be amplified or made bigger so the person now sees in the virtual environment that they're moving more then what they may be physically actually moving so this helps the brain to kind of interpret the movement somewhat differently and if let's say the underlying pain and they're the person's can hesitant to move because of the pain now even a small movement can be changed amplified to make look like a bigger movement and so the person can overcome come if you like the hesitancy to move and what <hes> science and the neuroscience behind pain also tells us that with movement the brain changes how we've perceive pain so it's almost like to me a two way sort of a system so when we have pain we automatically as a protective mechanism but also as mechanisms listen to your worried about the pain cost us to move less however when you start moving more the pain experience starts to come down so as physical take this weird always interested. How can we get our patients to move. How can we improve movement pattern so therefore what we are provides to us is a i believe <unk> a opportunity for us to present that movement in a slightly different context where that person or the patient can experience the movement differently and therefore they can address rested pain in that manner <hes> the other thing also that increasingly we're seeing with the virtual reality is not only can you change the movement pattern but also we can present it in different forums so to give you a good example. Let's say this is not an interactive virtual environment whether objects that environment the person's manipulate or the person it has to move and touch now that engages the person and we know for learning you we've been patterns or for that matter reeducating movement patterns we need need to have engagement so which will reality provides it engagement for that individual to get interested in it and the more they can address it. Hopefully they'll move more and then they can translate that movement to the real <hes> day to day life and to the real world so that's how what you'll reality and pain in my opinion with each other a quick break to tell you about choose p t the american physical therapy association's national public awareness campaign america's currently in the grips of an opioid epidemic and some situations dosed appropriately prescription opioids or an appropriate part of medical treatment but opioids only mass the sensation asian of pain an opioid risks include depression overdose addiction and withdrawal the centers for disease control and prevention is urging healthcare providers providers to reduce the use of opioids in favor of safer alternatives like physical therapy for treating pain learn how physical therapists can help you and move four p._t._a. Dot com slash twos p._t. And now back to this episode of ford radio well talking about the opportunities that there'd be our <hes> poses. It was just it. It's interesting that the new york times piece <hes> quoted both a patient with chronic pain from a motorcycle accident who sang the praises of v._r. But also a he cautioned saying <hes> v._r. Is not a cure. It's an adjunct to other methods that we know work so encompassing. Those statements are both the promise in the strictures of pain management so i wanted to ask you sujay what are some of the conditions for which v are currently is being used as an adjunct by some t._t.'s and can you sort of paint a picture of what that might look like how and at what point during treatment v._r. is being used a compliment or traditional physical therapy. Thank you <hes> <hes> the moment as far as the evidence is concerned tons of peer reviewed publications that are coming out virtual realities mostly being used in individuals who have ankylosing ankylosing spondylitis which is a condition where movement off your <hes> your spine for example is limited <hes> and this pain a ah in addition to it <hes> and therefore which reality is again used to promote movement in these individuals <hes> and also it's used in as i said <hes> patients burns <hes> and also patients undergoing painful procedures if you like so that's where most of the evidence right now is being a published however however i think there's a lot more opportunities beyond that <hes> and certainly any kind of pain movement potentially actual reality could be and the article that you say the new york times i did read that and the physical therapist has a very valid point. This is not a cure. This is an adjunct to what what we do in physical therapists we as physical therapists moving scientists and we'd like to enable patients to move better so what you're using v._r. Is an adjunct something that will help us. Engage patients better understand how that moving happens so that they can perform that movement in their day to day life so in a way which reality itself is not the treatment. It's more a context to that treatment so we can provide some kind of a <hes> environment where individual feels that they can engage with that. They can understand better so that that's what offers an opportunity for physical pacific. Can you see the are being potentially helpful <hes> for things other than <hes> strictly pain issues impatience absolutely and in fact there's more evidence <hes> i would say in terms of use of virtual reality for improving just any kind of movement <hes> so in my lab we are just starting a project with individuals with parkinson's disease wherever you're using our we're hoping to use virtual reality to help them to move with larger amplitude movement <music> by which i mean big movement pattern so into it with parkinson's have a problem making larger movements so when you're asking them to move them make very small movements and and that is not helpful for their activities of daily living but also engaging with a day to day life so one of the things we wanna increase his how big ah move and therefore we can use which reality to provide cues are which objects for them to interact with whereby even a small movement can amplify to a big amendment but importantly that feedback will help them to understand that they gotta move even more than they are normally moving so for those scenarios i think which reality offers a fantastic opportunity because now the individual as i said earlier can engage one on one with that particular movement and get some kind of an immediate feedback on how they're it moving which sometimes it's difficult to provide i would <hes> claim in a very busy clinic environment of that matter if this individual has to be doing this at home home and they happen to have one of these devices it makes it much more easier for them to interact and to perform their exercises so it has a wide range of applications in my opinion but the scientists still very young. We still have to provide more evidence to support it well. It's interesting you should mention the person using using the are possibly lee at home but it's sort of segue into that. I want to go back to that description in the new york times v._r. As a quote unquote brain hack so a patient is only going to have that v._r. V._r. set on or be engaged with their computer or what have you for a certain period of time. I wanted to ask you what makes ers effects longer-lasting and what's the p._t.'s he's role in helping to ensure that thank you and then we have to be a little cautious in interpreting the <hes> the science of the evidence that's out there because for the most respond studies that have done a virtual reality pain have done it for a period of ten to fifteen minutes. Maybe up to forty five minutes <hes> thirty to forty five minutes in a day. Maybe three to five five times a week. So that's the sort of explicit somebody has had to virtual reality and they don't get engaged at the home environment for the most part of that matter for a long duration nation of time however even that shot exposure that they have to watch a reality the individual is <hes> engaging movement patterns and that to some extent allows them to do the do it which they may not be able to do without the reality or if they were to be looked at you know focusing using on the pain and the word hack quote unquote in that article <hes> again. I have to be a little careful how we describe it and to understand that we have to understand the pain perception option. How we experienced pain happens in many different ways <hes> the information that we experienced. Let's say there's some tissue damage and so there's a pain that information to the brain use excel different pathways that are certain pathways that go to a part of the brain that also perceives sensation touch and and movement and so and so forth <hes> so that is where most of the what we call faster pain what happens immediately after we sustained energy that's where we perceive that but when pain states for the period of time that won't be called slow pain that gets transmitted not just to areas that perceived that sensation but it also get strengths made it to other areas of the brain that are <hes> in <hes> that had to do without emotion without motivation arousal so and so forth so imagine somebody having pain for several days and that experience affects their motivation affects it allows so when they talk about the hack or really saying they're i believe when be exposed individuals virtual reality and we're trying to change that experience of pain and be improving the movement. Hopefully that will decrease if you're like. Oh that's where most of the <hes> sort of <hes> published mature provide some evidence that there's some decrease experience of pain promoting movement so so what i see happening in most of these studies i think should be we have to quantify how much of virtual reality is being used and see how that level of engagement virtual reality how that translates to day to day life that part is still missing that part is not well understood and that's what i think we should be focusing efforts awesome well that that's an excellent segue to my next question which was going to be just asking you and you've kind of alluded to this along the way but can you just kind of look to the future and say say where you see the use of the are going and if there are particular areas of study that you deem to be the most <hes> interesting and promising absolutely absolutely like i mentioned earlier realities to very much in its early stages. <hes> cost was a concern but there are now device assist google google v._r. Where you can even use a smartphone to actually provide a virtual environment for an individual so cost maybe coming in the future so that opens up a lot of possibility ability for <hes> for a physical therapist use it in a clinical setting and also for patients to be able to use their own smartphones for that matter to be able to use it but what i think is missing quite a bit as a conversation between physical therapist and software developers and engineers. I think that is is something that there's a lot of potential for engagement between these two disciplines where this cross collaboration physical therapists can explain and bring forth ideas ideas of how we can promote movement using virtual reality and what are the requirements or what are the sort of <hes> concentrate if you're like for having such a platform and then potentially the engineers and developers can develop something like that. I think if there's anything that should have i think in the near future is that kind of <hes> engagement between clinicians physical therapists and engineering <hes> sort of community and i also think that we need more studies like i said that are well controlled control that look at the dosage of how much of virtual reality is good because one of the things that we also have to understand his not everybody would be suited for virtual reality individuals who may experience motion sickness so things like that. We have to be cognizant of so. This is not like a well. Let's use it for everybody. We have to assess. We have to elevate wait and so there's a lot of studies that's needed to see who is appropriate for which kind of population will benefit the most so if they're going to be studies i i <hes> recommendation. I think book clinician as patients is to think about how or what types of patients would benefit so those are studies. We have to be doing where they are very controlled control and we can also look at <hes> sutton conditions for example like my lobby looking at parkinson's disease so if it's going to benefit in there was parkinson's deceased. Is it going to benefit the early stage or at the latest so these are sort of the questions and i think these are sort of the opportunities that are waiting to be exploited <hes> in my opinion so sort of summarize <hes> a lot of promise here but probably not something people should expect to be incredibly widespread anytime in the immediate future. You're correct yes. That's what i would agree with so it's out there but i think there's still a lot more work needed before it gets too mainstream clinic and being used by clinicians every yes thank you so much for speaking with us today move forward radio. We've appreciated eric. Thank you very much for this opportunity and i hope this information will reach a number of patients and consumers and it's all about how as physical therapist we can make this information available so thank you for giving us a platform to do that. You've been listening to move forward radio inside from our guests for informational purposes only and should should not be used as a substitute for individual treatment medical professional subscribe to our podcast on itunes or find previous episodes at move forward. P._t.'s dot com move for radio is brought to you by move forward t t dot com the official consumer information website of the american physical therapy association find a physical therapist near you at move forward p. t. dot com <music>.

new york times eric ries v._r. official researcher georgia state university parkinson V._r. jane brody united states india spondylitis nintendo linda steve
#82: When Suffering Lingers (with K.J. Ramsey)

The Puddcast

58:46 min | 1 year ago

#82: When Suffering Lingers (with K.J. Ramsey)

"I. My friends welcome back to the podcast with me Jonathan Puddle. This is episode eighty to my guest. Today is my beautiful wonderful gifted friend. K J Ramsey. She's therapist and a writer and. Her Book Vis to shell last finding grace when suffering lingers came out I just about a month ago. And, so we talked today all about suffering. About the tension. Between Jesus words that you know all these things and more you'll to. As well as in this life, you'll have hardship. We talked about how stories that include how things can also include great hope and love. honestly I don't think there is a more. Relevant conversation for the suffering that the world is experiencing right now in this one that we have right here. In scope, we're talking really about just personal pain and suffering any context. But I know this is so. Applicable to the entire world I saw some stats yesterday. Some someone was saying that just about the entire world. Is. Experiencing. Certain kinds of type a trauma right now and so I commend this conversation to you in the strongest gentlest way that I can. Please listen to this and please share it with your friends there is. Love and brace and hope here in the midst of our deep. I have just been sitting here at my desk crying all morning while I edit this. And I have just felt I. Ne- I needed this so bad today. And so. May it be a source of hope for you? I highly recommend you. Go and order cages book. And that'll be in the show notes of course, but anyway I'll get out of the way, and you can listen to our conversation K. J. Ramsey. When suffering lingers. Okay so hello, everybody here! We are with my K.. J. And I want to just give everybody a little bit of context for what's about to happen K. J. and I. I've been meaning to do promotion on her book, and that's a really dirty sounding phrase. Let's start that again I have been meaning to tell you how wonderful this book is for a while. I'm going to hold it up to the camera even though you can't see it, because in my brain I'm on instagram. Live right now which I'm not. It's called this to show us finding grace when suffering lingers, and I have had it for a while and I have really been meaning to. Read it and get into deep. I could do a super informed interview with Caja here, but here's what happened in state about a month ago. Hey Jay and I just had a phone call. And It was probably both months ago. Wasn't. It. Yeah I don't know. And time has ceased. Being normal become meaningful. And, so we just had zoom call. Though. We probably talked for like two hours. And we just had a I think a really. Warm mutually encouraging wonderful time. And so before we even start talking about the wisdom and compassion. And Science and spiritual care that she communicates so gracefully in this beautiful book I want you to know. That this is someone. WHO. Reached out to me and we had a real great phone call and encouraged what another despite the fact that she was in severe chronic pain that day. And had to change positions and number of times from room to room, different shares different sets of blankets. And heaters. She embodies this message really well so I. Want you all to know that? And now you have to awkwardly. K. J., comeback from that and say hi everyone. Yeah. Wow. No, it's so. It's so good to be with you and. I think that's what has drawn me to you as you. You make space for people to feel seen. And heard so thanks for. Giving me that in that conversation and hopefully we can widen that space for other people in our conversation today yes. Yes, let's do exactly that so I'm going to dive right in This this book is. Really Beautiful I have I have read now like a bunch of books in this realm of. Mental and emotional spiritual integration with lamenting suffering, shall we say? And each one is useful and has different language in a different avenue, different angle of attack in a different. Approach, because we're all beautiful, wonderful different people. I JUST WANNA. Go try you and love you one of your early chapters. You Talk Biologically Spiritually neurologically bringing us together that we're made for relationships and you bring that back to the. Fact that we're created by a try Yoon, fundamentally relational. God I've spent decades trying to get my head and heart around that. It's amazing deep. It's huge. Talk to me a bit about where that starts for you. Yeah well, the place that that started for a in terms of my own exploration was sitting in classroom. A hearing by forward writer Kelly Kathak teach. And him describing. The the mystery of That we worship God. WHO has three one and At the time he he made, he drew on the Whiteboard a picture of a mountain. And that we have these lines of. God's transcendence and God's imminent, so God's like His Holiness, his otherness, and then God's nearness, and his enhancing humanity in Christ and that. It's it's like the Trinity and God's Transcendence Eminence together are like a mountain with a peak that we cannot see. That we wear these lines of who got is intersect are beyond our site. And that instead of trying to climb to the top of that mountain, and see what that peak looks like. We could bow down and worship and wonder that this is real. and. That was how the Trinity was introduced to me as A. Eighteen year old college sophomore. The year before I got sick and. It's out of it was out of that place of learning that what can't be understood? Can Be full of wonder. And can be a place of worship that actually. Started My. Exploration of How I can enjoy the delight of a God who I can't understand in a body and stuff that I will never understand. As good and real. So that's where I started. So that's. That's pretty foundational. Yeah so let's let's behind the whole book and my life. That's amazing I. Feel like I've been deconstructing everything in order to rebuild on that kind of foundation. Yeah well I mean it's such a honestly such grace that that was what? Where I was taken the year before I, got sick and and also his wife. Tabitha was was my mentor college and she says have time at their house and. She introduced me to Kathleen Norris a few months before I got sick to this writer who writes about a more contempt of spirituality where I was for the first time in my life introduced to things, silence and solitude, and let showed Vena and. I didn't know what was about to happen in my life, I didn't know that I was about to be thrust into a story that I would not be able to parcel out and understand that story would remain my story for the rest of my life. I didn't know that, but God somehow put into my life these. gave me a pocket of peace where I could see. I don't have to understand everything in order to feel loved. And that there is another stream of spirituality that make space for us to tolerate what we cannot understand and have it be transformed into a space of worship and communion. And I'm just so grateful I'm so grateful that that was the the gift that was handed to me in the months leading up to. Me Getting sick and it never leaving Yeah Wow. So walk us through you getting sick and what that has meant. Yeah it's been eleven years now. Was Twenty I was a junior in college and I out of nowhere in a matter of a few days, I? Couldn't walk and I can hold a pen. I couldn't open my Bible. And that. Pain and inflammation swelling. In never went away I. eventually was diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis as took four years to get a diagnosis. There's for years of. Being told that I was making it up. It wasn't that bad while while experiencing barely being able to work. Sometimes barely being a believe my bed. that was how I spent my twenties. I'm thirty one now. I've still never had a day in these eleven years without. Pain. and. Yeah. It's part of my stories, not my whole story. But it's like during is. Is a companion in my story and A. In my house and I could treat it like. An invader. WHO's here to take away my home and my happiness? Or could become friends with it and hear what it has to say at the dinner table. and. perhaps that time at the table could turn into a beautiful conversation. and. That's what's happened and It's where I've. It's where I've learned to hear the story of a savior who chose to suffer because he loves me any loves you. And that story has become my truest story. As beautiful. And for sharing. Immediately I'm torn. Between three different. Polls. The first one is because we have a relationship already. I know. The. Truth and simple, simple truth and honesty and goodness. Of everything you're describing. Andrew Book. Is a wonderful gift that if needs to create. The next I mean since that's not an opposing poll to these other two Poles, but it's a factor. Okay, okay, okay. The next poll is. Make peace or make friends with the invader. And and playing through my head is the enemy comes to. Steal killing destroy, but I have come that you have life in the fullest, and I think the simple, probably this the simplicity of that. Is What drives a lot of? I think the healing desire in the movement that I'm a part of is just very simply. Do we want this. No did Jesus healed the sick. Yes, did Jesus say greater things in my name. You will do yes correct. End of discussion let's just get to work. A no longer totally satisfied with that anyway but it. been part of programming since I was thirteen, so it's. A big thing that rears up in my head, okay? What do we do with that? And then, of course, the other piece is. I mean maybe not of course, but anyway third poll is. Absolutely right scriptures full of suffering and. The one thing she's promises. We will have is hardship and suffering. Yeah. It's a constant theme. And so. So, I'm obviously, these are tensions that you actually like I. Sit here as as abstractions and try to think up and try to come up with wise and smarter answer. I, they're they're not entirely abstractions because I do have suffering. Yeah, that's GONNA. Say these these are I'm sure not. That are only abstractions for you either I. Think these are actually the polls at which we all feel stretched between, and it's just that we don't usually may, and we don't usually acknowledge the. Point on the opposite end of where we want to be or what we want to express as what is faith so I i. don't think it's an obstruction I think it's it's probably. A massive part of your reality. Yes I think that is true I think that's my fear. Speak Game. Because of the level of pain that you go through. yeah well. Yeah I'm I'm a firm believer that. All pain matters. All suffering matter. There's no higher Erkki. and. Anything I think what my my intense level of pain and How prolonged as been just makes me a st that. Anyone's pain really matters I. WanNa give it space because I know to go back to that tension that you're bringing up. Yeah. The enemy comes to steal kill and destroy. But my good shepherd sits at the table with me. I have what I need. And I know that. You Do, too. And so. I think I'm always just wanting to help us. Sit At that table. And see that the shepherds here. For All of us. You know. I have like a segue. That I'd love to make right now but I. Actually kind of just want to sit at the table with the shepherd. And meet you. There's this whole thing. About the sheep fold. How? The sheep fold didn't have a gate. And the shepherd would come and sit. In the opening and would be the essentially the barrier himself. And that's that's where that. Passage passages talking about. It's not just that he sits at the table with us, though of course he does. But that he makes a barrier of his flesh. Forever he is forever changed. What suffering is. So that we truly do not have to fear. These. Things that stay in our lives. They because Jesus wet the infinite distance. To, death! He has made every part of human experience and pain. A place of his presence. And when we simply decide that suffering is something that has to be removed in order for God to be good us to be faithful. We miss going to the depths where Jesus went and finding that he has covered it all with his love, and in every place that I am. Fearful and faithless and hopeless and crying out for relief. I get to. Absorb his trust in the father as mine. And I am changed. I am transformed and you are transformed. That's that's what I'm trying to invite us to in in the book and every conversation I get to have. That is a beautiful framing. As I think what what I've been what I've heard a lot in. In the world that I inhabit and have inhabited. which has so many gifts, but one of those things is you kind of like? Every area where that same list that you just numerate did every area where? They were sponsored. B You have been believing ally. Yeah. and. So! That kind of makes me feel shitty. Excuse my language everybody. but what you just said was that. In every one of those areas I get to. Imbibe. I get to inhale get to. receive. And be received by. One Who suffers with me. Yup which is transformative? And so whether or not I was believing ally. I'm changed nonetheless. Yeah, yeah, whether you were believing ally or whether you have spent your wheels. Years Spinning your wheels trying to see. How a story that includes. Hard things could also include great hope in love. God has been here all along. And God his patient. So patient with us. As, part of the Metaphor of sheep that. We are sheep. We can't understand that takes us back to the. Right about in the first chapter. I think it's for chapter the book About original sin that I. Was Eve reaching for the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. We want this knowledge. Of why things are the way they are. We want to declare our knowledge of God's goodness. As the truth that prevails over any darkness. But. Faith was never about knowledge. That was the that was the original reaching for that knowledge that that God had said was off limits because it was too big for her body to hold in. It's too big for our bodies to hold. We can't contain. We can't stomach it. We can't. We cannot come to a point of understanding this. It will literally make you. Go crazy and be. Calm not joy filled, you know. That! We've confused if confused faith with fact seeking, and and I think it makes it hard to then see the face of Jesus. Across crying out my God my God, why have you forsaken me and then to allow our faces to be dripped with tears. And for that to be a place. Where we are united. To Christ in love. It's a reversal. Mountain that has the peak that we can't see, but where we can bow down in worship and be embraced. With arms of love. Yes! Yes wow. You wrote suffering is like a terrifying mountain whose peak is covered in clouds. We find ourselves midway in an ascent. We did not choose. A you talking to that that cloud of glory of the top of the mountain that we can't see at the same time as talking to. The mental cloud of Confusion Yup. Yeah I think that when we when we we. In prolong seasons of suffering. Riven. Stretches of days that are particularly hard we are. Stepping into that mountain space, and in that in that chapter of the book I'm talking about this. Space where we come up against our limits of standing, we come up against our desire to reach for the fruit of that tree that you've reached for to understand gooden evil, and when is this evil in our life Guinness Stop. That it's these spaces were we are confounded and confused? That God is creating new life. So. Yeah, that's the mountain. The Mountain, the mountain that exhausted and terrifies us is also the mountain where God's transcendence, an eminence are coming together, and if we could stand there if we could be still, we could actually not try to. To run away. Find a path down the mountain. We would be transformed by the glory. Because Jesus we don't turn our face away like most assisted. Yes, we can be seen. We beholding fully with unveiled faces. have. You ever read the ascent of Mount Karma. No steph stating it's wonderful. Down really reminds me of what you're talking about Saint John of the Cross. You know. Seoul and yeah, and in the ascent of Mount Carmel he talks about. This path it's it's quite merchant s grabbing. Obviously, it predates Martin. Yeah this this ascent of the mountain where in order to? In order to know anything. We must know nothing in have anything. We must have nothing. This? Stripping away process as we ascend the mountain of God's glory. That is so often been framed I. Think for us to at least again a my space. Then I will know God then. I will commune with God in a very in a way that my expectation is that I will know that I will have an experience that is definable indescribable somehow. But. What we instead encounter is often. Horrifying darkness. Even. An absence of what we thought we knew God's presence to feel like. And I know this maybe to the casual listener sounds like nothing they want to be involved in. But the number of People who I have observed such veracity and vitality of their faith and spiritual life that have gone through this. Path of unknowing. It's too big to ignore. To commonly spoken of. Yeah, yeah well I think that. Understanding the way that our brains and bodies work is actually a particularly compelling. Invitation for why. Not Understanding. Y your story is the way it is. Could actually be. A space of grace for you guys. Oh I'm craft for me. Yeah, so I think that we get trapped in these cycles of. Trying to make sense of our suffering and our world and What is actually happening in our brains and our bodies? When we come up against these painful experiences, painful motions we are. Our bodies are being flooded with neuro chemicals like Cortisol. and. We are experiencing disintegration so I'm you can't see this on on our? PODCAST Kinda showing the hand model of the brain that when we feel fear, we feel threatened like our sense of self is being threatened, and where is God? Why would he allow this and We stay in this state of like. Pleading for relief our brains were not able to access the prefrontal cortex of our brains, which is the part of us that makes sense of who we are that helps us regulate our painful emotions that helps us feel like we are safe and good and loved and. When we stay in this heightened state of trying to make sense of things. Were not able to give our bodies what they actually need in order to feel embraced and safe and held. And so I think the common. Christian approach to suffering that mostly is like trying to find the purpose in your pain and find the Higginson that you need to repeat repented of an also like pray ardent we for healing constantly. It. It takes you out of the tenderness of what. God has actually creative your body to need to be held and soothed. So these points of disconnection and fear overwhelm, and these massive questions we have about God could actually be prompts to turn toward your whole self and embrace. That you are one God loves whom God delights in, and whom, in whom God dwells, and if you. Be where you are. And breathe deeply. Offer your body away to rest in the embrace that this invisible thing you can't see can't understand might actually be true. That God is here and you loved. Your body can receive the calm that it needs in order for you to come back to a state of integration where you can cognitively. Notice that God is here and feel that it's true and feel like yourself again. The. I think that. Are Common Christian. Cultural way of approaching suffering actually bypasses the. Process. That God created for us to come back to a state of whole this. into veal, his embrace and kindness. In every part of who we are. Yeah. Oh, wow, that is a beautiful summation of never a calf seen all those bits and pieces at play. But I've never quite soon heard. It encapsulated like that. Especially, in regards to the pleading position. Because I've. I've definitely that understanding that it's like way in that kind of fighter flight mode, but it's typically framed in one of like. I I've been attacked. But of course that if we're relating to our sickness as this. Too are suffering rather as this invading force that we're pleading pleading. Goodwood delivers from I. Guess. Yeah, we stay in that zone. Wow. Yes God made us with the capacity to. Come back to a state of peace and joy calm. But. It happens part of part of it is pleading. Part of it is crying out like a child cries out for their mother father. And and then. there. There's this mysterious experience of being heard. But the issue is that we tend to as Christians. We tend to think that our fear n are fragility are faithlessness are doubt is something met has to be dispelled an order for us to remain faithful like. There's this pocket of emotional expression that is simply in most churches and and relationships not allowed. That is actually what we need in order to. Embrace the Gospel. S. And so it's this, it's this actually far more honest faith that is exemplified in the psalms, and then on the lips of our savior himself. Throughout his ministry, and all the way to the cross. That is what we could engage an experience for. Our whole selves to know that we are still held in God's love. And that the The end of the story has been written is not finished, but it is, it has been written. Like this to shell last is not simply saying. You're suffering is the reality that will be here forever. It saying the Kingdom of Jesus is what lasts. And you have been united to Christ. He is here. No his presence absorb his presence so that his faith and trust become your truest reality, and God's words of you are my beloved. Become who you are suffering is the place where that becomes true. Come on. Thank you I'm loving this. The Joy. We'll take a quick poll just for me to say. Thank you to my Patriot supporters. You guys make this possible for me. Thank you so much. It is a great honor to be able to share this work with you and to receive the ongoing support and encouragement of my patrons. If. You'd like to become patron. You can do so for as little as three dollars a month. It would be very much appreciated by me and my family. You can go to Patriot dot com slash Jonathan Puddle to our community. Thank you so much. We're trying. We're trying our community to. Open up spaces for in process testimony for. Yeah stories that Donald tied up the bow. It's new for us. We do not feel in any way that we are excelling at it, but especially given the covid context it feels like. A foolish invitation to norm. Hey, so this sucks. We all hate this. Not One of US likes doing on line. Accept the fact that we don't have to get out of bed. So? We're trying with our leadership team to create more space, but it's very. Awkward. Put it that way we. We're not used to it, and we're struggling with how to foster and welcome people to come to the front and share their testimony. When! It doesn't sound the way we're used to the sound yeah. Yeah, can I read something that you wrote? Sure! Yeah, because you're. Is a couple of things that when I flipped the book open this morning really struck me viscerally. This too is one sentence that's from near the beginning. And then there's the largest section from another chapter. Read them together. But this first sentences from your chapter on try in love, suffering feels like getting lost in the forest while the rest of the church charges ahead. and. As a charger. That I felt cold out big time. So. It, sure did. I was like Oh pause. So, that plays into them that. The next piece is from a whole chapter dedicated to the subject the communion of the saints, and and you write. Churches where I felt most alone and most alive. Others who suffer, tell me the same going to church can be exquisitely painful and incredibly beautiful. When we arrested at the foot of the Cross for the rest Jesus promised on wooden pews, or cloth, covered seats among the bodies of gathered saints, who smiles and lifted hands seem to speak stories of gladness, a suffering body can feel like putty stretched and spread the margins of the room. Can you give me any thoughts or painted a picture or give us any insight on on Azza? Expression of the body that is trying to create space publicly community for more stories. THAN JUST Gladness where. Do we go with that. While the word that really struck me and. That was the word awkward. And I would invite you and your community. and. Anyone who's listening to embrace what feels awkward? We in our culture have such A. We privilege and prefer things to be pretty. And That includes our worship and how we relate to one another. but our God. was born. Just like every one of us, Jesus was born through the womb of a woman. came out as a sticky infant cried needed his mother's milk. Walked and talked in the body that pooped. God became human. I mean that's that's awkward for us. And this is the heart of our faith, right? Same things that a little bit awkward like no one wants you. It doesn't feel right to talk about God like that I think that. Great Holiness and hope happen when we make space for things to be imperfect process, and often what that looks like is it feels and looks awkward. It's not tidy. It's uncomfortable. Does what that I with the first line year read did in you. It makes it kind of stings a little bit. It's a little weird, so. We need to make space in our communities, and in our conversations with one another four words that are unsettling and truth that. Is a little terrifying. That we don't have answers for. End To. Come there with this posture of expectation that here where we are uncomfortable? We will see Jesus. Who made himself human? In a way that is so hard for us to fathom. See I, think it starts with this awkwardness like. It doesn't have to be perfect to doesn't have to be tidy. You say things that. Make US scratch our heads and make us wonder. Have you lost your face? Because we can rest ourselves and you in your identity in the heart of God. Who holds us? We don't have to be so afraid about getting everything right and making sure that you don't. Drown in a pool of sorrow, because God is God and we are not, and we are here to bear witness to him. And when we are weak, he is strong, and and so all these stories weakness. Scare us our place where we can see Christ power perfected. Right so it's like okay. I'm used to high watermark testimonies. As displays of God's power, but when? When scripture tells us like in our weakness. His strength is made perfect. There's another way of viewing that. 'cause weakness mean. We we love the. Amazing sparkling testimonies. And those are true man. God does heal. God does amazing things that are stunning in those stories need to be told. and and Paul said where his it's in his weakness that he experiences Christ power being perfected while Paul on a ship. That's about to be shipwrecked. I WANNA. Think that experience of weakness and terror did not look pretty. Right like if I was on a ship that was thinking it would be screaming. There would probably be some expletives. Like that's part of the testimony. That's part of it. Like are my places of weakness there there are tears and an Gosh, sometimes I. It doesn't. My faith doesn't look so pretty. It looks like my selfishness coming out and me being bitchy to my husband. And then finding the I'm still loved. And I'm still embraced. And that I. Don't have to be that person I i. that is what. Is A story where Christ is present and I am loved an an it's. It's awkward and it's very human. and An and it needs to be heard so that we can experience are. PAINFUL PLACES AS PLACES OF CHRIST's presence. Yeah well. That's good. That's good. You wrote as well. You touched a couple of times here in different places like this idea of the fruit of the spirit, and even to stand talking about you know where on us in our sufferings coming out his unpleasantness to those around us. described the fruit of the spirit. Lay them all out and talk about. When we're guided by grace, some the love that flows from from garden within us, and then you tied directly to a well integrated prefrontal Cortex as we discussed earlier. Yeah I guess brings me back to. To the need to be honest, right like. How can we BE PRESENT? If we're not honest. which I can already hear, some people are going to say. Well just because you're honest, doesn't mean you have to be unkind about it. Sure. Whatever? Yeah! I mean even in those moments where I am unkind to my spouse. This experience that I'm accepted by God. Doesn't it does not excuse, my said. It provides a safe haven for my truest self to be sued. And strengthened so that my sin does not have to be the controlling feature of WHO I am. We have the mind of Christ. So when I? AM HONEST! I can learn that I am held. And I can allow the mind of Christ his. Love his trust in the father in unspeakable circumstances. His faith. To become the controlling feature by the spirit of my whole self. I said. My sin gets dissolved by the spirit. Not by me, covering it up. or China make myself prettier than I am. But by finding again and again in all my experiences in places of shame. Christ has come near. And and we talk about you pointed out I talk about the fruit of the spirit and. Spirit really are well integrated prefrontal CORTEX. We're talking about a little bit ago. Experience of integration involves. Being honest about where we are being honest about. The fact that we feel flooded by fear and overwhelm its its beginning there with that honesty that can put us on a trajectory of remembering crisis with us. and. That the spirit is here that the spirit is giving us what we need to be in Christ love. Yes well. How. And? Maybe this is another whole thing. But I mean there's there's really good reasons we rub from. The pain is really good reasons. We don't WanNA. Be present that we. I mean that we numb that we escape family over spiritualize. Like! It's not just because we want to. I mean when the pain is too much as you well know. How do we make that shift. When we come face another day. How do you make it like? How do you? How do you? Staging. Yeah, well, I have to make that shift a lot. So much. Which I both love, loathe and love Because there's this, there's always an invitation. In My dysregulation. To be seen and soothed and held. Because of the spirit. I think a? Pain. Can talk about in the book pain. Props this experience of disintegration. And disconnection. we are disconnected from the parts of US within that. That makes us feel safe and okay. We also feel disconnected from God and one another. And knowing that when we begin to see, this is kind of what's happening within our brains and bodies in within our relationships. Pain can become a prompt to pause. And if we pause. We can pay attention to ourselves. Wholesales including our bodies as though we truly are. People who are who are loved by God? and. I find over and over again that. The pause. is where the Spirit's power. Shifts my experience of suffering. And allows me to seek what I need. which is often soothing. Paired with truth. Of what my truest story is so. There's that pause which is literally like taking for me often taking a few breaths. Like I know that when I'm in pain or I feel overwhelmed by by big emotions that my body needs regulation, and so I carry the another word as you know. For the spirit of God is the breath of God The Progress of God is in me. This facet of my body that I need to stay my life, my inhale and my. Excel Are here and I can when I pause and take some deep breaths, slow down the rate of my breathing. I am booked remembering that the spirit of crisis in me. And offering my body physiologically what she needs to come back to a state of wholeness. That's the number one thing that I do every day throughout the day is a breeze. So I. Don't have to stay breathless and we're when we're stressed over wound or distributed. Our rate of breathing is often faster. Heart's pounding. The spirit of God is in you. You can be where you are. Grieve this will give you what you need. So pausing has power, and I think from from that pause of acknowledging where I am that I feel flooded also. Reach out I can reach. There's this comes back to. Both things are like a picture of our attachment, and how suffering is often invitation to repair into secure attachment with God self and others in that, so in that moment of pausing I'm I'm reaching for God and I'm realizing the keys. He's turned his gaze at me and. That relationship secure. He's actually here. There's over time as I. Turn Ganden again. See My father cares. I. Experience less of the the cycle of feeling, abandoned and forsaken and more of the. Strength and soothing of. I'm connected to God always. But also I'm I can reach for his people. I can let my faithlessness in my hopelessness. Be heard by some people who are safe and empathetic, and they can have hope and faith on my behalf and. Interchange of me sharing honestly with them about where I am. I learn that it's okay to be where I am I am loved, and they are not ashamed of me. So I experienced God's love there. But I also. I also experience. The. Read from the chapter about trion. Love I experience. Something at the heart of what it means to be human. Which is that? I am not an individual. Being I am inextricably connected to others, and it is within my connection to and need of others that I'm most reflect the image of our God. Who is three in one? And so this place of pain. Becomes in my reaching in my pausing. Becomes a place where I get to see. Who I really am loved. connected. Seen heard. And that ends up giving my whole self what she needs to be strengthened and to stand firm in Christ love today. And to know that his story is true. Amen that is beautiful. Would you pray for US my friend! Definitely. And there. Thank you that you see us. Thank you that you have made. A way. For us. To experience your love rate in the middle of our weariness. Thank you. That Jesus is a high priest who. Understands our weakness more than even we do. Thank you for making your story real. In my life. And Spirit I. Pray that you would fill your saints who are listening today with courage. To see that, their stories are still part of yours. Fill them. Give them curiosity about their wives and their suffering. Strengthen them. Lord provide safe places safe people. For The saints listening to this to be heard. Give them courage to speak the truth about what they're living. Without shame. And in every place of their shame God. Help them see that they have been clothed Christ love and his willingness to become shamed for us. Give us courage. God gives courage to be where we are and to be who we are. And God Out of our stories. Would you. Carry Your Song of love to this world. God. We ask for this world's healing. In this pandemic. Awful lives that are being lost God we ask. Let your kingdom come. In your will be done. We believe that you are as good as you say you are. And that? You are as present as you say you are to. Do this name. Amen. Thank you K- Jay. Friends going and hit. The show notes to order a copy of this, too, shall lust finding grace when suffering lingers. It is I believe a really important work. It's so relevant so timely. And I have sat around the table reading from this book. In tears and sharing words with with friends. And I, D. I really believe for for many many people. There is a message in here for you. So. Please go and consider. In other news, I'm not sure if I mentioned this, but my website Jonathan. PUDDLE DOT COM, which includes this blog was shortlisted four to the best blog in Canada award. BIS Christian blog and Canada which is sponsored by crossroads communications. It's the David Maine's best blog of the year award. So the the Saturday night there is going to be the the. Awards show. Sponsored by the word guild. Which candidates Christian Writing Association so. Very excited tune into that you can find the word guilt on facebook and I'll put a link in the show notes. Excited to be included with some wonderful writers and bloggers. Across Canada? So yeah, tune in to see how that goes. Thank you for listening. May you find hope and may you find love? May you find in the midst of your suffering? God very very close. GRAYSON PIECE GS

Jesus US Jonathan Puddle writer K. J. Ramsey K. J. Pain Canada Caja Jay Faith spondylitis Kathleen Norris facebook David Maine Seoul Andrew Book Yoon Azza
But You Don't Look Sick: Life with Chronic Pain

The Road Home To You

54:54 min | 2 years ago

But You Don't Look Sick: Life with Chronic Pain

"Uh-huh. Hey road trip buddies. It is brandy. Thank you so much for joining us today at the road home to you got a special treat in store today. It is an interview with my lovely mother. We're not in the studio, but you'll hear about that in a little bit. I just wanted to tell you guys a couple of things and one of them is if you would like show notes. That will have links to other shows that we reference as well as I don't know other things possibly you can find that in depth at our website, which is WWW dot road home to you dot com. You can also Email us your show suggestions or questions if you have any of those at road home to you at g mail dot com. And by questions you guys. Here's the thing. It could be like just a general question about like, hey, I'm having this problem. What what's your take on that? It could be. Hey, I don't understand what scripture means when it talks about this thing here. It could even be a how in the world. Do you? Start a podcast, or what is your favorite recipe? It could be any question you want. I'm just saying hit me up. Call me. Don't call me. Email me Email me it will likely be me the answers. And not Matt. So if you wanna hear for Matt. You need to indicate that and then I'll pass it onto him. That's all good. So anyway. You can finally star. Social media's also on our show notes, which is our website. And finally, there is a lovely thing that we have called patriot. And that is if you would like to become a monthly sponsor of our show, you can do that we have different levels that you can contribute at starting at one dollar and going up to ten dollars, and that's a monthly donation and with that you also get a little bit of her award. So that's exciting stuff. Here's a question. How do people feel about merchandise 'cause I've been given this some thought I've been thinking bumper stickers. I've been thinking t shirts and coffee, mugs. I don't know you guys interested. Let me know you can tell me that on Facebook. You can tell you that on Instagram. You can tell me that in our Email. You can you could shout it. I mean, honestly, you could like shout it from a mountain top. Up, and I just might hear it probably I won't. But I might any way you guys that will do it for the business. Let's get on with the actual show. Take it away past brandy and future. Mom. That didn't make sense take care. Bye. Hi, welcome to the road to you. I'm brandy Gable? Joined by my husband, we'd like to invite you to join us is we have real conversations about truth grace and living out our Christian faith. If you have a messy past struggle with the idea of being the perfect Christian or simply curious about just what Christianity is your the right place. Listen, we don't claim to have all the answers. But we're excited to have real conversations that deal with topics that matter so grab a drink. Buckle up. And let's head on down that long road home. Take seventeen. Hey, welcome to the road home to you. I'm brandy Gable? And I am not in the studio with Matt today surprise, I am instead in the lovely town of seaside, Oregon with my lovely mom who is on a little vacation. And I called her up. And I said mom, I wanna record with you. Because I have some questions, and she said great, I'm going to the coast. I set great. I'm coming with. So here we are sitting at the dining room table in nice, little condo. And we're gonna have a conversation about a really prevalent topic that seems to becoming more and more prevalent as the years go by but we'll get to that in the minute. I welcome Maam also known as Teresa Pedroia. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. And I am happy to be here for all. You listening audience will I'm happy to be here at the beach. It was a lovely drive over there were some patches of fog. But according to the news, we're supposed to have snow, and it wasn't fact sunny. Yeah. It was sunny all our trip over yesterday to was. Yeah. Meanwhile, the rest of the country is in a polar vortex. So sorry about that everyone else lead. It's not us. So glad it's not us. So so like I said we're not in the studio today. So Lord only knows exactly how the sound is going to be because we're recording on the fly so listeners please bear with us. But this is this is an important conversation to have today, if you notice from the title, we're gonna be talking about chronic pain. And and kind of what is that? What does it look like what does it feel like how can you hold onto faith through it? How can you support somebody who's in it and how can use revive it? If if you're the sufferer of there's nobody better that I could think of to talk to about this than you, my dear, mama. Because you've been dealing with chronic pain for quite quite some time. Can you go back to the beginning of that with us? I can I was nineteen years old head just had my first child. Actually, I might have been eighteen I'd. Nineteen. Years ago, sixty eight eight yeah. Had my first child and we decided to go dune bugging on the Oregon coast and had a little trouble with the Jeep. We were in. And I ended up getting a pulled back like a. Whiplash. Okay. And went to the doctor went to the hospital until MC Oregon. They shot me full of pain medications, and sent me home told me to stay on the floor because it was flat and hard and that I'd torn some fascia in my back and Fasha is like that silver skin. You see on meet that usually cut off, and that's kind of the Fashoda of those muscles. And so mine across my back, gut torn, and they said just laying around and taking care of would heal it. Well with a less than one year old baby. You don't really lay around a lot not a lot of rest to be had with invent no. So my clever husband brandies, dad built a staircase where we taught Chris her brother. How to climb up the staircase to get into his crib? How how old was Chris at the time. He was crawling age. He wasn't infant. From July, two probably. I don't know. I don't win the accident actually was but he was less than a year old. Oh, yeah. Okay. Yeah. So is probably early early the next summer spraying, okay spring. Anyway, he could get to his changing table. He could get to his crib. And he could get down from both of those by climb. Those stairs are kinda Shinhan up and down. I struggled with back pain and just the healing process for for several months, and it kind of went away, and I thought okay, this is done and it kept coming back and about every four months. I would just go into this bad back issue and go to the doctor, and they'd give me some more pain. Medication? They'd send me to chiropractors. They, you know, do whatever they. Did I and I wasn't getting relief. But you know, I'd have those few months where there was no pain or very little that I could deal. So. That was about fifty one years ago. I'm now pushing seventy and in the past several years. This chronic pain, or this on ios random pain has become real severe. Well, and where it used to be kind of a little bit more sporadic over the past like fifteen years or so probably twenty he it's become pretty much an all time. Yeah. And at about twenty years ago, maybe twenty five or so I had a doctor who decided to just do some random blood tests, and he found in me something called H L B twenty seven which is a genetic sign, and it's for ankylosing spondylitis, and that's a cousin to Crohn's disease and several auto immune diseases. Okay. And he said, that's what's going on with your back. That's why you keep having these problems because of this ankylosing spondylitis, and I said, okay. So what are we do about it? Now, just just our audiences aware so ankylosing spondylitis, it's a degenerative bone disease. Yes. It is. It's kind of a rheumatoid arthritis of the spine. Okay. But then it also seems to affect other parts of your body. So is that just like because your spine is centrally located pain shoots out. Or is there another condition that you have on top of it? While do I have fibromyalgia top. Oh, that's right. That's right, which is nerve ending issues. Okay. And just chronic joint pain and ankylosing is most mostly the joint. Okay. Because I get like shoulder issues, and I've had about eleven surgeries on different joints of my body and my wrists, and my knees may have brand new knees Yang. But they don't work for good their biotic knees that are busted by on it. But I've I've kind of had to do whatever I could think of to do whatever the doctors could think of for me to do to alleviate some of this pain, and I've seen Matala gist. They told me to quit going to car practitioners because as the bones. It's not really degenerative thing. It's a calcium. Oh, I think it's like calcium deposits on the bones. Okay. Becomes like, bone, Spurs and stuff. Okay. And there was some concern about the chiropractor possibly breaking one of those off and puncturing my spine or doing something ugly. Like that. Just sounds like it'd be way worse. Yeah. Way. Wor. Yeah. Okay. Well, I anyway, I don't think I realized that. But okay. Yeah. That's interesting. Yeah. So that's kind of what I've got. Now. I know that you've had back pain my entire life wrote. But I remember it really kind of coming up not too long after dad died which was about twenty one years ago. And it seems to me that it was probably within about four five years of that diagnosis that we were at a pain specialist. You know the day. I'm that was a bad bad ugly day. So I went to the pain specialist with you because because sometimes it helps to have an advocate, right? And we both walked out of that office completely flummoxed by what a pain specialist had said to you, which was pretty much. Will you just need to lose weight? And it's all in your head. Yeah. And and you just going to have to live with whatever you think you got going on right is there's nothing I can do for you. Right. And he said that with his back to us and many. Just the worst. Dr every it was hands down the worst bedside manner. I've ever seen in doctor. Yeah. And if I would have had the my gumption about me that day, I probably would have given him a piece of my mind. But I just I wanted to try to comfort you, I don't think I did a good job of that either. But oh, I'll I was cry. We we I think we both just kind of stood out on the parking lot. And you cried. And I yeah, I just kinda loved on you and tried to. Yeah. But I was sent to him by my rheumatologist. Yeah. So so ever anytime. I hear somebody say, oh, go to a pain specialist. I'm like, nah. That's not the person. She needs to see. Yeah. Yeah. Pain specialist, and I don't know some of you probably have stories of really successful visits to Spain pain, you know, pain specialist and. You know, maybe you've gotten some results. Great more power to you. Right. Did not find any thing that was good. So so the some of the treatments that they've done for you over the years they've done cortisone shots. I've had a lot of cortisone shots in different joints most having to do with. My sciatic joints, my back spinal joints in between the facets of your spine. The fifth sets are the the space between the vertebrae 's. Okay, I've had in my hips. I had him in my knees and elbows and shoulders things. Like that prior. Also, those were a kind of helpful. They did relieve the pain for a period of time. But you know, maybe I'd get two or three months out of him where the doctors were fairly insisted. That I should get six months to a year out of him that didn't happen and in the past. Oh, probably two years three years eventually had back surgery, which they fused couple of vertebrae together to keep it from moving around and rubbing against nerve endings that were causing problems which really didn't help the joints. But it helped the nerves there. Rub. None right, right. They tried to give me shots. They tried to give me I can't remember the name of shots. I don't know. I don't know either. All I know about cortisone shots these weren't cortisone shots. They were they were shots that were blocked the nerves is. Well, like, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And those there again were supposed to act kinda like cortisone shot. It would go into the nerve. And it would deaden the nerve, but they were supposed to last. Several months they lasted maybe a week. Right. Maybe two weeks if I was really lucky. Yeah. I had some ablation surgeries where they gave me shots that killed the nerve. But as nerves are want to do they just turn around girl back, right? So couple of weeks later, my nerve, it'd be grown back and hurting like crazy again. Yeah. Yeah. So it's been a lot of years of a lot of different treatment about fifty one years and a lot of a lot of doctors Ladas specialists. Yes, lots of surgeries not a lot of relief. Absolutely. So let's let's go back because you we talked about this in in our very first interview together, which I'll link in in our show notes, but you became a Christian in nineteen eighty one. Okay. So that's been a hot minute. Yeah. And when I was a kid, I remember you doing you. One of the youth leaders of our youth group, and you were part of the worship team at our church. You did touch ID school taught Sunday school. Did you lead you've lead women's bible studies? I have lead women's bible studies. Recent more recent okay? Yeah. Yeah. So so you early on you were very active. You had L time job. You were an involved. Mom. You were married. You had ministry. You had all those things going on right? And then dad passed away, and then and then the pain spiked you've you've also since remarried. Helped raise a stepson. Hi, matthew. You're not listening, but high anyway, and your life has changed. I would say fairly radically real radically especially within the last like ten years or so, yeah, we're the pain has spiked up again. It's kind of it kind of seems to jump up in like increments layout. It'll kind of be at a level for a while. And then it will spike up, and then it'll be at that level of spike up. A you might remember we have friend that we had lived on the mountain who walked all bent over. Yeah. Cliff? Yeah. And he had ankylosing spondylitis. Okay. It tends to cars you're back to bow really badly. And you get to the point where you're almost bent over. He was very Hunchback very, very he. His bent over about for forty five degrees or so. Yeah. Which was quite severe, and and chronic pain through the whole thing to I really work hard at standing up as straight as I can. But I do know that I'm starting to get that little bit of a Hunchback probably more than starting. I'm just trying not to be banned over like that. Right. However, standing up the best position for me is bent over in an L shape. Okay. It that's what feels about. That's what feels he asked. Yeah. Okay. Sitting down. I can do really well for fairly long periods of time standing up. I don't do real. Well, walking is very difficult for any length of time. And that just come on pretty recently too. Yeah. That's been within the past year or so two years all know, probably when I. Since I got my new knees. Oh away. It seems like it's kind of gotten worse the dust year. Yeah. It's gotten way worse. And I don't know whether that's partly to blame on that. You know, going on seventy you'd expect things to go a little bit wire. Yeah. But it's gone haywire. Pretty fast and furious and an I'm not very thrilled with little thing. No, no. And to be to be perfectly honest. I'm not very thrilled with it either. Because well because when I when I think of my mom, yeah. I think of thirty five thirty seven year old Theresa those were my best years. Well, you know, it weren't they the best throw. And you know, you were you are off, you know, every day after work you and your girlfriends would go for a walk, and you guys did competitive walks. You are active gardening, and you're active in ministry, and you were. You were just super active. Yeah. Yeah. And and that's the way of being active. Yeah. And and that's the way I think of you. And and that's the way you're forever going to be in my mind. Yeah. And yet, I know just going, you know, if you decide we wanna go to Kia that will put you down for the whole rest of the day. And of course, anytime you come across the mountain to come. Visit me I seem to break you every single time by self well, but I don't stop the break. And and you know, it's hard because I I want you to to you know, be able to have that same active lifestyle, and yet it's just it's not possible. It's just not gonna happen. Yeah. So let's let's talk about that a little bit because it's little need to go back to the faith issue. Two of you know, all the things that I used to do that can't do anymore. And it it just kind of breaks my heart to not be able to do those things because as you anybody that's listing. That's older will realize your brain stays fairly young as your body gets more older. And and unusable. Yeah. And you know, my brain says, I can still shop Kia and shop, Costco, and and do all those things and my husband's forever, saying don't overdo. And by the time. He says it I've already overdone, right? It's just I'm done because really it doesn't take much to overdo. It doesn't. Yeah. I I work pretty well. The first about three or four hours in the morning at takes me a while to get moving in the morning. But by the time, I have walked around the house a few times, I can do pretty good for a few hours. And then I'm kinda down for the rest of the day, which is a drag. So how has that? I mean, it's changed your ministry. It has my ministry. Now, I am the women's ministry leader at my church, and I plan things for the women to do and and help with them. But I I'm more. I'm more the planning and designating person right and let them kind of do the job. Fortunately, my I might church has several older women. We're all kind of around the same age. So we're all gonna working on the the crippled end of. Well, you know, it's interesting because I was thinking as you were talking about how your you know, when you're when you start approaching seventy or so you expect your body to start kind of malfunctioning a little bit. And and I was thinking, you know, it's interesting because your mind is still thirty five about your body is older. Right. And meanwhile, grandma, her body is still doing pretty well. And yet her mind because of dementia is just gone and she's ninety one. Yeah. You know, you guys like you've got the young mind the old body, and she's got the vice for. Yeah. So it's interesting because. Man, you know, I guess something's going to have to go. And you just kind of pray that it's not both of them. Right. Or maybe maybe rather it be both of them. I don't know. I don't know either. I just hope rapture comes. Jesus. Take the wheel kick me out. Well, so how has this? Oregon's has it changed your faith. And if so how will it has changed by faith? It is. I think given me a stronger faith because I realized that I can't do anything without Jesus Christ. Yell. He's the one that protects me. He's the one that keeps me standing on two feet. He's the one that gets me up in the morning. He's the one I cried to at night when I'm in pain, and and guess can't find a comfortable way to be I call out to him a lot more than I ever did before when I was still in the process of feeling fairly good, which really kind of annoys me. I I hate to be calling out for once, and, you know, needs like, please take this pain away. Please give me back some strength. Please. Do this. Please do that in. Oh, I love you Jesus. But helped me. I would rather just beyond the worship end of it and not have to be so needy. Have did you have you gone through a point at which you were just like dang it? God, why me like have you? Have you been mad at God about it? Yeah. Not not so much mad at God. Because I have it. But mad because my church after every service. The pastor calls for is anybody need prayer and the church gathers around that person or those people and and praise for them. And they have prayed for me a good deal, and I just don't seek error have seen God working in relieving this pain or giving me the strength that I wish for I. I'm sure there's something I'm supposed to be learning from all this. And and the Holy Spirit hasn't really told me what that is either. So I'm just. Kind of in a muddle of what to do. And it might just be a simple as you know. 'cause when Jesus was on earth. He said pick up your cross and follow me all gonna have a cross to bear. Yeah. And this might just be the cross you have to bear. That's true has anybody along your journey told you that your faith just must not be strong enough. And that what you're not receiving healing. A thankfully. No good. No. I have not run across that person. Yet. I pray that I don't I pray that you don't either. And I pray that I'm not standing there. If you do because I'll punch them in the know all this rip their face. Unapologetically? Yeah. That because that you know, it's such a. One of the things that you and I talked about it's such a hidden disease. Yeah. It's something that you know, you can see me walk gimpy, you can see me cringe at different times. You can you know, you can see some results from the symptoms that I go through. But in the earlier years, yet didn't see those as often I would go to bed and have those symptoms and cry myself to sleep, and you know, I took a lot a lot of pain medication for years. I took a pain medication clear up to the point of morphine four times a day. And thank goodness that that I have been weaned from that. And I hope never to get back to that amount of pain medication needed. Right. Will it's interesting because like sitting here across from you right now except for the little shit. Shift in your body that you just made where I could see you're getting stiff and sore. You know, it just to look at you. You look fine. You know, you're you're Flusher you're healthy looking, you know, all those things you're bright eyed bushy tailed, and you know, if I didn't know better, I'd think this is a healthy healthy woman sitting across from me, you'd be wrong. I brought on one hundred percent. And even when because like I've been at the grocery store with you. And you know, there's kind of a little bit of an attitude when when you'll say, okay, would you like not put so many groceries into one bag or whatever? Like people kind of look at you like, you're an idiot or week or a problem? It's the matter with you. Yeah. And you know, and it's it's interesting to see people's because I get to observe this all, but I'm not you feeling the pain, and maybe kind of tuning other people out. Yeah. You know, I get to see the the pain that you're in. And I know because I talked to you about it. Sure. And then, but then I also get to see people's responses to you, and it just it frustrates me. As an observer because I just kinda wanna grab people by the lapel and say, you have no idea what she's dealing with on a on a minute by minute basis. So cut her some slack. Yeah. And and I got over that years ago because. You can't just grab everybody that. Much as I'd like to. But you know, they just don't know. And we don't know other people's pain. I'm just because I'm in chronic pain. Doesn't mean I should take anything away from anybody else who seems to be struggling, you know, they may be having it much worse than I am just because you can't see it doesn't mean it's not there will an inlets it's like any other kind of hidden disease. Whether that's depression or exile, or fibromyalgia, more or even grief. Well, a lot of the auto immune diseases Crohn's. And and lupus, and those you know, you don't know what those people are going through. Right. It's the same thing. Yeah. It's just called a different name because it's a different genetic profile. Right. But, but even I guess what I was getting at is like, even you know, everybody's got. A story. Yeah. Everybody's got a thing that they're dealing doesn't have to be genetic anything or a a Bogue type disease of any sort it can be an emotional disease than you know, is really crushing that person's soul. Yeah. And and and makes just everyday life kind of almost unlivable, right? I did tell John or maybe it was you. I told somebody that I really don't get me wrong listeners. I have no suicidal tendencies, but I did say to somebody. I understand why people with chronic disease issues, and chronic pain issues would commit suicide. I have had those days where it was just like Lord without you. I can't go on. But I can go on because if you, but I I there are days that I do you understand that wanted to end it yet? Just wanting to end. Yeah. Yeah. I personally don't want it to end because I love my life, and I'm not going anywhere till the Lord decides it's time for me to go. Well, and we love you in this life now. So please stay for as long as possible. I'm hanging out. I don't wanna think about about that. No, no. But I'm sure that everybody with you know, all these diseases has felt that way at some point or. Yeah. Yeah. You know? I mean, I've got a old childhood friend who was in the military and had extreme PTSD. Didn't look like it had a family. You know, like as an outsider looking in everything was fine until he committed suicide Ryan and. You know, as as again as an outsider, I'm looking at that. And I'm thinking where did that even come from like that was out of left field from my perspective? Because I don't know that inner struggle. I have no idea what's going on in his head and heart, and I have absolutely no idea. What's going on in your head and heart as somebody who, you know? I can I can intellectually know my mom is always in pain. Yeah. But but that does that such a kind of a is vague. Yeah. Yeah. I've been in pain, you know, what pain feels like, but. Constant pain is a different story. I remember at Christmas time boy just right before Christmas. I screwed up. My back. And it was my sciatic, and it was just oh it was terrible. And I remember sitting at our midnight service on Christmas Eve just interiors because a hurt so. So so bad. And I remember thinking this is my mom like all the time. Yeah. Ninety percent. Yeah. And it just and that made me cry even harder because I was like jeeze. I can't even imagine having to just knowing that like, okay, this is my life. And that's that's frustrate. It's so frustrating. Yeah. Because at least in my mind, I'm thinking eventually I'm gonna I'm gonna be better. I keep thinking I'm going to be better. And we'll keep praying gone through about three months of sciatic huge sciatic, but I am a little bit better. So you know, it it comes and goes into grease. Yeah. Well, and we continue to pray for healing. Yeah. Address teen in knowing that God could heal you just like that just like that. Yep. You know? And and I will never not ever stop praying for healing, right? Because. You know, you don't get if you don't ask. Yeah. And continue to to believe that God is God. Even if the healing doesn't come absolutely and be thankful for the the things. I can do. Yeah. Beth more in her. Daniel bible study talked about was shattered me shacking Bendigo in the fiery furnace. Yeah. And and she was talking about how you know. Sometimes you get to like go around the furnace, and sometimes you can go under the furnace, and sometimes you can go over. But sometimes you just gotta go through right through it. Yeah. And and that's that's been such kind of a poignant thing for me to just know. Sometimes you just got to walk through. Hell, yeah. And I think that you know, anybody has got any age on at all has been through different edges of hell in their lives. Either through the death of someone they loved or divorce situation of somebody. They loved. Losing child any number of things chronic illness of some sore? Right. So yeah, there's kind of everybody, and then you have to worry about what they're going through, you know. And and that's so let's talk about that. Because that's the thing that I think is probably most burdensome on you. Yes. And something that I really want to explore as well is how do I how do we as people who are not chronic pain sufferers come alongside and support the people who are chronic pain sufferers within our lives? How do we help you Inc? To encourage you to to not make you feel weak and incapable fan. Yeah. But also to not push you to the point of your broken because you've come visit. Or you know, we'll I think that's it. I think being sensitive to. To the fact that okay? She can do some things. So we'll do the things that she can do. And. Yeah, we might go for board a little bit. But it's for a short period when I come visit you, and we go do I keep I don't have a Nike a where I live. So, you know, it's a real treat for me. You know, it's I'm going to be with you three or four days, and I will have to rest up for several days afterwards, but I can do that. So once in a while, you gotta just go for it. But on a general day to day basis. Think about the things that person can do and do those things with them. You know, most of us that are going through kind of the same thing that I have I'm going through can swim and the water is so good for us and feel so good. In fact, that's something you, and I are going to do. The save Ning. Yes. Indeed. And keep praying for them. Call him up and encourage him how you feel today feeling crappy. Okay. You know, what can I do for you? Well, you can't do anything for me. But pray for me. And thanks for calling. I in all it's nice to just talk to somebody for a few minutes and have. No, you're thinking about them. And I am terrible calling you. Yes, you are. I think about you every single day. I know I call you once in a blue moon. I know you're the you're the initiator that and for that I that has been pushing on my heart lately. Yeah. And I thought I need to be so much better about that. Because I know the encouragement that it is I know that there have been any number of times where you and I've talked on the phone, and, you know, we started the conversation with you just like in a lot of pain and feel frustrated, and and then all share whatever stupid crazy things going on in my life, which probably isn't bad. But I always. In my mind. It's like a thousand degrees worse than it is. And so, you know, my just make you laugh because of my own stupid life. Yeah. And by the end of it, you're feeling better absolute or you're at least distracted. Yeah. And that sometimes when she and I talk when Brandon I talk real both be kind of like, how are you? Yeah. Are you? And by the end of the forty five minutes, or however loan we talk. Yeah. We're both gig Lynn and feel much better about for sure for sure I will say though, and I think I've mentioned this on previous episodes that I used to be smoker. And yeah, and you were as well. And it was a lot easier to talk on the phone when I had an excuse to go outside and and stop for a little bit. And so that's when we make our phone calls to and now not smoking for it's been three years for you almost four. It's going on for. Yeah. Because it's Hawaii don't know. It's been like two and a half. I thought for me it was November. So it's been three then. Okay. 'cause we pass November. Yeah. It's been a while. Yeah. Which is great. Yeah. It is great. We did good. We did good. But I do miss her glow. And I do miss being able to weed the garden because that's when we get our weeding. That's true. That's see smoking isn't all bad people. But but don't do it never start. And if you if you if you have started, please quit. Yes. And it really will be thankful you really well. And if you want to know more formation about how I quit I'd be happy to share that with you getting contact with me. Absolutely. Do. Is there anything? I mean, I feel like we've kind of hit on everything that we kind of were planning on talk about is there anything that you feel like you want to add or that we kinda didn't maybe highlight enough or well, I've just been looking around on Facebook a lot lately and being so ticked off at all the anger and hatred and stupidity and. Stuff that's on there. Uh-huh. Political. Not political. Just it all this seems kind of antagonistic Dom. Yeah. Everybody's ticked off at everybody else. And you know, you have no idea what somebody's going through. Yeah. So if you're in the grocery store, and the lady ahead of you is really slow and not doing things exactly the way, you think she should. And she's taken up too much your time just live with it or help our out if you can get oh, you don't know what's going on in her life. Maybe she just flat can't move very fast or maybe her brains a little short, wishy washy. And and she's just can't think really well people that write things on the internet. Don't just immediately right back to them and tell them what it is screwed up idiot. They are maybe they just haven't a crappy day, you know, maybe in courage them too. Have a better day. So I mean, inter no, I just get so tired of listen to the nonsense. Yeah. Yeah. Well to kind of piggyback off of that again around Christmas time, I was how is just up to my eyeballs in it. And and it was just, you know, sometimes I'd respond because I have very different views from some people that that I love and respect in. Sometimes I just wanted to slap them up side the head because in my mind, they're just idiots for thinking the way they do. Right. And and sometimes I'd respond and try to do with love and compassion and truth and grace and all those things in in. Sometimes I think more often than not I did that most of the time year really sensitive about that. But regardless it was unjust up to my eyeballs fighting with people that are never gonna change. Right. And why am I doing this? Yeah. Like, what's the point of this? And every time their name would scroll. By and I'd see their little mean or their post, or whatever, I just get more and more frustrated by it. And Finally, I was like I I need to just I got an end this take a break. And I thought I could just stop going on Facebook. But I can't really do that. Because I've got a business in a podcast and friends and family that I care about and want to see and so that's not realistic. So I just unfunded unfold and blocked a bunch of people. Yeah. And it's the best thing I've ever done -absolutely. I did the same thing at the first of the year. Just you know, if I haven't talked to him in a year's time. Yeah. I don't need to have on my Facebook or in my. Any list my on tax or anything? Yeah. 'cause chances are good. I'm not gonna talk to him unless I happen to run into him on a street corner, which is very unlikely. Right. So get get them out of your hair. Yeah. Out of your eyesight. Yeah. Yeah. And and you know, I mean, there's because there are people that I that I blocked that. I consider really like it, man. If I'm in the trenches, that's the person I'm going to call right? Like, I've got one friend in particular actually couple of them that I that I blocked, but man, I know if the chips are down, I call them and count on them a hundred percent. Yeah. But I do not need to see their political or religious posts. Right. Exactly. And I love and respect to these these people. Yeah. So so very much. So it's not a matter of like cutting out toxic people. I hate that phrase. I do toxic people and toxic masculinity. And there's you know, there's a place that is an an appropriate descr. Option of somebody. But but more often, the whole person isn't toxic. It's just an aspect of them. That is so cut out that aspect. Yeah. But that's just my rant right there. But no, I think you have a really good point that, you know, you don't know anybody else's story. You don't know what anyone else's going through? Whether it's like their whole life has been sucky in hard. Or if it's just today, they're their dog just died and now, and they're just pissed off at the world, you know, cut them some slack because everybody is responding to life differently. Yeah. And we can't expect everybody to respond the same way. We do. Right. And we're all too quick to respond. Yeah. Think about what you're saying before you say it. Yeah. Because once it's out there, you can't get it back. I made a huge boo on Facebook today. I was. Yes. And you know, it's nothing serious. And it's nothing anybody's gonna get overly offended by anything. But it was just a stupid mistake. And let's just tell them what it was. Okay. Some yahu I called him a- joker because I didn't want to be antagonistic on Facebook. You know, I bet you can't think of a city that doesn't have an aide in spelling of it. And I said, yeah, I can mop and Oregon, and which is the was was her ion where I grew up. Yeah. And so is telling brandy that and she says well mop got an A in it and a U P. I and I went. She literally hadn't even thought about that until I was like mom mop and has an eight and she was like, oh, man. I told him he was a joker. Aren't you embarrassed? Totally embarrassed. But once something goes out like that yet can't take back off. It's there, and I mean, you can't you can't take it back off. But by this point somebody's screen shot at it and said who's the joker now, actually? Exactly. And I know I'm gonna go on there to saving and find all kinds of people that are calling me out which I deserve to be called out because I screwed. I actually got called out. I don't know if she's listening to this. But a friend of mine, she was actually also a guest on our show while back it, she was by recovery mentor, and I posted something on Facebook. And this is completely beyond the point of today. Subject. Where on ramp? That's all good. I posted something on Facebook. That was one hundred percent political. And it was just it was a barb that was completely unnecessary. And and I thought it was funny. And that's all I I was just commenting on how funny I was because I thought I was hysterical. And she texted me, and she said, hey, I don't want to call you out publicly. So I'm calling myself out publicly. She said, I don't want to call you up publicly, but I'm calling you out. Yeah. And and I don't think that that's a good representation of us a Christian and did it and care about you. And I wanna see you do better. And man my first response. I got to be totally honest was what the heck? Yeah. You know? Why would? That's you have. No, right. And I took like thirty seconds and just breathe deep, and I was like, oh, no. She's a hundred percent, right. Yeah. And texture back said, Cathy. Yep. Yeah. You. Alie? You nailed it. And I I'm so sorry, I will remove it immediately. And thank you for addressing it nicely. And that was the cool thing about it. And maybe this kinda ties into what we're talking about earlier is that she she did call me out. Yeah. But she called me up privately. Yes. And she called me out for my benefit. Yes. It wasn't to make me feel small. It wasn't to belittle me. It wasn't to make me feel like an idiot. It was to make me a better person. It was to make you understand that. Sometimes funny isn't funny to everybody. Yeah. It may be funny to two or three people. Yeah. But there may have been a lot of offense taken as well. Right. And and it was it was so well done that. I couldn't respond any other way than graciously because she did it, right? Yeah. And so I think I guess when we're talking about social media and just being kind and and not spreading so much negativity. Yeah. You know, there you go. If you've got call somebody out to do it privately. It privately. Absolutely. But I guess how social media kinda ties into it for me. Is it like when we're talking about chronic pain and stuff when when you've got angst and anger right towards anything. Anybody anything? Yeah. It that that only hurts your body because your body your body hold onto your emotion every acts to it at tents up, and it does horrid things. Yeah. So if if you're in any kind of chronic whether it's pain or anxiety, or depression or grief or anything like that cutting out as much of that negatively as you possibly can can only do good things for you. Absolutely. And in the meantime, men, just spread as much love and kindness as you can like you are saying of slowly, that's huge. Yeah. I've been trying to do that more with my driving. I'm gonna talk about my driving a lot on this show because I have issues brandy and her mother both issue. I mean, that's a fact I learned how to drive from you. And and so did Chris, and we all tend to be. Kind of speed demons Chris. Chris raced figure racing for right, right? And yeah, we haven't done that. We haven't. We haven't technically raised. But oh Lord knows. We have raised. So yeah, we we have a little bit of that NS, and I'm just trying to slow down and and just kind of like let people in. Yeah. Ahead of me, Molly even commented on at the other day, go into dance. She's like, why are you being so nice drivers? Like, I don't know. But if feels good it does it does you just kinda get that? When they wave to you and say, thanks. Yeah. Like, yeah. You're welcome. Yeah. Holding a door open. I held the door open for some people when I ride here today, and it was his whole family, and they're like, well, thank you so much, and I was like no problem like it took literally two seconds out of my day to make their day, slightly better. And it was nothing. It takes it costs. You so little to be kind. That's right. And in Grace's, a good thing. So let's just spray the best. And if you know somebody in your life, who's got chronic pain or suffering of any kind ask I would say ask. Them what you can do for that person. Specifically. Yeah. And a lot of times they will say, oh, nothing. I'll be fine. And and you know, that's because there's really, you know, there isn't a list out there that says do this this this and this, but it never hurts to ask. Right. It's always nice to be asked. What can I do for you today? And even people that aren't having chronic issues of any sort ask somebody if you can help them with something ask him how you can pray for him. Ask him how you could pray for him. Yeah. Very good. Yes. All right. Well, hey, I think that's probably it for us on this on this topic. Hate you guys. Thank you so much for joining us today. I know there's probably been some background noise. We had some family it sounded like walking by probably had into the swimming pool, which sounds quite delightful. If you ask me, I think this weekend, we're not going to do. I'm not going to break you I refuse to break this week. I will not break I'm already broken. So you just can't help put me back together. We've planned we've planned on doing some sewing. Yeah. And I'm hoping to go down to the MTO store, which you don't even have to join me for if you don't want to. Not and we're gonna swim. And we're going to sit and watch TV and chat. Yeah. It's just gonna be so low key. And I'm so excited at may two. So we're gonna get on with that you all and I hope that you guys have an awesome day and love God. Love people. Pray hard. Was he next time Levy guys bye?

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Your Essential Nature | Podcast #1 | Our Journey Begins

Your Essential Nature

1:23:23 hr | 1 year ago

Your Essential Nature | Podcast #1 | Our Journey Begins

"Oh. Wait hold on, okay. Now didn't make any sense. To? Welcome to the study string and the Rabbit River. Our first podcast for your essential nature and we bring with you today, De, Mike. and Dave. And here we go. So doing. So far so good, some really good. Thanks! How about yourself? Can't complain. I can't complain. Not Going to know I'm going to. I was going to start by not complaining. We'll get into that, but I'm actually GONNA complain the entire time. So here goes. I. I was GONNA. Say like it's a long way to go, yeah! For sure, yeah, he doing Dave I'm doing really well. Enjoying my Sunday so I will say that these fine young gentlemen waited around for me morning because I had a group guided meditation and Dharma. Talk with one of the UNITARIAN. Churches here in Kansas City and it was so crazy, because one of my dear friends carol from Minnesota. She's in town visiting. And she got to experience with experience at this morning, so we were just kind of like laying in my bed because it's livestream with everything that's going on. And it was really cool, because our relationship is kind of bridging like just melting into something beautiful. They say all of this to say because as ours our moment the. Facilitator. Today's topic was all about Not Being. Somebody but being a nobody, and in being nobody we can be everybody. And the reason I bring that up. Is because during his conversation, he made the comment. This is your essential nature. Off. Topic. He's just he's still idea. Yes, sir, an older gentleman. Right, right? This is already. This is already escalated. To Google. To cease and desist. Already got my attorneys on it. I'm going to Disney on him. COPYWRITER that right? It's okay. For the next fifty years at least. Beautiful thinker necessity for this morning because I even went to Carolina and she's like. That's our podcast where I stole that idea from no a car tollway. Eckhart totally talks about getting into your central nature. And and I I was surprised that you been in no other places online. We're using that and what I liked about. It was got people who come in all the time that are made us. It was and when you when you whispered actually trust people in more I was working with a preschool teacher recently, and she said to get the kids attention. That she would west. And when you whisper people, people are automatically more interested. No no getting into your central nature is something that's like ecumenical. It's like something that is. Expressive for all people, so you could take someone who is a thief takes him his Nathan. And your essential nature translates because it's who we are as people. And it's really about getting into the hearts base and connecting into the feeling centers. Not really about this express an expression of of the mental states like we try to understand the infinite through our brain, and we wonder why it's so limited, and for years I myself was agnostic for many years, and only because of the fact that I was trying to understand like the mystery of life and through my brain. And it's like you just you just can't do that. You have to be able to feel through your your heart center and every time I think that's dogma so Counterproductive. Because you're trying to notify. The infinity what you feel what you know you can't. Dogmas is the brain's attempt to go to a spirituality, yeah. It's I. Think IT'S A it's a marriage of the the heart in the mind you know. I don't think that it's. It's really about like a toning down. Right, you know I think it's. About unity, all unity and harmony, and I think whenever you have the to working. coherently then that's whenever you get the best results. Absolutely. Yeah in your point with dogma. I do think it's important to have lessons, and so someone comes in, and it could be from any background. And it's all an expression of the one right so someone someone expresses it in. It's really the description of the infinite. And something that makes them feel comfortable. But. That's different than Dogma is. No. This is the only way or you know this is the right way or like legal legalism. Yeah, it's dogma. Dogma is is. Like yeah, it's a rulebook and and one of the things that I struggled with. You on my spiritual journey was in the beginning. I was really like well. What's the right way? And and it was just going around in circles and circles trying to figure out okay. What's the right because I? Want to follow the I. Don't WanNa waste my time on the wrong the right way and what I found was that. Each person has a right way for them. Right. And it is the right way, but it's not look. Exactly like the right way for anybody else. And that's what's most important is the right way is? You can't find it out here. You gotta find it within here. Yeah, and so it's stop looking forward out here. You can get clues to it. You can get things that are going to help you. Get closer to it on the inside, but it's it's all inside, and that's fine because it's it's infinite. And so everybody has a different right way, and it's right for them. Yeah I love this exactly like what we're kind of talking about. Before and I was hoping we'd be able to talk about this because I mean just especially with everything. That's going on right now. I feel like what's much more important than the vice of issues like left or right. Democrat you know, how should we be handling the pandemic? Right you know I. Think much more important than than those divisive things. Is is the unity you know is a treating each other with respect and not getting caught up in all of the things that are trying to drive apart. I mean it's better for health is better for everything so I really think that even if you're getting into the science of one of the best ways to stay healthy for yourself, and for others is to skip your Vajpai. Hear about all the time. How Meditation? Helps with immune system. And it real head in the last five to seven years working with patients that. The ones who are most stressed out with once. We're not getting better and I. Myself was sick for most of my life, and so I eat organic food and took supplements in everything. I saw these different practitioners, but it wasn't until I actually worked in my fight or flight response, and started to connect spiritually and started, meditate that I really started getting healthy, but then it made perfect sense, because if you're sending a signal to your body all the time that I'm not safe that I'm endangered Cortisol Cortisol Response Think about the people are walking around right now with with the room as you so aptly put it. I don't want to sing right now. Is there's many renditions of the coronavirus? One is one. Is covid nineteen as in a lean? Good, and then my maestro, it's my corona. Had In my head. Levity with that. But if you're sending a singles, your body all the time that an endangered on the endangered and that safe then your body's going to be in this state where it's surviving, but it's not resting and digesting and healing, and so just from the perspective of if you're trying to take population of people right now and get them to a state where less susceptible to getting sick at the very least what you have them doing is mitigating stress and meditating doing things to calm themselves down because as long as they're keyed up, their immune system will be affected in an adverse way, yeah. I think you're hitting on something that is one of the core principles of health which is a sense of trust. So, if you don't have a sense of trust. As I was exiting from my corporate career, in in a fantastically flaming out. You know rand grand live crumbling before me manner and I was trying to figure out I know that I've struggled with eighty for much of my life, and as I was really digging into that and understanding why you know. Why do I have such a hard time focusing on the task at hand, and what came to me was that there was a there was a deep level of a lack of trust and if you don't have a trust that is. Directly linked to hyper vigilance. And hyper vigilance basically is a component of add. You can't stop. Checking your surroundings. To See if there's something? Dangerous coming loud, and if you can't stop checking your surroundings, you're basically in a state of eighty. But if you can, if you're like I'm cool, and so what how that came to be? Was that I had adopted so I moved into. My Aunt's house is one of the things I love about spirit and I had I was. It was July July I was shutting down my life and in the bay area San. Francisco Bay area. And I was getting ready to pack up all my stuff and move back to Kansas City. I didn't even know why just knew that I needed to do this. And I had I had no I did not know where I was gonna live yeah. I get I. Get a call from my aunt, she says. A here. You're moving back to Kansas City. Is You. Know where you're gonNA live like no. She said well, I'm going to be moving out to California my cousin at lives in northern California, and has this. started this Boutique? Chocolate company with his his college buddy and it's doing really well DICTATOR CHOCOLATE, go go load, yes. Awesome. And they're doing so well that his mom who's an accountant? It's going out to basically help them grow the company and she said well. Would you like to? Read My. House. which happens to be in Waldo, which happens to be exactly where I needed divorce and I was like okay. That sounds great, and then like three days later. My sister, who's an an airline pilots call him, said Hey. I heard you're gonNA. Aunt Coleens House. Do, you want to split the rent. was like okay well. She's here like maybe a couple of days out of the out of the year, but. So! What are the conditions of me running? The house was She said well. There's a a stray kitty that lives. Outside and I feed her every day and I said sure I can do that. Well, that's now no longer a street kitty cheese. But as I was watching her try to eat, she would constantly look up from the bowl and look around. Straight reflection and I was like that's it. CanNot Focus on eating on the task at hand, because she's so worried about her environment, I was like that's at the core of I think maybe not all, but certainly a lot of add issues. Is that certainly for me? I'll say for me. was that lack of trust and my surroundings and that hyper that that? Connection between hyper vigilance and. It was just like an eye. But. I think it it goes deeper, and it's at the core of why people aren't healing right and you know that you the rest and Digest. You can't get into that rest and digest if you're in the state of hyper vigilance, and that all comes down to feeling that security that trust in yourself. Within your environment does that does that go into kind of what you're talking about before when you were talking about like Really, not like not judging and not and just really looking for the answer within yourself rather than now looking outside of yourself. That was like the next leg of my journey was. When you don't trust yourself. You're looking for the answer outside of you. And, it needs to be the right answer because your life depends on it. And so you know my whole journey has taken me to this point. Where like? What we're here to learn is that and this this goes way back to You know the ancient. Traditions The Hindu tradition of that Maya is the great illusion. Right the world's illusion, and it even goes back to you know all all different kinds of religious text. If you look for, you can find it in that The illusion is here to serve us. We're not here to serve the illusion as like a giant mirror. Yeah, and so if you're trying to, if you think the illusion is, the master will in the Tarot Deck. That's the devil card. The illusion delusion is the master. That's the devil card. You see the devil. You see the two people they're. They're in chains, but if you look closely, the chains are just. Around their necks. It's like the tail taking the dog. They could take it off at any time, right? It's also like eight swords. You see this person. They've got a blindfold on surrounded by swords, they could take the blindfold. Pluck up the storage and leave that at any time but it's the idea of youth think that. The tail is wagging the dog right and in this case we're all taught to think that the that the illusion is in control of us when we're actually in control of the illusion. Right have you ever heard of Plato's allegory of the Cave? Absolutely it. It goes right to that of like. Do, you have the. Those who haven't. The degree in philosophy so. Really. What! Is actually made him take off his ascott before he. Pajamas type had little Oxford little sleeves tackling, So for those. Metaphorically network. Metaphorically. Take them off. They're still on their ticket. Bulkin. But what Plato was saying was now he believed the philosopher. Was the highest end of the totem. Pole. So I would say the spiritual, adept or the person who aware wouldn't be the person that would be the highest end of the Totem Pole, but he said that most of society was was like fettered or chained to a Cape Wall, and they were seeing projections on the cave wall shadows, and they thought the shadows were objective reality right so when they were when they were fetter tied to the cave wall, they were seeing the shadows they were reacting to the shadows, but outside of the cave. Cave they were seeing there was where the fire was where the enlightenment was where the actual truth was, and so plato would say that the philosopher had gone outside of the cave, and found truth I would say the spiritual, adept or the person who becomes aware becomes aware of this present moment becomes aware that everything that's coming your way like David was saying of it. Coming away is a giant beer, so like I got triggered last twenty four hours, and when I got triggered I was like. It isn't about this situation. It's about something I'm holding inside of myself. About scheduling our time together. It was totally. It was. Interesting I feel like the the other part of the allegory kind of is relevant to like what we're doing right now, which is like so then the philosopher it comes back in after he seen you know after seeing this unseen all of this scene the fire you realize that, and then he tries to explain that to the other people that were still chained, and then they not only do. They not believe him, but then I like they tried to kill him. Place. WAS A. Was a student at various sorry of a soccer club. And you know He. He basically watched socrates. Drink poison instead of launch changes life, and that's where socrates, the unexamined life is not not. We're leaving. While and that's you know that's. That's basically gut the action sane. I trust her I. Trust my way of doing things so much. That I would rather die than. Change to fit the the community. So crazy that we're talking about this solely. Because that's kind of where I'm at in mind journey, you know being the youngest one here. No. Fifteen right? No. Tomorrow. In a month. No. Yesterday I had the opportunity I was at an all day. Women's retreat. Women's empowering retrieve. And it was all about faith-based equine therapy. And Man I mean I've had a connection with my whole life, and in fact I used to do equine therapy for children with special needs. So this is just like. Like my heart was fulfilled the gun. Ironically the horse looked exactly like my cat. Like white belly white paws but in. Actually Bareback Cat Talk about animals. It's. Everything's a cat. taught acid rain. Mom. anyways, but yes, the first activity. I'll kind of fast all of it, but it was me and another woman and I really got to step into. My authority was the youngest one there These women were all like older retired. kind of working through our trust in source God. Call it whatever you know. In that first activity, it was a obstacle. Course that we had to take big. Mama is the Horse's name. We had to take her through. And you know those little wooden ramps kind of like for that, you might go. rollerblading or something? So the biggest obstacle was to bring big mamma over that ramp because she had never done that before. And so obviously it. Everything's mirrors, so we're working through our thing. Me I'm like Yeah Piedmont. We're going to do this like yes, and you know. That was because it was the preconceived notion of she had never done this before, and I was there to be her cheerleader XYZ. So it took US three times to get her over which was the quickest that she was ever accomplished a task I'm like. Yeah? I. Know. But, then the facilitator asked us if we wanted to do at one last time. And like me immediately I was like okay. We got it to work once. Let's just leave it at that. Because what if we fail the next time? The next attempt right never do it again. Just leave it on the high now. Anything never do it again. Right? Twenty nine hundred was great. That means twenty twenty. It's going to be a shit year. I literally remember saying that in January here. We are young and. So. Found patients zero. Like a phenomenal I love it. Perception always at any rate, so we decided to take big mama all the way from the beginning. And a little hesitation little hesitant I'm just like riding this out online, or whatever like, but the whole point was guide. I expect your greatness in my life. And I don't really believe that it's going to happen. Because I haven't seen consistent greatness in my life, and perhaps that's why I haven't is because I. Expect it not to be great. I've been here the entire time. In, that's the. That's the secret to manifest. Dean is that we don't manifest what we want? We manifest what we expect. I'm learning. I'm learning this and this book. Is On. Is what you come to expect. Right But it's even more than that. Because so after we took her home, which was to the cross, the wooden cross in the middle of the circle of women I like it was just beautiful. You have like fourteen to twenty other women. They were just you could have heard a pin drop in the barn, and for me I'm the type of person that I need space for to allow. Whatever's GonNa? Come up because I. don't really know what it is. But I can feel it bubbling. And, then just a release of tears. Everyone was just like they're like okay. She's working through it and for me. It was this whole concept of surrender like I, I've been in which coincides with trust and yes, I've been surrendering to God in the fact of like. I need to release my control mechanism. A lot of entrepreneurs have the control aspect. And so I've taken a big step back with that, but even with like some of these newer bigger endeavors. Truly expect. His greatness. And I. think that's like wrong for lack of better word in my life because I want to expect that. Develop that trust? Yeah, so I think it's. Being in relation like for me. It's being in relationship with him her. Whatever it is to you so meditation For me I journal a lot. I do soul journaling, which is where you're just in a fluid space to here and talk. And like a conduit, a channel precisely. Yeah, there's a whole book call. called. What is it? I'm really bad at this discovering your or writing down your soul. And, so it kind of goes through a technique about that. I'll wrap up by saying that. It's just truly. Yeah. This concept of trust that you bring up. I mean that's precisely where I'm at is I can. Clearly let go of the reins, and I'm just like God. I'm going to pray before each one of these podcasts and just ask that we speak on what you need us to speak on. Because we're GONNA touch, somebody, and it may not be a hundred million, but it may be one hundred that really need it. So it's funny into. That has just yesterday. I was out on my little walk and. I was listening to a podcast. And so the podcast is called manifestation babe. And it's this woman. Catherine's in Qena Anna Lover Energy and she was talking about. The podcast title was how to train your brain to be your bitch. Already that. I Of course a click bait titled. worked. Marketing and So. To break it down really simply she gets to the point of like. If you say you're GonNa, do something even something really small? And you blow it off what that does. Is it train your brain to expect that whatever you say you're going to do? It's not going to happen like that. And eventually that's how your brain starts to work against you of like it not only expect that to happen, but actively works to make it not happen. Yeah, so schilling. She said that. To how to get to the to the big stuff on the for the small things, medium things the big things in your life. She said the way to reverse. That is to start really small, and even dislike as you're about ready to go brush your teeth. You say I'm going to go brush my teeth right now and you go brush your teeth. I'm GonNa make a sandwich, you make a saying. I'M GONNA. You speak manifestation going to this. Okay and then you do it, and would that your brain Li is a pattern, rick. That's all your brain as pattern recognition. And it's trying to understand the patterns. No confidence when I brush my teeth and I'm like can I do it and I grabbed the toothbrush and I'm like today. Today's the day is going to happen today. I smelled something. She said it's competence. Stupid simple, but it works. You've actually train your brain to. Whatever you say you're going to do. That it expects that to happen. That's exactly the the book. I'm reading right now. I'm reading a book called time. It's by Brian fog and it's that exact same concept. It's like so he's trying to. He's trying to build. His body is trying to work out so. So he has a trigger that tells them when when it's going to happen, and then you start small so. He would go to the restroom and then due to push ups. Just to. You know. Your yes, simultaneous pushups! Exactly, but then yeah, just the same concept that you're talking about. Your brain is like to see. It's like Oh, so do push ups after. A certain point, and then you just starts to pick it up and don't shake Chan if he's out in public and he goes to the bathroom. But to your point. With people coming in. They'll say things and I think we're all natural empathic, but meditating over the years I can feel everything that's happening with people so when they feel sadness. I feel it. Coming up with him I feel angry. I. Feel that coming up with them. And when they say things like what I've really been paying attention to some people say oh, this is hard. People say to me this is heart and our go pay attention body right now, because as soon as they say the words, this is hard. Their body actually tightened yesterday and you can. Actually you can actually feel. Feel it. You can feel the chess titans, the body titans egg. Okay lady was working with doing. It isn't the distant session with about two or three weeks ago and she was saying this is hard and I, said well. Let's try something else just for a second all right in reference to the same thing I want you to say this is easing. Just notice what happens to your body, and what crazy? She was having neck and head pain, and as you were saying, this is easy. I could feel I could feel the change happening within her. And I said you were. How does your neck and shoulder right now? And she said actually I've got no pain, and it's just just codified like through the words right. It creates the field itself, not only affecting our minds, but it's affecting our. Field or energy field what we put out in the universe. Never share it said I mean the the power. Suggestion is just so powerful. I. Mean there's that. Example so just just based on stereotypes. It's not even really based on truth, but it's like. An Asian woman before she goes in and takes a test. If you remind her that she's a woman before the test and she'll do worse on if you remind her that she's Asian. She will do better just because we're stereotypes, I, mean you know what I mean at speculation? Right your expectations. Is this what you're talking about? You're saying focus. Yeah, what what? What what you pay attention to is what you notice and what you notice is what you start to expect. Collapse Reality Yeah it. You know you're. You're. Zeroing in on on one thing out of many things, and then your brain just wants to see that pattern over and over again right so it was It. have an experience where myself to other friends were walking along the street, and we all three looked cross, and there was this group of young women across the street. And myself and my other friend noticed while also I'll start off with. My third friend. Gosh. How do I wanNA frame this carefully? Order logic so. What am I friends noticed? One Girl of the group that. Young woman the Grossing Young Woman Out of the group that he felt. Unattractive different. And it's driving away. But feel to notice. All the other young women that were very attractive. And and so. Me and my other friend, notice this and it was kind of one of those talking points of like while you're so focused on what you don't want. Oh, you're not seeing. Everything else out there that that would fall into what you do because you're hyper focused on what I don't want eight, so the the bigger takeaway from that was is that it's. It's just whatever you really focus on like instead of focusing on what you don't want in your life. Really start to focus what you do. Want in your life, and you start to notice that more often will become a pattern in your brain will start to expect that showing up in your life, and that tell you manifest you manifest on your expectations, and I think a big part, and this is what I discovered this weekend, also that expectation to expect the greatness. There's a lot to deal with self worth without you know like. Well. I, don't deserve. Because Ben's got all of it and Ben is. I knew I shouldn't have done that. This is like a touchy subject. Especially for women, like for whatever reason we don't believe that we expect greatness, and maybe it's because of those preconceived stereotypes, and you know I think we're GONNA huge like shift of I don't even want to say dominance but like. It's uprising. Are. Equilibrium, Gamble because for the longest time. The what does he query? An Age represents a movement towards balancing male and female and piscine age was more masculine. Sue had more money, more bell, caustic or war driven, or if you looked at from like the eastern perspective, it would be ginning. You'd be more young than yen so now we're getting into like if I would mention meditation and people I worked with many years ago. Many people were closed off that. But but meditation is one of the most Yin things you can do it is. It is basically we talk about. Let. Go and let God people. People say to me all the time like Oh my God. That is the most thing you can do. It is just surrendering to the moment accepting and allowing. God Creator to. Just got to get some doing. Zones in, real? Good whenever I talk I, always like to have now sounds. PUNCTUATES! Designed to wrap it up. No, no, it's good team. So. It's like the Oscars when night the person goes off play while. She plays me through asthma. and. On onomic, what was it automatic, semantic, autonomous sensory, Meridian response. For. Those who don't know what to ask. But no just just all that and water I completely forgot what. You're talking about the. Young. Yeah! There's been cultures where where it's been. A female driven. You think like the Amazons you know, and that's where the term Amazonian I believe comes from look at you because you're like a walking out of knowledge, you're actually put on my experts. But, I think I think of this age is being that perfect balance because for longtime team leadership looked a lot like male leadership. Yes, now, female leadership is actually bringing forth this nurturing aspect. which is needed in this world fan, because a lot of people work on where they have their mid back tight or something along those lines, or when they're when they could be harsher caustic, they don't open. They can't open up their hearts. Because there's so much pain in there. And when they can begin to soften the moment and open up their hearts, a lot of healing can happen so when you meet someone who's like a boy, person's really mean just understand that their heart center is likely very closed, and if I was to work on the music chiropractic patient, their mid would be really tight with the nervous go to the heart centers literally shutdown of this just talks right about kind of what I've been talking about before like like cotton, you know and kind of having a waking up kind of experience whenever you're whenever you're in one of the most war-torn neighborhoods in the country you know. It's exactly that because I would, I would whenever I was this transformation, and then I would go out into the world and I would see people that would sketchy, and for so many times I would know duck away. It's going to goof whatever, but then whenever I really got my confidence up, and I wasn't wearing my surrounding so much and I, just really and I was like you know what I'm going to go and I'm going to smile at people. Can See what happens and I just worked up the courage and I did it, and it was just like it was just like what you were saying that the scowl would just like melts once. They would walking up. I don't know who this person is, but then as soon as they would see me smile. It was like their scour just melt, and then that smile was just right behind. It is like they wanted to express this whole time you know. Absolutely exactly what it was, it was like. It was like you know because mean. I feel like it's more difficult to be all like. Like I feel like our. Our natural state is to be more. into the essential nature are essential I. Agree I think are essential nature every time we referenced. The desire to be in harmony with your surroundings. Think about to like laughter. Laughter as ubiquitous like every culture has laughter. And thinking like a few years back about how laughter's the perfect signal that you're sending? When a dog wagged, his tail, or a cat purrs sending a signal to us that we pick up in perceive, but laughter bites very nature like it causes to breathe differently. It kind of massages, the organs it relaxes the shoulder, so we're the guy in the nineteen sixties. Norman Mailer. Norman cousins. You're laughing about. The you're laughing and this is the perfect place it's heading. But Norman cousins had ankylosing spondylitis and he was hospitalized. Closing Spinal ankylosing spondylitis my mouth hurt. My brain just exploded. But he cured himself. That was my brain, not her. He cured ankylosing spondylitis through laughter. He would watch the three stooges himself laugh, and I think about like like being out in nature and being like primal, and in your tribe or something along those lines, and all of a sudden you hear something, rustling the bushes, and you think Oh my God it's it's tiger something, and then a squirrel comes rustling out, and then everyone laughs, and it sends a signal that we're save so like when you're smiling at someone you're like. Hey, you can put down your arms I'm safe and the Squirrel in the bushes I'm not the Tiger Nj. The rest and Digest. The whole number system just relaxes and its like. God. That's so because I'm really into I'm really into laughter in comedy and that. I just did a video where. I've I've added that to my morning routine. Now you know I'll listen to to something. That's not doing push ups do. Push ups and then he'll do I, do pushups a cold shower? Yeah Wim Hof prioritize. Sleep and I do intermittent fasting. Laugh I have to bring myself to laughter. kind of set my own for set the tone for for the day. It's like I can't have a bad day. Whenever you connect with your body, you know you you take care of it and you feel good and you laugh I mean it's like it's such an amazing day. Activity to for decades my my best therapy. My favorite therapy was just listening to the car. Talk guys on on NPR, radio. Click Click and clack, because they just laughed and laughed and laughed and made. Fun of themselves when Joe Schmo funny, they were, they were laughing like an. Matter what you know how deep of a! Funk was in just listening to that. Bring me out of it. It was. I didn't have any interested in the cars, but I just love listening to I know nothing about cars, but i. just wanted to hear them like thick Boston accent. Well there they were. They were perfect. Example of how you have to. Really find your way and the way that's right for you. They were both highly educated. MIT and graduates the oldest brother you know he was. He was an engineer. He was on his way to work when days driving a small little car seat, or whatever and semi cut him off, and he almost died, and to the point, where he had to pull over the side of the road and kind of have a moment of like. Wow I almost died and if I had died. Am I. Okay with where I met, and you know in my life right now. And he wasn't so he drove to work and quit. And then. You know as he said bummed around. Harvard Yard for how you went to Graduate School Practica and haven't gone for marketing eventually. He found his way to be a car mechanic and he loved doing a car mechanic and. The local radio station NPR radio station. Wanted to host a group of car mechanics come in, so people could call in and ask their questions. He was the only person who showed up. And he said Hey. I'll do it. You know like I. Don't care if I'm the only guy here and it went so well. He invited his brother. You know to come in, and that was like history, and those guys had like the best life ever because they were just doing what they loved. They found. You know wealth and fame. Being mechanics. Talking it on the radio and laughing. The past can be oblique. It doesn't have to be this, you know there's a book I read years ago. Talking about how we all go after like this one coveted area, and meanwhile the entrepreneurs and the people that are really pushing things forward or moving outside of that bubble and going towards what they really want. There's if I can plug something right now. There's a documentary that I recommended to one of my favorite people Lisa was watching us right now, and it's called the wild parrots of Telegraph Hill. And Welfare to Telegraph Hill for those senior, a documentary in about two thousand, one to two thousand three, somewhere there abouts and the gentleman. That it's taken from. He was kind of a wanderer vagabond. He just didn't want to have a conventional life. So, he eventually looks for meaning, and he finds it through these birds and these these local. Not Local, but there are these wild parrots that people let go of and Telegraph Hill which is in San Francisco. And he just became enamored with him, began following them, and they became, he became part of their flock, and it was like the Saint. Francis like you would hold out seed and feed from him, but. Like. Sewing set of wings like talking with I. Mean it's such a such a spiritual movie every time I watch it I cry. It's so beautiful. But it, you know it's your point. Life happened in actually became famous for this, not following the path, everyone would ordain, but just follow what he felt passionate about, and it manifested well. That's that's a that was the path that everyone ordained. That's kind of dogma. It is any just in all areas of it doesn't have to be spirituality, but dogma is your enemy. Because it's going to limit how you what you think. The possibility is I. think that's really I think that's a really important point because I'm a Lotta time whenever I'm talking to people. Coaching people a lot of people try. They're trying to get out of the rat race, but they think that the only way. I. How can I quit my job? How can I? How can I survive and thrive? And I think that it's really important like what you're talking about like you're saying. Entrepreneurs are kind of moving into different areas because. We have these gifts, but then people don't really know how to utilize them to create value with them, and so they think that the only way that they can create values to work for somebody else. Fulfilling and is not fulfilling, and it's not fulfilling any of the things that any of your -tective not making enough money to do the things that you want to do for some people. It is right right. I'm talking about people, but if you like I, don't feel good about my job exactly not for you. Not The only way up. You were talking about moving into new spaces I. Don't remember who the author was, but they're. Talking about so a blue ocean blue ocean philosophy where a as opposed to a red ocean full philosophy rhetorician is filled with blood, because everybody's fighting for the same of killing each other, and you know what I'm saying. Nobody's really gaining because you're all fighting for the same stuff. because. We think that that's the only space revalue lies, but really you want to go to the Blue Ocean where nobody is, you know nobody's performing in those in those areas and you create something new like you take your skills and was important to you and your empathic skills, whatever whatever qualities that you have, and and you create value from that you know not just focus on them. When area there's so many there's an infinite way if an amount of to create value, you know to create your abundance. But not whenever we kind of pigeonholed into the only way that we think that is able to create. Yeah, it's so for me that. Guidance System. Is Your Gut. Your Sacred Energy your gut. It's where your passion comes from. and it's gun at your gut. Your brain will create all kinds of stories. You don't know if they're true or not. Like your heart doesn't know whether to trust it or not. Your gut never lies to you ever ever ever ever. It's not going to create a huge story about things you know like the gut check is. Is this right for me. Yes, or no, because. It's always gonNA. Give you just a yes, or no, and you can always trust that, but that's that's the tricky part is trusting like putting your trust I mean this other person. I listened to her name's Amanda Flaker, and I love her stuff and one of the things. She says that I love is and I don't even know if it's hers, but I got it from her. She said the brain is a wonderful. Servant but terrible mass. Actually got that from me. Yeah, there, you go. But you'll. Be Talking to somebody and they're trying to make a decision through the mind. And to your point, if you just ask them sometimes to ask a question and feel inside their body. Their body will will effectively be dictating to them and what have been to a lot lately. When something just isn't right like like I felt like this was like I felt really good about this, and so I asked you guys to be a part of this because it felt like this is a great connection, but I felt very open in reference to it, and that's what I've been listening to us like. When my body opens up, my heart opens up. A spirit opens up. On the right path that what? I'm doing something I'm like why I've been doing this for ten minutes. Why am I exhausted? It's not meant to provide even just like a beginner's tip on not. Solely because that's kind of where I'm at. Yes I. I notice the like we have to feel. The right answer is as opposed to thinking and for me I'm in a very numbers driven. Career at this point, so it's very easy for me to wrap up like okay. This is why this woodwork and this was why it wouldn't work. So. It's like okay I. Don't know that I. Trust I, self that much just yet. I'm still working through that, but I know that I have to feel it as opposed to think it says something that actually just helped me. A week ago was I had one of my Really good friends slash another spiritual mentor in my life. She we were going through the two options that I had for this particular situation. That could be Pretty Large lawsuit type. Situation so like a lot on the line. I'm like to make the wrong decision right so she. She actually said option one. And I could feel this release and I was like. Whoa I was like so. Let's test this out so I was like Hey Karen backup. Now say that the second option is if that's what I'm doing like present. Tense this the now right, this is the expectation and immediately I started closing up and it was like Oh my God. So like if you're not in this space of like being able to do it, yourself and gut, check yourself to have somebody else that you trust and love do the two options or three options, and just notice your body within so that they're taking the thinking and you're just doing the observation. Basically, it really was a profound moment. It really helped me trusted friend or a coach or something right? She. She helped to hold space. Yes, Oh, and she! She just shut up. Super Bag jumping off of that. Just went on a brief tangent about space. I came across something last week. Where did you ever hear someone say I feel your pain. It's pretty common parlance, but I was giving it a little bit more thought, and what that means to me is so so much of the healing work. That's being done an adequate conversation again with my friend the other day. About this, but holding space is really just holding a higher plane of consciousness in front of someone who is holding a lower state of consciousness. And when you're feeling someone's pain, you're helping to raise him to that higher state of consciousness, just by being compassionate understanding and forgiveness to become the embodiment of compassion, understanding and forgiveness, and whatever pain they're holding. It transmute moves into that state. So your friend Karen? She was like being a patient listener, and and reflecting compassion, love and understanding, and because you were so embroiled and what you were thinking about. because. She was steady force within your life. She could reflect back something more clarity to you. Yes, and I think it's important just because this came up on the women's retreat. It's great to be empathic and. Compassionate, but a lot of people may be women in general. Hold onto, somebody's paying. And then it just like they're like. Oh, my Gosh! I'm depressed. I got fibromyalgia all these things, and so it doesn't serve. Anyone any good to hold onto somebody else's pain. Yeah, that's. Raise them up if you're holding onto the lower I've been diving deeper into my empathic nature. That's. Might, That is part of my. I, is. That it's important to To not own other people's feelings. You know as as an impact. You feel other people's feelings, and that's that's you know a superpower but it's important not to own it to give it meaning. Holding space, but just just fee so feeling somebody else's what I found. Is that being able to? Clearly feel someone else's emotion. Has To really great benefits. Is that you can connect very deeply to somebody because. It's hard to for that other person who's in that moment of. Revealing themselves. To do that if they don't feel that connection between. Very right? Yeah, it's like you don't understand me. So been an impact is like okay I. Really do feel I can. I can connect with you at that level. And but you don't want to own it. It's not yours so that that's the the thing is that you can connect with those people? The other thing is a personal benefit which is. You get to learn from that person's experience. That's like for me coming from an IT background, a high tech background is I. See everything is information as data, and as you're collecting data and that basically you know we're this giant relational database, and so as we're taking that data in. We get to incorporate that. Perspective and learnings and deep knowledge into our own experience without having to have gone through them. Experience Ourselves Yeah Yeah. I really love that so. I was just so. I read a book called It's called. Maybe you should talk to somebody and it's about a woman in. Her therapy and her therapist, and also it talks about. Her patients as well but. Because she's talking about the the one factor in whenever a therapist can effect change was somebody is it's not the tactics or or the skill level of the of the? Teacher whatever it's all about the connection like that's the that's the main focus. Is that that connection and so with reflective listening in the benefits of that? It's like yeah, you can. You can jump into somebody like on one of the tactics that I use. You can jump into somebody's perspective. It's like you can jump out of yours, and it's not saying that you agree with it or whatever, but you just jumping in connecting with them, so you've got four is now looking out. At their problem, and then you can kind of seal the spots where they Mr. Of reflect back to them, so they can kind see exactly where you are, and then whenever you you find your, this is where you are. You're starting point in. See where you want to get now. You can take the correct actions to actually get there, and that's why group therapy is so powerful. Group therapy was developed by. A counselor who was trying to counsel Vietnam vets. Is this like the same percentage like amd are i. don't know, but. He he was he was trying to counsel. Vietnam vets with through there. And he was having terrible success because they they would tell him like I. You know like I'm sharing with you. But because you can't, he understand my. You know what I went through like. It's falling flat and I I've lived into war zones myself. And I had the same. Experience when I was trying to go to counseling and the counselor just had no idea what a war zone was like and you dislike. I'm talking to a brick wall. No, no fault of their own, but he had this idea he's. He 'cause he had several That's who is trying to counsel. And he thought I want to bring them together and have them talk in a group. And he did, and it just grew on. It's like they were because they were when they were expressing what they felt. There were people in that group that knew what that was I can could we're dislike? Reflect that power of support group. Yeah, and so he just kept growing this idea, and that's where support groups. Grignon was okay I, so he was going to. He was going to be kind of the directing the flow of things, but. It was having those other people who knew what that was like listening in to your testimony, and reflecting that back to you I think any good, really really good counseling is the ability to reflect. Back to that person what they're putting out so that they can, they can see it from a different perspective and they can feel they can feel their pain. But yeah, with with with people that will work with I've said for some time. The two were combined English, language that tends to be the most powerful when I'm working with people is me, too. So, someone comes in whether I'd had that experience or not. I can say well. I've worked with somebody recently, also dealing with this. And then I for moment I become that person. So I'd say. That's why Jesus talked in parables, because we always yourself with no stories. It becomes reflective upon ourselves, so someone comes in, and they have you know insomnia while I had insomnia so I had that too, and that you bet you you go to bed, and you just can't fall asleep in your mind races or you wake up from one to three in the morning and he just can't subtle. But one one phrase I'd like to say to people all the time because it sounds poetic and was you're the mountain and the valley, so when someone comes in and say you are the mountain I'm the valley, and I can see all of your peaks and troughs, and I can see your high points in your low points, and they can see things. You can't see because you're living it. But because because I'm sitting here in a place. That's stillness piece I can reflect back upon you. Because we can, it's kind of funny, but A. we don't like to be called out on her own stuff. And oftentimes we're so deeply embedded. In that experience, we're not even realizing what we're doing so people call me out on things all the time and I'm like. I didn't even notice that until you reflected back upon me. That was I was just saying in. Any Coaching sessions like I spend the first half of the session just reflecting back, and it's so funny because people come in with the problems and then I'll just I'll just reflect back kind of in my own words, but they said. Oh my gosh. Yes? People aren't listening so i. mean just the fact. You're listening to them exactly that that right there. Just kind of takes you out of it, you know, get Yuda. Be Able to focus a little bit I. think sort story core before. It's another NTR thing that they had for years and I'm going to. Put your phrase. They had like a little a tagline for basically listening is an active love. Going to say that I've never heard that before, but I was just going to say that listening is an active love, and that's what they would have, so they would have these sound roofs. They'd set up all over the country. People would just get into sound boats until stories and. It'd be like going to school. At the time listening to NPR among other things, and as I drive to listen to it and I would just be like sobbing. Because people were talking about. One Guy had visited his wife's grave. You know for like ten years or something like that. Passing every day she would go to her grave, and he was just like talking about like for me like such an intense love. that it was still kind of expressed where they talked about like have someone at pastor. What someone meant to them in their life? And of course you know when they're telling that story, the words are just a carrier for the feeling. They're giving right, so they're going to their deepest feelings. Broadcasting it and I'm like I'm just losing my stuff. But but listening is very much. This is a superpower even when we're talking about in business in negotiations. Whenever each side of reflects back with the other one is saying you know it's not saying like I agreed to, or whatever is just saying. This is what I understand that you're saying. This is what you want and this is so whenever they do that. The both sides walkaway more satisfied I. mean whenever you can create that. Win winning. Just you realize like you. Whenever you're able to listen to somebody, you can get things you know what I mean. Create can find out what they want what you want. You know new I negotiated a lot in my business and I worked with very large companies, and I got them to do things that nobody art industry had been able to do and people always ask me like. How do you do this? And eventually I figured it out. I said I understand their limitations. A it wasn't. It was more important for me to. Stand what they couldn't do what they could do. Because if you knew what they couldn't do, you could work around that to find an equitable solution for everybody. Where they needed you bouncing where they needed you, my grandfather had a barnes space miniature, little sign with his bar, and it was a bear cartoon holding a suitcase said diplomacy is telling somebody to go to hell and having him look forward to the looking. But to your point, it's. Whether, you're talking about sunset in the art of war whether you talk about. The Dow teaching in the data, Ching they talk about doing others is powerful, but knowing yourself is wisdom. And when you know yourself and you know the people that you interacting with. Then you, it's like you're at the table experiencing all the experiences simultaneously. And so when you're not getting something, you want your feeling that you're not getting something you want whether it actually is coming your way or not, and when you can have the full experience, the full breadth of everything happening in that moment. Then, you can see how things follow into like this equilibrium or this balancing harmonious state. I've got to negotiate recently with with our landlord who saw a lovely soul in actually very easy to work with, but I went into it from his perspective, and with love at the center of everything, so it wasn't a matter of business, arrangement or anything like that I said. You're supportive supportive of you. I'm willing to take a little bit of a loss on this just so we don't have to negotiate. And we all left a table feeling going since with with his with his suitcase. Yeah. I mean do you think? I was just wondering like from a woman's perspective. Just going back to something we were talking about earlier so we were talking about manifesting expectations, and maybe the reasons that we maybe don't have expectations. You think like there's maybe an element of like. Not Wanting to be disappointed. Do, you ever feel as a woman or just in general. I mean I I do think in general, but I'm wondering if you think that might be sort of like. Attended may be more of a woman. Tendency or something like manage expectations. Anything like up so. I take on more of like a mass hit like my masculine side is more prominent than my feminine side, I would say on most days. So. I had a whole bunch of answers, but I forgot. Say Okay so managing disappointment basically I think the root of this is just fear of failure, and yes, I would say most people. Might even say most women have a fear to fail. Because we have such high expectations and you know we're used to carrying the kid while vacuuming and cooking with her foot on the stove. just historically and then when the. Caution with history. What's? What's the age when women not Sixties Nineteen? What was that though? The whole Lake Emma. Who is the feminist? HUNK selfridge's. Thousand nine hundred nineteen. That was the right to vote and then the the ER A. Equal Rights Amendment feminist. Pushed the era, and who is the The lady with cute? LITTLE BANDANNA ROSIE! Asked sees the forty s and the nineteen forties, so I'm thinking of her, so that was US women moving into the work space, because so many men were in war. And War. Though is because not only did we have all of the household expectations? But then we had to maintain those while also working where the man was just working whether it was war or job, and so we're used to having these high expectations for ourselves, and from from others so that I think the the fear of failing is really the the root of that cool I appreciate that I'm just really trying to emphasize. edify myself perspective. I, present. An interesting aspect of where we find right now is in the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies. We went from a single income household. It's good to left me when I. When I talk, it gives me a lot of self-confidence. Anymore my in high school. And doesn't have self confidence issues. The child inside and. Thank you I feel better. But the nineteen, sixty, nine, hundred, seventy, zero to single income household, there was able to stain. The same living standard we have now and now you need two incomes in. It's barely scraping three. Yeah, barely scraping the same same standard of living that we had back then so it. Michael Palin talks about this guy that certain extensively food. Any said in the nine hundred seventy s corporation, said Hey, families. We got this. We will feed you. And then industry started stepping in, but the issue with that is that you have no nurturing, side and nurturing come from both male or female, but now you have households where. Neither man or woman are able to help to fulfill that role incorporations can't step in either. And when corporations do the food quality diminishes and the connections. We have diminished. So the whole covert thing that we're seeing right now I think is potentially an opportunity for have more people working from home, and actually begin to reestablish that focal point because you were talking earlier about how bringing all your consciousness to something when you see something. and You bring your attention to it. You can manifest, but when you're giving ten percent of your attention to a child. Then then is it any wonder that they're dealing with attention? Deficit and the are stressed out. Having such a hard time with reality, because they aren't getting the attention they need. I've heard that before the before. The child needs your presence, not your presence. Yeah. But to your to your point I mean. Women I believe had it harder for longtime because knowledge about the glass ceiling where women typically don't get paid the same for job that man does, but the expectations are still higher where you have to then oftentimes be the person that orchestrates the family, and does everything well by the way also wearing that scaring and make up looking perfect. Oh my Gosh! Have you seen them listen Miss Mazel? That's something because it's exactly what you're talking about because she's to these incredible links to be so perfect for for husband she. Like, make sure that the blinds perfect of the sun hits her in the eyes, and she wakes up early and goes and puts on makeup and then goes back in bed interest. But as layers because then later on, they get together and she doesn't do that and he's like what. Have you always looked like this in the morning? Don't ever say. Unless MSU serving you papers. Even expectation for women always. To me really comes out when I'm watching I. Watch a lot of YouTube. Videos and ninety plus percent are made by women. And every once in a while, there'll be a video where let's say because of the lockdown. They weren't able to do their nails. Or for whatever reason they didn't do their makeup end they they have cast perfume breaks my heart and you know I. Just give him a heart. because. The hug the huggy. It's just like you know like. I feel a lot of compassion for that. You need to apologize for not or even apologizing for crying out of Back Level I. Know, it's being human. Being for showing your motions well, it's I mean it's. Specialties. So, Relieved crying right now. This is your base. I do the Tobey Maguire crying face. Stupid fix. It if you've ever seen, there's a meam online. It's like Spiderman like holding the train. And, he kind of looks like he's. But the meam is like. Diarrhea faced. Was Funny. We were talking about this before we started, but how long it would take for us to like toilet humor and I'd say well. That's about forty five minutes slow and it was me. Okay? Right on track. With a woman. Because she's more masculine. Given? The toilet faces given just ask. That's what that book is. About to say something. I kind of felt. I was just saying. What's? What's your? What's your background I mean I was like to hear. What people like whenever people I don't know the right word is like became spiritual started on your path. Is it something that you were? Born into or like something happened that you. How far do you want me to go back? That was. For spiritual boy. Anita one point I wait into multi celled organism and then. From the primordial, WHO's. Just seems like a lot of times some people will have an event like they'll have an event that happened. That was kind of like a line in the sand. Moment was like I. Think it's been a long drawn out fight, okay? I was born in the late. Sixties grew up in the seventy S. Extremely sensitive, my feminine, Strong, masculine and Feminine Energy, by Feminine Energy has always. Been Lied can? Grow up in the seventies as a as a very, you know Feminine Energy Boy. It was not easy, so I really suppress that. I went into the military after high school. To become a you know A. Special OPS soldier. To try, and you know be that masculine. I went into I, went to college after that and I got degrees in philosophy, psychology and cultural anthropology. which was more in line with you know my my spirit wanted, but then after that had no idea what I was gonNA. Do didn't trust that I could make money by following my my path. Got Lured out to San Francisco. Because I love San Francisco I'd been there in nineteen summer of nineteen ninety loved. It came back in the summer of ninety seven. After finishing college and it was right. As the DOT COM was getting ready to explode in a media I mean as soon as I got off, the plane and I was like Whoa. The energy of this place is just like super changed from summer of Ninety two seven years later. Did know what was going on got sucked into that because I've always had A. Fascination with computers spent the next eighteen years in the high tech industry, the last eight years of the hot and the video game industry Made. My way up into an executive position, and one of the most competitive industries in the world like it's harder to get into the video game industry in Hollywood well. And right at the peak of that I was like what the FM I doing here. had a complete breakdown of just like I gotta get Outta here I. Don't you know like I had winky apartment? A sports car I was the head of product, development and Japanese video company. People have worked their entire lives to get to that point and I was just like I'm Outta here. I got an MIC to go. And drop these MICS. To, Kansas City. He's the only thing I knew what to do. I was like a wounded animal, just coming back. And what year did you come back to Casey in the summer of two thousand, fifteen, relatively recent, yeah, and I just had a complete breakdown of like what am I going to do with my life and the struggle has been to really let go of that old life. and just sort of everywhere like from I moved into Waldo, and because I was in Waldo, found the place to cut. My hair also did yoga and massage. And specifically when I looked them up on Yelp I was like they do. They do haircuts, Yoga and massage I'm like that's the place for me interesting and then that led me to yoga patch. Where I ran into a person who was doing weekly meditations, who eventually had? Workshops on energy, channeling and I was like I. don't even know what that is, but I'm going to sign up for him. And felt right. Ed that has led me into my current occupation of doing energy working intuitive guidance. And I actually have an office in Yoga Patch. Oh, but it's the so I started that office in the summer of twenty, seventeen and I've only truly embraced it like. Last year. It was a big fight to come out. As doing this, and and there was always that part of my brain was saying. What if I do this on? Never be able to go back to. This other thing. But, but I mean that's where You know the it's the fear of death, and you really do have to let that party when you're stepping into something new. You have to let that old part. Red I the coalition, so one of the things I noticed along this journey was that. Why is it so hard for us? We to a certain age, and it gets so hard for us to let that part of ourselves die when for all of our early life, we looked forward to the rise like you so looked forward from going to kindergarten to first grade first grade second grade. You stop everything forward to letting go of your old. Getting new clothes like dislike this cherish moment that you're you're progressing progressing, but but you were also at that same point letting that old part of you die, and we're still a safe container, though you know, it was like something where like if I go through tenth grade, I'm GonNa make it to eleventh grade to eleventh grade and graduated. Yeah and it's the same thing, but but you know Jim Carey talks about this. He said Jokingly seven time Golden Globe award winner. Jim Carey only be complete when an eight time Golden Globe! Carry and the point of it is, and you see this a lot of celebrities is they reached the peak of the mountain, and they realized that that wasn't the peak of the mountain. That wasn't the fullest expression of who they are, and when they got what they wanted. You got what you wanted. You got this job I finally. Had this job this coveted? And why do I still feel so empty? Yeah, yeah, yeah, it was horrible. It was enjoyable, but was horrible, right? There was something lacking that caused you to continue to go into your seeking yeah. I noticed that. It's kind of like you start on on a path. And there's like the path that your spirit really wants to go on. And then there's like if you're not on that path of like the higher up, you get in life, the it's like you've got a foot onto boats and the boats are moving further apart and like at some point. You gotTa jump on Way. Split Yeah. You're going to get way. If you're friends, you can do it. You can't say. Crazy splits pence was awesome. He was he would I feel like he was in. He was one of those souls that was just on the on the precipice of moving into ascended master state, and he finally got to a point where he's like Yeah I've had the fund that I'm GonNa half peace out, and then that's when his spirit he didn't. I just dissolved into like I feel like Luke. Skywalker, his spirit just said Yep I'm leaving. I'm done because I. Mean You look at that guy and he just owned his life. I don't know too much about him. Oh, you should look them up. Yeah, he was, he was named a symbol at one point. He wrote one of his one of his albums patient because he felt that the record industry owned him. and. My, wife actually talking about him the other day. How how? I would love to have gotten into conversation with him because he was so enigmatic that you know that there was like some depth behind that. Oh, they're like the either either. You're just anomalous in you're just. Really out there or you're tapped into something. I felt like he was tapped into something I mean I. Truly believe that he you know at the point of his death. He basically his spirit said I'm ready to ascend and he did, and I mean you look at him and like Dave Chapelle used to make fun of him. It very in a very fun way. Jay Shoot it. Would dress up this. You know like you get away with it. Because it was a parody. You can get away with you. Know totally I have. That means my mind right now like we're in the purple. And everything so prince so awesome that his last stunt was that he he released this amazing double album, and the front cover of that was dave. chapelle dressed up as print. Dave, Chappelle can do anything. because he like a parody of appeared. It's a parody of a pair of. Socks. Yeah. So. That's beautiful. Okay, that makes sense because you were talking about the symbol, and it was kind of like a combination between the male and female. What I mean so like. Goal absolutely. Maybe he was just like all right. I've given you all I can give you. Yeah, but that's the next thing. Yeah, that's It's like talking to someone the other day about union young, and and you know you Mary noticed, but Yin and Yang is not using union. You can't have one without the other. Yeah, yeah, so so they they describe it as the mask owns more of the physical side, so the mass side would be like kind of part of mountain, it gives like physical shape in then the dark side would be the feminine side because it casts a shadow, it's more more soft and more less physical. An interesting sidebar with that I often find that women peacock like a peacock. The Peacock I've actually think before at this panel. Like who has the most masculine energy is emmy. Which is totally cool? That's why you're here. Bounce out all the for energy. That was actually emmys voice. Things so. We're gonNA Flash your phone. Number Call the number below. Appointment Swipe Right. I A if you look. threat. Shocked the Sheva. The wikipedia pages I feel has a really good explanation of that, and it basically talks about the feminine energy is being the the what is and representing start, because it represents the potential of everything that can be a formless, and or even the form, but the the the masculine is the well. It's the actual, but it's also really the movement. Of the energy of the Feminine Energy from one state to the next state. So the feminine is the potential and the actual end. The masculine is the actual izing. The Movement of energy from one state to another way, makers well so air napkin videos was talking about this, he said. This is so poetic, but he said love and light or two sides of the same coin. But light is the masculine in love is a feminine yeah, and so when you see like your comedies or romantic movies. It's light that is seeking love so some on seeking the feminine. And and of course, love as an embodiment in this in this form in this world is light. But, yeah, just just the combination between the two inches to components well and so I really follow the GERMANIC, Scandinavian. Pre Christian, spiritual tradition that speaks to me, and. They saw the sun as Feminine, and you can actually see this in the German language the Pronin for the sun is is the Feminine Pronoun these Una. so the son was the goddess that provided life to everything in the solar system, and they knew that thousands of years ago. They knew it but. The light coming off, the sun was masculine, so the Senate self was feminine. The light coming from the sun was masculine because it was the movement of that. And then alternate. The Moon was masculine. That's where we get the term The moon was called. Manu it's where we get man which meant humans? Oh, like people like mankind. it's also where we get mind. Which isn't our act but our awareness. And, so the the. Moon itself was masculine, but the light coming from the Moon Feminine. So, the Moon, the mind reflects the light of the soul. And does that it creates a very feminine. He'll lean energy. That's interesting. There's like so many things that if you go back far enough. People knew this already had the answers. We're just rediscovering it now, remembering because we've become, too. Embedded with our minds understanding intellectually. We're getting there. But to your point to its you have masculine-feminine and everything. So so from like an eastern perspective, like Chinese medicine otherwise they would say the right side is masculine feminine. And there was an acupuncture so many years ago. Who would almost judge radiate the teacher? The healer based upon the symmetry of their face, or how balancer left and right sides. But historically people coming in to see me, we'll have one side that affects them more than the other, and I think it's really interesting how someone will say it's on the right side of my body, or it's all in the less people say. If I get cut off my right side of my body, I will be fine. Yeah. I've tried that it doesn't work. Yeah it doesn't. It doesn't the left and right side also. Correlate with past and present or excuse me past and future cells that would be. More like the front of the body in the back of the body. Okay, so like the front of body would be a future in the act. The body would be passed. Yeah, I agree with that, you know. For for me as an example all of my injuries have been on the left side of my body, and she's my on Lorraine. It's because I've been trying to run away from the feminine side of. I didn't appreciate it. I didn't want it it was you know like shut it down. The right side them. On. The right side is massive, but then the person might might have more. The right sided masculine. Things may see his and this is just a general rule. It's great, but would be maybe some pushing striving forcing rather than allowing right in the person Dan who developed me on anymore on the left side. would be one who's almost feeling like. The world is pushing them or pulling them like they've have so little control there. But it comes out in in so many ways i. mean you know so Western cultism? Talks about how the right hand path is the only path you should take in the left hand path is the sinister path right? Sinister is Latin for left hand, which also evil they believed Latina people relate for a long time, and and your greedy, and like, but the left your left hand side is your feminine side, and it is the part of allowing allowing abundance. It's all about shutting down abundance and shutting down the feminine side, which is why we're all starving so. We've shut down are allowing of all of that energy to come in as I, you know. I. Say That energy is infinite. And so why? Why like? Greed doesn't greed is only agreed when you're taking from somebody else. But if I, it's not greet if you think I wanNA create. You know as a much abundance for myself as as you know as I can. Really interesting out like stealing from somewhere else. Of the brain is opposite, though right like so. It's like the right side of the brain. To the left Ray, so that's kind of. Awhile. And that's actually. They call it Dick, session, or something like that of that hemispheres where it crosses certain point. So yeah, left controls right right controls let. My Dad was. For those still tuning intriguing. satisfied. My Dad was left handed and he had a coffee. Mug it said left-handed people are the only ones who are in their right mind. True, but I relate to that so much. When you're talking about running away from you, I'm like going back and thinking about my juicy I didn't I broke my. Wrist and But kind of running away from that that feminine. Energy I mean. Maybe it's maybe especially as a black male growing up how I did it was like because I was empathic and I. Think that I had. A lot of I was in touch with my feminine a lot too and. It would just way get pushed down. You know. I mean it would be shamed, and whatever I mean one of the incidents that just really kind of sticks out in my mind told you as whenever I was, I was playing basketball with with some friends and. Retired in between like a timeout or something, and I put my hands on my hips a certain way, and it was like ooh Oh my God. Don't ever do that again. You know and I was like Lex o'shane. You know like you're just really shocked me and I. I realize how much I was focused on that. You know how much I had to push everything down and. Always watching and judging in just a slight like my hands on my hips, what a we sound like I have to be super diligent about this, and and pay attention to every little thing that I'm doing and making sure masculine McGeorge. Up It's like nobody's really watching like everybody cares about themselves. Everybody's in their own head with her. Do It's like what somebody said? It'd be funny like. You would think differently about what other people think about you interview. Realize how little they actually do all right. Yeah, yeah, totally which is an amazing level of freedom. How is the way people act when they think that nobody's watching them? Liberating. It's so much fun I feel so much better. Because I am, I'm an expressive person number. I wouldn't do any of that. You know what would keep it very. I mean I'm so much more fun. Now I like myself. Now because I'm expressing because I'm allowing myself to access. ANYTHING THAT COMES UP I. Don't shame them. That's part of me. I love it, and that's awesome, right? We were talking about elderly people recently. And how I've always been a way. Almost kind of jealous because they hit their seventies and eighties shit. They don't know but when you've had like Chevrolet. ARE LATE! Teens imagined what your life would be. Like I've been saying this for years. Imagine what your life would be like. If you had the same now I'm not saying all, but but many of them watch their favorite people pass. And they've watched institutions crumble, and they've watched so much change. You think that somebody born the eighteen hundred eighteen hundreds, and they've seen the horse move to the car moved to. The airplane moved to computers moved to television. They have no continuity things changing so fast and to be able to go. I'm going to be me because a lot of older people. I work on they. They say this is not how was, but now it's like now funding. Why am now the seventies or eighties? claimed, from from you just really came from like I was trying to please everybody. And then I got to a point where I realized that whenever I do this. This group of people said something whenever I do that. This so like you're not gonNA play. You're not going to, and it's hard to keep up with like how do I? Need to act around this person and how do I need to act in this environment? You know it's difficult. I think the biggest leap of faith to take is. The idea that as you start to really. Be Your True Self. You will get more of the things that want. To be around you because you attract what you are, so if you're not expressing what you are, then you're going to be attracted novice from from everywhere. Yeah, so it has beautiful yourself. Everyone else's taken Oscar Wilde. I love that. So let's wrap up in the meantime because our main camera just went out snow. We're using our Beta cameras. So on that now on that note. Dave thank you for joining us. Having yes, yes, and you guys have been listening to the state stream and the Rabbit River signing off. Thank you, thanks.

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E 134 EMR Considerations Josh Nation of Chiro8000

A Doctor's Perspective Podcast

1:20:07 hr | 2 years ago

E 134 EMR Considerations Josh Nation of Chiro8000

"One hundred thirty four you Morton's iterations. I'm your host Dr Justin Show Square today Josh nations perspective twenty seventeen at two thousand eighteen podcast awards nominee host as we get the behind the curtain look at all types of doctors and guests specialties. Let's hear a doctor's perspective <music>. Welcome back just got back from Shanghai again working at the ankylosing spondylitis lecture very ospital actually re met a friend so that was fun to hang out with more time with a guy before he moves back to his home country interested in any series that we've done the doctors perspective dot net slash acupuncture series our top one seven eight which is the top episodes of twenty seventeen and twenty eighteen and podiatrist so those are quick checklists. Here's the top ones take the ones you like and listen to download them as always if you're into what is Justin recommend as far as rehab tools speakers podcast. The marketing stuff is that a doctor perspective dot net slash resources today's episode yes it says Cairo eight thousand which is a brain of Forte Holdings. They have software that you can use podiatrist optometry medical doctors but it is heavily folks on the chiropractic market is H._R.. Or Amore however you want to call it as well as the scheduling the billing and all those types of things and that's what we're going to talk about so so obviously probably feels like we're promoting just Cairo thousand and in essence it is but at the same time we're GonNa go over all the things that you should be asking before you purchase a system or if you hate the system you have more questions that you can ask another one personally like you'll find out I use this system. Them and I've been using it for a long time. They're not a sponsor but I'd welcome it so things we're going to cover a coup. Older patient list is it saves a cloud. Is it on a heart computer. Do you WANNA pay monthly fee. Do Not WanNa pay monthly you WanNa do you wanna own the software outright what kind of computers the at the by we'll go over what is a template versus one of the macro and if you don't have what they want. Can you customize it how fast our notes when you're doing a duplicate from last visit offices not great to do that all the time. So how do you make seem more. Natural is equipped to add your own note in there as well oil so they talk about all these A._D.. L. Got Better. I don't want to go through a million boxes. What do I do that and then the big piece that we're talking about the end of the episode kind of sprinkled throughout but mostly at the end because got bogged down in the beginning with like Dr Notes and those things but I'm going to go for appointment reminders scheduling billions like how you make reports from like C._p._t.? Codes that you use how often how much which insurance companies you can send text messages ain't email reminders like if you're going to get a patient appreciation day you can text reminders all these people. If you had like doc <hes> maybe a supplement that you want to promote to just people who had headaches you can segment that list to like it removes needing an infusion soft the male chimp and a Weber like you pretty much converted that like you can get set up to where it does the on boarding email sequence for you which is pretty cool and of course A._R.. An Eugene and all those things so anyway hope you enjoyed this episode. As much as I had recording it should answer some questions that you have for any software that you are considering data transfers all that stuff all the criminals can be found at a doctor's perspective dot net slash one three four including the transcripts by the way all the Sonos have transcripts now on the bottom of the webpage. You'll see a little bit and you just click that expand it otherwise it's hidden leave a review. You feel good helps other people to discover overdoing. Listen learn integrate. Let's go hashtag behind the curtain live from China and Eldorado Hills California today on the podcast. We've got an interesting gene episode. We don't do a lot of product highlights but this is some program that I've been using for poof twelve years so much my entire career as a chiropractor <hes> before it was just the billing and the scheduling finally upgraded greatest the anymore and <hes> actually I really enjoy it. They don't get a lot of press and just I don't know why so invited Mr Josh Nation on the show. He's the product support manager Forte Holdings of Cairo eight thousand and now they've actually combined signed the scheduling billing and e more under one roof for their version sixteen. They've been around for over twenty years. Thank you so much for being on the PODCAST. Thanks for having me. I'm excited all right so I know each other thinking. Oh my gosh you really think we're GONNA listen into a product sales pitch for half hour to an hour well. I guess you could look at it that way but we are not trying to present it that way. I'm not being paid or anything at this point although I would just saying no I'm just kidding so but we're just WANNA highlights. Some things like why we know the big players. I'll just say it. coyotes eclipsed Jane's APPs getting some really big press recently and I'm always the guy that's thrown out there conroy thousand and for me one it works really well and then to I'm not a big fan of these monthly. Monthly fees is like pay ten grand up front for something then you've got to customize the whole thing. Pay somebody else for like a template which will definitely ask if you guys have that system but I like. Hey guess what I don't want to pay monthly fee and you guys don't do that. It's the software for costs. If you need help you can pay for that and then we're done and you pay for upgrades every couple of years and usually we had this preach at the upgrades aren't like we change the font and we we added an Ortho test or something like usually it's like these massive overhauls will oh okay. Everything's Kinda the same but it's so different that there's a little bit of learning curve in a couple of weeks your backup to where you wanted to be so they're not like Oh. My Gosh can't figure this out. It's like no these are things that we wanted and you guys fix it so that was a long intro. What do you think about that yeah? No I agree you know when I very much user of software just as I am also a product manager of software so you know I always kind of look at what's out there in human being too so I look at price of something I look hit the value. You're getting for something also to be quite. Frankly I mean we live in the digital age. We all are attached the hip to our cell phones and computers and everything else you know. I've got to last week for days so really simplicity now. I you think is key. I I think less is more look at some of the stuff out there. I'm not saying anything negative about but to do. You know fifteen APPs to do what what Hap- can do do. I need all that Dwayne. All those loggins different settings I mean you'll we look at the profession itself and we understand why you got into business. I mean you're truly helping individuals. You know you're making a difference in their lives and you didn't go to school to be a computer science major on the side right. You don't need to be a computer programmer. You don't need to D- a Master of twelve different APPS and that's exactly I think he hit the nail on the head there now it's true that at least whenever I was using it more regularly like right now in China. I don't have to use it as much it was still customizable. You had everything get set up and then for myself well. There wasn't enough activities of daily living. Everybody wants that stuff so I had the create and you know Oh. My Gosh yeah a lot of these systems you can pay are you. Can maybe download the free template that your buddy down the street who's been using it for six years and to get his system run for but I'm guessing that somebody's GonNa charge which rightfully so like this do spend a lot of girls spend a lot of time like I spent some time. customizes I do certain Earth I one of those in there and it's it's really cool because I just still flows you WanNa done and they'll point and click like all the charges and things like that one thing I wanted to mention the Forte Holdings is the the umbrella corporation and you actually has not just for chiropractors listening Tony. You'll have other modules. What are the other professions that you'll I guess support right out the box? Yeah I mean you can we have podiatrists that are supported optometrist's. We have some M._D.'s that are starting to venture into our program program offerings so definitely I take our practice our our forte for lack of a better pun but that's exactly what we're we're tailored for. We do have the sub areas that we can go to what does that look like that says they'll have like the podiatrist jargon preprogramed and things like that well over the years you know we we looked at the different softwares both internally and externally and in one of the things that we started doing just finding ways to allow things like diagnostic diagnostic codes for instance so instead of US shipping version has one said when another version that has a different set for all the different primary specialties what we can do is we can offer the full library and then when when you come in let's say you're chiropractic. I can have those codes preloaded up for you. You know the m the codes <hes> things like Daniel few gecas for some headaches and things like that but I've already got those codes pre lined up treatments things like that you know you're C._p._T.. Codes are common for Chiropractic. I can do the same for each of those but all under the same heading if that makes sense so just to make it easier experiences I again i. I like simplicity. I like to make sure that everybody can get in there like you said you need. customizing optimizing is no fun for anyone. There's always things customizing in and the update word. Nobody likes likes to update anything you know so I we definitely take that to heart. We try to make an update on experience in in an easy experience but then we also look it up discussing rising software. It is your software. I mean you own it when you get it so like you said no hidden fees or anything like that. We just try to make sure everything's user friendly and easy to use. There's kind of three ways you can go and shameless plug for our support team because I really you know they go above and beyond when it comes to that <hes> they treat everyone like family. You know they're not scripted. They're not timed or anything like that but we have three ways. You can go about setting up your software so you can either. You know we can do it for you. We we can do it with you can log in or something like that and assist us that we gonNA learn as you go if depending on your level of of tax petits if you will and then finally you know I can just make sure that you get a good thorough training at any time and we can make sure you know how to do it so any level of comfort there because everybody's different and it comes pre popped with icy tenant this point right Oh yeah yup pre populated with that of course as those sets get updated from time to time we can get those codes in their forty pretty quickly and easily but again the one thing I like to stress. Is your seeing you have access to the full library. Should you need it. However you're seeing specifically what you need for your specialty right out of the gates? You don't have to precept data. That's a good thing because that's that'd be out of control because I remember I looking into icy the Tin Tin. I haven't had a lot of experience with if I'm honest like whenever I get into it. I'M GONNA be relying on my friends to send me some. I'm <hes> you know top fifty codes in versus what we used to us and then seeing what the eight thousand system has in their pre done like okay these are the common coats left right. Yes the challenge because before you know I mean you. I mean there was now now. It's all your different quadrants in also you've got a factor in encounters and things like this. Is this an initial account her subsequent counter things like that so it's definitely an interesting world for those coders out there now. There's something to talk about a couple of features that I mean I see a lot and people want and then after that we'll just kinda. Ask you like what are some of the top features that you know. Separate you guys or whatever and get more people like Oh. That's why it's cool adjusting. We can always have five or six ways to explain what we're doing and if you see somebody say fifteen visits over say the car accident you're gonNA end up using all three all six of them three times and the person has reviewing. You're not going to like okay so it's still canned but at the same time as a doctor when we want some speed in this we don't just want we can't say the same thing every visit although your program does have that feature just copies everything and did the last time the way it's quicker you don't want to Redo the history and all that kind of stuff. So what do y'all do. How does that work to where you know? It's quick but you can still make it look different but at the same time you don't have to recreate the will everytime what's going on with that in in you touch on a good quite. which is you know? Sometimes those things do become similar Miller from visit to visit and you gotTa randomize it so we we got a couple different ways so <hes> as you mentioned we do have the way to clone everything forward so meaning from the last visit you can clone at four but we took that one step further in our our newer versions so now you can actually go Dan and you can actually pick and choose of the areas what you want to copy forward so we used the term salt same as last time but essentially you know there's there's commonality of things that you might see you want to be changed inches. Well as some things that are okay is the same so you may go in and say no. I want to never carry forward the diagnosis and treatment but I wanna carry everything else for it or you may find a combination so inev- of course we've got fifty different sections. You can pick and choose what comes forward so that's that's that level when you're talking about but we do have options very simple interface where you can just simply click to randomize your subjective for or your narratives in the in the software itself so that even if they are copying shopping forward they still are arranged in a way to give them a uniqueness because we're even starting to see in the front billing Francis Medicare or or some of the work calms. They're actually scrutinizing that to a degree as well <hes> to see if there is variants in your report so when this objective they'll be like a section if you click into that tight muscles either tonic muscles guarding whatever words you WANNA use. I'm sure there's better ones but I just gave as an example example so they might have what like ten or fifteen different ways to say the same thing and then somehow the software's able to like combine several options as well yes so we essentially in that specific area would be it's almost like a sentence builder so we've got two sentences sentences think of apparent and a child so parents being the patient presents today and then child is the the subsequent filling in that sentence for acute symptom of you know in going down through the the order there so just it's like you said we have we already pre populate with common phrases and in used terms so that way you could just with applicable button select them but we also understand every every practices different so that'd being the case you can also come in and add your own phraseology to so really you're. You're combining. These just click a Biden and in the program can throw them in a different order scheme beyond so you have the ability to randomize it as well as the software will take that one step further in random. Is it as well. Thank you know essentially. It's like putting dyson and shaking around right so you've got the same components or they're. They're just presented an indifferent order if you wanted to and if it all makes like if you're talking about objective you're going to have tightened muscles. You're going to have `asymmetry pain so you're going to be all the Medicare guidelines on every patient regardless of the reason you know. They're cashback another cash their medicare their insurance those are just the basics ju just have in my opinion like this. Don't skip you have a computer. Just click the button right so right so here's my thought you gotTA screen. You gotta like who knows you. Start going through and you like all right. We're talking about muscles so then you have all these things so you. You're like okay. I'm only pick this one today but you clone the the visit and you couldn't forget about it you you're going through. You're seeing a lot of patients. Oh Man I forgot that clicked that and click a different one so do you have to go in and say okay. Here's the six ways to save muscles are tight you you you click all of those and then just pick one each time or like yet. Go in today's this and tomorrow is this one and then tomorrow's that one no so you're you're on the initial outset so let's say visit one or visit visit five. It doesn't Israeli matter so at some point which doing as you're going in and selecting. Let's say those muscles okay so you selected five muscle groups. You targeted though so now when you go into your next exam that's going to already beep beep repopulated populated for you so now you just simply de-select select if you wanted to but you already see what was entered before however let's say just hands off. I did nothing with that same group that was already carried over now. If I went to print out my son my soap note and because we have the randomized option on it can reorder only those selected ones nothing more nothing less <hes> so it's okay. We've got to be cautious at the same time I gotTa make sure that I'm still fitting in. Yes I can randomize things and yes. I can make make sure things have a unique to them but I still keep your voice right. I can't go in it. preselect out of the order that you've already selected in terms of those muscle groups are going to be what's randomized because that's the only thing you allowed okay. <hes> what about. I'm a big fan of okay cool. We've got an automatic random ization. That's great but I'm always like okay today. Patient made the comment they could walk for one point five miles where the other two weeks ago. It was only point five Ooh. Is there a way to just quickly. Add something like that so it's truly is truly custom and it's accomplishing what they want their daily living and it makes it a unique note every time because you always add something that easy to do or is it like buttons yeah so it those are I just I mean that would that change. You just talked about their under a second. I mean you simply would go into the next visitor exam. You would already see the preexisting they were able to walk X.. Amount of miles and all you have to do as change that one number <hes> we have also one of the newer features uses we have templates and I see this time thrown around a lot in industry right now. I think there's a I'm attack guy so I obviously a more tech minded when it comes to this but I I hear terms like Mac rose and templates kind of being thrown around I here you're the Buzzword is macro when it back I think they're more templates is what we're seeing out in the world and what that means is a macro is idea something I clicked something and then and other set of actions occurs meaning. It's it's moving to the next realm of of doing something whereas template is obviously if I have a work comp and I'm only going to see this set of fields in this set of options because they're what's allowed for cop so I don't want to even be bothered with anything outside that realm and that's typically what I see out there so we can actually go. We do both templates and macrumors. If that makes sense you can go in and define a visit type or an exam tight as well as the subsets that are kind of already pre populated in there that doesn't mean that you can't change them of course no matter seconds can but we're we're seeing I mean in the states here. I mean it. The the visit counts are only going higher. I mean there's just more and more people going chiropractic. That's a good thing but you're still right. So what the documentation side of this you know so that being the case you have a shorter amount of time now to complete your notes then you've ever had in history so you've got to be able to get through there but yet you got the catch twenty two right because there are more requirements on your reporting than there have ever been so you know that's the the conundrum. You've got to do more with less time and so that's where we start seeing you know some some out there. You see template. Some you see macaroni <unk> macro. Macaroni and we just Kinda you know we figured you need it and that's just because it gets you through that much faster for people who might be confused for system when you get a new patient will ask you this P._i.. is in cash is a work comp and so at that point if fiscal P._i.. It can take you through certain questions that it wouldn't ask if the cash patient like Oh. You're an auto accident okay. You probably need these fifteen questions right and you know where you hit where you're going to see so have all those types of things he's in there. That's what he means by a different template versus a macro would be Ortho tests. Click neuro tests click and you just go through and write down what it is and okay you don't orthopedic test you do straight leg raise. There were pain. There is painting <unk> distribution. Oh Anthony a winter fifth to- Winter I hope is all of that is like button button button. Yes all touch base. <hes> we've got something around the corner. You know so we're we've. What we've you've got right now? We really tried making sure that our current latest version of the product is definitely designed for touch base so that way I mean what we're finding more and more is gone are the days of a workstation sitting in each of the treatment rooms or or at. There's no way station so now everybody fuck around with a tablet <hes> most everybody you know I'll say tablet yeah tablet so I mean we're talking a windows device or something were or ipad and so you're walking around and you've you gotta be able to just move from room to room. Freely tapping on these things so yes to give you a long answer for what you just asked his. It's touch base so you'll have the ability now to doesn't have to be on a eight gigabyte Ram processing computer laptop carry that to each room you can actually do tablets and things like an ipad Snow will yeah in watch too much to accredit of well so we got a few things right. Now yes dance. Your question. Is you can work on a tablet. We've got the benefit of cabinets are are very well progressed from where they started even a few years ago so I mean you can you can purchase tablets for a very minimal amount of money there obviously devices that you can hold with one hand their touch base entry. You can walk around one room to the other and quickly and easily for instance a service pros are a good example surface. Pros are powerhouse machines <hes> they they scream with our program so they go super fast and you can just I walk around instead of being tied down to just this old antiquated evie software hardware so now that's the whole goal we do have also an ipad based kiosk basic key okay yeah for the patient subject themselves we could do a desktop version of that and then we are just right around the corner. We're having our official doctors APP. IPAD APP is coming out as well so that's right around the corner. That's going to be a game changer. I think it just because we're we're trying to give the level kind of what you've talked about. Leading up to two now is the mobility but the speed and being able to still randomize and give unique assessments within your report hurt is that's kind of all coming to ahead with our doctors out. That's coming out and that's I'm pretty excited about that one so we're going to be seeing it here soon that one is just a full-fledged app you download on Ipad or windows something like that and then you're able to truly I it's all touch base entry. You can get through visit if you wanted to or an exam. I I'm going to dare say you could do it under a minute I mean don't get me wrong. You could go and really go to the nines and you can fill that out. Take fifteen twenty minutes if you want but it's designed to give you a full compliance and Medicare ready report <unk> in that amount of time. Let's jump to this because you've made a comment about it when you work when two tablets so there's going to be a workstation the jargon people I'm sorry I don't know all the fancy terms so there's a there's a computer a main computer like you say in the front desk or something and then the program is able to be put on the full version John or like a lighter version that goes on these tablets and then those just sync up automatically all save on that one workstation yeah because you wouldn't want to fifteen different computers and they don't talk to each other so that how you'd have to set it up it said up. You're right in the fundamentalist you do have. It's a a server workstation based <hes> situation because we do have a database that resides on server but like you said that's essentially the main computer. That's your choice and wherever you want it could be the front desk computer could be one in a backroom or one in your office but not being the case just so these tablets do sync up however they have a secondary storage on them and of course we gotta keep in mind that everything is networked so much like if you connect to a Wifi network or V._p._n.. Or you know there's a million of one different ways you can network in but these devices these tablets these notebooks are these laptops whatever you decide to use their just simply networked to your your main computer and as such everything writes back there all right so you don't have that you should probably have a special area that has like massive hard-drive or whatever that even the front desk who's dusing all the billing wedding talked about that stuff. There's would even be on a slave what they call it master slave. They'd be the slave version of the one that's in the back room with the air conditioning and everything do y'all help with that kind of setup because I mean as me. I never did that because I was like I don't do that and I was like oh my gosh I was going to cost and when they work computers about the by why we helped to a degree it depends on what level we gotta remember. Some things like networking for instance. That's not just how our program is talking amongst your office. Networking is kind of the security of your office. That's how all computers owners in all programs in all data on all those computers are talking to one another so I absolutely can help in respect my program just understanding that we always recommend that either you know if you're if you're tech savvy and comfortable with it you can do it but getting a a network professional and there's always a good idea but in terms of setup. I'll be quite frank you can you can set it up very quickly yourself so I mean to set up a server set up the workstation I- windows updates or something like that might take you a little bit longer hurt just because those are are time consuming events but networking has never been easier. Most of this is all just point click in windows interface yeah so then another question I have because you know a lot other competitor's they always are you pay monthly fee. They slower it for you on the cloud but with this system you're stored on your server your stored on your computer. So if you had a fire is gone you lost. Everything and that's not going to be a good situation so so you should have some sort of whatever backup means you know you might put on an external hard drive. That's encrypted. You May WanNa back it up to a hip compliant dropbox p cloud or something like daily so that's is that is that a big drawback back for people. They're like Oh. You'RE GONNA do one more thing with this computer. So you know I I can go in both directions so to talk about which I said is yes. Your data is in your control so I don't see that is a bad thing you know by law in many states you have to have your records and your possession available at any point in time for certain number of years. I definitely would recommend taking a look at you should be in control of your data. It is your patient data <hes> but but second if we look at that yeah absolutely I mean you can use. We're never trying to be a nanny program if that makes sense so I'm not saying you have to spend five thousand dollars. I'm not saying yet to spend five dollars that being the case you know you can back up to. Let's say your desktop up to your hard drive anywhere of your choosing or to external drive. There's cloud services out there that are free under a certain gigabyte limit and I can tell you that on average most of our clients. The data drain is not that pig so you can actually be capped and have kind of a redundant system so that you have data being stored locally but you also have not getting upload. It's the cloud like You said in EPA compliant club but nowadays that's that's very prevalent so you'll find not being very accessible. I mean if we're talking ten years ago in this the tough now it's different story and this is important. This is a discussion I have with Mike Clientele because I try to help educate data is something it's a serious matter. I mean we watch the news. Every day. You see some large company that's been compromised and and people look at us and think it's ridiculous but then they don't realize the power of the data that having their own hands and unfortunately a side effect of the society that we live in technology we live in everybody has has to be to a degree data minded. I mean whether it's your cell phone. Whether it's your laptop we gotta understand that at any point we could be compromised so I believe that knowledge is key. I I mean backing up software takes matters seconds in terms of another thing to do well. We have an option to manually do it or you can automate it so one time you can take all of maybe fifteen seconds you can set and build a schedule and from that point you never have to lift another finger. It's automatically backing up to whatever redundant systems and this is absolutely where my support team comes is. We'll make sure I want to make sure your data secure. I always put it in kind of a frame of mind if what our clients would understand you know I I look at it like your bank account. You don't not look at your bank again and make sure thing is there and it's as it should be the same should be happening with your data and it shouldn't be some mysterious techy thing it should be something that's very simple easy to manage and inexpensive and that <unk> absolutely as possible. It's it sometimes if you were to go out. I mean don't get me wrong if you go to an I._T.. Person whose job is to secure in backup data. It's probably GONNA cost a lot more and it's probably gonNA sound really complicated because that's that person's way of living right right and I say that crudely because there's a lot of passionate people out there. I'm just saying you know there are come to us. There's no extra costs like you said there's no hidden fees or anything you paid for it. You got it so give us a call and we can give you very quick and easy alternatives. We can help walk you through every step of it like I said we can do it. We can help it. We can train you to make sure you know how and you'll be up and running on data perspective now. The other side of the coin is for those people that don't have data <hes> locally and then what happens when you leave a software I would challenge. You know you definitely need to look at. Are you being charged for your own data to get a copy data. You know what are the policies of that because here's the thing whether you're saving locally or whether you're you're getting store to a cloud from some other software your still responsible for your data so would you rather be responsible and have the data in your own two hands and know exactly exactly what's going on with it or have no clue where it stored how it stored what the policies are on it and not know anything about you're still on the hook for regardless while for me that puts it into perspective. I'd rather see it and no words because realistically a lot of people by as a program maybe Cairo touch like while this is a behemoth. I'm not very happy with it. As what I kind of been hearing people kind of like I'm trying to go some results and they're like upset because of already spent so much money and not happy with it. Now I gotta go and try to buy another one and so then I don't like I said I don't know if they hold your that hostage are not but you really have to consider that because it's too late now if you own it but now I gotta spend how much money to get my data and then transferred to a new program and from the past what I've noticed y'all are good about that. If you use the different program you can take their backup and you can least transfer you tell me can you transfer everything. Can you only transfer like demographic information like address and all that our own can do it all so when it comes to that <hes> we have many tiers of data services just to make sure you get what you want so we can do the full everything that's in a pass system we can bring into our system. <hes> being a case what we we can do and sometimes we'll see that people opt for only demographics why because they'll say off my financial sides a mess I wanNA start over on that and so just here's all the data but just extract the financials Gimme just my demographics that let me start from square one and then I have some people say no I want everything or I mean. Really you call the shots so with the data service you get to pick you want insurance information demographic medical history <hes> financials. It's up to you because if I'm in the middle of a bunch of cases I guess some people are like look every patient from today forward US Cairo eight thousand every patient you had before you can back it up in case you don't need it but if you're in visit twelve of Tint of fifteen visit package you gonna had to keep using that one because we can't transfer those last twelve visits into the new system but we did not show we absolutely get we can transfer the visits I can even so most modern software is now even goes far along with the visits they can also so go deeper in. Let's say <hes> claims that are outstanding so let's say you just about your claims and now I've got a batch twenty five claims out but yet I WANNA move my software will have to wait because I'm made batch and I wanna wait. 'CAUSE I gotTa Post that no week you'd actually pulled claims history for instance I can put from the past software into our software. If you move to us and entry saying you've got these twenty five claims out on these twenty five patients to these pairs for this much so that way you're just posting the payments and can rebuil- if you need it to from our software but you can pick up where you left off with that makes sense so is it when transferred over does it look more like like if you were to print your soap no when it looked like that for all the old visits where no it'll look like ours because you're essentially mapping rates on taking this field to this field so it is still in the heart it is our program so are so would still be the output at so note however however you could go back and change something right right right. Okay not like a permanent which you're not really supposed to do anyway so if it was just like no these I ten visits are going to be a word document that you're just going to print is like no actually you could actually go back and alter the record. If you needed to for some reason on the new log we can also. I mean going in there you you. It's still formatted and template. It's not like you're getting inc bare bones if you moved it over so it's it's pretty exciting. You know what what I like about it too so let's say you WanNa do data conversion and that's honestly that's a big part of what you touched on. I mean that's a massive thing so people say I hate what I'm on. I'm frustrated with it. I don't meet pain to whatever there's all different reasons but I'm also tied to it because I've got so much going on. I can't take my practice down. So what do I do. I even if even if you say wait a second so you can do a data conversion bringing whatever data we want. What about that period of time of business? I still have to conduct business between them. So the Nice thing is is wreaking get your data. We can get everything all primed up in ready. You can still continue to use your old software if you want and then once we're we've got everything lined that we can come back to you and say let me just grab one more quick current backup of where you're at of everything you've done at this point. Give us just a short amount of time in that same day. We'll come back and say here's all your data to today so your current. You had no give us ten minutes has got to upload our big is and Blah Blah Blah Blah. It'd be good to go well. What about the the other side of it because we're talking about Dr stuff but in reality some people get rid of stuff because you got the scheduling horrible? It doesn't integrate with <hes> unless you say facebook post. I don't know why you would want to do that. Maybe doesn't integrate very well with trying to do milch him. You know maybe you want some of the automated someone throw a bunch of things at you and then let you make an answer so Melchett integration. You put a new patient. They got an email. Some people like I wish it would just populate that to chip and be done with some people are like the billing sucks. So how do I you know. Does it have good aging does it. Whenever I click five different treatments today will automatically go to Sally Upfront and it'll be boom right there on the patient nations comes out? It's going to be right. They're able to do a lot of reporting to find out well. I'm not doing any three regions. I've only been doing one and two regions. What in the world I've I've been doing them out of the statistical norm? You know <hes> are never actually charged for this and I thought I was like what's going on so you can track all of that as for scheduling goes I want fifteen minute blocks. I got five doctors. You know that type of thing yeah so what give us a little spiel on that area because that's important that used to be an entire module for you guys that like that was one purchase that you didn't have to us with the software but now it's combined which I didn't realize until recently so that's pretty cool. Yes so everything now like you said everything's under one roof. <hes> we've got the scheduling is is a breeze. I mean honestly it's it's clicking point. You can do it on your all windows base <hes> windows-based that's correct and Yooglie on calendar slot and you can simply rate than dare to say what type of visit so you you on on a high level can go in and actually set bizet visit type of defaults. Let's say you can go in and said visit length defaults. You've got a lot of stuff at the high level ardy situated for your day to day average things if you will now on the schedule it simply click on a slot and I go. I can select a patient patient were prospect and I can put him into my system now. Let's say that appointment I WANNA move it to a different rule or a different doctor that day dragon drop it. Let's say I want to expand visit. It's I click on the window itself and dragged to a longer or larger time slot and there you go so just very intuitive easy touch controls or using the mouse beings case. Let's say you came in today and Schedule Appointment for Union so wait a second. I want to schedule forty forty five more visits while I got you okay so I could click on that appointment that you've got right there. I can say create a recurring appointment. I can then I. I've got like a very simple wizard to take me through that process so I can say which days in play for your office. Let's say Monday through Friday or Monday Wednesday Friday how often or what's the interval. I want between the appointments so every two days every one day whatever you want so after answer just a couple of questions taking maybe two seconds I can say do. I want to avoid overlaps just so that because I'm not looking into future I I'm not looking at my Galvin. I don't want to see if that slots available. I want to program to do that so I say avoid overlaps build schedule instantly on there. There's there's all the forty five visits ready for you. Chose me all the dates times and I can hit print rate from their Oregon. Click email and email you your appointment so that way it's Narran logged in our software as well but scheduling to sticks matter seconds. It's very easy <hes> <hes> in terms of integrations you know it's funny because hairless par for a second when you're talking about the schedule all your visits. I like that idea you know they need to come in eight times. Boom is done you like Mondays Mondays and Fridays <music> awesome. That's the only two days you like nine o'clock. Slot boom were done but at the same time before everything saves does it at least it used to be used to pop up and media you could say <hes> so like when you're learning the program like all right every other day is not what I thought. Assignment let me fix it. Let me let me start over you might want to do is on a dummy patient. I and play with it out so you can kind of see the difference would be like Oh. That's what that means that was I was confused but anyway the point is Bob's in front of you you have it setup. You can start looking like oh well. That's weird that wasn't that was not correct. Let me change that real quick. Are you already knows I'm on vacation that we all right. Let me just remove that in at it somewhere else and it's kind of all touch buttons always now you've customizes schedule based on schedule to exactly so so you can change it on the fly there too and you have a review period so that way if you do need to make some last minute adjustments or something yeah absolutely okay and again like even when you're doing that you can still dropping drag and drop. Hey <hes> today I gotta come at three o'clock okay to done and we logged those things too so you know of course we've got the appointment reminders so reschedule yeah so we can. We've got appointment reminders <hes> but that being the case also let's say somebody calls and says that they can't make it you know I mean some offices charge for that. Some some offices just want thorough records audit logs of what's transpiring so for whatever reason you actually will see every occurrence that occurred with that patient with with regard to their scheduling is like you said they may call in <hes> also you can make in that schedule and building the schedule or just doing daily visits. You can do this for prospects to in a lot of softwares you have to go and create a patient file then go in and create a schedule for that patient in this you miss somebody on the phone right then and there I gotta get this person's information as quickly as again my phone's ringing. I gotTa get more people you know but I don't WanNa lose his information plus. I WanNa make sure your spot. I don't want it necessarily create a patient while one because got time too because I don't know if this person's GonNa end up actually coming patient. There's the practic what to eat up my time by resource my program on them until I know they're gonNA come in but let's say you don't come in will now. I've got reports. I show all my prospects. My no shows that will say hey here the people that didn't come. We've got reports views and things like that so you if you WANNA know the number of patients income in in the last thirty days or sixty days or the year you can just quickly pull will report on that and then you can recall their information so it's got their number their emails that way if you're resigning somebody to reach back out and say missed you know just checking to see if you'd like to reschedule that and to get them off that schedule even like this person isn't always reschedule rediscovered more than three times take off the list and you can set that up so they get the report printed out you like wow I had five hundred patients at whittled it down to fifty because they hit all the criteria that I didn't want to call back because I have a patient appreciation day and I don't appreciate you missing in fifteen or whatever reschedule every other day but yeah in on the other side so let's say they do come in well you already. I'm of the call took some information so you took whatever you decided you take. I mean it could be basic sick demographics. It could have been that you also Balsam insurance information so that's cute up Lindo. If you did show up I don't have to reenter an end that I can just click the button in that prospect and say creative patient file problems so no double entry data anything like that now they are officially a patient because they did come in so you can lock them in and you don't have to reenter that data before we go to integrations. I just thought of this. Sometimes you get an M._R._I.. Report and it's not digital so what do we do. We skinny we'd take a picture inserted into the file the patients trying to fill out paperwork that I do. I'm not using the kiosk or hey you kiosk is kind of glitzy. I don't like using it so now they still gotta fill out the paperwork and then I gotta go back and then I'm not doing it but you know somebody's GonNa go back and be like name. Click this condition. Click this quickly so it's going to be done twice by your staff and by the person so what do we do about all that yes. Let's start on the M._R._I.. Said thinks so on any any paperwork or any reporter any image that you have you can scan directly into different areas of so for instance 'em or is that I want to scan into their Amore section. Why because I'm going to be looking as chiropractor writing so I I can scan directly from the software into into the program Bob to take it one step further because a lot of times what you see with xrays? Let's say they came from Hospital Orange imaging center and they got CD and that C._d.. Not only has the images but it has a self extracting image viewer. That's proprietary to that so what we can do is set up your program to recognize this. This file type will open with this extractor so you are still just scanning and directly into your program however when you double click don't realize it a behind the scenes were opening that diagnostic centers imaging program so it still looks like you're just viewing and they x ray in a matter of seconds just clicked on it opens. You don't realize behind the scene all the wheels that are firing. We're actually opening up. Any sub-programmes needed if they have something like that to make that easier now I might have something that's billing related elated insurance cards or something like that. I don't WanNa put that in my e._M._r.. Section I want to put that in my building section so that being the case I could scan directly into the billing area so it's primed up in ready there as well so you know I mean we we don't hinder you. We don't stop you from you can scan to any section you want. We've just made it easy to scan the appropriate things into the appropriate places so people still use scanners but still a thing you can buy out there yeah a- As a as a tech support person <hes> one thing you were talking about size of data and you know if I were to give a suggestion out to the listeners here is every scanner has very easy to use settings that you can change aged file type format k. most people will scan in something like J.. Peg which is a standard good files got an image type that is you can see a lot of detail but a lot of these new scanners come out and their setup skin as tiff files sales and the problem with that is one tiff file is about ten times the size or more of J. Pack so if you're an agency or let's say your your office is scheduling and scanning all this billing information and mountains of Xrays if you're doing tiff files and I'm not talking about to start program. I'm talking data in general you're creating a massive need for large space. You were talking about hard drives and things on the server you need hard-drive with. You know maybe a four five hundred Gig hard-drive is good and that is on a minimal computer you can get for a couple hundred bucks. Nowadays I mean you can go to any box store and get I mean you can buy terabytes worth of external drives edged but in this case to get a few hundred you can get for twenty bucks thirty bucks however you might want to get an S._S._d.. And spend the extra money it's faster in his last longer spend the extra money people each S._S._d.. Solid state drive which has no moving parts. No moving parts means. It's GonNa last longer. It also means it significantly faster if people want a Hanna understand what that means <hes> think memory cards <hes> the little U._S._B.. Plug ins think of the the little S._T.. Cards that maybe put back with people actually gary cameras around and stuff. <hes> you know any of those are solid state devices now in a computer you can get the full fledged solid-state drive pricing has never been better on so yeah. Absolutely you know what you're GONNA see. There's two areas for any program if you're if you want to get some more <hes> muscle out of your hardware and for the best price it grew upgrade on your Ram your memory it's the cheapest component computer and it's also the sixteen thirty two even nowadays as the prices so cheap. Do you need that big. Oh no you don't it. It depends so here's the thing you gotta remember. Memory helps with running more things at one time. What are we see offices doing so they're running a software like our own? They're also running and you know what's a huge resource allocation hauge chrome or they're running their <hes> while could be facebook or something but in reality with the running is they're playing music. Everybody's playing Pandora Pandora's on the back so they're playing. They don't recollect tearing up computer resources so that's where if you are in office it does something like that. Memory is definitely GonNa help you out now. The S._S._D.. Is another thing that is going to show you. I would say you'll get an S._S._d.. Before I would say go by the latest and greatest processor processor is going to us so much more money and you're gonNA see marginal returns. The S._S._D.. Is Very affordable very easy to change and you're gonNA see massive returns. Do we need to get an intel I nine or the Intel I seven eight series because that's the latest stuff like I nine extra expensive and the I seven eight series. You'll pay premium for versus the one generation lower than that. I know we're getting in the weeds or people but you know when you're looking at avenue by new equipment. They're gonNA WANNA know like are you buying the right thing. They only want to Gig of Ram. Well that was dumb. You should have at least had eight and really twelve or more was what you need it. You don't need thirty two per se but at least sixteen well. Here's the thing so let's let's talk about this so your adjustment table. Would you put a patient on an adjustment table that was thirty years old. The leg was was wobbly and and the padding everything started being ripped in term. You wouldn't do it right not a respectable chiropractor right so now if we look at it so your computer whether you think about it or not your entire business is running on that computer the financial side of Your Business. The compliance side of your business is all on that so do we look at trying to see if we can get a computer appear. That's twenty years old up and running and up to speed or do we go to a box store for a couple hundred bucks. Get a brand new computer. I mean do you to answer your question. I don't know if it was related to our software specifically. Do you need an I nine for our software. No nowhere near that I mean really we were going to dual core processor running at two point seven or higher which is any any processor that's been made in the last ten years or or even some greater ones but that being the case in terms of you know some of our competitors. That's another thing I mean so your data's your own with our program your hardware you pick and choose you maintain it. We're not trying to rake you over the coals with any of that some softwares you gotta look at some provide the systems to you which means you've gotTa Kinda factor that in on the cost side on the maintenance side you know. How often are they upgrading? I really we try to make sure that we're running at minimal specs to make sure it's more approachable for everybody for our side and you guys will have a list of this is what you need. If you don't know what you're doing you can go to best buy and like I need something that has at least this and they'd be like okay well. You still have thirty options so we'll do so why my goal is always into make sure that we're finding something that would work for the office and is the most affordable economical here and so oftentimes all talk with clients that are just starting with us. Clients are thinking starting with us or existing clients and I'll say send me a bunch two links and what I'll do you know my support team is we'll take a look. You give an honest assessment sure this one computer. It's a Lamborghini of the computer. It's also seven thousand dollars. This other computer is five hundred dollars and sure unless you're you're you. Sideline is an online gaming professional. I don't think you need the Lamborghini. I think you're GONNA be more than adequate with this other one. If it's you it will be powerful it'll be fast. It'll do everything you need to do. It will be secured in. It'll also save you quite quite a bit of money so our goal is always just to make sure that she can make it out the other side as you know as affordable as possible and what we're talking about two is these are two separate systems. You're going to have like that one mainframe server. You're probably GONNA have another computer for the front I am each doctor is going to have at least a tablet or laptop. These are meant for your office. You should have a separate computer if you're a Gamer or a podcast or video editor Debbie a completely different computer as you have. Am I still be at your office or maybe at Your House but don't confuse the to you probably want to have separate ones completely and that'll save you a lot of money. Well hopefully we're. We're all thinking of the all encompassing EPA ride at any point so not only are we thinking about what we should or shouldn't be doing on that office office computer but we're also thinking about the other things that are currently sitting on that computer and what we don't want others to have access to you know security. It's just like home security. The best security in the world starts with the office in their staff. You know if you have a great security the system in your office but you don't set the alarm. Does you know good. You know you could have great security minded individuals but if you were opening doorways that you shouldn't on that office computer then you've kind of you've turned off the security system if that makes sense doesn't say what's a good like security system for your computer but it changes so much. Let's just ignore that question. I got a good answer that one short and sweet okay yeah give it. I personally recommend being that we work on windows devices. I I would recommend windows security Microsoft of security essentials why it's free to most of the the security softwares out there nowadays are what us in the tech industry would call bloat wear meaning you buy security software to secure you not to do a bunch of a bunch of ancillary services like. Did you back up. Did you do this. Are you doing this. Where you're going here? WHO's doing this? There's so many pop up so many setting Sony problems so many charges well. Let's look at Microsoft. Security essentials is free. Also the operating rating system is the makers of it. You think they have a pretty good vested interest in protecting windows being that it's made by windows so I just I. I recommend that I'm not I'm never saying there's not other great security out there but I just think that why hey you know just because something cost ten times more than something doesn't make it better okay. That's good to hear hey okay. We didn't really ask about this. I'm sure some people who are listening Justin. You didn't let them finish here there. Is this <hes> thing that didn't get completed and that's just how it goes sometimes because we're not gonNA take five hours and be a full full thing here. There's a lot of online APPs. Let's let's just call it out. I'm GONNA call Jane APP. I don't know if you know much about them. They're big player to coming up if they get the insurance situated then can be a Lotta chiropractors at least jumped on Jane's APP which is an affordable rate each month and not crazy but like you said they're always online so what are the pluses and minuses of having an online based program versus when that's going to be sitting on your computer that you pay hey one time for will cloud based solutions. Were real big a couple of years ago. We're now starting to see him. Die Out <hes> okay so cloud systems are great for ease of access. I mean you you log in on the Internet that quick their light. They're easy so they don't require wire any kind of hardware technology anything like that so that that's very appealing on that side because of that costs can be lower. <hes> now the thing that we've gotta look at so some of the competitors I won't name names but a we've talked about today have had at cloud systems and those class systems are no longer with us one to two years later on some of the big ones so that being the case these individuals bought in on the cloud. They didn't have their data on hand so we've got again. Go back to the what's the advantage of having your data. You've got a legal. They can't just disappeared outlet. You know right no but they can then force you right back to that local system so because I I mean if we think about it you know. Can you answer the question that your Internet is is always on and you've never had a problem with bandwidth so if you're in a business part and somebody cuts wire or somebody else is using so you have X. amount of bandwidth in your facility Windy Day v Anything I mean really so so unless you're just maybe if you're in major metropolitan area then that's not a problem but if you're in a rural office or you're like me I've lived in pretty big cities and I've experienced lot of outages. So are you just done for the day or now. You've you've got to drop to paper for the day so now who is going to stay after to reenter all that I mean there's logistics there that just you know it. It sounds great on paper if you haven't always on system if there's no issues that sounds great the problem is not real life and then we've also got to think about things like data just making sure that does your software. They're not responsible for your data your responsible for your data so in terms of accessibility security Freddie or anything like that. If you ever do go to a cloud you really need to vet that you need to understand. I mean just like where you're backups. Go where your data is. You have to know where that's out because the day you're on not that yeah like you said the Internet speed is a big differences regular website and be like oh my gosh. This thing won't load and you don't like a hefty program. That's gotta come through. We'll so just this week <hes> there was a major issue with the Internet so sites like Google Lincoln facebook had complete outages for certain at time so these are corporations are some of the biggest companies with the most money the most resources in the work and they were down so if we if someone like them can be down then it's very easy see for us to be down. I mean it's not if it's when you will be. I can guarantee you that <hes> so that's being the case there for me. I'm thinking data security on thinking you know being able to always be up. The power of our system is you don't. I don't have to have the Internet you can move your data's your own and if you lose power you could have a backup generator of some sort too so you never actually are down for your office or because if your data's on hard-drive that you own you could go to a location that has power yeah. I remember the questioned. That didn't get answered when you're saying new patient paperwork. They don't like the kiosk are two older. Whatever it's not being used they all this paper? What happens somebody somebody has to go back in and type it and click all the buttons that just part of life that has to happen? Can you <unk> scan it. No no and then it gets transferred somehow are because I think if you scan the paper is just a is it just shows up as an image attached to a certain of your program. So what do we do. One thing is. Yes I mean you of course you can have a manual solution. Can you can have somebody typing in based off paperwork. That's always it'd be a plan B.. If you will <hes> yes you can scan that paperwork and it won't translate that data though from the paper onto the files <hes> another thing that we have a few uh other options so for instance. One of the things we see is just trying to look at win. PEOPLE DON'T WANNA fill up that paperwork a lot of times. It's right there when they're in the office so we also have some new things where I can actually send my patient intake forms <music> aww ahead of time I can email you intake forms a month before you come in kind fill them out at your leisure so now you've got plenty of time to fill this out. You can email that back and it will that will automatically input itself. Oh so what alternative yeah that's pretty cool so still interactive P._d._f.. You just fill it out and you can send it back. Essentially is not the way I'm thinking about it like Oh. There's a print this thing and right out. No you just type right computer and hit print and what you're saying. Is You fill it out on your computer and you actually email that back at your leisure. You can come back so let's say I WANNA go eat some dinner on the patient. You know I'm going to be seeing you in two weeks. I can start filling it out on the computer I could say. I need to take little break. Come back but it gives you time so that's the one big thing is you could just come walking right in office. They say everything's right here. We've got all your paperwork so you're all loaded up and reading okay and Sally could do the kiosk at the same time like all right. I'll ask you the questions. Let's go oh to the back in person in person right yes because you get those people in a bad attitude. They got back pain for the last two weeks. They can't walk. I'm not doing any of this oil. We gotta do something so let's figure it out grumpy pain okay okay by the way it's kind of fun. They're usually nice. People once they're paying goes away doesn't works imagine that the power of Cairo that's right. Okay you can answer to either way on this one. What something that we haven't covered that you feel like we definitely should talk about just as like a little cells pitchy hope people there at this point in the interview that they realize they're like this wasn't as much of a sales pitch as these things you just should be looking for in all of your software considering a software? These are things that you should be considering considering. We're just giving you the <unk> thousand pitch on it but whatever you choose. These are things that you need to be thinking about the begin with so with that. Is there anything we missed that you're like Oh. This is a huge selling point for our company or potentially we kind of talked about like the cloud cloud. There's fads out there that can come today and going tomorrow that it's a Gimmick Watch out for it and we don't do it so you have anything for us. One of the things is if you're shopping around for software one it is that easy to move so don't judge a software based off your existing experience <hes> because there are better solutions out there in their easier solution so just because you had hard time with your existing software doesn't mean that you have to stay with them because you're just your to your into deep if you will we we've had people that have moved in just a man in a day they've went from practice. They use fifteen years of a different software. They gave us our data. We expedited it for them and they were up and running the next day so it is absolutely really possible so don't just just having open land and understand that perception the other thing is to <hes> being that I'm a product in support manager. I'm not a salesperson you know I am. I'm very passionate about our product on very passionate about helping our clients achieve success in attacks stress-free life so that being the case you know another part of when you're shopper up for software is re between the lines and and actually factor in what you need and do a cold hard look at it so a demo for instance since on anything in the world is taking a roller coaster ride right everything they want you to see and do why because that's what they probably do the best it's my job. I like to take those people off script if I'm ever sitting in with a a potential client I see you take me where you don't like to be in your current software. I'm not gonNA lead this Yuli. This and let's see if we do it in a way that works better for you. I like that idea better because I don't want to get a preloaded demonstration instauration where yes everything glittered and it was all perfect but then I get it and it's something different especially like every program does this Duh. This is like basics. This is my struggle convinced me that you do better well. I mean very simple things so I I'm not saying anything about about the other product but there are products out there that have twelve different APPS and I will question. Why do you need twelve different APPs to do one thing? I mean if it's all under one roof. It's all easy does understand stand it. Go out there and honestly try everything. I always liked to use the term that Pepsi Challenge which is pit to programs against each other in fine which one works for you. You know we've gotta think about things like we we normally don't WanNa think about turnover and the office. How many front desk individuals have you gone through in the last year us a lot of retraining or is it? Do you have a system that requires a lot of training. Is there a fee for retraining. How complicated is your system billing and things things like that? Are The our program right now with our partner clearinghouse you can click a button and it creates and upload your clams without ever leaving the software. If imports your claim status messages you can import your C._e._R._A.'s and post from them automatically so I mean we're taking a billing process that ten years ago took hours and we may be had multiple people and now we can refine that down to one individual who can do this in minutes but it does work for other stuff like office office ally and all that as well yeah absolutely so we we tie in with all clearing-houses but that's going to one of the major points I look at is don't just look at one facet of your office. I mean it's gotTa have brick notes. It's got to have the options you need. Of course. It's gotta be fast. It's gotta be reliable. We've got to think about billing we gotta think about scheduling what about appointment reminders. I mean really it's a total picture and make sure you're thinking about all that to have an informed warm decision because there are don't just look at what you think everybody else's on because our is your practice everybody else. No you have any identity you know and that's that's the one key thing you need to find what works best for you in. We've then here you know I one of the points that I like to make. Is You know I often times get asked about how long we've been around. I mean we've been here for over twenty years. You know we're privately owned. We definitely we're we're a group of carrying a passionate individuals for chiropractic especially so you know it's one of those things I'd say. Just give us a call. I'd love to show you the program. I'd love to take us off script. Yes off script again appointment reminders. Can you do text messages or is it just email automatic because you can do it automatically yeah we can do you can text. We're email or tax and email Z.. And do you know I forgot one time that I click the button to email everybody and sometimes I get phone calls like hey. I'm going to miss an appointment or hey. I don't know why have an appointment. You're like what I was like. Oh Yeah Yeah of course I did yeah. I'm looking. I'm like Oh. Maybe I should turn that off. My laughed the crap but it was it was on the back and I didn't even realize it was happening and their boondoggles it was so that was pretty cool and all that we make that kind of thing you know where you can automate it or you can manually do it. Let's maybe you set something up to be automatic Monday through Thursday Thursday Friday. We don't know maybe we're GONNA cut loose. You know a little early on Friday and so you want to choose you know you you could manually send your appointment reminders out earlier than if you wanted I mean really we try to have a Bevy of options to make sure we can do whatever suits your best. Can you send mass texts or does it. Is that a different program so I could say hey we haven't a patient appreciation day on July twenty fifth and it can just everybody gets one so here's what's really neat and if you've got a couple minutes here so we have the ability I this is the service that other people pay for and that's where I was so we see a lot of clients who are paying third party service to maintain these lists of patients and then send out certain material at this time so our software does everything when we save practice management and H._r.. I mean it truly is everything you can think of so when it comes to that we have the ability to create clinic newsletters in the software you can build quickly and easily we have templates and things too quickly do that but we also have the ability to mass so you can isolate your patient so in your case yes I could send in a matter of seconds to all patients or maybe there's new Medicare cards out today or or Blue Shield has updated their insurance so I wanNA target just those clients I could create mailers in a matter of seconds for isolated metrics of patients as well so if I wanted to just send to all Medicare patients were all blue cross or <unk> CIGNA or something like that but I also do all patients and so you can really we've got everything under the sun. I've got policy. If you WANNA put the company Policy Manual Indus off wear. I've got a place for that. You want the newsletters. The appointment reminders the building. It's all there. You know if you want to know I tell you how much you're software. So a lot of times. People will say <hes> US every bit of the software. We even have a tracker. You're in the software that shows you how much of each part of the program you use down to the second and percentage of your time in use the program so I can say hey get your money's worth as support person. I see you've never used this component opponent of mass emailing out your newsletters. You're paying somebody twelve hundred dollars a month to do this. How would I show you how to do it for free and your software and I was able to isolate that because the program shows everything you're using all right so you can have an eight series email on boarding sequence right upload those documents upload those to the system it points to that wherever it is on your computer every new patient gets that in a sequence so that you know like Mel Champion on talking about they one day three day nine? You're you're getting advanced now but yeah we absolutely have a we have what's called A._I.. Artificial intelligence you can actually set triggered actions so it does this than do this than do this so you can get ah very deep with the program for instance and I'll just do one example but there's really unlimited on that examples but I can have that when I first set up a new patient in it's never been in the system that patients never been in my citizen so the second I hit save on that new patient it automatically fires things like a new patient visit package and things like that get emailed out automatically. I didn't do anything so behind the scenes because I took this one action. It's GONNA fire off these other three actions for the new patient just because XIV define those to happen and I did that one time joke me seconds to set up and then I never had to worry about it again. Can you do something where they refer. Someone and I think the program used to say hey. John Actually referred billy sweet if you is there like right like that says if this happens then send yourself a note that pops up that says hey sinned this person a welcome package. You might have like a t shirt that you would mail you can set up the A._I.. In combination with the alerts that's that's actually that's a good one. I've never had I've got a lot of people that ask for referral reports but I've never had the automatic action type. That's that's a good idea like okay you could do I just I don't I've. Nobody's asked me to do it yet. So That's interesting and another one based on diagnosis codes anyone who had headaches. I want to send them a special newsletter. Are I'm running a promotion this month on a nutritional product base for headaches and then I just email anyone who has these fire diagnosis assist codes. Can that happen all absolutely as things getting gangbusters man you exclude an infusion. You would ask this and we skipped this but you were asking about for instance C._p._t.. Codes that I'm not using <hes> so we have report. I mean we have a wealth of reports reports. We have reports to do forecasting statistics on business level but we also have things like a C._p._t.. Pair report so I can actually see which C._p._T.'s are being charged for an eight. It's like an aging report on those. C._P._T.'s he's I can also break it down to see specifically which insurances or catch those are going to <hes> but like you said if I'm looking at my practice from a business perspective and I wanna see I I mean I've got reports. I can do to your statistics. Mystic's I can it will take metrics based on what you've done today and will provide a forecast where you'll be at next year and a year after if you hold these numbers so it's much more than just the side of making sure you can do soap notes in your appointment reminders. It's making sure it's everything I mean. We've only scratched the surface in today's discussion on what we do. I mean we do quite a bit more on top of that. So I mean really it is a fool everything you need for the off now. That's fantastic. You know it's funny funny. I got so caught up in the soap notes earlier as whenever I do the Perot I'll definitely have to mention we stay stay tuned to the and because we're GonNa talk about the actual other stuff like the marketing and the business that actually save you time and money so you're not having a by infusion soft or male l.. Chimp are using it. Are these other companies that do what you already do and your customers are using it. They're not saying it's clunky and they're like well. They have it but Nelson what's funny is I ended up getting a lot of clients to call call me because they're so happy with the software and services. They'll call me up. I I've had clients in this is this is unheard of so on the tech support side. I'll have someone call in just to say thank you. Everything's worth married. I'VE WE'VE HAD PEOPLE I've had people all us for any tech issue outside of our software and they usually open with. I know this isn't your software but I like dealing with you guys instead of my tech and so I was wondering if it helped me answer. Did this so we really i. It's a real family feel here. I mean we know our clients by verson basis. We make sure we read between the lines. That's one of the things on talking with Texas making sure you listen to the inflection of a person's voice. Listen to what they're asking. What what's the influence on the call not just verbally what are they saying but I may explain how to do something to you and you kind of answer like okay thank you you know I'm not going to hang up the phone own and say thank? You have a nice day. I'm going to say clearly. There's something there you you. You didn't figure it out. Let's go ahead and get back. Let's if got the time if not let schedule a time. You know that works for you. Let's work around your schedule. I've had you know it's just that's kind of mar both in the application as well as our support. That is our sales processes. Are Everything that we do. It's always client facing and I. I really liked that Walmart based on what you said once I figured out your program and you know you when you buy it. You get a certain amount of like tech support included all right. I got it and then every now and then I'm like <hes>. Maybe I forgot I do billing are really interested in all this ancillary email stuff and I didn't really care about that at first because I just needed to get things done. Are you able to look. I know you want me to sign lineup for a year and pay every month but literally after about thirty days I'm not going to need you. I'm going to be wasting my time and money. Are you able to purchase your time like I would rather just give you one hundred dollars for this hour. We figured out then pay one hundred dollars. Whatever it is for the next twelve months for tech support it depends on what it is you're looking to do? I mean if it's if it's generalized and you're saying I just let's go through from Ada Z.. I haven't used the program in a couple of years. That's something probably benefits. You better to be on a support your plan okay however let's say you said No. I want to just learn the our side or appointment reminders I mean we can do you know we can take a look at it. Potentially scheduling a block for Justin event meaning a topic okay. We can do that as well. It's not an hourly based thing or anything like that. Though I mean we don't just say okay. Can I purchased two hours of tech support knoll. I mean if you're looking to learn a subject then we can absolutely look to make a session for you know I mean we have other ancillary things outside of so we have tech support via phone. We have tech support via email. <hes> we answer in real time we also have you know tools. We have built in manuals. We have the ability to you. Go we have four three sixty which is an online portal and so if you want to explore and learn topics outside of calling us okay you can go through the forte three sixty and we have hundreds of topics in there. If you WANNA learn how to do advanced billing or scheduling or anything of that nature I mean we've got videos recorded. We've got documentation. We've also with the Forte three sixty you also can go in and do live webinars. We have two week that we rotate around different topics to also make sure that you know if you WANNA patch in new employees or something like that we can do that as well also in Forte three sixty as a forum so sometimes you may not have a question to tech support person because it's not I don't I know how to do this but maybe of questions about how to implement is in your space and so you can go talk with other chiropractors who are using losing our software and you can talk most yourselves as well. Wow all right that's great. That's sometimes the vein in some people's existence that I go tech support but I just wanted to show me a manual and you're telling me do those manuals. There's videos. There's women are there's all this stuff that you can do you can self learn and whatnot so that's fantastic great support boy. I think I've had you way longer than I expected and I really appreciate your time so okay. What is all the information we need websites phone numbers that kind of stuff yeah so a Cairo eight thousand dot Com? That's <hes> that's going to be are linked to the software on the website of things in that. It's got a very detailed description of what we are. Who we do in a way to contact us? You can always give us a call here eight hundred four four five six two six to two and we're happy to entertain any questions anything. You'd like to see who Josh Nation bringing it today main. I enjoyed this conversation at answered a lot of questions that I would have like I said before in general what we're looking for and then what you're with some of the things that you offer <hes> but I really appreciate your time in coming on and showing us this because it's an important topic that we don't like to talk about in podcast podcast in in business where it's always like secretly behind the door okay. What are you guys actually think so just like this basic product demo of pluses and minuses? It's been really good for me and I'm pretty sure some of the audience members are GonNa be like yes. This was great car away thousand dot com onto your check them out and see what's going on so really appreciate your time deal. Yeah thank you time. It was fun. That was a powerful interview like always please listen critically think about it and then implement. I know a lot of people don't always make it through the episodes but I encourage if you've made it here and you you talk to your friends about it and courtroom to do it. I think the the family vacation and the home life balanced part of the in is important. It's something that I didn't get in a lot of those other podcasts that I was listening to so check them out Minnesota Thursdays and Saturdays those come out. Let me know what you think about that. If you have an episode that you want me to do for the audience just send me a message on facebook just chocolate. M._C._C. is the official page of everything about me. You find the books the acupuncture the needle book the Today's Choices Tomorrow's health book that talks about weight loss exercise dieting and financial health you can get free chapters at dot net slash chapters or slash in a protocol so that way you can experience the book before you buy them. If you're interested in interviews that I've been part of where the roles have been reversed its dot net slash as heard on the resources page on the website has all the products that are recommend and there's deals for some of those check that out it has always if you click any of the hotlinks in the sonos page for books we piece of that and we appreciate that as well the dot net slash support is the webpage. If you want about a host a cup of coffee and lastly reviews always always appreciate it so grateful when you get them so that's a doctor's perspective dot net slash reviews. You'll have a great week. We just went hashtag behind the curtain. I hope you will listen and integrate.

Forte Holdings Cairo China US Medicare Dr Justin Show Square Bob spondylitis Mr Josh Nation Amore Dr Notes Weber Eugene Shanghai
11 Science-Backed Health Benefits Of Sauna  BHP51

BOOST Health

17:41 min | 2 years ago

11 Science-Backed Health Benefits Of Sauna BHP51

"Welcome to the boost health podcast where we are searching for wellness balance. Your host is Paul sanfer. A certified strength and conditioning specialist with nearly twenty years of experience in the health and fitness in street and degrees in human biology and business at blue self. Our passion is to learn and share new wellness tactics and help individuals create their own personal health strategy. Join us on this journey of being open minded and try new thins. You can learn more at my health dot com. Welcome to the show. Your hours thousands. By your balance that is both here at do. Tell welcome to episode number fifty one of the boost health podcast in today's episode him and he'd be doing a special focus on sauna bathing and all of its health benefits. All awesome sharing a ton of research today. So make sure you get your no pads ready, and I'll put everything all the references and all the benefits in the show, notes and blogs. So you can check it out there in case, you miss anything. I am totally addicted to sauna now. And I think after you listen or watch this episode. You'll totally understand why a couple quick announcements and they'll jump right into the show. Facebook group joined the boost health Facebook group, I created this group as a special place to share wellness tactics. Inspire each other try new things and have some fun. It's a nice community of folks in right now, we're talking about Sony's since that's what we're talking about on the show this week to join it's real easy. Just click on the link to the Facebook group at the bottom of the homepage of my boost health dot com. Boost sell TV, if you're watching this right now, you obviously already know about boost hell TV, but the podcast is now available via video format on the boosts LTV YouTube channel boosts LTV also includes several workout videos that I created including one. That's really nice has no quit requires you can do it anywhere with any space that you have I linked to the channel in the show notes and blog so you can check it out newsletter. If you haven't already signed up for the weekly boost newsletter, you can do so very simply by putting your name and Email into the form on the homepage of my boost health dot. Com. This way, you don't miss any boost health news. All right now here is episode number fifty one eleven science backed health benefits of sauna. All right. Everybody quick. Disclaimer before we start sauna bathing may not be appropriate for you. Please check with your doctor before beginning any sauna bathing program. I started my career in wellness and fitness as a personal trainer while I was still in university. I had the opportunity to work at several different gyms while I was in school and one of them didn't have saunas in the locker rooms it was a new gym with all new -ment, and the footprint was enormous. So it wasn't really a capital issue or space issue. The owner told us that he didn't put in on his because he didn't think there was enough research on the benefits of saunas. I remember hearing our members complain about the lack of saunas and that some of them may go to different gyms because of this. I didn't really get the whole sauna thing at first to be honest, it to me just seemed like sort of a lazy way to burn calories instead of just hitting the treadmill or bike ride. Fast forward to five or six years ago. And I started hearing more and more about Colt. Genesis and heat therapy for more and more wellness experts. I did the cold shower in cold pool swimming, things on and off but not consistently. And I thought the research on the benefits was only sorta home and then the heat their thing. Just sorta scared me a little bit. I had once overheated very badly playing golf on a super hot and humid Kansas day before you laugh, I was actually sprinting as fast as I could with a pushcart around the entire course, I was attempting to get a workout in and the temperature was over one hundred degrees Fahrenheit, plus really really high humidity. As I said, the course was also extremely hilly. So I was getting a pretty intense workout, and I made it to about whole sixteen and I started to feel dizzy, high heart rate and nausea, basically classic symptoms for heat stroke. I had to quit golfing. And the front office sent a card out to get me with a large ice water. I remember struggling to drive home. I had a terrible headache and now's you for the rest of that day. And it took most of the following day to feel normal again ever since this incident, I felt more susceptible to heat exhaustion riding around Hong Kong in the summertime has been tricky as it can get extremely hot and humid here even early in the morning before the sun comes up. It's still like riding in an oven here in the summertime. So when I initially heard some of the benefits of sauna, I figured it. Just wasn't for me. But then I heard some incredible longevity benefits of sauna from doctor. Rhonda, Patrick, and I was intrigued if you watch or listen to my show last week, which was absurd fifty on fasting. You know that I'm very interested in longevity. And I'm doing everything I can to make the environment for myself, a happy and healthy one. When I heard Dr Patrick talk about heat shock proteins in aging figured I had to at least give sauna bathing and try and we'll talk about that here in a little bit. We're very fortunate here in Hong Kong to have a decent gym and pool and saunas in our building. And I've been using it almost daily for the last few weeks, and I'm totally addicted. I'll talk about my routine and my anecdote of findings at the end of the show after we review these eleven science backed health benefits of sauna. I think you'll understand why I'm hooked number one longevity. A twenty fifteen study in JAMA internal medicine is one of the most exciting. Findings and sauna bathing research. They looked at over two thousand middle-age finish men. They were from forty two to sixty years old for an average period of twenty years and found that more sauna sessions that they did per week the lower the risk was for sudden, cardiac death, coronary heart disease, fatal, cardiovascular disease and all cause mortality. This is a massive study over twenty years over two thousand participants and it's pretty hard to be all cause mortality, so you can almost stop after hearing this study it had to the sauna. But there is lots more a twenty eighteen study in the journal of applied physiology showed for the first time in human skeletal muscle that heat stress can improve mitochondrial function and adapt pation a quick review from your seventh grade science class on motto Qendra, they are considered the workhorse of yourselves because they create a tea p or energy from oxygen. Nutrients and this powers the function of your entire cell. They are pretty important component of our human functionality. So you can see why there is excitement about helping these operate optimally doctor. Rhonda, Patrick, also talks about how sunbathing activates heat stress responses in the body or good stress including heat shock proteins, which prevent ourselves from damage and aging and how humans that have genes that make this job protein, more readily have a higher chance of becoming a centenarian or somebody that lives over one hundred a twenty eighteen study in mayo clinic proceedings that looked at over seventy studies on sauna bathing and affect on health found that there is evidence that it can lower blood pressure, reduce inflammation, reduced possibility of stroke and help prevent neurological issues. So those are just some of the mini great findings on sauna and longevity. Number two, improved endurance performance. This is one for all the athletes out there. A two thousand seven study in the journal of science and medicine in sport found that thirty minutes sauna session two times per week for three weeks increased performance in male, endurance, runners, the sauna sessions were done post workout. It was found that the runners could run thirty two percent longer than their baseline. They also noticed an increase in plasma volume by seven point one percent and red blood cell count by three point five percent. The researchers believe that the athletes were becoming acclimatized to the heat which would boost their red blood cell count through arith- row point, nor EPO while the plasma volume rises. Number three, improved cardiovascular function, a twenty seventeen study in the European journal of preventive cardiology found that sauna bathing can improve vascular compliance, which is the blood vessel walls ability to expand and contract automatically as pressure changes occur. They also noted a decrease in systemic blood pressure with regular Sony's. If you think about how many times your heartbeats each day, it helps you appreciate why having an efficient cardiovascular system is critical to health number four, reduced inflammation, a twenty eighteen study in the European journal of epidemiology found that increased sauna bathing brings down levels of c reactive protein, which is the main blood marker of systemic inflammation. So what is systemic inflammation? You may wonder we hear the word inflammation, getting thrown around a lot these days, and how certain things 'cause it and how particular foods or tactics. Can bring it down. It should be noted that some acute inflammation is actually good like how the body responds to a twisted ankle or a cut to begin the healing process chronic systemic, inflammation, is the bad stuff that we want ovoid as it can lead to cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer. Luckily, healthy diet exercise fasting and apparently sauna can all help reduce stomach inflammation. Number five improved muscle growth. A two thousand one study in the American journal of medicine found a two to five fold increase in growth hormone with Sony's. I love the fact that there's a natural way to get growth hormone to increase. I've always been a hard gainer for putting on and maintaining muscle. So this is exciting. Number six better injury recovery. A two thousand five study in the American journal physiology regulatory integrative and comparative physiology found that a muscle degradation can be decreased by twenty percent with heat treatment for thirty minutes and thirty two percent with heat treatment for sixty minutes. While the limb was immobilized. So if you have an injury that is keeping you partially or completely immobilized. It sounds like sauna bathing can help you maintain muscle and regain muscle quite significantly. Number seven pain relief. A two thousand nine study in clinical Rheumatology found short term benefits in pain and stiffness for rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis patients. I've noticed my trick. Knee feels a lot better during and after Saana sessions also Mabel to take it into a larger range of motion on mobility movements. When I'm in the sauna. Well, this seems to be temporary. I've only been doing sauna for a few weeks. I'm anxious to see if consistent use overtime. We'll help in conjunction with other tactics to reduce pain in my knee more permanently. Number eight, improve sleep quality now much more research needs to be done on whether or not sauna sessions actually help with sleep quality and assistance with sleep disorders. There's lots of anecdotal evidence of folk saying that it makes them feel more relaxed after Asana session, and so they can sleep better, which makes sense. And there's one promising study in two thousand five in the journal of psychosomatic research, which showed heat therapy dramatically, improved fatigue pain and sleep disturbance. But this was only for two participants. So we need to learn a lot more about it. Number nine, stronger, immunity. There's an interesting nineteen ninety study in the annals of medicine the found that regular sauna bathing, reduced the incidence of common colts, the reason for this might be due to increased white blood cell count. A two thousand thirteen study in the journal of human kinetics found that a single sauna session improved immunity function in white blood cells specifically, they also found that the immune response was greater in athletes versus non athletes sort appears that combining exercise with sauna can be extra powerful from an immunity perspective number ten detox benefits, sauna bathing causes you to sweat pretty much instantly. As soon as you get in the song and sweating can be tremendously powerful at detoxing the body. A two thousand twelve study in the journal of environmental and public health found that arsenic cadmium lead. And mercury maybe excreted an appreciable. Quantities through the skin and rates of excretion were reported to match or even exceed urinary excretion in a twenty four hour period with this in mind wondering if we make ourselves sweat enough number eleven better, brain function workout a problem in your head will Helen the sauna a two thousand one study in the American journal of medicine shows an increase of nor epinephrine by two four fold with Sony's, nor Efren is known to improve memory recall, and focus, and alertness. I haven't quite gotten myself to the problem solving or meditative state yet. But I think as I get more comfortable in the heat. It'll be easier to do. So those are the eleven benefits of sauna him. Now, here's some additional considerations for you to think about I for Tilleke doesn't seem to be affected. A two thousand one study in the American journal of medicine noted that serum levels in men of testosterone and gone atropine remained unchanged after repeated Sahni's beg knowledge that says. Studies have found a decreased sperm count in men after sonny's. But then they also note that finish men have a high sperm count and sauna use pretty much their national pastime that said always check with your doctor first. And if you're having issues with fertility you might consider leaving sauna out temporarily just to be safe infrared sauna versus regular Sony's doctor. Rhonda Patrick was on the Joe Rogan podcast. And she mentioned that the benefits of sauna come from the heat stress at self versus the sauna type. She also mentioned that the studies have mostly been done on the traditional Finnish saunas at about one hundred and eighty degrees Fahrenheit or eighty two degrees celsius because they typically can get hot a little bit faster. I would say whatever you have access to is good as long as they can get hot. We have a regular sawn in our building that the only turn on by request. And it takes a little while to heat up. So I usually ask them to turn it on about twenty minutes before I want to get in to give it. Any time to get up to that sweet spot of about eighty two degrees celsius and last my routine and semantic dotes so far I've been doing sauna bathing post workout, I've been doing it after both my strength training and cardio workouts. And it feels great after both. I made the mistake of jumping into the sauna for the first time in all of my workout gear. And I didn't realize just how much sweat there is going to be it was buckets worth and all of my stuff got soaked. So now, I just bring a pair of sandals on a towel with me, and I can sweat freely without a problem. I put on some music on my bluetooth headphones. And this helps me relax and take my mind off the heat. I keep my phone outside of the sauna because it would quickly overheat. I usually do some light mobility work and stretching and enjoy the added range of motion and lack of pain while I'm in the heat. I'm already noticing them. At horrid is not going up as high and I'm able to stay in the sun a longer at hire temps. This isn't just a few weeks of consistent Sony's, it seems that the adaptive process is already taking place. I'm excited about reaping the benefits of sauna bathing. And I think that they'll be more to come as its research further similar to fasting. I'm most excited about the long jetty research of sauna bathing. But it makes you feel fantastic to think you'll very much for listening to the show today. A few things you can do to help out boost health if you would be so kind please subscribe rate and review the podcast and your podcast app. Lieber review on the boost health Facebook page subscribe to the boost sell TV YouTube channel and follow. My boost south on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook, you can also visit the boost health website at my boost health dot com for links to everything along with more, motivation and information until next time. This is Paul Sandberg, saying goodbye and find your bow.

Facebook Rhonda Patrick Sony American journal of medicine Sony golfing Hong Kong inflammation Paul sanfer journal of applied physiology European journal of preventive journal of psychosomatic resea growth hormone European journal of epidemiolo journal of science nausea spondylitis
The Try Guys Try Public Radio

1A

34:54 min | 2 years ago

The Try Guys Try Public Radio

"Support for this podcast and the following message comes from Babbel, a language app. Learn to confidently speak in new language with affective ten to fifteen minute lessons. Choose from Spanish French and more, download the app or go to Babbel. B. A. B B E, L dot com to try it for free. This is one A. I'm Todd's Willeke looking for Joshua Johnson. There's a good chance that you or somebody that, you know, has heard of the Tri guys, they've built a base of over five million YouTube, subscribers by making videos of them having new experiences everything for making sushi to ballet to trying not to die at sea. And we're delighted to welcome the coretec to one to talk about their online fame and their new book, the hidden power of effing up joining me from Burbank are Ned Fulmer, Keith Harrisburg and Zach cornfield three of the Tri guys, guys. Hello. Hey, how are ya right? That's, that's the California contingent Eugene Liyang joins from NPR in New York Eugenie there. I am. Yes. Thanks for having motley Crue and everybody's spread all over the country. You try guys have so much work that one of you is in New York. The others are in Burbank. Look, let's set some ground rules. There's a lot of you and I'll have specific questions. But if you need to chime in, if you got a we got a riot gear. Try guys here. So just identify yourself if you're going to say something, and we don't know who you are before you chime in. But, but what fun tod? That's Ned, by the way. Yeah. Trying some live radio too. I mean you guys you guys have a lot of fun in what you do. I just wanted to begin maybe close to the beginning. I'm not sure how earlier how early in your career this was. But here's the try guys trying on women's underwear for the first time why not? I will not like this will not be over. Quickly panties, actually. Yeah, it into this pretty okay? These are much lower than they appear. We'll take a look. Sort of like spill on the sides and the front. There's no way for me to wear these without something popping out. Maybe tuck it up. This is what girls are always picking it out of things. All right. Let's construct this a little bit. If we dare of I get it fellas trion on girls underwear. Why not? But, but what's the dare here? What's the what's the discomfort? What's the fear of messing up by doing this in front of everybody? Oh, this is activity ahead. We've making deals together for five years. And when we started we were employ early employee's at BuzzFeed video department. So that was when that video department was really just starting out there about twenty people, and we were viral video producers, just experimenting in really in the early days of social video. Facebook video hadn't even launched yet. And as hard to even remember that time. Yeah. Pioneer we were everything we were doing was thinking about how and why do people share content on the internet? And how can video be used as a way for people to communicate with one another. So we were every video was just a test. And when we started the try guys, we actually didn't start the try guys, it was another video in a long series of tests, that video women are mentioned women's underwear. I think we called it mentioned, Victoria, secret underwear something like that. Something like that was just based on a lot of data that we had that showed that people liked videos of other people trying something familiar to them, we hadn't done too many gender explorations yet. And it seemed like an obvious next step. But the difference is that we for that video did something that was kind of unheard of at the time. And we consciously cast the video we were moving so fast. The four of us were responsible for six videos, a month, each and that was everything from idea dating to shooting to then, editing and turning it around. So we were moving really fast back in the day. But we really. Enjoyed working together, we thought that there was a fun chemistry there. And we thought that there was more to explore. We kind of like to say that we came up in the world's largest and fastest focused group because it wasn't we didn't we didn't set out to create a show, but it was clear from our enjoyment, working together and the audience reaction that there was something there worth exploring it really seems like you guys have turned a corner, I could be wrong about this. And you'll tell me if I am, but it seems like it's gotten a little more. I don't know if series is the right word because you're, you're just a lot of fun. But it seems like the stuff you're doing is more important than it used to be. I mean, it's gone from sort of reveling in fried chicken strips and thong underwear, which is fun and gets shares. But moving onto things like trying better relationships with girlfriends boyfriends with family, and significant others leaving healthier getting in shape Eugene in your case coming out things that are a lot more important than the best chicken strip. Yes. So I think that there's it's interesting because I. Feel like there was always a certain subversive element to our earlier work. There was, of course, the share ability in the silliness that was inherent, but being four sis- gender guys who were very vulnerable, and open and ready to explore the cultures was in itself, sort of sort of serious act of, of defiance, whether it was seen as silly or not in tone. And so, I think we just got more in touch with that sort of narrative of speaking more directly to things that feel like they're important. And so I think the tone of those current videos, you're talking about sort of just caught up to what was always there, which is examining ways in which our society boxes people into certain certain corners. So, yeah, we've always just used ourselves as the Guinea, pigs, which many times the best way to share that through laughs. Yeah. But we've got an a little more in tune with sharing a little bit with a with tears. So I think that is definitely part of the pollution in regards to how we present our concepts. And just the concept of trying is important. Trying that new. Food is great, but really putting the effort in and trying for improved relationships with your family and letting people in on it that is a risk a real risk chicken strips, aren't a risk. But that's a risk. And, and a lot more important. I think a lot more valuable you really hate the chicken strips. No, it's not very tact. It's not that I chicken member. It's not that I hate it, it's at all. It's that look when you guys get a lot of shares, I'm happy for you. But when you start to do things that are more important to more people than it really matters. And I think you're starting to do that. Yeah. It's been really important to us throughout the five years have been doing this to take projects that we can really help spread better messages, and do better education. We make about once a quarter. We try to do a series, that's purely educational but still very fine. We did a DUI series where we got drunk and high and drove a closed course to sort of just show the different ways that these substances affect you. We did an old age series recently, where we sort of explored how our bodies will age and how society handles the elderly, and how we are living longer. But we aren't living are making our society built for people who live longer, and we've been doing that more and more, because we do so many fun silly, things that allows an easier entry point for people to come into these more serious topics. And also we've just found a really fun way to present all these things. So it's, it's we feel lucky that we get to do this sort of nerdy, brainy content, sometimes under the guise of these same four guys who try on lady. Underwear? Well, for the book you each tried a new thing, people can read the book to find out your challenges in each of them, Ned talk a little bit about what you tried for the book that you chronicled and how it worked out for you. So one of the things that we were doing for the book was rather than each attacking. What are strengths might be? We each tried to overcome our greatest insecurity, our biggest weakness. So when it came to these style section you might think that you gene would be writing all about that because he is the most stylish member of our group. No, no insult to. Yeah, I feel very assaulted my two friends to right here. I look his he's incredibly stylish me on the other hand, it's always been a source of deep insecurity, struggle to think, what am I going to wear each morning and my closet? And so for the. Book. I attacked that head on tried to discover what the hidden power of effing up would be by just trying to wear things that made me uncomfortable. And I faced my fashion fears for a whole week. I wore lace t shirts, I wore mesh tank tops. I wore giant oversized hats and an all know was I gotta say gnashing myself to the limit. It made me more comfortable, taking maybe smaller risks, and I yes, and I appreciated the risk that you took because it's more than putting on clothes. That might be funny to you and going out in public. It was really about putting yourself out there in ways that, that can make you feel exposed to invulnerable that being said, buddy. The crop top two did not work on. Shape the effort. Thank you. Yeah. I that one has not come back that one that one stayed in the book. But that's part of the point though it didn't work, and you did it anyway. And even though it's a small thing wearing clothes that don't work for you in public. I think each of us with our insecurities can see how gosh if I were sitting here in the one eight studios, working with all these people wearing a see through crop top that wouldn't be other laughing children. They love to see that. Well, look, people have been getting in touch with us to about what you have done for them with, with your videos, with your tripod podcast cayden rights to his via Facebook. I've always been a fan of the Tri guys, but Zac truly helped me during a really difficult period in my life. He has ankylosing ankylosing spongy spondylitis in auto immune condition that affects the spine and has been really candid about his struggles with it. I found his video about it when I was having major symptoms of AS and struggling to get a diagnosis in proper treatment on living my best life today in large part because. The guys are so willing to be real and put their whole selves out there on YouTube. Cayden says thank you. I mean, that has to be that just has to make you feel like it's all worth it tied. You're trying to make me cry this morning. It sounds like you may. It's unbelievable. They hear that. And it kidding. Thank you so much for that message. It really means a lot, I think something that we've been trying to do for a long time, as you know, as as has been mentioned, by the other guys as allow ourselves to be vulnerable on camera. And then our work in a way that I think a lot of people are afraid to and, and that sometimes means sharing parts of our identity that aren't quite so glamorous. Yeah. I've been living with chronic pain now for a couple of years, I've only been aware of what it was for the last two years. And I found that instead of hiding it or trying to, you know, deal with it in, in private that I had an opportunity and without opportunity, almost a responsibility to share this part of me and show that, you know, not every video I make is about AS, but sometimes just the fact that I am out there doing something like ballet, it doesn't even have to be mentioned in the video. But, you know, that, that is a background of my character, and if I can get out there and keep try. Buying and keep doing it. Then maybe so can you the try guys are our guest today? Their new book, the hidden power of effing up comes out tomorrow, more just ahead today. Close. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from home, instead, senior care gerontologist, and caregiver advocate lakeland HOGAN, reflects on home insteads mission to enhance the lives of aging adults and their families. You don't stop living once you hit a certain age, you can still live a rich meaningful life through your, your later years. And so we are really excited to be celebrating our twenty fifth anniversary at home instead and to be still working towards our mission. To learn more about home. Instead, senior care go to home, instead dot com. Answered truthfully, except for ten room who it was. I did not name. No name after Jim rebe was killed in Alabama nineteen sixty five no one was ever held to account. Finally, the full truth comes out. On the. It's white lies from NPR. Back now to our conversation with the try guys you'll find more of them online at the one eight dot org, including their video trying to simulate labor pain. That's the word the, the number one the letter A dot org. We got this note on Facebook as well. You gene recently came out as gay in the most moving, and fabulous way ever. I'm curious, why he decided to come out in the form of a dance video rather than just tweet or a confessional style video like I've seen some other YouTubers do Eugene. I've seen your video. You're coming out video. It's entitled, I'm gay. You're one hell of a choreographer ours. I'll say that, but why did you choose to do it like this? You know, it's interesting. I think everyone has an opportunity, particularly online to express themselves in the medium in which they're most comfortable in, and I've never really been the most open, even of the four of us are of any other youtuber online. I I'm not someone who naturally is effortless in flogging, and I have a background in cinema and production. So I thought that this was the strongest way I could put my life story on screen through mediums likes, and mythography and dance and storytelling. So for me, it was sort of a no brainer. I it's the first image that came to my head was in this family in that opening shot. I knew that I had to make something that kind of surrounded that, that messaging. So for me, it was music video. It was really no question. It's it's entertaining. I want to repeat I had no idea you were a choreographer but, but I think you are even if even if. Your future is in in books and podcasts. Eugene, what kind of response? Did you get personally from young people? Or from anyone who watched that video. I, I suspect it was voluminous in meaningful. Yeah, it was it was pretty incredible. And it's only been a couple of days now. But the, the response has been overwhelming. And I think that being able to just, you know, I was I was out for being queer, and generally LGBT before, but to be able to live in specific truth, where I can be myself to everyone it feels great to be able to now communicate that directly with people who are responding with their own stories. And, you know, a lot of the motivation to actually create the video was progressively, I've been having a lot of young people walk up to me. And with the little, I've done, just as a queer person online. They've said, I've inspired them to come out to their parents. And that really pushed me to think that, you know, I'm only giving them, you know, twenty five percent of my story. And I think that what change could I make if I was one hundred percent all the time with them about my sexuality. Sure. And we want to brag on Eugene. Nhs behalf as well, because he, he never will that, you know, that video is all about expression and Eugene has this unbelievable cinematic talent that I think gets hidden in how you two videos are made. And so a big thing that we're trying to do now is really now that we have this company, you know, let ourselves take these big creative swings. And so it was really thrilling to watch him be able to make a video like that on YouTube, and in just two days that video was also a fundraiser and has raised over sixty thousand dollars for the Trevor project which is a organization Eugene takes a big part in. And so it's been really amazing. You know, even just the three of us on the sidelines watching, how that video has struck a chord with so many people and the impact is so much more than gene will ever be willing to admit, and we're extremely proud of an impact that really makes all of the following I think that you've built with very fun, but maybe less serious videos. You know all worth it. I'm happy that you guys have leveraged, just a formula for lots of shares into something much more important for so many other people Xavier writes on Twitter, and here's a great question. A Keith you can take this one. If you want have the guys seen fewer shares with more serious content. So if you will the real stuff is it less monetize than that old villain chicken strips? You know, their it's both there's certainly like I, I would say that the DUI series right? That's like very edgy, even though it's super educational that still performed incredibly well, because the idea you could watch video with somebody drunk behind the wheel or high behind the wheel is very like that's a new offering. No one's I've ever actually done that to that extent, but then things like the old series that was still tougher to get lots of massive us on. And I think it's just because young people who sort of dominate the internet aren't yet still as in touch with aging or you're still afraid of. Few feel like oh, that doesn't apply to me. We still though, I think the mix of all of our different content helps every video perform higher than maybe it would without the environment that it's in. So there is sort of an importance to these chicken, strip videos after all, you know, they just keep the because it does play into the algorithm of how many videos viewed on YouTube, and how everything works but it's both certainly some of our educational stuff performs. Really, really, well, some of it, we wish performed better because we are really excited about it. I mean we got to partner with MIT's age lab to make this old series. We were like, wow. This is the coolest thing ever. This is so amazing. It did well, but it didn't do you know crazy numbers. We'll look I despaired chicken strips and I acknowledge it, but, hey, bring it brings them to the yard. I acknowledged that too and and brings him to the screen for, for the more important stuff, you guys are doing a stay close everyone. We're going to have more with the try guys in just a minute. After this short break. You're listening to. In the Trump era. The news moves faster than at nippy, our politics podcast is there to keep you informed every time there's a major political story, we get our best correspondence together to sort through the noise, the NPR politics, podcast, what you need to know right after it happens. Well, the try guys are here. They are Eugene Lee Yang Ned Fulmer, Keith habits Pablo's burger and Zach cornfield they are known as the Tri guys. Now, look, Keith I spent so much time. Disparaging chicken strips that producer producer j q a dug into the archives because she says that you made a big difference. In her fruit choices, we have a clip. Here's Keith doing his famous to some, some would say infamous, chicken strips video watch and lesson, there's things you order restaurants. You get chicken tenders get chicken strips, you get chicken fingers. Is there a difference there surplus, an is chicken tenders are the actual piece of tenderloin, meet on the side of abreast as the best thing you can get the second best thing you can get a chicken strip, that's any whole piece of meat cut into strips, breaded, and fried chicken, fingers are ground up chicken, mishmash, breaded, and fried? If you go to restaurant, and it says, chicken tenders the guy that good stuff. You got chicken strips, probably still pretty good. They got chicken. Fingers. Wary chicken lesson. Keith I spent so much time. Putting it down. We had to get it out there. It's certainly a lot of fun and Jake hill to. Yeah. That's real social information. Can tell that to people at parties when you go, and they have like catering, and there's, there's chickens, though, these chicken fingers chips, you know, there's a difference people, you know, people know now discerning discerning chicken strip heaters. Yeah. But we went out and we dug out that audio because this is I think one of the more popular videos that you guys have produced if anything else Keith what a big personality, you have on video. I mean you've really got you've got what they call it don't you, I suppose. So I sure am entertaining when I eat a lot of food and in and in the book look this was important. Because you stepped back from this not only this habit of yours, which is helpful to us all, but extremely unhealthy. And you knew it and friend, you put pictures of your Muffin top waistline in this book before, and after and showed us all what happened in your underwear when you stepped away from chicken, strip fame, and tried out veganism. Yeah. I I decided to do. I don't know. Live the opposite life. I was leading healthwise and I went vegan for a couple months, and I started exercising regularly, which I've never done before I tried cross fit as well as part of it, which was certainly. The most intimidating workout for me and intentionally the most intimidating we could think of. Yeah. And it was really hard. I learned a lot, though from veganism not only the health side. But now I was on that other side of the line, where if I told people I was vegan there'd be like Hawaii. And I think sometimes we talk about how vegans are such jerks. I'm like, I, I think they're only jerks because everybody's a jerk to them, like, I think everyone like is quick to write off other people's dietary choices if they're I don't know maybe seen as healthier than theirs. Because, you know, you think by cutting out these different foods like all this person, like, well, they're not enjoying all these wonderful things in life. But I think there's, there's, obviously, a huge amount of health benefits to just eating more vegetables in general, and, and less animal products. So it was a really difficult thing for me. It was certainly hard, socially going out to eat for dinner with your friends is really really a tough thing when you order. The steamed veggies and they get steaks chicken and lamb and really cool stuff. And you and you just can't participate in the same way. And, and Keith one thing I did like in all seriousness about this was how you embraced improvement in the face of perfection. There were slip-ups it just wasn't realistic for you to be one thousand percent vegan. But that doesn't mean you didn't make massive improvements which which are illustrated with your waistline. But also with the way you write about it. Yeah. I think my takeaway from this book is that it's not about changing yourself one hundred percent. I think if you can change yourself five percent for the better. That's, that's still such a success, right? Like if you can get fifty percent better twenty five percents really doesn't matter as long as there's a positive improvement in your life through trying something else. That's that's really the point. It's really hard to totally renovate your life. But when you do that, you, you make little steps in that super great. And if you shoot for a thousand percent, change it makes five. Percents little easier for sure. Well, we got this note from Twitter, which is like a lot of the notes. We've gotten my wife and I are big fans of the Tri guys and they're subversion of expectations, we live in the south and on Saturdays after watching the video, I wore pink shorts my wife was worried about what people would think, and I responded, that's a problem with society, not with me. Score. One in charts. Katie wrote this to us on Twitter. She says I've been a fan for a long time. And I'm so proud of all the good that you've done grateful that you're willing to be so vulnerable in an age. When so many people need to learn that the social media perfection, a lot of people portray isn't at all true. And I think through the lens of social media, that's a great point. I mean so much of Instagram were people's personas on Facebook is all about the great things that they do in the perfection of it. You guys are trending toward a place. That's not really about that at all. Yeah, absolutely. And I think that, you know, hopefully as the the message and take away, people get from the book as idea of the hidden power of effing up is not just to not fear failure. But to embrace it and seek it out and get it out of the way because I think we've gotten to a place where success and failures such a binary where if you're not succeeding one hundred percent you are a big fat failure, and you are now bad, and what we want to show is that there's a lot of room in the middle and. Really the only way to grow is to embrace, not hitting your Mark. You know, you think of anyone who's ever gotten good at anything it comes through whiffs and failures and hard work and tough long nights and all the above. So we want to encourage people to get out there get out of their comfort zone. And even you know, a lot of the stuff that we do, even some of the more frivolous, fun things like eating foods that you would have never thought to eat. It's just all in this idea of getting out of your little bubble and just leading it pop and seeing all the amazing things. The world has to offer will Eugene you've got a lot of focus on your family in the book, but it's not a new thing for you. Here's a little clip talking about family. Eugene, here's a moment where you decided to babysit nets, baby son, Wes. And here's you gearing up for that all possibly difficult day, but happy year ago, one of my best friends and his wife decided to bring a baby into this world and in doing so there's the expectation that I'm supposed to care, obviously. All of my friends by proxy. I should love the baby. However, I'm just not a baby person. You've ever seen a try guys video, you know, I'm just not the most paternal type the other try guys thought it'd be a pretty funny idea to tweet out to our followers that if we got over ten K re tweets and I would be forced to babysit Wes. And we surpassed that pretty quickly, any, this is a terabyte yellow around. I don't wanna be around the baby Ned in era. We're gonna leave me for the day to watch it. Him. I keep doing that. I'm sorry. I have no idea what to do with the baby. Eugene, I'm going to get to you in one second. I think I we have to go to Ned Ned. This is your baby. You were. I know you love your friend. You were cool at this. No. I trust you. I mean we also have beautiful. I'm gave Ideo, right? Someone that can pull that off. Scot to be. A couple hours. Here's by with a net just had twins and and was very, very attuned to the needs of the baby. And, and for for much of the video, I was just in another room like you're doing great sweetie. Oh, so you re really on the high wire without no, no, I definitely left. I mean we definitely we get having glass of wine at the cafe around the corner. But in the there, I kind of let them I supervise the first half hour to make sure that everything was going. Okay. And how many FaceTime calls. Seven. Over the span of seven minutes. We FaceTime them a couple of times that was the lifeline. Well, thank you. Trust your friends. You have to have to trust that. They'll do a good job. Babysitting. Your, your pride and joy Eugene wh what was this about for you? You said in the video, you're not a baby guy. You don't really know what to do with it with it. So you took it took a risk here. What was it like for you? You know, I think that the surface level which is interestingly, one of the first things as a as a character online, people really related with me on when we did our motherhood series early on. When I said, I was not a baby person there's this huge contingent of audience members who also disliked babies, but for me, it's less about actually disliking babies and more. I have maybe I, maybe put the most pressure on myself to try to succeed. I've learned probably a quite a bit of, of self discovery through effing up in the Tri guys. Videos and babies. I think are the, the epitome of somewhere where I'm terrified of effing up, you know, I don't want to hurt the baby. I don't want to do anything that might you know, if shape the baby's mind in a way, that, you know, for me is just too much responsibility, where I feel like there's just your percent room for failure. But that was a great video where I was sort of allowed to understand what it was like to be parent, which is not a hundred percent successes. And you have to just kind of do it to learn. And so gave me a lot of respect for what Ned narrow wanna young. Parents are doing out there with their kids not to I still will not hold people's babies, even though many women now who know me will walk up to me on the street and asked him. Yeah. Sure. With their baby. It's only just begun Eugene, you're going to get so much more. They really liked me holding babies wait for the babies to cry. And then they handed over that photo of laughing when the baby cries built here. Moms dads fans of the Tri guys, we know you love them. They love to pose for selfish. I'm sure say, keep the babies come into. No ship doors at Foley. Here's a great question that we got from one of our listeners, who's also a fan of the Tri guys have any of the guys in the group ever tried to live without social media. Have you tried that, would you be willing to Zach? Oh man. Have I would love we've talked about that as a video, and I've never done it for an extended time. It's something though. Look, my job is on social media, and because of that, I have definitely noticed that. Yeah, it's, it's kind of consuming my life. So now I've had to carve out times in my day where I put the phone aside. I've put what does it? You can put a time lock on your phone. So now I have daily limits and then I get the daily limit and type in my passcode, and I give myself an extra hour, but I'm working on it. I mean, they actually did do a project where I locked my router and my phone in a locked box. And then gave the key to the production crew and told them to come back after the end of it weekend. Oh man. So it was a whole lot about that whole weekend with no internet, just me. And my wife was kind of a social experiment, and like the first hour we were we were. Very manic and stressed out. And like just felt this like itching need to look at our phones, and then we kind of relaxed into it and realize some things about each other and about spending time without social media that we like appreciate it. And it was really nice. Our content is on social media. But hopefully the videos in the takeaway, there and shows that really experience life, you got to get out into the real world. You're not going to have fun and become a better person unless you really interact with people face to face and get out there and try guys we're going to go in just a couple of minutes. But what's next? So you've moved moved from BuzzFeed. You've got the book out, of course and your own production company. Now which means try guys is now a multimedia, brand YouTube videos, tripod the podcast. What are you guys planning for the future aside from your your four way exit from social media for a month? Well, we have a very exciting project that happens, only three days after the book comes out. We are actually going on a nationwide tour and it's not like just a book tour. We're putting together a this huge ninety minutes spectacular show. It's a variety show. It's got original music original like performance. Art, sort of pieces. A lot of original video as well. It is a variety show, that's wrapped up in like eighties. Glam rock package. It's super incredible. We have crazy lights. We have some we have some fireworks. It's dynamic. It's amazing. So it's called legends of the internet, you can check it out on try guys dot com slash tour. See into a city near you. Hey. And it's very exciting. If nothing else try a promo, but that's great that people will go out. We'll go out and see the show, and they should if that's their kind of thing we're going to go in a minute. I don't know eugenol single, you out, forget about the business and the and the expanding media empire. What are you? Eugene lee. Yang dying to try next. Maybe something you haven't shared before, like, what's on your mind? You know, it'd be fun to be away from the other guys. No. I'm kidding. No, I think that I would love to see us be able to elevate further what we do in a way that can reach more people because we do clearly have our Mark on the online world then for the production company in particular. We want to try to make sure that in order to keep delivering these types of messages. Maybe different formats, maybe different mediums or platforms. Bring it to TV bring things to foam. We're very excited to, to try elevating it further so that it reaches more people who might not typically see our work, and I think that's the biggest challenge for us over the next year. Well, from the response that we've gotten from public radio listeners, you know, I, I'll say I wasn't aware that there were so many try guys fans out there in our audience. But maybe we can all try something new because there seems like there's a lot of interaction between these two worlds. And I'm glad we met here. I'm glad you guys came dot it was a pleasure. And when we're when we're in DC, we'll make sure you bring you out for some chicken, all right? You know what I will never despair chicken strips again? You know. You and I will go out and do this. And, and you can put me on Twitter doing the full chicken, strip range and all all submit to your expertise. Now, you can join me, an eat an entire fast food menu. You're gonna feel great after we're only if I do the one month vegan challenge afterward. You guys. That's eugene's. Thank you. Ned Fulmer he'd Harrisburg Zach cornfield, they are the try guys their new book is the hidden power of effing up. This conversation was produced by junk hill, and edited by maranda full more to learn more about them and the rest of the team. Visit the one eight dot org slash staff. This program comes to you from WMU part of American University in Washington, it's distributed by NPR. I'm Todd's will like I'll be with you again tomorrow. Thank you so much for listening. And don't forget to try, this is one.

Eugene YouTube Facebook NPR Keith Harrisburg Zach cornfield Twitter Eugene Lee Yang Ned Fulmer Ned Ned Ned Fulmer Todd Babbel Burbank Joshua Johnson Eugene lee New York Babbel Wes spondylitis
Finding Happiness Through Fame with Dan Reynolds of Imagine Dragons

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

59:09 min | 1 year ago

Finding Happiness Through Fame with Dan Reynolds of Imagine Dragons

"This is episode number eight nine zero with Dan Reynolds of imagine dragons. Welcome to the School of greatness. My name is Louis. House former Pro Athlete turned lifestyle entrepreneur and each week. We bring you an inspiring person or message to help you discover how how to unlock your inner ratings. Thanks for spending some time with me today. Now let the class begin Henry Moore said to be an artist is to believe in life. We're all artists if you think of it that way if we all believe in life if we believe in the magic of life the the wonders the adventures the ups and downs. That's what this life is. This and Dan Reynolds is a singer. Songwriter and record producer. Who is best known as the lead singer and frontman of the Grammy Award? Winning band imagine dragons and he is a liver of life for sure. He's been around the world he's been through. All the ups and downs had a lot of pain and a lot the happiness and I'm excited to share this episode of the interview with you about him and his lessons of life and imagine dragons chart topping. Single radioactive holds the record for the most weeks charted on the billboard hot one hundred that's staggering and rolling stone called it the biggest rocket of the year billboard named them their breakthrough band of two thousand thirteen and the biggest band of twenty seventeen in. Dan is also the recipient of Songwriters Hall of Fame Hall. David starlight award in two thousand eighteen. He began to talk about his physical and mental health struggles on social media accounts and continues to offer encouraging messages of support to his fans in others struggling as well and there's episode we talk about the challenges challenges of marriage and what. Dan Is learned about making relationships work. The powerful lessons about love that Dan learned from his family and upbringing. We talk about De stigmatizing mental illness and the power of being open and honest about it. Why it's important to listen to your body and advocate for your health? Dan's biggest piece of advice that he's learned from being a Rockstar. A family man and an advocate for mental and physical health and so much more. I'm excited chatted about this. If you're a big fan of Dan or imagine dragons make sure to share this with a friend Lewis House Dot com slash eight nine zero text. Someone one posted on social media. You can tag me and Dan Reynolds as well and let us know that you're listening before we dive in big. Thank you to our sponsor then being club now life can be a little a bit crazy and there's never enough time to many things that keep track of and it's hard to juggle all the bills and make sure you pay more than the minimum of your credit cards with lending lending club. You can consolidate your debt or pay off credit cards with one. 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Thank you to our other sponsor net suite now if you're a business owner and or an entrepreneur four and you don't know your numbers in your business then you really don't understand your business challenge that growing businesses have that keeps them from knowing their numbers is all all the different hodgepodge business systems that we use right. We have one system for accounting another for sales another inventory and so on just a big inefficient mess and it takes up too much time and too many resources and that hurts the bottom line. And that's why I want to introduce to you. Net Suite by Oracle. Now this is the business management software for the handles aspect of Your Business in easy to use cloud platform giving you the visibility and the control that you need to grow with you save time money money and unneeded headaches by managing sales finance and accounting orders and HR instantly right from your desktop or phone and that's why net sweet is the world's being number one cloud business system and right now nestle is offering you valuable insights with a free guide seven key strategies to grow your profits and you can get it for free at net sweet dot com slash greatness again that's net sweet dot com slash greatness to download your free guide. The seven key strategies to grow grow your profits get right now at net sweet dot com slash greatness. A big thank you to our sponsors today and let's dive into this. I'm super superpower than excited for you to learn more about the one and only Dan Reynolds all right. We've got Dan Reynolds here welcoming school greatness. podcast man super excited about this. You have been blowing up on the world with your music and your your message. You Know Your your music is unbelievable. It's addictive on top of the charts because it's so inspiring an addictive give but your message is what is interesting for me. I think there's a lot of artists that become popular. But don't have a message says something meaningful and when you have that which is really cool and inspiring so. I'm glad you're here. Thanks I appreciate am curious about is that was doing research on you. I'm curious about marriage marriage because I'm a single guy. I've got a girlfriend who had been getting for a year unless she's about to move in in a few weeks. Okay this long distance for almost a year. And you've been married and I read that you almost got a divorce when you're talking about marriage worse seven months. Someone's and now you're and you're still back together. We've been together for about a year and a half and have had a baby boy together and that's so yeah wild remarried. You've been married for eight years. Yeah we never got divorced but we were going to But then we we were separated. We kind of learned a lot about ourselves during that time period about six months seven months and then We were literally going to sign the papers and went to lunch to talk about it and then we ended up getting back together so you were separated for seven months. You're not living together. Where were you not speaking? We didn't even really talk. Yeah other than the I was on tour for those whole seven months and the kids would come out and visit and stay with me a couple times a month and back with hers it. It was basically zero communication for seven months after being the other for at at that point six years seven years I think is that goes I remember someone saying Oh. It's the seven year itch or something. Hard at seventy seven years posibly Khalid. That's the thing. Yeah I guess. Seven is the unlucky number. I'm the seven son to of eight hundred. I'd say you're pretty lucky. Yeah exact- act so okay so give me some advice if you can't of about to get into a more committed relationship. Why do you think that it got to a place where there was this disconnection or lack of communication or whatever it was yeah? That's a good question. And what would you've done differently. So that didn't get to that point I would. Let's say my best advice so far. Just if I was reflecting on my relationship for anybody who would be first of all of course. Communication is everything. That's kind I've cliche right but I would also say I had a really hard time in my life knowing what I wanted I've felt like a lot of my decisions. Were made for me yeah. I was raised in a really conservative family. I felt like there was this path that was kind of carved by seven boys in front of me and I kind of follow it. They were all eagle scouts and like it was like this is the Reynolds Way and I fought against that my entire life. I was like the one who was getting in trouble hard time. Religion didn't really work for me but I also didn't want to disappoint all these people in front of me that were so successful and then they all got married and had kids so I need to get married. I need to have kids so every decision in my life. I mean I made it. I was a victim of myself really. I was being stupid victim but I also at the same point was like I feel like I've just been forced in all these things victim of myself so I think where I finally made a big tournament life as I realized that I am free three to make my own decisions and I'm able to actually say what do I want and I making this decision for anyone else but for myself so I think my first question to you would be are you with this woman hundred percent just solely on the fact that you want to know and when I say that of course I'm not saying somebody's willing undergrads but I don't I really love her now and I don't want to hurt her. Let hurt like all of that aside. Why are you just here because you want to be here every single? They're there every day because of that. Not because of any pressure. I don't WanNa be single anymore or people ask me like why. Why am I still sing or do you need to be married or getting married? Yeah Yeah so being able to get to a point in life where you really can let go compl- I had to get to a point where I was able to to conclude of. It's okay to disappoint people around you. It's okay to just upset everyone you know even if that's whatever retakes for you to be happy as one of the hardest things is not letting US other people down appointing other people. It was my greatest strength. In greatest fall of my life was really being. I hate the term people pleaser because it just sounds so corny but kind of what what I did my whole life. I could meet someone. Like what do I need to give this person. I'm GonNa like you for them to like me to feel comfortable. Like it's a good trait and let me let me meet you. Find not what you need from me and then I'll be a chameleon argue that crazy. Yeah and then it just by to NASA and it actually hurts everybody around you pretty terrible quality to have i Salaam released to realize that because you wanna be polite still and kind of conversations to be easy but sometimes they need to be hard and sometimes you have to have face hard truths and so I guess I don't. I don't know that I have great advice other than on a why did you get to the point of like okay. We're going to separate because it was solely me was my fault. I got to a point where I thought am. I sure that where I am in life right now is exactly where I wanted to be. I was like going through a faith crisis. I've been raised Mormon. I leave this but I've been doing it for all these other people man. I'm like thirty years old and I don't know that I can't point it any decisions done. Mary Asia because I knew I loved her but I was like but to do. I know that I want married. Is this something that I want right like did I choose. It sounds so selfish saying this all trying to be really honest with you but I was just felt like I was in a cage and I felt very claustrophobic and not. Not because of her she was absolutely wonderful but because I was just a victim of feeling like I didn't have free agency my entire life even though I I totally did you made the decisions so you got married. You could anytime backed out. But you've felt this pressure from family or myself my own head so so I guess my greatest advice. You might not be a thing for you but for me it was. I wish somebody had said to me. Then you don't have to do anything you don't have to like him not the move. You don't have to move in together you don't have to be with you. Don't have to be the state run out. You don't have to be nice to you. Don't have to do and be honest. West is GonNa be okay like you'll still have friends with the people who should be funded. You'll still alternate okay. And so I think that I wish somebody had. It just really helped me to feel okay about doing whatever I needed to do in life. Did you feel a bigger your sense of pressure from family during that separation period or like no they all were very like like they knew. Dan is unpredictable. Reservoir the what. He's an artist and he's a really like wow what a horrible like I definitely. I went away and I talked to nobody because I genuinely felt l.. Like everybody thought. Well that's shitty person and I thought they deserved to think that you're right. I I really was in. I was in a really dark dark heads base and I was like I don't free and just go be free. I don't care how many people hate me. I really don't know the hardest part for me was how much it hurt Asia but I just had just. I knew that I wasn't a choice for me at that point. I just kind of I decided to go on a journey. Yeah yeah and I almost completely lost her. I probably should've move. But she went on a journey for herself and I went on a journey for myself and it just worked out that we found I for sure and hopefully she. She can't speak for about found out that obsolete wanted to be together. You know you recommitted from a free choice not a fresher show like it. It was like we. We washed it all clean and then we came back to each other and we dated. We were like. Let's let's go date no commitment to me or you know that was just one second date back to square. One like rewind ten years previous back to square one pretty cool man. What was the biggest challenge? You faced On tour during that time being alone and being you know I can be self destructive so yeah I think I was just it was hard to. It was hard to love myself. I really yeah I think so. I felt like a bad guy and just kinda was like well. I am the bad guy. So what is the bad guy. Do whatever he does. That's over to play the role so I think you know there is a bit of that for sure. I don't know this is the first time I've talked about this. So I don't know I'm still formulating in my head. Exactly what it was like looking at it it was. It was a very important important time in my life. It was the first time I felt completely free because I was like. I like Golf Caring and now I'm at this new space in my life where I just. I'm not I don't I'm not saying don't care about people I'm just saying don't ever dictate the way that your decisions that are going to affect especially most important decisions based on pressures of other people. Your Parent's friends France. They should make choices for himself. And you should make choices for you and if they love you. They're going to respect you as long as you're not hurting. People are being a bad human being like you know like we have to make decisions. Have Your family been supportive of the way that you have in the bad decisions. Bright good to sit and how they always been supportive respectful or yeah I think it takes distance from them at times and never really took distance from my family. Me and my mom had a aw time period while we were having a hard time communicating it was when I was really dealing with my faith crisis and she. She's very religious. And that was. It's hard for me and so I had resentment feeling like why did you raise me in this and then I was like I came to the realization. A whole nother conversation. I came to the realization. Like oh she was just trying. Can you tell me what. Give me the best things that she thought she had to give you like. How can I be mad at my mom for telling me what she believes and thinking would be the best thing for me but No no I think it was kind of one of those things where it's like if you beat someone up there like well just the way it is is he knows like I got kicked out of college before that I got you know I had. I had all kinds of things growing up. That kind of got my mom to a point where she it was like I had I feel like I tell my younger brother and then you gotTa really easy. Because I broke mom I like really yeah. They had a lot of good good straight and narrow kids and then I came a long time. Now you talk about the challenge you had with your Saints Group. LDS where you out with faith eighth now or what was the realization. That had really the spiritual person I really. I believe in spirituality. I think it's important part of my existence and and I'm on a quest. I think every day to find truth and light and to hopefully be alight and and find truth. I think it's a dangerous concept. I feel like you're at a point of arrival. I think I'm always searching and I'm always like wow that that feels true and I like that it doesn't feel like that and just kind of like listen to everyone and and be open so I wouldn't call myself religious. I do still identify identify as Mormon but more culturally than anything. I think I have a lot of loyalty to that community. They're like my people. I went on a mission for two years. I like you know like beat up with other missionary sites like surpise thrown at you spit on you know what I mean. So it's like Kinda unites for me talk to me. Yeah you went up being like a Mormon I. It's not cool. It's never been unless you've lived in Utah. Uh or something. I did graduate from Las Vegas. Everybody's Mormon so it's like if you're come on but in Vegas it's not cool to be middle school and be like I'm Mormon every pilgrim number something special garments and then you know it doesn't and then you get like Broadway plays that are all about how stupid you are. And they're honey. I'm not knocking musical. But you know it doesn't help that you as a Mormon kid. You're like you're done. You're dummy to everyone just like ever. You're you're kind of like the butt of everybody's like like joke when it comes to like religion you know like Mormons are freed year. louds make fun of Mormons. All you want. It's actually kind of a law that I'm like at a point where I'm like kind of on the outside. Look it I like it kind of is it's look there's some things about mormonism like like you guys are messing up on this and I'm trying to like help with especially when it comes to like lgbt things and stuff that's a whole nother conversation but that being said Mormons are like free game for everybody to pick online and it's not cool to pick on anybody period but especially when it comes to people's Religions and like why is it okay to you know like we're not allowed to pick on this religion but we can't pick on that one but not this one I'm like all Orthodox religions are messing things up in certain ways so either we make fun of them all or let's take it all off the table. It's a little hypocritical but whatever I do you have a relationship with the church or the the support you do. They not because you're into honestly I have no idea what the leaders of the more mature seeing. Mommy if if they think I'm like a thorn in their side or something because of I you know I really believe in I really firmly believed that are Orthodox. Religions are hurting our LGBTQ UBT key youth by telling them a look your most in the sense of being is flawed. What are they saying to the community? Well it's just in general. I mean you're telling a child old that they need to love a specific way and it's very dangerous thing to us. I grew up with some friends who are Mormon and gay and before they came out. I think anyone who is close to them. We knew there. Yeah we knew but it was like they definitely didn't talk about about it because it wasn't safe for them to they weren't wouldn't have been accepted in their family at all. It really really hard road in front of them and I watched that and it was hard hard to watch that charter for them. But being their friend who you heart hurts for them you know and then I watched some of these some of these guys go on missions and come back and they didn't feel safe safe to come out till some of them were on their late twenties thirties and it was and then they lost family over friends and it was like it's devastating so for me just just watching that it made me feel like this is this is broken and then you look at the stats. And it's like the number one reason for death among teenagers. In Utah's suicide really suicide aside and then on top of that they'll be Tiki. Youth are an accepted in their home or community. There eight times more likely to take their life so you put those two stats together and it's no wonder that we're losing so many. LGBTQ suicide it's it's not because they're broken it's not because they have mental issues or something. It's because our society and our culture is broken and we've we've created this really desolate place for them. It's like here. Let me raise you. This religion let me tell you for young age that this is everything like God loves you based on this or if you do this if you do this and by the way if you are Lgbtq you know you're you can. You can still be religious. I just put just be celibate or or hide it and then it's like you're setting them up for really unhealthy lifestyle. That's just impossible to live by so and someone who is unable to share their truth whether it's right or wrong good or bad. If you're not able to express your truth who you feel like you are in. That moment is setting people up for big failure unable to share how we feel express ourselves now curious. What do you like your truth? After all these years' of trials and tribulations ups and downs and marriage and almost divorce inactive kids yeah I feel like religion non religion right right right. I don't feel like I have a like a core like this the truth like I said I lots of little truce but I think my main the principle that I tried to abide by is it's a simple concept and it's been said a million times but I really try to meet people and just say say you know what they were raised with. Whenever came you know what however you were raised? How would I have been if I was that person? I would probably probably be worse. I'd probably have been a worse than them. So I think you know it's like everybody is living in this world where and everyone screaming at each other stupid. Republicans and the Republicans are like stood with Democrats and like the religious people are stupid anything stupid religious. It's like right right but if you were just born in a different state or different home or difference or yeah you just would be different. And so what's so silly to me that we're spending our entire existence as humans mocking each other based solely upon where you were born in what you were born into. It's someone's choice. They just were born to be gay or they were just born uh-huh to be you. Don't have this choice to be raised in this family. That's Baptist or raise like whatever it is like. How can you judge someone off that? It's really silly. How can you even judge them? If they're in their forties and they have all the free will in the world. They're still doing that. Maybe he would have. Maybe it would still be doing all those exact same things as a person. I really in some areas of your life. You're still that way you're still fixed in a way and based on how you were raised right and you haven't chosen a different way. So the leaf I guess my just true abiding principle is just to realize you know realize that just love people. Just come from things with love and Passion Compassionate bashes. Look if someone's going to burn three times in a row whatever is like you know then. Don't take time for that person. Who would you say if of your greatest teacher growing up my mom and dad for sure? My Dad just quietly has worked his entire life. He's still working. And he's late seventies east along sorry forgot mid Seventies. He worked as a life. He's a quiet guy who grew up on a farm kind of farm boy mentality hardworking very conservative Mormon father. Who just has you know? Leave strongly in the things he believes and was great. Dad Bad and and is a great dad and And my mom was very outspoken. Very intelligent very like strong. Strong woman. could have done. Anything was the Valedictorian of her college. I think that's has a different term for our what it's called but could medicine and a lot of great things and She she decided have nine kids instead. And what was the greatest lesson she taught you to love. I think true empathy true love like I I was talking about this the other day that was in Utah actually and it was a LGBTQ summit. We had this part where we're talking to parents I don't know why I'm not qualified to talk about. The things is like a straight man but I was raised Mormon so I can speak to that a little bit and things like that but anyway I'm speaking of these people and was talking about how the second apparent says I love you but just not love the second anybody in your life the second anybody what he says his girlfriend says this team anybody. I love you but this is my view on this. It's just not your LGBTQ. I Love Love You but religion tells me it's love is just I love you. That's at the end of the conversation. That's love otherwise not love and that's something my mom taught me because 'cause I was really difficult I was a difficult child and she she's NC. Love me there was no but I never felt but from her. She strongly wanted me need to do things she strongly wanted me to be a good Mormon boy. It'd be an eagle scout and going more emission industry. But she didn't force me to do it as I get older. If you would ask me this two years ago have been like my mom when you go on a mission as I get older I look back and I'm like you know I could have said no to any of it. She wouldn't kick me out. She might have been disappointed or maybe disappointed disappointed when she was strongly emphasized things but added choice and I made my choice even though there was a lot of pressure. And you felt like you please please your mom. Yes more of you than her. Yes yes right. Yeah I mean I can relate to that what you started opening up about seeing therapists therapist or therapy depression and some people might say and you're the top of the world. You're like the biggest artist but number one hit had songs for weeks in a row. Whatever it is like your your touring the world sold out arenas how could someone like that right field depressed or ever feel lonely only or insecure when they have everything that I could imagine wanting myself? Yeah I think it's a really redundant thing it feels. I'd like to say this but I'm just going to say it because it's a real big truth for me. Happiness does not come from achievements. It doesn't it doesn't I won't say happiness doesn't income from some money. There's there's like fifty give enough money or for to do the things I wanna do for the most part by that little thing he wanted. You've always wanted to buy like your bike to you. WanNa go mountain biking with have your house or have an apartment have food like those things absolutely. Anything tells him he doesn't make Obvio- say I called the right. I've been so when I got married. We're totally broke musicians. Both of US living in a one bedroom studio apartment that we barely could afford. I guess her where we in in L. A.. Actually in Hollywood because we were trying to break into the scene so we both what for years. This is two thousand nine and ten years ago. Yeah yeah something like that. Two thousand nine with the baby sleeping in the closet and no medical insurance and like would just it was a really you know scary time for us but we and so we were happy but we were very distressed so anyway and a little bit of money absolutely comportment. Yeah but so. What was the question when people are asking like like? Oh you have all this right so I'll sweep back before that. So when I was in like middle school slash high school I started to really deal with serious depression Russian and anxiety and the where described because I know some people are like well. I've heard people who have impressed. He just had no. Depression is not just sadness. Depression is like and explain it to someone who's never experienced. Depression is numbness grayness a loss of interest and and every single thing. That usually gave you excitement to do like what other sports or music. Whatever it is I just I just went and I just I just felt like my existence was a cloud like I when people talk to me? I can hardly even engage. Could hardly even listen totally antisocial. All these things is it come with major depressive disorder. Were happening to me. I don't know some genetic I don't know if it was a trigger from dealing with my spiritual crisis I don't know as a matter of just is being Dan rounds. I don't know what it was but it I should have been happy. had a really great life but that doesn't indicate whether or not something we depression so went to therapist. Therapy for many years helped me a lot in middle school. High School Yes high school helped me. A lot went went to therapists. While I was on my Mormon mission came home from my mission and went to therapists. I still go to therapist today. And it's made all the difference for me absolutely so when you when you're a child of the nineties and you grow up then it was very different. It was like. Don't talk about being depressing because if you are depressed in your week or tailings or that. You're sad yeah insecure. Because then people were like Oh that person like right worthy normal people in that weird guy you know what I mean. It's like it's it's definitely was superstar. We're better now a little bit but then it was like nobody's talking about seeing therapists. That's not cool at all so one one of the first things I really wanted to start talking about to stigmatize is good as good now. which a lot of people are doing which I think is fantastic saying have their post depression anxiety because if someone were saying to me when I was in like high school or something Oh my God yeah it was like Oh that person I look up to like has it all all who has it all is still the press just like oh my gosh who gave me all right you know? Yeah I feel like it's been a battle for men I grew up. I was was born. Eighty-three so group eighties nineties. And I wasn't even allowed to really put my arm around the front like a guy friend without being called FAG. Gay a little girl. Whatever the term was just a buddy like in the largest potluck asking were to be on the sports teams and I wrote a book look couple of years ago? That came out called the mask of masculinity which was about how men can be more vulnerable and how vulnerability is the key to healing into freedom. Four men and I opened up about being raped as a kid and what that affect had on me growing up in relationships and just like not being on a talk about that for twenty five years and I've talked about it a lot now but not talk about anything anytime pain or insecurity or vulnerable anything. Because I didn't feel like I could ever ever share with anyone other. If I put my arm around a guy and I was called negative name just like a little bit of friendship or if I started to talk about something I was insecure about. It was like get away from me. So imagine someone who's gay and it's not being accepted not being able to. Do you understand that so I I remember I was just like I always felt like I couldn't share things that actually happened because I would never be accepted and loved and the moment I started opening up about it about six six years ago started opening up to my friends family and then publicly like the pain started to go away. I started to become less of a prisoner of the fear because because I put it out there I think when men specifically who don't like to open up learn how to open up more vulnerable even just with a therapist in a private setting. I'm not saying say this publicly to the world but when we start to open up you say you start to feel better can manage the anxiety or depression or negative thoughts or insecurity security tonight. Why do you think so? Many people still today don't share how they feel with even someone where it's confidential. Why don't they seek that out? What are we trying to hold? I mean look at first of all like we said it's something that has just been a part of like toxic masculinity for a long time. You can't be vulnerable. You need to be a strong man. That's just perfect. Put together and and the woman needs to be this. Here's a feminine quality and this is a matter between. There's no anything it's just your this that for sure. I also think today it's it can be really unhealthy. Social media can be really unhealthy Harris. Yes people spend a lot of time on it and a scroll through these pictures and they look like let's click on this family. Wow they look beautiful every pitcher. These beach traveling on women traveled in the while while. I'm gone on vacation well. These people aren't vacation all the time. Hey look at this person. Oh my gosh. She looks so great a makeup all the time. Why did I don't look like that when I put my makeup on like this these we're going through everybody's mind all the time and that creates this real false narrative that there are people out there that if you just could be fantastically wake up every day? And they're like Oh yeah this is quite myself. I looked so good. I'm going to go on vacation every day. Like it's like no that doesn't exist doesn't exist and people get into this dangerous thing. We're like if I get that then this first and then you get that and let me tell you what happens when you get that a way where wait if I get that then this if I get that and it just goes on nonstop. He's he's never it's never it's not even it's not even like there's a tank in your feeling a little bit. It's actually do. This thing stays zero literally the Bulls. Just if you're looking for achievements don't get me wrong. It feels incredibly great when you're like working for some job and you get that job you've always wanted like yes absolutely but that's not what happiness is a moment of that. Yes then you got the rest of your life to be happy and choose ninety that promotion. I really don't like this job. I'm Doug that promotion. You know. It's always it's just like it's amplified for artists who were on massive stages with the pressure. He was just talking about that. He was a photographer for a big artist won't say her name but stopped working with her and the toxicity of the industry three of the jealousy and the competition such rusher to I remember interviewing Stevie Oak and I was like what's your biggest fear and this was a couple of years ago of his documentary. Sorry and just like tour. Every night of the goes staying. Relevant was his biggest fear that he shared on the podcasts. Either Really Nice Guy. He's he's like you know the fear of like just being relevant are people want this to my stuff in a week a month a year are people still gotta like my music. It's still interesting for people. Yeah it could. It'd be once you're up there more pressure to stay and get bigger not decline right right for sure. It was the saddest part to me of the industry he is. These are a bunch of artists that are sharing the whole point of artistry is. You're sharing vulnerable party. Let me tell you all what I read in my journal and nine. It's just basically like here's my journal these things. I'm writing by the way let me go to the rooftop and say it's everybody and so the second that becomes a competition of like Oh this person's since journal and especially when people are like it's not subjective. It is completely subjective. You WanNA listen to. That's GONNA be a subjective reactive thing whose journals better than other. That's going to be a subjective thing so the second artists are and then when artists are turning on each other. Oh it's just it makes me sad. Ah that is something about the industry and I and I watched people just get torn apart. Because they'll they'll express their most heartfelt thing and then it's it's just it just is a people will just eat it out. Criticize agitate like this Guy Sucks. That's no good. Whatever right this is cooler is is not as cool? There's a lot of great art and songs and movies that have stemmed from emotional pain or suffering seeming where people talk about their pain and it becomes his beautiful hit where people relate to it a number one bestseller. Whatever you believe? It's more powerful offer to create a place of pain or love a great question which one is more sustainable. Well I would say. I've deathly written a lot more from pain than love. I Britain very few love songs. So I don't know that I'm the best person asked this question to you because I don't how I have a really hard time writing a love song without feeling like all. This just doesn't feel right now authentic or I'm not gonNA write a song. Just write us on Dobie right I've written a few songs but if I were to put it on paper it's like ninety percent of the Magic Dragon. Songs are like the five percent of like just. I'm completely happy like bliss. Yeah like on top of the world just felt great and then there's like five percent Santa bungs but so for me I remember I was talking with one of my friends. The other day news told me that he's having a really hard time writing and I was asking him why and he said well. 'cause I'm really happy. Take man really. Happy is all the songs he was turning out. Start reaching for something. I'm not saying you can't write us on really happy. But maybe maybe it's more just like in a peaceful state. I don't know that art it does exist and some people are in total zan mode probably writing great songs and poetry and stuff but I I would. I think that most art comes from pain if I had. If I'm just guessing just comes from a place of insecurity pain hurt questioning thing and then love is maybe second you know. I don't know that's just what I listened to the product of what I choose to listen to sure. What is your greatest fear? Well if I were to say my greatest fear on just a level I think there's two levels of fear there's like there's fears that are like the com- tom like spiders or fears that are deep fears. So on the COM- if here's I'd say I'm very claustrophobic. I really I don't want to get stuck in an elevator or in a coffin now for me is like like I've had one time where I was. I was literally begging only thirty seconds. Yeah I'M GONNA dive here. Yeah Yeah it was. I can't even get to tell us. yeah so that's that would be like the the trite fear but a deep fear ear for me is losing people. I I know that a Lotta people say that but for me that authentically I've lost. I've lost quite quite a few. Maybe an unusual amount of friends. Yes to drug abuse To suicide Or cancer those three things. Those seem to be just a prevalent source of just. They're just like these demons lurking over all my friends and family throughout take years. I said this to. I don't know if you know Lindsey stirling. She's she's LDS. The Violin player she was on about a year ago and her you know she had some deaths in her family and her life and I was talking to her about it. I was like no one of my fears is. I've met so many people just like you or I've interviewed so many people have become friends with people. I've had so many friends in sports and business and on walks of life and how many people have died right and I don't know what it's GonNa be like losing someone like eventually. I want to die. Or they're right. Come alive someone's GonNa die at some point. How do you handle grieving? Death breath of someone who's close close. People you interact with our friends with you know. I wish I knew the answer. I'm going really through something right now. or I'm really trying. They made peace with that sporadically searching for some set of peace. Some way to make peace with people. I've lost I like just started reading this book. PROOF PROOF OF HEAVEN. I'm like please yet. But I think that's that's an important part of life because otherwise otherwise I was just staggering. Just like what you know we're GonNa live and then you're like I'm GonNa live forever you just. You're not thinking that no you know it's going to get to a point in your life tipping point where you're going to start to lose people whether it's you get older and it's just heart attacks and things like that or if you make friends with a lot of people apparently have whatever whatever drugs whatever it is like me. I've lost quite a few friends to that. So what do you do about it. I have a great answer for it other than I just choose to leave. I'm going to see them again. I and I know a lot of people are like you know. There's a lot of atheists were like. Why chose to believe and BS and I went through face? Actually where I was really at that point I was very angry about religious people. Aw and very angry towards anyone who believe in like just what you know what. It's funny 'cause I turned into the person was one of the first people I met on. My mission walked up to me and said he was like look missionary. He was like I just want to tell you kid. Religion is for weak people fasten actually the first day first day. You're religious. Yeah you're on the street like hello. I'm other Reynolds and this guy religious for week people just like he's like just people who can't handle the truth. I went through the space whereas I was there I was like what all these people making these these things just because they can't base partiality of live you're gonna live and then you're going to die. Nothing used nothing isn't the screen. I definitely went through that phase and I'm not knocking on people who are there because it's just as possible. That's the truth. Is something else any what I haven't prometheus when people tell me. I know it's this that you don't know. Yeah that's what bothers either. The waiting bothered by eightieth telling me that they know a ham is the Mormon want. Tell me they know is the fastest. Just just is also on the fact that we don't know one hundred zest. Yes Julius. I went through that phase nominee place where I have had. I've had one experience that I can really look to that I was like I don't I don't know how to explain that. And it gives me a little bit of hope in hunting us in a in a cool way that I always wanted my whole life I was like like God. If you're like I would pray every God as a Mormon kid like give me what was going on with my family. They all believe in this thing. Because I guess you're answering their prayers you'd certainly. I'm not asking my brother just wiggle. My bed do tend to lights on something relentlessly. I prayed for that nothing. And then you no. You're always like well the miracle secrets. Never get the miracle. What the hell was the now wanted? Answers like you just can't win so So yeah but now. I'm GONNA place where I've had certain things happen where I do. I feel a closeness to some people who've passed and some people can call the motion. Whatever that might be the truth but for me? I feel like there's something more and I tell my daughter you know it's on my kids. Yeah that's cool. Get a few more questions. Okay okay. She's like talk about ankylosing. Spondylitis I get to ask you but on a respect for for your time I can tell you a little bit of health. How okay so? There's so let me just tell you about all my problems. Let me complain so the the biggest thing that I'm most passionate about are the Lgbtq community because of the reason. I explained obviously religion in talk of those things are important to me and it's interesting. I really like to talk about that aliens. I like it means a lot into that with you later but mental health is important because the reason I explain and then physical health is actually super important to me. Yes yes. I was diagnosed with two diseases in my twenty s sort of quietness and and ankylosing spondylitis. which are both immune diseases? But I was diagnosed for many years which is super frustrating. Anybody who has some magical goal thing going on. It's horrible to their body and nobody knows what it is. And you're seeing the doctors who were supposed to know and they either don't know or they have crazy egos and they pretend to know even worse. Yeah they're like. Oh you went and saw a wondering you didn't get an answer. He's really stupid. I can tell you what it was. I was having all these crazy back issues that they came out of nowhere. No point of injury didn't do anything and just suddenly I was just having extreme back pain in the joints just like unexplained Back Bay lots. It's morning stiffness couldn't sleep at night and it was right when the band was just starting to break so it's like a green perform so I was like oh great. I worked so hard as my entire life mass. Just GonNa the fall apart. Wow so finally went after a couple of years to rheumatologist which I wish I had done earlier and I was diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis countrymen go for it changed my life. I'm able to do all the things I want. Live great healthy wonderful life. So that's my last thing that I'm really really focused on right now. Wow which is part of this campaign called if you go to monster pain and the. As Dot com you take three minute quiz and find out relatively if it's possible. Sounds like so you have this. And then I'll refer you a rheumatologist in your area. If I would have had. That would have literally years. Pain Changed is oh for for me I just I oh really frustrated that there's a disease that millions of people have and that millions of people probably have right. Now that's undiagnosed and they're just living with it and going to doctors just like me. Don't don't know ankylosing spondylitis. Is I understand some awful but it's actually pretty common disease So we need to make a mainstream this camping searching for people that that maybe they have something going on in their community or their system. Go to this place to take the quiz. This grabbing unexplained back pain period back pain go to monster cannot serve review wrong to go on Spain they ask dot com take literally. It's like a two minute. It took me two seconds to do. It's like there's certain indicators that show okay this. This isn't like a point of back injury. This is actually more likely in auto immune thing on inflammatory thing. So it'll tell you whether or not in the next steps what to do. Yeah they'll find a rheumatologist for area. It's literally it's just. I wish I had it available to me so if you hear a friend who's I always have this back pain. Total tell them to go to the manifest itself different and other people some people. It's in their neck. Some people it's in their ankles. So if you have unexplained inflammatory pain in your body that there might takes couple minutes you said you moved out here. Roughly around two dozen nine. It's the back Vegas now. I was here for a while. Yes academia but did you move out here to start your career into dozen is fair to say so. It's been a decade of you on the journey of pursuing this career. This dream blowing blowing up being where you're at now has been a decade and we're about to start a new decade twenty twenty new decade. It's perfect vision. Twenty twenty right okay. So based on the last decade of your life with all the challenges ups and downs from the religious questioning family marriage the being a father you know rockstar superstar success injury all this stuff to failure failure. Mastering your health issue being the bad boy to all these different things. What was the greatest lesson you learned in the last decade moving into twenty twenty perfect vision new decade? Great Question I would say listening. I feel like we live. If there's anything I want to implement in the next decade of my life is just listening more And actually having conversation that leads to progress I think we live in a nation right now especially that's so divided had it because people are just name calling. No one's listening. No one's taking time to actually say this is what I think. Now what do you think. Why do you think that? Let's let's let's actually really get into the nitty gritty of that. I just think that that I wish there was just more listening. I wish I listened more. I want to like being a conversation conversation with anybody at any time and give it a hundred like. That's I really am trying to make more of an effort to be present to. Yeah I say all this telling you I'm like thinking I really WanNa listen. Let me list. That's great man. This is the question I asked at. The end called the three trips to everyone. So imagine it's your last day on Earth many years from now you get to live as always you wanna live. Eventually you gotTa Pass and you've achieved every dream you can think of you make all the arch you WanNa make an. Can you help all the people and you do. All the things in all happens for whatever reason you gotta take all of your art creative writing videos content you put out in the world with with us and no one has access to your words music. This conversation gone hypothetical question. But you get to leave behind a piece of paper deeper and you get to write down three things to be true from your entire life. The three greatest lessons that you would leave behind for anyone to be remembered by you and and this is all they would have to remember you by you. Say those three truce or three lessons that you would want to share with the world is heavy school greatness. I school move heavy. Well first of all I would try to be just short an ice because people's nobody's GonNa the first thing I would say that's the obvious thing That was the quickest thing that I've learned my life was love completely Yeah just love completely like everybody you mean give them complete love acceptance since and yeah that would be one. I too would be love yourself. I think that sounds like it'd be covered in one. But I think I'd reiterated into because it just needs to be said I have had a really hard time coming to terms with myself I self loving myself and I think that's really really important to love yourself Three do more of what makes you happy and I think uh. DVD feel guilty. Because you you need to do more of you know I don't know I just think more more of what makes you like. I know that sounds selfish to some people but it might make you extremely happy to serve others right. You know what I mean like making super happy makes me happy. I'm not saying I'm great at it but I it makes me happy so do more. What makes you genuinely happy? Maybe I'd throw in genuinely because it's like it's GonNa take capable of to learn. Actually what makes you might think it's just eating like a pig. mcmuffin egg thank you. That's what genuinely makes you probably those Ed. I want to acknowledge you Dan for a second for being a great listener for showing up and listening to your audience for being someone who is this is a humble servant. You know as much as you're off on the road and pursuing your passion you're lifting so many people up and you're able to shed this type of message acid vulnerably when a lot of people position. I don't think open up like this. It's going to help a lot of people and I know you do this on stage and untorn events speaking about out this for communities that really need this knowledge for your heart your ability to listen to your own frus- yourself and For spreading so much love to so many people so I know you for that man appreciate it of course catchy adequate spirit about you appreciated. How do we support you in other ways? How can we follow you online? Where can we go and hang out instagram? The most do twitter. How that's just Dan Reynolds? I think for both with your coming up. We're GONNA be off the road for a little bit. Don't have to worry about that. I feel like the world has had enough of mandrakes for a little bit. You take a break from that you can go to love loud loud fest Dot Com if you WanNa look at the LGBTQ festival we put on every year. We've raised good money for great. Charities Wakes people who said SALT LAKE OR AROUND UTAH. Sometimes we do Salt Lake sometimes more than like southern Utah area and monster pain in in an dot com. If your back's hurting you man I think just about checking on your your health and be good to yourself. Listen to this guy. Sounds like I love a man. The last question is what your definition of greatness definition of greatness as a true humility like the people I respect at the most. And I'm like that person is great. I think like my dad. I think people who just say true humility because there's a lot of false humility and people like But it's hard to find. Somebody really just spends her whole life just making other people around them feel good. Yeah because they just that's what they did look at those people in like that so leader everytime that's it for me to death. Thanks Bro I hope you got some valuable insights from this episode with Dan. Such an inspiration A wealth wealth of knowledge from all experience. I mean the guy has been through so many different challenges so many different ups and downs traveled the world. He's been through it all from nearly getting divorced to having multiple kids to having different phases in his life that were good that were challenging to Again experiencing what. I'd like to be famous all over the world to sing and perform in front of tens of thousands of people and so much more. The guy's been through a lot got a lot of lessons and if you enjoyed this share it with one friend text someone today Louis House Dot com slash eight nine zero shared on social media. Get the message out there. You can be a champion ending a hero in someone's life by helping them improve their life with this interview. Never know who you're going to impact you never know whose life could change from this wisdom system so make sure to share it and get the message out there. If this is your first time please subscribe over on Apple podcasts. And leave us a review. I love to hear from you of what you enjoyed about Out this how we can make this podcast better and any other types of suggestions or recommendations you have go to apple podcasts. Click subscribe on the school greatness. And leave us a review so we can learn more about you than what you like about this. Show also shoot me a text with the word podcast over at six one. Four three five five zero three nine six zero. I'm connecting with intimate group of people. Who are texting me over there? That's my community platform where I'm getting back to people. One by one do my best. I get hundreds of messages a day there. But I'm sending micro audio messages of inspiration every single week so if you I WANNA get on my inspirational voice memo and text messaging platform then again. Text me the word podcast at six one. Four three five zero three nine six zero a big thank you again to our sponsors today. Lending club dot com slash greatness again. You can check your rates in minutes and bar up to forty thousand dollars at lending club dot com slash greatness. Make sure to check them out there. The number one peer to peer lending platform platform over thirty five billion dollars in loans issued and also net sweet dot com slash greatness again. You can get your free guide. The seven key strategies to grow grow your profits by going to nets dot com slash greatness. That's any T. S. U.. I T. E. DOT com slash greatness as Henry Remorse said in the beginning to be an artist is to believe in life. Well in that case anyone who believes in life is an artist and this world is a beautiful canvas that you get to play and explore every single day and bring your art to life. I hope you enjoyed this episode. Share it with your friends. Subscribe over on Apple Podcast podcast and as always you know what time it is. It's time to go out there and do something great. Yeah aw.

Dan Reynolds Dan Depression Utah Spondylitis US Grammy Award FDIC School of greatness Las Vegas nestle Henry Moore Louis David starlight Lennon Club producer Golf Web Bank business owner
E104: Lyme Disease and Hypothyroid. Is there a link? With Dr. Darin Ingels

Living with Lyme

49:40 min | 1 year ago

E104: Lyme Disease and Hypothyroid. Is there a link? With Dr. Darin Ingels

"Greetings this is Sydney Kennedy and I'd like to invite you to subscribe to the podcast series at www dot living with live us. This will keep you up to date on all our new releases living with line. Podcast maybe discussing very controversial topics. The information contained in these podcasts are from the guest personal experiences and are their own opinions. These podcasts are intended for information. The opinions expressed are solely the guests zone. Please discuss treatment options with your personal healthcare providers before changing or adding treatments. Enjoy the PODCAST. Living with live is brought to you in part by Dr fired formulations a supplement company offering products such as Labor civil Beasted like a similar Oregano oil and the most patients can purchase without a prescription and practitioners can open a wholesale account and carry the products in their office to learn more visit. Dr Inspired formulations Dot Com. That's doctor it's fired. Formulations DOT COM. We'd also like to thank Hopkinton. Drug many people have healthcare needs that mass produce pharmaceutical medications. Just can't meet. That's why more people turn to Hopkinton drugs of base counting and wellness pharmacy. Whether it's lime disease fold illness thyroid. Hormone Replacement Therapy paediatrics. Dermatology Hopkinton Drugs. Specially trained and licensed pharmacists had great customize compounded medications to the your specific needs shipping is available. Nationwide go to our X AND HEALTH DOT COM. That's our ex and health DOT COM or call eight hundred four three nine forty four forty one drug compounds with everybody. This is Cindy Kennedy ad today. Where you're going to be talking to Dr Darren ingels. He's very well known highly respected over thirty years of experience as a natural path in the field of health. He's publicized or published. His publicized people. Know Him but he is well published and he is a speaker. He's super knowledgeable and he has left the northeast now is in California. We miss him very much around here. But we're going to talk a lot about how The thyroid is impacted with lime disease. So I WANNA welcome you to the show Dr Darren. How are you doing today? Good Cindy thank you so much about yourself. Hanging in there had to shovel snow earlier. This snow lowest note was really funny because Maybe a couple of weeks ago was nothing. Green was warm and then this gigantic snowfall twenty five inches. All my Gosh and then shortly after that it wore depp again and it was gone. I was like Oh God did it all. Go but yeah. That's what happens you know. I'm unsure you're enjoying your Californian time out there Go ahead I become official California wimp now where you know when it gets below sixty degrees. We break out the heavy jacket and turn on the heat. Well you know that's okay. I understand that if you experienced cold if for periods of time you actually increase your Mitochondria Ago. Yours get a little shiver on so shivering isn't so bad after all up. Birla not so so. Let's talk about infections affections in the body whether it be line whether it be viruses et. Cetera can lead to a problem. How about if you tell me what happens there? Well I think people understand that. Certain infections can actually trigger an autoimmune problem. And when you look at a lot of various autoimmune diseases and specifically like Ashy motos disease which is an autoimmune thyroid problem. Something like ankylosing spondylitis which is a problem with the spine in across the board. We often find that there is an infectious agent. That is really the source of triggering. That inflammatory reaction. So you know on the surface level you see these auto immune problems and you think well. Okay I've got this auto. Immune issue something. Immune systems not functioning. Well and often. The therapies are really designed to suppress the immune system whereas if you start really looking at that underlying cause and see that there's an infection that's triggering reaction and deal with the infection you know the need for those immunosuppressive. Suppressive medications really starts to go away. So you know if we're really into root cause medicine and we're trying to get to the source of what's causing people's issues in this is something. I think that anyone has any kind of autoimmune problem really should be evaluating is that is there that underlying microbe that can be causing the problem and again when you look at the research will see? It's bacteria it can be viruses in some cases even parasites fungi. So you know. We have to put on her detective hats and dig deep and try and figure out what is it. Potentially that might be causing these problems. Go into the medical literature. I mean if you go into there's a thing called pubmed it's the big national database of where we publish all of our studies and you type in whatever condition and you put the word and and molecular mimicry. You you'll find all this data. Come up about what we know are associated with these various conditions in terms of a microbial. 'cause so you know anybody can go on their own and look this research. But I'm always surprised. The number of doctors and health care providers that really don't spend the time to do this legwork for their patients you know I had a group of Primary Care Docs one in particular that had some Quite negative things to say about me to a patient and I sat on it for awhile and then I sent a letter and basically after I went through a litany of how dare you. I said if you'd like an opportunity to meet with me that would be fine and I would. You know do that so they invited me. I narrow minded closed off. We are like Voodoo doctors. Don't you know that we're like practicing Voodoo? I'm like it's it's not. It's not what you think. Well look at these types of tests you use unlike yes but if if you've got a GI issue and you order a Owen p. a. four stool culturing as well. You're not going to get the information that I'm going to get I'm going to show you. It's it's not proven in research. I'm like everything we do with science based well nonetheless the best part of the whole thing is they have heard about the microbiome the micro by on so advanced two guys so. I know they won't be listening to this so I can. I won't say names but I can throw him under the bus all I want but you know the bottom line and it really is unfortunate is a lot of the primary care. People are You know when when it has to do with insurance. Their allotted only a certain amount of money to take care of a patient and if somebody on the outside just spending the insurance money then they're getting less or they're having to pay back so you know we're really it it's tough. It's tough in in the United States with this managed care Cetera but nonetheless. Let's get onto mimicry. Because I think people misunderstand when you hear that someone is suffering from an autoimmune illness they saying that the body has just completely turned on on itself against itself. And this mimicry is completely different. Can you tell us more about that? Yeah it's a pretty simple concept you know it's basically if you've got let's say a bacteria in your body and sometimes it's things that are part of our normal flora. That's really the crazy thing about this. No we always think it's something that doesn't belong in our bodies that we get exposed to that sets off that chain of events in reality most of the things that trigger these reactions are things are actually part of us you know. We have this thing called. Immune tolerance your immune system is equipped to recognize. What's part of you and what's not part of you and when see something that's not party you it? It responds appropriately. But in the case of will become molecular. Mimicry there something. On the outer surface of what's to say a bacteria for the sake of argument that looks very similar and in some cases may actually be identical to something. That's on our own tissue. And what they found in the research. Is that something as small as three amino acid residues as just three amino acids linked together. I mean. That's that's tiny. Tiny amounts of stuff can be enough to trigger that reaction. So you know. We're getting really complex. Immunology and I don't think we really fully understand the mechanism by which we lose that tolerance to self but nonetheless now this is part of what's happening and so our immune system in the effort to go. After the microbe basically accidentally starts attacking our own tissue because structurally it looks very similar to something. That's on the microbes surfaces. So is your body starts making these antibodies to get rid of strap or lime or whatever else it. Is You know it may start connecting with our joints or our brain or our muscles or whatever tissue happens to be the target and because you know these molecular mimicry. Targets can affect any tissue. That really kind of explains why we see. Such a variety of manifestations of these various autoimmune conditions it just happens to be a function of what what tissue gets selected as part of that process. But you know kind of coming back to your your statement. Is You just talking about with the doctors being very close minded? I think it's really interesting that you know if someone really spent about ten minutes doing the research they would see again. There's just a plethora of research out there on this subject. I mean this is not fringe. Medicine. It's not alternative medicine. You know if you talk to any immunologist a PhD immunologists. They'll absolutely validate that. Yeah this is a common problem of. We've got literally thousands and thousands of articles on it. So there's nothing about this That's that's fringe. And I mean I think maybe the best example is like romantic fever or heart disease. This is an autoimmune reaction to strap and every doctor in the world learns about this medical school. They'll all absolutely say yes. This is a real thing okay. Well that's just one microbe one condition. It happens with a bunch of other microbes and other conditions. So again it's it's not a stretch by the imagination at all and yet it's a common problem that I think again. It just happens. Get overlooked a lot in medicine. Yes so you know you might find that. I'm just wondering. How often is it that someone presents with just not feeling well tired and you know mainstream medicine gets a TSA and you know it's four point to and they're told it's fine and you know you know the whole cascade of events you're bopping around from one doctor to another to another when in fact that could be the initiation of something with an underlying problem? Yeah I I think we get into this point In medicine you know when do feel you need intervene and not everything that people experience you have intervenes. Sometimes the body has a wisdom will resolve on its own without having to give up a supplement or a medication but I see people come to my practice and I'm sure you see it as well that they have been to several doctors and they've got this collection of symptoms. They've got lab values that validate that. There's a problem and yet the practitioner just still ignores them. Like what more evidence do you need to start intervening when they've got the symptoms? They've got the lab evidence showing that that's what explains their symptoms and yet you still don't WanNa step in and and start cracking the problem. I think you know you know. Conventional Medicine is probably best when there are very serious life. Threatening problems this is where heroic medicine is truly life saving and amazing but you know when we start to see people drifting away from the norm and having these very subtle symptoms or maybe just minor elevations changes in their lab values. It's very easy for conventional medicine to sort of dismiss it but I think this is where we step in and say. Hey look you know you've got something going on here. It's early best time intervene. If we can start correcting problem now we're going to present potentially prevent a much bigger problem down the line and I think with autoimmune disease you know from four time for most people by the time it gets to be a problem. It's a problem I mean you know. It's it's one of the things that we often don't necessarily see early on The symptoms or if you bought the symptoms. They often ignore them because they're not terrible. They're a nuisance. Doesn't drive him to the doctor to get evaluated so off. Were seeing people at those later stages but for people who are early on you know. Gosh if you can intervene now potentially again saves people just say a lifetime problems right so if you're trying to intervene because you know something is at the level. Let's go back to the thyroid. It's it's not quite right so you put on your Sherlock Holmes cat and cap not the cat the CAP and you you're investigating and you do find an infection is there. Can you be sure? That's the association or do you take it one step at a time. Yeah I mean I think that's where it lets thyroid. For example you know Hashi motives disease which is a common thyroid autoimmune problem. We know that up to eighty percent of people who are hypothyroid so have an underactive. Thyroid is Hashi motives so most those cases are autoimmune. And yet if you go the endocrinologist and say well why do I have Hashi Motos? They kind of shrug their shoulders. And I don't know it's autoimmune and whatever but again if you go into the literature we'll see that you know Epstein Barr has been associated with she. Motta's your cinema which is a bacteria associate with high motives H. pylori bacteria is associated. Hashimoto's Lime Disease Associated Hashi Motors. So we've got laboratory testing. That shows that there's been exposure. You know it is a little bit of Kinda putting two and two together. Can I prove that? That's what's causing the problem. No but is a reasonable based on what we know from the research that this is a potential trigger for Hashi motives and if we deal with that trigger the Hashimotos may get better. You know. It's just logical so you know we kind of take what we in the research plus what we see in front of us but the two together and I guess it's a pretty good indication that that may be part of that underlying cause so we're looking at antibodies for Hashimoto's and if we come up with a virus et cetera. And now we support the immune system. We help the body kind of put that virus to sleep for a while. Do you see the levels of the antibodies dropping or drop of the canned that in some cases so you know in some cases. I've seen the antibodies drop off and I've had some patients were drops up. Just completely go completely back to normal. I've had other patients what their amnuay levels drop it clinically feel a lot better so I mean again. At the end of the day we treat people. We don't treat labs so the lab values can give us a clue sometimes that were on the right track but ultimately I thank you interested in getting people feeling their best but Yeah I think you know with Hachimoto is in particular because it's looking at these potential infectious triggers. I've also seen you know things. Like food allergies related. The HOC- MOTO. So not every single autoimmune problem necessarily has an infectious trigger but again. I think it's something should at least be examined while that's interesting in terms of the food. Are we talking about truly I G? E allergies sensitivity. No food sensitivities is really the better term you know fortunately legitimate food allergies are pretty uncommon and those people that have those issues have more of the typical eat the wrong food they get you know swelling of the throat itching hives things of that nature where with the type of things were laid. The Hash does tend to be more of what we call food sensitivities or food intolerances so these are often delayed reactions to foods that can occur hours. Today's after you've had exposure to it. So yeah it's a little bit different than a run-of-the-mill sued allergy right right. Elimination diets can be be a good way to assess what's going on with someone. If that's the case do you like to do sensitivity testing on people or do you try an elimination diet? I will Alan Gaby's was my nutrition teacher when I was a medical student. And if you don who Alan Gabi is he's a very well known in nutrition world and he wrote an enormous textbook for healthcare providers and studied. You Know La- medical literature on nutrition for the last thirty plus years and you know he was the one that taught me about elimination diets and the great thing about elimination dies is that anybody can do. It doesn't cost you anything you know. Just a little bit of know-how on how to do the elimination reintroduction phase. But basically over the course of three weeks you know you can kind of figure out what foods might be bothering you. So it's pretty straightforward What I found in doing that with a lot of my patients though is that during the elimination phase. Which foods do I need to really eliminate? Sometimes people were having reactions to not the major foods that we typically think of like a wheat and dairy and soy eggs and nuts and so forth so it became a little bit more challenging if it was a minor food that was bothering them and I found a lot of people they just wanted to cut to the chase now which foods actually bother me so in our clinic we typically test people the find out very specifically on what bothers them and it just saves them the time of having to figure it out on their own right right. That's that's true. I mean because a lot of times people have seen so many. It's been so much time already that they wanna feel better quicker but I think it's good to know that again if you're in an area where you don't have a good functional medicine practitioner and you just want to know for yourself. Anybody can do this at home right. And there's a lot of resources online. If you don't know how to do an elimination Diet you can just type elimination diet into Google. And you'll find a lot of resources on doing it yourself. So there's a lot of information about familial tendencies so especially when it comes to autoimmune people will say oh well. My sister has rheumatoid arthritis. And so so did my dad. So I'm just GonNa get it and you know that is a factor you know. We don't we don't know sometimes. What is that big trigger right? Maybe there is a genetic component we know that genes are only predictors But there's gotta be something else what what? How do you feel that? Genetics plays a part. What do you think that role is? Well we've got so much research coming out on what we call epigenetics and it's really the expression of these genes based on environmental exposures. And when you see no different autoimmune conditions that passed down through families is it truly genetic or is just. These families all grew up in the same area and had similar environmental exposures. And that can be very hard to discern. Unless you've got family members that truly grew up in different parts of the country different parts of the world And they still express the same kind of condition. Then you could probably say yeah it probably really is genetic so I think it's a combination you know they say if you know Genetics loads the gun environment pulls the trigger. So I think that's true for most of these conditions that you know. The genetic piece is a disposition. You're not necessarily destined to have these kind of autoimmune issues but we do tend to see this familial tendency so I think it certainly disposes people and if they have that disposition plus the environmental exposure. You know that's where we start to see. These different things manifest. So that's where if we can get an early really monitor. Diet monitor environmental exposure. And that's why you know we're really you know so Interested in educating people on know how to protect themselves early on from these different things and unfortunately you know we live in a more toxic world between our food and environmental exposures. I think it gets harder and most places in the world but you know even with the world being is what it is. You know. It's still something that you can be proactive. In AND MINIMIZE EXPOSURE. So your approach versus General Medicine when it comes to identifying intriguing. Something let's say let's say Hashimoto's how would you go about it versus maybe an endocrinologist? Would you know? Hold off until it gets to above ten What what do you feel is the right way to approach that possibly motive specifically again? I think it's looking at those potential underlying triggers and. I don't think it's the same trigger for everybody. Who's Got Hachimoto? So they know that's where we do a battery of blood tests looking at various infectious agents that we know are associated with Hashimoto. 's I pretty much do stool testing on all my patients because sometimes we'll find that certain gut microbes are also say with Hashi Motos all typically do food sensitivity testing to make sure there's no food component. You know. I think people need understand that it's the total load on the body. That's really the the big factor we break down in individual pieces but in reality it's the total exposure that potentially creates the problem so anyone exposure by itself may not be a big deal but they start adding up over time so it's a function of you know the length of the duration of exposure the degree of which exposure occurred in all of these factors play a role so you know as an environmental medicine doctor always interested in looking at the total body exposure. And that's why we're looking at no allergies Sensitivities things. We know that provoke immune system infections. Things that can provoke the immune system chemical exposure toxic metal exposure anything's they can undermine the immune system because all of that potential is going to have a negative impact on how body starts noggin holding immune tolerance or not holding Tallinn's. So it's just about really looking at the whole person when we look at Herbal ways food ways to support thyroid gland. Do you have any suggestions for that? Well from a food standpoint. I think you know kind of going back to a basic anti inflammatory diet is helpful for pretty much. Anybody and that's really eating a mostly plant-based Diet Depending on you know who you read. There's some varying opinions on that I really recommend following an alkaline Diet. Which is really eating a diet. That what you eat breaks down and making your body more Allen. You know we've got some research out there that this really helps promote tissue repair and anti inflammatory diet. It's good for your bones and and some other health benefits including cardiovascular benefits so that's really no mostly plant-based diet and keeping your animal protein down to about twenty twenty five percent. There are certain foods you know with automotives that they typically recommend you know you avoid they call these foods go trojans Because they can potentially exacerbate the problem so that's some of these cruciferous vegetables In clinical practice. I have never seen anyone who actually had a negative effect from these foods. It's things I think they teach you in school. I think the reality is the quantity of those food yet to really become appropriate. Thyroid is probably pretty high. And I don't think I've seen anyone who eats so many of them that it's actually interfered with their thyroid function as I am not actually terribly concerned because these foods are very nutrient dense. They actually you know are actually very beneficial for your liver. I think that the benefits outweigh the risk. And I don't I don't advise people to stop eating these foods based on that and then in terms of you know herbs and other south months I mean. We've got a lot of things to help. Support the thyroid. You know from a botanical standpoint. Now we've got herbs like you know furious which is commonly used I've actually not used a lot of herbs for Hashi Motos again. I just wasn't finding like huge. Huge benefits. it's something that's been used in botanical medicine for a long so. I can I think if you catch people very early in their disease. Herbs can be very beneficial. If they're later in their illness they probably won't be as beneficial other certainly not harmful. But that's something that people concerned explore with their practitioner. If they're interested night my I mean cruciferous vegetables. That's like every Every poly cystic Ovarian Syndrome. A woman is tall to eat. Lots of cruciferous vegetables. So yeah we'd like to take a moment to thank our sponsors. Botanical medicines are an important part of the integrative Lime Disease Program Bio Sidon from Bio Botanical. Research is a professional strength broad based program that has been extensively. Researched effectiveness has nutritional support in live in code factions asked repetition about bio Sidon LSF and visit bio Sidon Dot Com master supplements specializes in probiotic enzymes and fiber. That support digestion. Their products provide results. That you can feel working within sixty days more of money back guarantee their staff is available to help you decide which products and programs are right for you. Visit MASTER SUPPLEMENTS DOT COM or call. Eight hundred nine two six two nine six one for more info so mimicry back to mimicry. That that's initiated in the gut. Yes well I think a lot of it can be it doesn't necessarily have to be. I mean molecular mimicry can happen anywhere. I mean if you think about certain viruses loves viruses they don't particularly live in the Gut in Epstein Barr. Virus can get into your lymph nodes and get in general logical tissue as can a lot of other viruses and they can trigger we know with Multiple Sclerosis that Epstein bars unknown trigger through molecular mimicry. And that's mostly you know found in your nerves and your lymphatic tissue. So yeah it doesn't necessarily have to come from the God but I think the got is a source of a lot of it for for some people right so stool. Testing can be really important. What are you looking for in the stool testing? That could give you a clue of what's going on in someone's body you know especially if they're not really having any gut disorders with the guy that's always about balance and I think with all the new DNA technology that's come out looking at our microbiome. You know again. I think our technologies ahead of our understanding we've got you know groups like no you buy and buy 'em that to this very complex sequencing and tells you exactly what you got but we don't really know what it should look like and how many people out there have never had an antibiotic have really a pristine. God have always eaten healthy clean food. That doesn't you know somehow sway the mixture of the different microbes in your gut. So I think we're still in that process of understanding. What a healthy microbiome shed look like so that we have something really to compare it with and right now we're just getting a bunch of data on individuals and at some point we'll probably hit that threshold. Worry realize yeah. This is really what a healthy microbiome should look like. And this is what it looks like when it deviates so you know what? I'm looking for specifically as their gross overgrowth of certain microbes in when we start to see overgrowth of clubs Sihala and someone's got like a joiner muscle problem. We know the club sale is a major trigger for that that can be helpful if we see mass overgrowth of yeast. Yeast can be a trigger so when we start to see things really getting away from the norm and really overgrowing again. That can be a sign that it's a potential trigger but again. I think we're always hard pressed to prove a one hundred percent that this is. What's causing the problem? So we really are you know using it just as a guide of what has your exposure band and if we see that you're exposures been higher than normal and you're having the symptoms that gives us an idea that maybe that's all we need to target. Do you see going in people who are presenting possibly with an underlying infection. I'm thinking of this. You know and thinking that I see more often. The lab work off without seeing something physically going on. We'll we'll see goiter certainly in some individuals particularly if they're hypothyroid May or may not represent any kind of infectious process. I mean I've seen it. You know in mostly women no with or without Hashi motives disease so again you can get a goiter just by virtue of having an underactive thyroid But that is a physical sign When you start to hear particularly with thyroid about you know an enlarged thyroid if you hear about hair falling out and constipation and dry skin and sleep problems and depression and constipation. I mean all these can be signs of an underactive thyroid and those may be some of the early signs in before the T. S. H. Is really off so again. If we start to see these signs that may be an idea we WANNA start monitoring closely take a look at other things like iron deficiency which very closely mimics hypothyroidism But again it's just by getting to the root cause right I right and you know long time ago. would have more than salt. Yeah you know. And now when it rains it pours. Because that's what the little caption was on there and that was fortified with some Some iodine and now a lot of people have moved over to other types of salt because they are a little bit denser in minerals but again there is an the iodine component in. And so. That's that's important between that balance of Aydin Selenium Do you do you see that. A lot that imbalance. Yeah well particularly in my vegetarians. Vegans they're the ones that are most at risk because I- Adine is found in animal sources. It's in meat. It's an eggs so unless new eating a lot of Seaweed. Another High Iodine. Vegetarian Foods It's very easy to become iodine deficient and same thing with the Iron Iron cofactor that helps your body. Convert t four to t. Three and t. Three is the hormone. Your body actually uses so if you're not eating iron rich foods and you know he myron which is found in red meat is just a higher source of iron. That's found in vegetarian sources. So it's not that you can't get iron through vegetarian sources. It's just that the amount of food to eat as much larger and a lot of my vegetarians consume a lot of soy protein. And we know that soy has one of the things that actually blocks the absorption of iron so I think you know my vegetarians. Vegans just have to be very mindful of their iron levels are twelve levels. I dine levels are just harder to get in vegetarian. Sources and see. Just have to make sure you're covering the bases. How do you feel about general labs screening for these minerals and certain components because you know even know magnesium has to be done within the red blood cell? What about some of these other minerals? Do you find that. That's a sensitive enough inaccurate. Well your body is a has a built in mechanism that controls a lot of the minerals in your body and you know even you start to become tissue deficient. Your blood levels may look normal. So by the time your blood levels change Your tissue levels have already probably been depleted for a while. So yeah if you're going to do any type of nutritional analysis typically will do something the more closely represents a tissue sample in shorts doing tissue biopsies which pretty much nobody does in a will use labs like spectre sal or one of those groups that actually looks at red blood cells or sometimes white blood cell minerals and vitamins. I'll give you at least a better approximation of Watson tissue. You know. This is one of the things that I've had issues with when I have someone who I've found through a spectra sal to B B twelve deficient and they go to their primary care in the primary care. You're smiling. I can see you smiling around. The primary care goes ahead and says well. I don't I don't know this test so I'm going to draw a standard B twelve and that be twelve is normal The patient then loses you know confidence that I know what I'm saying and it's it can be very very difficult but it's important for people to think again and listen and actually do their own investigating and be an advocate for themselves. Absolutely and you know I think people knew their stand with lab values because I think this is a big source of confusion for people you know when you look at a reference range understand every lab has to establish their own reference range that's actually a guideline from Klay so I used to be a medical technologist. I worked in the lab in Chicago. Did all this work and you would literally grab one hundred people off the street and go. Are you normal? You say yes okay. Can I draw your blood and actually we used to use each other as controls because we figured we're all normal. What if you're not normal off them? Lab Lab? Values representing is ninety five percent of the people who got tested. That's the range in which they fell. It doesn't tell you anything about what's optimal or ideal which is wife. You GO FROM LAB TO LAB. You'll see the reference range changes a little bit because it's just reflecting that that one specific lab. Which if you think about it doesn't really make a lot of biological sense. I mean as long as Farzana were all human. So why your labs would drastically change between Detroit versus New York if you are a male or female of the similar age. I'm like yes. We can have gender differences and yes. We can have age differences but aside from that you know. Why do we have such a wide variety in these values? And I think of something like Farrington which is an iron marker while the normal range they show goes down to ten yet. If you look at all the literature they find that when you drop below fifty you start getting signs of iron deficiency on optimal levels above fifty. So we've never adjusted our values to what's optimal it's always been adjusted to what's out there. And because so many people are not healthy. Our our pool of what we used to think was healthy has really changed. And therefore these reference ranges keep changing to reflect that making more people look normal when they're not normal and so that's where you know again if you're working with the Good Functional Medicine Practitioner. Who understands how to read between the lines? You know we can start to see the trend on where your IRA dat where iron levels are at any other. You know analyze that. You're looking at just understand that what's on that piece of paper is certainly not representing what's optimal and it's it's a snapshot at Best Best. But yeah you have to go buy a clinically. How that person is is feeling. So what are what are your pillars for your care What I'm asking basically is on the grounds of Diet as well as Lifestyle at CETERA. What are your pillars that you really base your practice on? Well I think you know. My population of people being mostly people with lime disease and children with autism and although they might sound quite different fundamentally there are extremely similar and it notes really about Diet and gut health. I think you know Diet Gut Health Detox. That's where it all starts because you can correct so many of these underlying issues by just dealing with that piece first and then we can start to layer in other therapies as needed. But you know if you're not functioning well that means you're not necessarily digesting absorbing your food the way you should your body to sustain all other mechanisms in up to eighty percent of your immune function comes from the Gut. So the guts not functioning. Well your immune system not function. Well so making sure that you're in good. Working Order is important. You know diet of course is tied into the which you put in. Your mouth obviously affects gut. But it's also about you know really being mindful about treating food as medicine and not just something. I need to get through the day in for people who live on process no junk foods that are nutrient dense. You know you're just more disposed to start having different kinds of health issues versus someone who is a plant based whole foods diet. You know. That's mostly organic and clean healthy food so again. This is something that anybody can do. You know you don't have to be a doctor to figure out most of this stuff but It's really just the commitment of you know starting with that part of your health because if you can get that piece under control it's going to be easier with any other therapy you do out there whether it's a supplement medication. It was more likely to be more effective. When you've got these foundational pieces working well for I think sleep is huge but I am absolutely but it's a problem. It's truly a problem. I think well I'm going to say it's more of a problem with women especially when they get past forty forty five and there are some huge fluctuations in hormones and you know generally sleep hygiene we talk a lot about that and how you really need to protect yourself by shutting off the the phones in the computer couple hours before you really need to try to go to bed around the same time. Get up around the same time it you know. There's certain things we can use like Gab And Certain Passion Flower and El Nino and things like that. But what do you do when you get to the point where nothing seems to work for these people? Yeah I mean sleep can be very complicated and again. It's on these issues where I think it varies so much from person person of why they don't sleep well whether they're issues falling asleep staying asleep or both I mean I've had some people Who just take everything under the sun and they just have a hard time getting their body to get out of that fight or flight state and Yeah it's it's complicated. I think it varies so much individually. I'd hate to say well. You just need to do this because there is no one thing that works for everybody for some people. It's a function of yet disconnecting from their electronics. A couple hours for bedtime for other people some of the herbs and supplements we use do the job for other people. It's really learning better stress management techniques because their brain just doesn't turn off when they go to bed For OTHER PEOPLE. We've done things like you know. Pms where you know that seems to help you know. Get them into a more relaxed state. I've had people do acupuncture. I've had people do neural feedback. People do hyperbaric oxygen. So you know you just kind of have to find what works person. Look at some people who use medication. As much as I try and steer clear of it I've had some people where that has been the only thing at least a point. That has really gotten them at least get some sleep And for people who don't sleep at all even not getting great sleep better than though sleep but ultimately you know sleep is a pattern. It's a rhythm and we have to get the body back on that rhythm and I think we're the worst cases I've seen in with people. Is that somewhere along the line? Something really disrupted that rhythm and so it's just takes a long time some cases to really get their body back in sync because there's all the hormones that are involved with sleep and you've got your body retrained to get that those hormones working the way they're supposed to so yeah it can be really complicated and My my thought is always that. Keep trying different things you know. Find the thing that works best for you if it worked. Great for someone didn't work for you doesn't mean it doesn't work for everybody. It just didn't work for you and then you know you'd move onto the next thing but you know your your brain literally flushes itself out when you sleep. That's when it does all its detox. That's when most of your tissue repair happens so outside of you know diet and got healthy I sleep would definitely be at the top of my list of things that are absolutely necessary to heal. You didn't You weren't primed for that question but you you did it perfectly and I was waiting. I was hoping you were going to say exactly what you said. Just because it didn't work for you doesn't mean that there is not something else that will work for you and you really need to continue on that path. I have a few patients Right now that Well that are having Either learning issues over they have been diagnosed autistic. And Wow those families talk about the patients. They've got this little one or this young teenager and that's the patient but do you find that you have to help the family as well. Well absolutely I mean it's a family dynamic issue even though it may be the child itself that's The they're the ones that are affected physically but the dynamic and how it affects the whole family. Because there's so much care and therapy that's involved with these kids that it's you know managing their diet. It's getting them to speech. Therapy occupational therapy physical therapy. Aba You know. There's a whole schedule. In a lot of these kids are very rigid in routine oriented so Yeah is probably the ultimate test of patients as a parent. When you've got a special needs child just to have to you know schedule and deal with all the things you have to deal to help your child get well It's it's it's probably not a lot different than what happens with a lot of my line patients. Though it's the same thing where it's about schedule and routine and strict diet and taking supplements and being routine oriented to get your body in a rhythm They're different but in so many ways they're very similar and I think the fundamental things I've you know gut health diet. It's still still the same right right and we do talk a lot about pooping in my practice. How `Bout you yeah? I think it comes up pretty much with everybody and you know not. Everyone's favorite topic you know yet. What color how big how often I have more pictures of Poop sent to me than I can shake stick ad. You know again i. I was a micro biologist For many years before I went back to medical school. I've looked at a lot of poop and so people think they've got these parasites coming out of them and they'll get pictures. Now look at it. I'm like no. That's not a parasite. It's just a string of mucus and they're fine so low But Yeah you get a lot of pictures of your the Kinda Doctor People WanNa Goto. Because really if you if you can be that close to your patients. Yeah I WANNA party with you college. That's excellent that's excellent. Do you have any other thoughts surrounding autoimmune illness? Well I think you know for someone who already has a diagnosis. It's never too late intervene Start making these diet and lifestyle changes. I mean I've seen some people that had some amazing recovery's when they made that commitment to really focus on their health and again it's it's mind body spirit. It's so easy to throw pills at you and deal with some of the physical things but there's a huge huge mental emotional component. I think any autoimmune illness and that certainly not to say that you know. It's all psychological. 'cause it's not but being chronically. Ill does have a toll on your mental health and your relationships. So it's important that you know we're dealing with the whole person and we're making sure we're taking care of the brain and the mental and the psyche as much as we're dealing with the physical symptoms so it's really again whole person approach and Don't ignore the effect of stress on your body. I mean I have seen it. Just Make People Thousand Times worse and teaching people how to master their stress. I have a colleague. Heidi Hannah to San Diego. Who's got some great courses on helping you I love. She says you don't manage stress. You Master Stress Mike. I love that. This exact we need to do. It's not just about getting by. It's about learning how to let that stress not by the way that it does have that impact on your body away. Thank you because that that is really good. I'm I'm also excited to tell my listeners. That my daughter Karen I put together It's almost completed a quick start programme for autoimmune illnesses Learning about them. What it's caused from and some ways to treat it as well as a whole program for food to help you out that so that's going to be available through health means Probably Spring of Twenty twenty and we actually had a quick interview with Doctor Tom. O'brien he's like the big guru in auto immune issues. He talked quite a bit. And so I've gotta find that one segment that's going to be worth. He is funny a fire in the hole. That's as big his big terminology. I I get. I get a chuckle out about one so well. This has been very very enlightening I think that a lot of people are probably out there. they know some one I think it's just about everything in the world. You know you know somebody with lime. You know someone with cancer. You know someone with an autoimmune illness and I think a lot of people don't pay enough attention to themselves you know they're they're out there and they're just mindlessly going from one place to another and they need to stop and you just stop take a deep breath and be present in just really take care of themselves because you know. I mean we're not getting any younger We're all on that treadmill going forward and everybody thinks that you and I were like the greatest patients and we do everything that we tell everybody to do. And I don't think we do that all the time you know but we have to try right the best we can do. That's all we can hope. Well everybody WHO's been listening. This is yet another episode of living with line. Come back and see assume. We're excited to bring you this. This suspense in the Kennedy. Dr Darin ingels. We LOOK FORWARD TO TALKING TO ASSUME. Take everybody by. Thank you for listening to another episode of living with Lime. We'd like to take another moment to thank. Our sponsors. Botanical medicines are important part of an integrative lime disease program Bio Sidon from Bio Botanical. Research is a professional strength broad spectrum formula that has been extensively researched for effectiveness as nutritional support in live. Co-infections University studies have shown that this combination of plant medicines is also effective on biofilms. That may be hampered treatment as well as providing broadly acting herbal support the life of Soma form of bio side and called biocide and. Lsf is used by line literally physicians. Such as Dr Richard Horowitz and Dr Joe Carnahan. Ask Your practitioner about bio side. Lsf and visit bio side Dot com. For more information master supplements does living with live ever get overwhelming and finding the right support seem difficult. Will Master supplements can help? Master supplements specializes in probiotics enzymes at fiber that help support digestive and immune health during and after antibiotics master supplements products provide results. That you can feel working with a sixty day. Money back guarantee their staff is available to help you decide which products and programs are right for you. Master supplements is dedicated to science based products with the highest standards of quality control visit Master Hyphen Supplements Dot Com for more information or call and talk to a team member at eight hundred nine two six two nine six one. That's master hyphen supplements dot com or eight hundred nine. Two six two nine six one. Thanks so much again for listening to living with lime. We'd like to remind you that you have not done so already. Please subscribe to the podcast. You can visit our website at living with wine dot. Us to make sure you don't miss any episode until next time. Thank you so much for listening. And we'll be sued with a new episode.

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NEJM This Week  September 5, 2019

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

29:47 min | 1 year ago

NEJM This Week September 5, 2019

"Welcome this is the new england journal of medicine. I'm dr lisa johnson this week. September fifth twenty nineteen we feature articles on a gabby type a receptor modulator for depression a trial of treatments for varicose veins f five years inhaled g._m._c. s._f. For pulmonary alveoli approach noses mataafa that for red cell peruvian kindness deficiency and death by stereotype review articles on immune thrombosis opinion opinion and on mobile devices into health a clinical problem solving describing a terminal event and perspective articles on morbidity and mortality in the priroda era on healthcare refusal and the trump administration and on primary care first trial of sage each to seventeen in patients with major depressive disorder by hand unglued news bruce from sage therapeutics cambridge massachusetts altered neuro transmission of gamma amino beauty uric acid gabba has been implicated in the pathogenesis of depression. Whether sage to seventeen eighteen an oral positive alistair modulator of gabba type a receptors is effective and safe for the treatment of major depressive disorder is unknown own in this phase two trial eighty nine patients with major depression were randomly assigned to receive thirty milligrams of sage to seventeen or or placebo once daily the mean baseline score on the seventeen item hamilton depression rating scale ham d was twenty five point two in the sage to seventeen group and twenty five point seven in the placebo group. The least squares mean change in the hamdi score from baseline baseline. Today fifteen was minus seventeen point four points in the stage to seventeen group and minus ten point three points in the placebo group group. The differences in secondary and points were generally in the same direction as those of the primary end point. There were no serious adverse events. The most common adverse events in the sage to seventeen group were headache dizziness nausea and somnolence administration of sage to seventeen daily early for fourteen days resulted in a reduction in depressive symptoms at day fifteen adverse events were more common in the sage to seventeen group further trials are needed to determine the durability and safety of sage to seventeen in major depressive disorder and to compare sage to seventeen eighteen with available treatments in an editorial emil could charles from the university of chicago writes that sage to seventeen is the latest example of an agent that is aimed at a new target in major depressive disorder. The authors make a case for why this orally administered positive osita alice derek modulator of gabby type a receptors could have antidepressant activity and they have provided preliminary evidence that this activity may be clinically relevant. The fact that sage to seventeen targets a different central neurotransmitter system than most available antidepressants. It's is administered orally appears to have a relatively benign side effect profile and appears to work quickly though not as quickly as glutamate modulators jalayta's such as ketamine makes this an interesting compound for further study. There are at least two caveats related to the current trial. I i it did not include patients with treatment resistant depression and whether sage to seventeen is efficacious in a large proportion of patients with major depressive disorder in a population that includes this group is not known second several agents developed in the past to target non manoa me neurotransmitter commit our systems that had not previously been targeted have failed after promising phase two results such as the ones in the current trial although sage to seventeen seventeen represents an exciting conceptual development in new agents for major depressive disorder only time will tell whether positive alistair modulators of gabba type a receptors will enter the pharmacopoeia of agents that are effective for major depressive disorder five live year outcomes of a randomized trial of treatments for varicose veins by julie britain from the university of glasgow united kingdom. I'm in this randomized trial involving seven hundred ninety eight participants with primary varicose veins at eleven centers in the united kingdom the outcomes it comes of laser ablation foam sclera therapy and surgery were compared primary outcomes at five years were disease specific quality of flyleaf and generic quality of life as well as cost effectiveness after adjustment for baseline scores and other co variants scores on the aberdeen dean varicose vein questionnaire in which lower scores indicate a better quality of life were lower among patients who underwent laser ablation or surgery story then among those who underwent foams glare therapy affects size for laser ablation versus foams glow therapy minus two point eight six and for surgery versus foam sclera therapy minus two point six generic quality of life measures did not differ among treatment groups at a threshold willingness leanness to pay ratio of twenty thousand pounds twenty eight thousand four hundred thirty three u._s. dollars per quality adjusted life year qualley seventy seven point two percent of the cost effectiveness model iterations favored laser ablation in this randomized trial of treatments for varicose veins disease specific quality of life five years after treatment was better after laser ablation or surgery then after foams claro therapy the majority variety of the probabilistic cost effectiveness model iterations favored laser ablation inhaled g._m._c. s._f. For pulmonary alveoli prognosis by review sheet zaghawa from nagata university medical dental hospital japan pulmonary very l._v. <unk> notice is a disease characterized by abnormal accumulation of surfactant in the alveoli. Most cases are autoimmune and are associated with an auto antibody against granulocytic macrophage colony stimulating factor g._m._c. s._f. That prevents clearing clearing of pulmonary surfactant by alveoli macrophages. A face to study showed some therapeutic efficacy of inhaled recombinant human mun g._m._c. s._f. In patients with severe pulmonary alveoli prognosis in this trial sixty four patients with mild to moderate auto immune june pulmonary outfielder prognosis were randomly assigned to receive daily inhaled recombinant human g._m._c. s._f. At a dose of one hundred twenty five micrograms twice daily for seven days every other week for twenty four weeks or placebo the change in the mean l._v. wheeler arterial oxygen gradient was significantly better in the g._m._c. s._f. Group than in the placebo group mean change from baseline minus four point five millimetres mercury versus zero point one seven millimeters mercury the change from baseline and week twenty five in the density any of the lung field on c. T. was also better in the g._m._c. s._f. Group serious adverse events developed in six patients in the g._m._c. s._f. Group group and in three patients in the placebo group in this trial inhaled recombinant human g._m._c. s._f. Was associated with a modest salutary allieu terry effect on the laboratory outcome of arterial oxygen tension and no clinical benefits were noted safety the and efficacy of mataafa that in peru eight kinase deficiency by rachel grace from the dana farber boston children's cancer centre pyro vade kinase deficiency is caused by mutations in p._k. L. r. and leads to congenital hemolytic. Anemia mataafa vet is is an oral small molecule alice derek activator of peruvian kinase in red cells this phase two study evaluated the safety and efficacy of mataafa that in fifty two adults with peruvian kindness deficiency who were not receiving red cell transfusions for a twenty four week core period followed by extension phase common adverse events including headache and insomnia occurred at the time of drug initiation and were transient the most common serious adverse events hemolytic anemia and pharyngitis each occurred in two patients fifty percent of patients had had an increase of more than one gram per deciliter in the hemoglobin level among these patients the mean maximum increase was three point four grams uh-huh per deciliter and the median time until the first increase of more than one gram per deciliter was ten days the response was sustained during the median follow up of twenty nine months in an extension phase hemoglobin responses were observed only patients who had at least one miss sense p._k. C._k. l. mutation and were associated with the red sale pyro vay kindness protein level at baseline. The administration of top that was associated associated with a rapid increase in the hemoglobin level in fifty percent of adults with peruvian kinase deficiency adverse effects were mainly low grade and and transient immune thrombosis appear via a clinical practice article by nikola cooper from imperial college london an immune thrombosis pina i._t. P. is an autoimmune disease characterized by isolated thrombosis dopey. Neha patients may be a a symptomatic at presentation or they may present with mild mucous cutaneous to life threatening bleeding although only five percent of patients with i._t. Pete present with severe bleeding bleeding leading to hospital admission within five years after diagnosis develops approximately fifteen percent irrespective affective of bleeding problems patients with i._t. P. often report fatigue and impaired health related quality of life i._t. P. is diagnosed in patients with a platelet count. Below one hundred thousand per cubic millimetre in whom other causes of thrombosis pina have been ruled out those who present with serious is bleeding typically receive platelet transfusions glucocorticoid. 's an intravenous immune globulin in patients with no bleeding or non serious pleading ding treatment decisions are guided by the patient's platelet count age coexisting conditions and preference glucocorticoid are used as first line in treatment but prolonged use should be avoided owing to adverse effects for patients in whom i._t. P does not remit or relapses soon after glucocorticoid coit treatment other medications for which there are high quality data include thrombosis point and receptor agonists and tuck saab splenectomy is not recommended commended during the first year after diagnosis of i._t. P unless medical treatment is not available otherwise it is reserved for patients with i._t. P that is refractory directory to medical treatment. Listen to the full text of this article at any j. m. dot org mobile devices and health health a review article by ida sim from the university of california san francisco mobile health the application of sensors mobile app social media and location tracking technology to obtain data pertinent to wellness and disease diagnosis prevention and management makes it theoretically theoretically possible to monitor and intervene whenever and wherever acute and chronic medical conditions occur with eighty one percent of north north american adults owning a smartphone this frontier could be reached in the foreseeable future in the united states and is particularly relevant to the management of of chronic diseases more than forty percent of u._s. Adults have two or more chronic conditions and chronic conditions now account for seventy one percent of all u._s. healthcare spending so the promise of mobile health is especially attractive mobile health is at the swirling confluence wentz of remote sensing consumer facing personal technologies and artificial intelligence data from smartphone apps and an ever growing range range of wearable and environmental sensors can be processed with the use of machine learning and other a._i. Techniques to support medical decision making this author reviews the current state of sensing digital biomarkers and digital therapeutics the use of online technologies in the treatment of behavioral in medical conditions discusses the challenges of integrating mobile health into clinical care and describes regulatory business and ethical issues confronting mobile health a terminal event a clinical problem solving article by andrew lie from the university of california -fornia san francisco a fifty four year old man presented with a two year history of constant non radiating lumbar pain over the previous. A six months severe back pain frequently awakened him from sleep. He described morning stiffness in his lower back lasting one to two hours which which was alleviated by activity and by non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs and sets a lumbar m._r._i. Showed multi-level degenerative disc changes the chronicity nocturnal awakening morning stiffness and lessening of the stiffness with activity and end saids were characteristic of inflammatory back pain. The imaging studies provided an alternative and common explanation for his back pain severe multilevel degenerative the changes disc dima and end plate irregularity on m._r._i. Suggested spondylosis guide us inflammation of the vertebra and adjacent intervertebral disc which along with elevated inflammatory markers progressive pain and night sweats arose concern for an indolent infection all bacterial fungal and mike o. Bacterial cultures were negative at tanner sept- was prescribed for suspected ankylosing. Oh sing spondylitis after one month the patients back pain decreased and he resumed exercise when the aseptic nature of the disguise was established alleged ankylosing spondylitis was diagnosed because there was no evidence of reactive arthritis psoriasis or inflammatory bowel disease the the reduction in back pain inflammatory markers and m._r._i. Findings during a year of tanner sept- therapy supported the working diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis. Thank you an editorial by jeffrey raisin nineteen years ago. Dr dre joined the new england journal journal of medicine as its editor in chief. This issue is his last in that position over these years substantial progress has been made in the art art and science of medicine and the journal is proud to have been the voice for many of the articles that detailed that progress despite that record some people people have questioned the role of medical journals in this age of easy access to information we think that on the contrary easy access to unvetted unvetted information and the proliferation of new journals make the journals work more valuable not less what health professionals want and the need is a trusted information source that can winnow the key kernels of new clinical information from the mountains of associated chaff we do this for you by reviewing submitted research and publishing the approximately two hundred research articles each year that we think will change change the science and practice of medicine as a reader you provide us with the resources to make these decisions on your behalf and we are grateful for your loyal support as he leaves his post. Dr jason is deeply grateful to all of you who submit work to us and who read did the research we publish without your submissions. The manuscripts that derived from groundbreaking work we could not bring new research to our readers who use to make a positive difference in the lives of their patients. Dr driesen looks forward to reading about further medical advances in the journal as its new leader takes takes the helm. He plans to use that information in his practice. He hopes you will to death by stereotype. Cancer treatment in unmarried patients a medicine in society article by joan delfa tori from the university of delaware newark in the summer of twenty eleven professor delfa tori was diagnosed with stage four gallbladder cancer that had metastasized to the liver. She is still alive against all the odds because a surgeon took a long shot as the surgeon was deciding whether to operate they had a conversation whose full significance significance ms del vittori did not appreciate until later ms delfa tori is single with no living immediate family so when he asked about social support ms del fatories spoke of friends and cousins neighbors and colleagues okay. He said that's fine at the time. She didn't realize that it might might not have been the surgeon obtained clear margins making survival possible albeit still improbable with microscopic cancer almost certainly remaining. He recommended seeing a medical oncologist for edge of in chemotherapy leaning toward ms delphi tori with evident concern. The medical oncologist asked you have no husband. No then how will you manage. He exclaimed when ms delphi tori began describing friend friend based support. He interrupted to recommend treatment with gem cite. Ah bean the most promising approach was combination chemotherapy and she was healthy except for for the cancer nevertheless he wouldn't risk serious side effects with as he put it someone in your situation ms dell factory moved onto another other on cosmologists who satisfied that she had sufficient help gave her jim siding and accelerate platin- perhaps she would have survived with just jam a._m. Site a beam. Perhaps not given everything she was told. The probability would have been lower as inexperienced researcher. She was curious was is this just one patient story or might. Physicians social views have wider implications for patients with non traditional support systems systems the dangerous threat to roe v wade an editorial by the editors the american board of obstetrics and gynecology legacy the american gynecological and obstetrical society. The council of university chairs of obstetrics gynecology the society for academic specialists shortlists in general obstetrics gynecology and the society for maternal fetal medicine a key result of our cumulative efforts as u._s. Healthcare providers over the past forty six years is that there are fewer abortions per one thousand reproductive age women per year today then immediately lately after the supreme court's decision in roe v wade legalized abortion nationwide deaths due to unsafe abortions in the united states. It's have been essentially eliminated with ninety percent of procedures done today. In the first trimester when the risk of maternal mortality is less than one tenth length of that associated with carrying a pregnancy to term access to legal and safe pregnancy termination a legal right in the united states for for the past forty. Six years is essential to the public health of women everywhere. We have lived within the guidance of roe v wade for nearly half a century injury. It has protected women from injury and death as healthcare professionals. These authors believe that reversing roe would be a grave mistake contrary to the health interests of women in this country and the authors strongly advise that this landmark decision should remain the law of the land in in every state perilous politics morbidity and mortality in the pre row era a perspective article michael by lisa rosenbaum michael bayden an eighty five year old forensic pathologist is best known for his role in investigations of such high profile file cases as the assassination of president john f kennedy and the murder of nicole brown simpson but forbidden who worked in the new york city medical examiner's mentor's office before the roe v wade supreme court decision the most haunting cases involve people who society seems to have forgotten women who died after illegal abortion attempts bayden told dr rosenbaum he saw about twenty deaths per year attributable to attempted pregnancy determination usually self-induced metal wire coat hangers knitting needles and slippery tree branches were the most common approaches he said ed when abortion was legalized in nineteen seventy-three bayden says with very rare exceptions deaths due to unsafe abortions stopped soon soon however we may once again see increases in morbidity and mortality due to self induced abortion though efforts to restrict abortion shen rights in the united states have been underway for decades. The recent appointment of two conservative supreme court justices has prompted a flurry of state legislation education taking more direct aim at rose protections. We don't know how many women died from abortion attempts before row but we should recall what we do know about what killed them toppling the ethical balance healthcare refusal and the trump trump administration a perspective article by elizabeth seper from the university of texas at austin school of law for nearly fifty a years u._s. Federal law has permitted medical professionals and religious institutions to refuse for religious and moral reasons to provide abortions and sterilizations in more recent decades similar safeguards have been developed for medical professionals who do not wish to comply with patients advanced directives or deliver physician aid in dying under existing statutes recipients of federal funding from hospitals and clinics to states and cities ladies may not discriminate against individuals or organizations that refused to provide such care but healthcare providers still bear legal and ethical duties to patients. They must provide information about treatment options. They may not abandon patient without reasonable notice while all the patient needs continuing medical attention providers also generally must comply with laws that prohibit discrimination as is most relevant here on the basis of sex sexual orientation religion or gender identity in emergency situations physicians and hospital emergency departments admits must deliver even contested care ethical guidelines of professional organizations reflect this compromise between conscience and care a new rule published in may twenty nineteen by the u._s. Department of health and human services creates a wide ranging right to refuse fuse to provide healthcare services. If it goes into effect patient health and professional practice are likely to suffer the primary care. I is it a step back up perspective article by laura sessoms from the uniformed services university of of the health sciences washington d._c. Supporting primary care is a major goal of the centers for medicare and medicaid services cms us which has added new billing codes to pay for previously uncompensated care that is long term care and transitional care management and new programs programs such as the comprehensive primary care plus c._p._c. plus initiative in which c._m._s. partners with payers in eighteen regions of the country to pay for advanced population based care in nearly three thousand practices yet primary care has not flourished in the united added states and it often fails to achieve the ideal of first contact care that is comprehensive continuous and coordinated to further support delivery of primary care to medicare beneficiaries in april c._m._s. announced two new payment models to be implemented in january twenty twenty eighty one of these the primary care. I p c f model for individual practices is loosely based on c. p. c. plus p._c._f. Payment payment will include three components or risk adjusted population based payment per patient per month a flat feet of fifty dollars per visit for face to face visits not including the additional twenty percent patient co-insurance and a potential performance incentive although p._c._f. Is a bold attempt to transform warm payment approaches. The program ignores the low level of current medicare payments for primary care. The need for greater investment and lessons from the managed care era about financial incentives tied predominantly to utilization reduction are images in clinical medicine and features a fifty six year old man who presented to the emergency department with pain in his right hand after he hit a desk in frustration during an argument at work work on physical examination there was swelling at the base of the fifth digit with no open wound a plain x ray of the right hand showed a fracture at the neck of the fifth metacarpal sometimes called a boxer's fracture. This injury typically occurs when a person punches an object with a closed fist despite its name name the fracture is uncommon among professional boxers and typically occurs among untrained persons punching without proper technique in this patient because because the fracture had created an angular action of greater than thirty degrees and the injury was to his dominant hand he was treated with perkiness intermediary nail fixation -sation and cast immobilization at follow up five months after surgery he had regained full use of his right hand a forty nine in your old man was referred to the oto rhino laron galeotti clinic with a three month history of progressive voice changes and pain with swallowing he had a history of hypertension pretension and type two diabetes melodies and was a current smoker he had no recent weight loss or other systemic symptoms fiber optic learn gossipy be revealed a two centimeter lesion at the level of the vocal chords. The laurindo lesion was excised and findings on his logic examination were consistent assistant with metastasis of clear cell carcinoma c. T. of the abdomen and chest were subsequently performed and revealed a mass measuring seven centimeters by six point four centimeters by six point six centimetres at the superior pole of the right kidney several pulmonary lesions and enlarged charged media steiner lymph nodes findings consistent with metastatic disease laparoscopic radical nephrite demy of the right kidney was performed armed and oral sued nittany was initiated for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma at one year follow up the patient had stable media steiner steiner lesions and complete remission disappearance of some of the pulmonary lesions. This concludes our summary. Let us know what you think about our audio. Summaries any comments or suggestions may be sent to audio at any j. m. dot org. Thank you for listening.

depressive disorder united states roe new england journal of medicin c. T. glucocorticoid spondylitis dr lisa johnson hamdi stereotype review autoimmune disease university of chicago aberdeen university of california nagata university medical dent san francisco peru spondylosis
BTS #19 Dr. Junella Chin on Medical Uses of Cannabis, Pediatric Use, Womens Health

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

1:16:30 hr | 1 year ago

BTS #19 Dr. Junella Chin on Medical Uses of Cannabis, Pediatric Use, Womens Health

"Hi I'm Dr. Jun Chen. And I'm an integrative cannabis physician. You're listening to the curious about Canada's podcast. Everybody this is Jason. Wilson with curious about cannabis podcast. Thanks so much for tuning in once again today. I'm really really stoked to have the guests that I have on today. I have Dr Jamila Chin someone that we just recently became friends We have a lot in common and I'm really excited about our conversation. Thanks so much for being willing to come on the podcast. Thanks for having me Jason. I'm looking forward to this. Yeah totally so for those. That aren't already familiar with you. Do you mind starting us off by just explaining a little bit about your background. And how that lead into working with cannabis in medicine and we'll just kind of spin off from there all right well about a thousand years ago right. Get SPILL I was a I was a patient actually before I even became a physician a medical doctor. I was diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis when I was a teenager. And it's a fancy big fancy name it's also called. As for short and basically what? It is autoimmune disease of the spine. it's an inflammatory disorder. There's no cure. There's really not no treatment let that is long term. It's really just Maine roots in Palliative. Care and what ends up happening is your vertebrae so the bones in your spine. Start to fuse together. They literally crazy glued together. And you lose mobility so you might. You might see people on the street where they look like. They have a big rod in their back and they're sort of turning with their whole body they don't have much range of motion and usually those patients with a s and I went through conventional treatment as a teenager and as a kid. I had a lot of pain but I did. You know normal prescription medications went to physical therapy for many many did acupuncture Epidurals I did a lot of injections and trigger point injections but nothing gave me long lasting relief so I wore back brace while I was in medical school and this was in. San Francisco went to school. Shortly after they legalize cannabis in San Francisco California. And I would wear this back brace all the time while I was doing rounds. And what am I attending? Pulled me aside and said you know what's going on? Why are you wearing this? Brace having a hard time standing assisting in the or delivering babies. I see that you're sort of standing on the side trying to sit down and you're in a lot of pain I told the S. and I was really disheartened. Was Really Sad because here. I was training to be a doctor. You know I had at my disposal. Hundreds of specialists in this great university and no one could really offer me any relief and it was sort of the same revolving door you know. Here's another prescription. Have you tried another dural? Have you tried steroids? Yes yes you know. And there's a lot of mets that I couldn't take you know when you're working in the hospital or you're studying. You can't be sedated. You can't be altered in any way so surprisingly he pulled me aside and this was an HIV aids doctor and he handed me this bottle. Okay and he said. Don't tell anyone I'm giving you this. Don't freak out but this is marijuana. This is marijuana. That's in a tincture bottle and it helps my HIV and AIDS patients with pain. He didn't call CD oil or anything. Fancy like that he just said it's marijuana steeped in alcohol. Take it before you go to bed at night but it really helps my HIV and AIDS patients. And I completely freaked out. I grew up in the Bronx and I grew up in a very traditional Chinese household. So there was a stigma surrounding cannabis was a pre med. I had my eye on the prize. I didn't really experiment with cannabis a lot but I knew and he said a two he said you know you're you're gonNA work eighty to one hundred hours a week and you have a long way to go and you really are not. GonNa make it. You know with just this back brace so I sat with my dresser for weeks on end Sarah at it night. I finally took it. I took it over the weekend. When I wasn't on call and to my surprise it did make me feel a little funky. It reminded me of when I I had a glass of wine. You know little little flushed but nothing crazy but you know by the time. The weekend was over by Monday morning. I knew something was working because I was able to stand and do the dishes without the back brace. I was able to do some some light household chores without pain and I went up to him that next week and I said what is in. This is what is this. And how com- more patients don't know about it. And he started explaining cannabis to me and what it is what it isn't Basically took me aside and he says you know there's this journal club that meets there's other. Md's you know if you want to start learning about this plant you know. Let's by all means. Let's start looking at these different cases and I made it a point for my career to learn everything I could about this plant medicine and this was in the two thousands so reno lot has changed since then but patients foul me. I didn't have to advertise I integrated into my holistic family. Practice and word spread fast because patients could appreciate the fact that they could tell me about cannabis usage. Tell me about their other medication usage without feeling like the doctor was going to dismiss them from their practice right. Yeah Yeah and that's you know one of the huge challenges that seems like you know we face. Right now with cannabis is getting people to one to get the doctors and nurses educated to know how to respond when someone comes to them. Saying I WANNA try cannabis or I am using it. You know But then also on the patient side to have that sense of safety with with the physician to be able to just honestly share what they're experiencing. What they're experimenting with and everything Because I think And tell me if you agree. But there's a a weird dynamic that's happened in our healthcare system. It seems primarily based on my own experience that the patient and the doctor don't always feel like they're on the journey together And so the patient even though they may have you know their primary care physician or their specialists that they see regularly. They don't always feel like I don't know they feel very alone in their pursuit of wellness and trying to to get better And so it's almost like this Like the canvas piece is sort of raising a bigger issue in healthcare. Broadly that stems from how stressed alive doctors are how limited amount of time they have to spend with patients You know all these these other pieces as well That I think we need to really seriously look if we want to improve our healthcare system and have people feel that since trust again with their physicians And I know that I went through a very similar experience so I have multiple spinal cord injuries. And so I've been through the back braces. I'VE BIN on Steroids. You know I've been on all of these things I totally understand. And one thing that Before unite ever talked. I felt this connection with you because I saw on a. I think it was a different interview or something you talking about your personal background and I was like. Oh my gosh. I've been through at least piece of that. And the same way I discovered cannabis as a patient before ever got involved in like a testing labs and research and all that sort of stuff and it was through very similar sort of thing. I was like literally stuck to the couch. Could move at these light back. Spasms and extreme pain felt like someone who like driving a knife and my spine just crazy so I can. I can very much relate to at least to some extent What you went through. Because it's traumatic going through that process of like how do I find relief with a chronic condition like this? You know without being just knocked out all the time. It's really hard absolutely absolutely at it. Takes a huge toll on your nervous system. Your you feel like this. Can't Pete my legacy? I cannot live like this and we're young we're young and we're you know when you think of someone with chronic pain you think of grandma in their eighties or nineties but chronic pain hits even teenagers. I see with overuse injuries through sports through a lot of genetic disorders as well so you so being a chronic pain survivor. I really know what it's like when you tell the doctor. I've tried everything and it doesn't work. I mean you don't want to go to the physician because you know the things that they're going to offer you. It's either jury Prescription medications or yeah. Yeah exactly right. You're like I've heard the story multiple times. Oh you want to do another MRI. Okay what's going to change? You know my pain is my pain but I mean really. I think this whole medical cannabis movement is a wakeup call to our health. Care system you know. Patients are turning away from mainstream medicine. You know they're heading to forums to to listening to podcasts like yours on places like Wendy's shop artists CBD shop because they're giving them what they need. The you as an advocate. They're listening to these podcasts or connecting. Better and they're looking for more natural approach to health and healing Yeah exactly and so coming back around so you are. You're in medical school. You discovered cannabis and were able to start to function better. Where did your path lead after that Kind of how did the rest of your medical school and go and then with. What did you specialize them so? I specialized in integrative care. So what I knew what I understood that cannabis was part of a holistic movement and that it wasn't going to be the end all be all even sure myself. I knew that when I integrated cannabis I then I could get off the couch. Then maybe I could give a breather and take my back. Brace off for a couple of hours but I needed to utilize those hours and exercise. Do some foam roller exercise. Is maybe take a trip to the acupuncturist. I'm an osteopathic physician so I also use my hands to help heal patients. I DO MANIPULATION. And the tendons and the ligaments so hands on approach for patients so so cannabis breaks that storm. You know it's sort of parts the clouds a little bit and then it allows you to do other things for me. Losing weight was a big thing. I had to lose a lot of weight. I gained a lot of weight in medical school. The Freshman fifteen became the freshman fifty right. Because when you're in pain you eat for comfort. Yes and you know that ice cream that hot chocolate. Just feel so good right when you're sitting on the couch but you know an anti inflammatory diet. I talked to my patients about it. I have a background in nutrition. So that's a really really big thing so I incorporate all these different modalities with my patients and I'm realistic. Might not all happen at once. But maybe it's a start with cannabis medicine and it's a ten minute walk. You know. Getting those lymphatic moving or maybe it is massage. You know something like that. So I try to work around the patients. And that's how we created our integrative health centers in California and can you briefly. Describe anyone listening. That's maybe not familiar with like osteopathic medicine versus allopathic medicine. And all these sort of things Can you describe sort of what that means to be an osteopathic doctor versus other types of physicians? Sure sure so. There's two types of physicians in the US. There's MD's and there's Dios and warnings are medical. Doctors stands for medical doctor. Do stands for Dr Osteopathy. Now we have the exact same licenser so we work in the same hospitals the same privileges. I can write all prescriptions. Admit you to the hospital. Emory's insurance companies cover US etc etc. The main difference between doctors of osteopathy is that we take an year sometimes two years of anatomy and physiology. So we have a much more deeper understanding of muscular skeletal system and some of us a very few of us but some of us go into what's called osteopathic manipulative medicine. And that's what I specialize in and we use our hands to help heal patients. Now it's becoming much more rare rare as pharmaceuticals became the you know the mainstream so most of most dios are just like regular physicians. And don't do any hands on medicine but there's about three percent of dios there's a few of us left that Still still practise Osteopathic Medicine Tradition. And what specifically kind of drew you into that route versus the MD. Route my pain my pain so I originally started as a physical therapy major. I knew who I was a teenager and I saw okay. Well this is helpful. You know maybe I can become a physical therapist chiropractor I was very interested in anatomy and physiology so I was at Cornell. Actually I was going to get my masters in. Pt As an after. I graduated UNDERGRAD and I met A. Do actually while I was there and he adjusted me. He gave me. My first adjustment was again in pain in college already so I was looking for alternative relief and I and I said what what are you doing. You're not a chiropractor he's GonNa. Do and I said you know what's the deal? And he explained to me about osteopathy and he says you're a physician so you can have all the privileges as a physician except you learn how to manipulate and you learn more about anatomy and physiology. So I said sign me up. I changed my major. I became premed and the rest is history. Well that's really cool. And how would you describe your experience working with a patient? That was trying to work with cannabis for the first time. What was that like so for me? It was important having my own experience because I couldn't relate to patients that were naive. You know I was very very Cannabis naive. I didn't know what to expect on my God. My my mother said I would get schizophrenia. Tried cannabis right so so I came from this really big fear factor but for me it was number one was education. You know what what does this mean? Let's break it down to plant medicine plant sciences. What does it mean to even try alternative medicine Doctor Andrew? Weil is one of my mentors so I really looked at at that realm as education. I Acupuncture is a really big part of my practice. I was a researcher at Columbia University. Women's Health Center and we research acupuncture and uterine fibroids. So for me when you think outside the box and you're seeing an MD. The biggest thing is expectations for the patient and education. Yeah Yeah and what were people coming to you To treat or some of the the common things that you're seeing that people are turning to cannabis for I imagine. Pain is one of them. Pain is one of them But also a lot of children actually cheated mostly children in California for the first I would say five to seven years children and these were you know. These are patients that have tried everything you know in me. They've gone through the whole ten different. Md's ten specialists and flew all over the country to different centers from Maryland to Texas to and they've casino the specialist and I was there last hope and they heard that cannabis could work. These were children with epilepsy children with cancer mitochondrial disorders genetic disorders. They came in wheelchairs. There were non ambulatory. They weren't walking. They weren't talking. These are special needs kids and then expanded to adults that were in chronic pain adults with MS ADULTS. Living with FIBROMYALGIA autoimmune diseases. Ls Parkinson's where there really is. No there really is no answer for. Chronic DISEASES. No chronic pain diseases. Yeah and of some of the. Let's focus on the children for just a second because I think that's really important to talk about What What were some of the successes and failures that you experienced working with kids and some of these conditions. The biggest thing with children is an important part of our practices to make sure that there was a team approach and still is so i. I Really WanNa make sure that the child's neurologist the pediatrician The psychiatrist is onboard when they're working with a an integrative physicians such as myself so the having that conversation about cannabis having that conversation with both parents caregivers guardians of the room and the specialists so that they know that. We're all a team here and we're not trying to say get off all your medication. You know it's not the point when they come see someone like me. It's really an integrative. It's the best of both worlds. So that is the number one thing and then working closely with parents because sometimes the spouses are at odds. You might say. I'm full on supporting seeds in cannabis and dad or their will say I'm against it. This is not what I want for my child again. Communication education expectations is is key. And when you ran into those sort of conflicts where you might have parents that disagree with one another or or maybe even Other physicians involved in the Child Care What were some of the key sort of like pieces of education? That would help sort of calm those. Those fears a bit for my colleagues so for other. Md's the biggest thing is sending them research articles talking to them about patient cases. And sometimes I'll go and do grand rounds. You know do a news conference Journal a Journal Club and talk to colleagues on their level. You know what is what's happening on the receptor level things like that and you know. Sometimes they go from Foley arms arms and there I rather just furrowed and they're really angry too like they relaxed their face a little bit. Okay this is not Voodoo. Medicine is actually some science behind it and also to reassure them that I'm working with the parents so they're not off getting something off from who knows where really there is some monitoring. There's charting so I'm charting everything and documenting. Everything might the parents that I work with are keeping journals. So we're no we know how it affects. Iep or how it affects you know. What is the child's teacher saying the speech therapist or ot or pt so we document everything and we monitor them very closely? There's a lot of follow ups at the beginning because I want to make sure that the parents are feeling supported that they're doing it right titrate of dosing making sure there's feedback from all the answer health practitioners as well. Yeah and what were the main modes of administration that most of these kids would use? Where THEY USING? Like tinctures or royal capsules. In the beginning it was just ensures you know the beginning parents were and you know. We're talking more than ten years ago. They're making their own Growing their own if you plan to their own so encountered when your parents were allowed to to grow their own cannabis. That was part of the medical cannabis legalization and they would steep their own sometime smoothies. They make T.'s atom it Times they would put it in ice cubes and you just put it in their juice and the kids juice so parents got creative and parents are very resourceful. Your Your Dad. I'm I'm a mom. So we do anything for our children. And the the forums and support the community was just astounding. Parents found that each other and shared stories and talked about anecdotally. What worked and what didn't work Shared You know sort of this like trusted. Integrative Practitioner List things like that and we all put our heads together and figure it out and tried to learn from each other parent. You know parents patients teach me just as much as I teach them. Yeah and Going into what you just said of like trying to discover what works what doesn't work and obviously that's a a loaded question because it depends on the condition and the person the dose in the you know all these different things but What were some of those lessons that you learned working with all these patients about what typically worked better than others. What forms tended to be better than others? I sort of thing so for the biggest thing for children. It's getting them to take it right. You know and when I when I'm treating special needs kids. They're very sensitive to taste. You know if the a lot of these children are on the same diet because if you veer from texture or taste they just won't eat it so that was the biggest tricky thing. That's why mom's will make the ice cubes. Were they use it or they steeped in tea or they really creative and put it in honey or something like that ice cream even whatever they could So ingestion just getting to the child was big thing and then also timing so some children did better taking it before school. Some children did better after school before therapy even so we really looked at timing of the medicine for seizure children of course rubbing it Some legally gums very helpful or a lot of the MOMS made a suppositories and this was the very beginning making suppositories and seeing if it would work and that was well documented as well so parents creative because when you're when you see your child seizing and this is the only thing that works and they've tried the conventional anti epileptic medicines. They tell ten more families and then ten more families come in right. Yeah and the cannabis that they were using were these TC varieties CD varieties mixture. You know along the spectrum. What were they working with? The there were mixtures. There are measures alone spectrum the very beginning we weren't calling or teach see there's just so many different chemical variants. I helped connect them with different growers different cultivators and we knew this cultivator was able to grow something. That didn't make the kid very sleepy. Rides obviously thc. But that's how we documented in the beginning and as technology changed as more and more things information was made widely available. I mean I use both check for children. It really just depends on what the goals are. What the disease with symptoms symptomology is and also Working with how functional the child is as well. And you mentioned tight ration- I think that's something when I was when I was talking with Wendy. That was something we got into. Because from her experience running a store she noticed that a lot of people are not exposed to That process of trying to find kind of the minimum effective dose. And to know working with so. Can you describe a little bit about you? Know for instance right now with C. Being so popular if people are running out trying to find a product and trying to find a dose. What is that tight? Ration- look look like in. How low do you start and kind of? How much time do you wait to pass before you up the dose? That sort of thing just describe a little bit with that process. Looks like so very different between children and adults actually with the pediatric community? The parents were very familiar with titrate. You know as you know even with your baby tylenol. Everything comes in a liquid and Even with anti seizure medications things like that everything comes into liquid and they knew how to titrate. They knew they know they know how to titrate. They know how to and as a parent if you look at your child and they have this glaze over there. Is You already know? They're sick right. He doesn't take much. Their parents are very intuitive for adults with a little bit. Trickier I think we have higher pain. Tolerance we sort of kind of just power through things so it all. We want instant gratification. And we want that. Cv to work now. You know yesterday the not working right. Yeah exactly so it's easier to work with VDI. Jake's it's easy for adults to to like I don't know really confound variables and things to when they're they're sharing what they're what they're doing and what were the given that children and adults are so different just in lake surface area metabolism. And that sort of thing. I know that in the early days you probably didn't have access to really sophisticated dosage ing data. There weren't even I mean. I'm trying to think of when testing labs really started to come along. I mean Steep Hill was one of the early ones in California. But that's still was not that long ago but based on your experience what are some of those dosage differences between children and adults with children. I'm just thinking of kids. That are my autism patients for example or kids that are self help self injurious behaviors that accumulation of cannabinoid 's can really take a toll on them so parents might notice that things are working really well for the first two three weeks. There's what I call the honeymoon stage and the child is really you know. Even keeled grounded really feels comfortable in their own skin and then all of a sudden it starts to turn at the thirty day mark maybe and you. They noticed that the child is just more hyper. You know the the motor tics sort of pop or the. They just feel like they're a little bit more more handwriting. Even repetitive Echolalia where they're saying things over and over again. That might uptick as well and I find that to be the case as cab annoyed build up in their system so less is more and and I actually find it a little bit harder now than it than it was when I was practicing in California because information is so readily available and there's just there's eight thousand products available so parents are trying all these different products adding this adding that. How come that didn't work? I read on facebook that this brand worked so I tried this brand and I added the point five milliliters another five drops another ten jobs and so it does get muddy but really staying the course and sometimes I have to hand. Hold a lot of a lot of these parents. Just say no. You WanNa stay with zero point two milliliters of this Branford thirty days. You just hang in there. I know I know you're not getting the results that you're getting but we're doing it. Slowly you know talk about sleep hygiene talking to the physical therapist or the speech therapist you know Sir tweaking things that way with adults. It's the same thing you know. Being patient knowing that to decrease inflammation in the body takes time and and I actually really encouraged the adults. Let's let's say we're talking about Chronic pain for instance or even insomnia to to add in exercise. Meditation Sleep Hygiene getting off the computer and electronics to three hours before bed. So it really takes. I would say a lot of other approaches. Not just the cannabis. Yeah exactly and when patients are going through that process and trying to kind of find the I guess sort of like the plateau of therapeutic response. How long do you prefer them to wait? Before you know you would make a judgment about what that cabinet therapies. Actually doing a month a month. Yeah everyone frowns. I mean yeah I mean but that's you know that's really common with you know a lot of other drugs when you're working with the physician and trying to find you know dosage in a Lotta Times. You might only see doctor once a month or so. And that's usually you know kind of how it goes So it's it's not that surprising but I could I could understand that. It's not necessarily the message. A lot of people WANNA hear Because they do want to see those results and you know another thing you you just touched on sort of this Like by phase response that can avenue. It's have that At certain dosages they do one thing but then as they build or as you increase dose or whatever you all of a sudden get to this other side of this curve response curve and you may be having less effect or a negative effect now. I think that's critical. I'm glad you highlighted that. Because that's something that I think needs to be talked about more in the context of Using Cannabis as medicine and I think that's largely a reflection of this is not just the United States. But this kind of mentality that we have of like you know more is better and You know if a little bit was helping than take more and take more and You know we have a sense of tolerance but that phase response is something. I think that we don't necessarily have a large appreciation for and some people when they might be on that other side of the curve. They might think they've just built tolerance and so then they add more and more overcome that. Yeah exactly and I mean and we look at medicine. We do that at the doctor's office when you're being prescribed pressure. Medication or diabetes medication. You come back and you retest. Maybe your sugars aren't quite controlled so will adjust it or your blood pressure. Even antidepressants anti anxiety. Medications doctors will tell you it takes six to eight weeks to see if there's a there's going to be a therapeutic response and if it doesn't work they're going to have to switch to another medication so so same thing with pharmaceutical medications and I know you had have Kevin Spelman on before and I adore him. But we're looking at this plant. That's affecting so many receptors that That's why everyone is so different right. Exactly yeah and as much as we understand now still. Only you know this fraction of a piece of a puzzle that we're trying to piece together. You know the one thing I really enjoy talking to Kevin about in that in that interviews you know about Indo cabinet system and just how complicated it is and that you know we kind of have maybe some general understanding of some of the things that's doing and the other Receptor Systems. It's connected to and all the thing but we're still a long way in this. Came out in my interview with Ethan Russo. As well that we don't have good ways of measuring the system you know. The definition of the system is rapidly expanding as we learn more. And so it's It's really tricky. And sometimes I think there's a perception Especially within the canvas industry in general that you know we know so much and so we should be able to use that information to really target treatments and make super informed decisions and we can definitely make better informed decisions than we ever could But it's just yes. It's not quite there yet. So a lot of it is still trial and error moving slowly trying to control as many variables as you can and proceed with caution absolutely and I. I see a lot of women in my practice now and we have to realize. This doesn't get discussed as often as I would like is that estrogen makes woman a lot more sensitive to cannabis mostly thc so our hormones interact with THC quite a bit and our cycle can influence. How how we feel. And this was documented through researchers at Washington State University. They found that women experience most effects of THC when their estrogen is Pete. Right right peaked beginning to fall so this happens about the day or two before you ovulate so day twelve today. Fourteen or so and this interaction makes us more sensitive to the compound in general but it also actually gives us more pain relieving effects compared to two males but also we actually can develop more tolerance to the THC compared to men so for women. I actually when they come into my office. I will look at their cycle or non cycle. So I'll look at their estrogen progesterone levels L. S. H. levels levels and I will actually create a game plan and I will dose them based on their cycle so they take a little bit more or less depending on where they're at and it's important I you know we're we're not represented in studies As as ethnicity different minorities or even as a female which is unfortunate but I do take that into account when I see female patients. That's really great to hear. That was exactly what where I was going to go next. There's very little disgust issue in biomedical research. In general that a lot of the way that we've come to think about Pharmacology physiology is based on research and men and it doesn't translate You know I mean some does but you know. Obviously there are big differences and these armorial differences drive all sorts of nuanced differences in pharmacokinetics. And things that really needs to be talked about more. I mean there's so many issues with biomedical research right now. So this one. So the underrepresentation between ethnic groups and sexes and that's where thing But then also we have a reproducibility problem too. So there's a lot of biomedical research. That's been done that. We're having trouble reproducing and it's a great time to have a lot of humility. I think when it comes to to medicine literally right at percent. I'm so glad you said that. I mean when you when we get sick you're GONNA take the same Z pack. I am bright right. So why aren't we dose differently based on our way our ethnicity based on our metabolism right? Yeah exactly and are just just hit. Several of the big Ways that cannabis can affect women differently than men are really just depending on a person's hormonal levels regardless of how they identify Are there any other big differences that you've noticed in how people react to cannabis differently that you think people should be aware about actually ethnicity is a big thing? I've noticed in my clinical data that different ethnic groups depending on genetic makeup and where their ancestors are from will react differently to Cabinet medicine so Hispanic population. Asian population seemed much more sensitive to lights. And so I mean it's interesting because I'm I'm looking at the data that I have and I I would definitely want to utilize this at and figure out where our maybe maybe we can brainstorm off line but but really think about how. This plant is working from demographic point of view. Yeah I that's something that I have. I don't know if I've heard anyone really bring much attention to that at all. So that's super super fascinating and something that yeah. We really need to look at and once again. This is one of those things where cannabis sort of leads into these discussions about medicine. Broadly but you know this is research that needs to happen across the board Analyses of large data sets that clinicians. Have and try to understand how different people are reacting to things differently and how we can drive medicine towards a much more individualized targeted approach rather than how we've been operating since you know. I don't know the fifties where we basically take Averages of Medical Research and we apply therapies according to Sort of an average sample population. That doesn't even exist in the world. You know you're always dealing with people that are bringing unique things to the to the table So that's yeah that's excellent to hear when someone comes to you. And they want to engage. Cannabis. What are some of the things that you screen for? That could be problematic like other like certain medical conditions. They may have that. Wouldn't react favorably cannabis or other medications. You know contraindications. You're worried about that sort of thing. Yeah so medications is a big thing because most of the patients that come to me are on a lot of men's rights you because you've already tried all these different things and All your specialists have tried to throw the kitchen sink at you. You know. So they they might be on antidepressants for chronic pain. Such as Simba for example the same thing I see a lot and Patients are trying to get off of the a lot of these medications so I don't recommend just going cold Turkey and getting off of these medications because your body's biochemistry has changed. Your brain biochemistry has changed. So if you've been on banjos antidepressants. If you've been on these pain medications you know for your condition for a very long time. You know just have hazard the adding cannabinoid medicine or even other nutro-ceuticals other other supplements can be a really dangerous thing. So I make sure that I look at the Medication List Cross Reference. It and sometimes patients have to really wait and I start to wean patients off with their specialist. So I don't I don't take patients off medication on my own. I make sure to work with their MD as well and help them. We not the medication. And then we fold in the cannabis medicine or some of the other. Integrative therapies very very carefully taking into account the withdrawals both physical and emotional withdrawal. And sometimes we have to compound the medications so for instance I'm trying to think of one That's actually really Ambien is one. Let's see we have to sometimes compound the medications? So they're taking. I mean you can only break the tablets so much right before just like mustard powder exactly. Sometimes we'll compound into a liquid form and help them wean off that caught up in. That's what I'm thinking of. Quantum can take patients one or two years to get off of so. We'll we'll create it into a liquid formula with a compounding pharmacy and drip drip drip drip and getting them off little by little. As we fold in the cannabis medicine and have you encountered Any examples of Adverse reactions between cannabis and someone's pharmaceuticals. Maybe even before they came to see you because they maybe didn't have that advice at the time when they started drawing yes so so cabinets can work on you know serotonin levels and if they're on other medications also affect that patients will feel much more anxious. Patients might have increased panic attacks. They might feel more restless And just feel uneasy. They always say I feel like I'm crawling out of my skin. I did something wrong. I took too much you or they're not spacing it apart with the medications or supplements some. Those patients are on four or five different supplements as well that they think. Oh it's natural. Show just take everything at once. And that's not a good idea either so so we really try to break it down for patients. So it's much more manageable and cost effective because that's a big thing as well as you know. Cbs's Dean Cannabis is very expensive. Nutraceutical are expensive than they had their prescription medications on top of that. And then they do all these other therapies as well so we look at everything from a practical perspective. Yeah absolutely and what was your changing gears a little bit here. But what was your experience like going from California's medical cannabis system to New York medical cannabis system. When you moved. What were the difference in? What was that transition like? Well there's definitely pros and cons in California was a free for all their a dispensary a on every corner more dispensaries than starbucks imagine so it was very difficult I had a few of my favorite dispensaries preferred dispensaries where the staff was wonderful and they supported my patience throughout the process. But in the beginning I would actually talk to these dispensaries and say okay. My patients are GONNA come in. Give you a heads up. You know without disclosing kept full. Hicfa Hypno- rules but giving them a heads up my patients coming and this is what we would like to try. Not Try some of the really good dispensaries. Were very respectful of of that and worked as a team. Some of them weren't and was just trying to push product than just move things off the shelf in New York it's very different in New York. Every dispensary has a pharmacist interesting. Every dispensary has a pharmacist. And every thing you pick up is logged into the prescription monitoring program and this is the same prescription monitoring program is if you saw your family practitioner and they prescribed medication for you like Ambien or some pain meds. They would log it in so when you go to. Cvs or Walgreens to pick it up CVS and walgreens log in and sees that you have cannabis as well that you picked it up from the dispensary. So we're all looking at the same database. Wow so that they know that you didn't pick up too much and the pharmacists dispensaries here. In New York will say. Hey wait a minute. You're on blood. Thinners you're on you know Oxycontin and then you just picked up cannabis. There's some. There's some poly pharmacy going on here. There might be some issues and the pick up the phone and they'll call me so there is some accountability and cross-reference so it is a very robust medical system in that sense. But it's very cross cost prohibitive here in New York it's about. I would say two to three times. The Price California easily. Yeah Yeah and that's such a shame when you have you know some of these patients being children that are already on. You know sometimes really expensive medications or like the elderly and the poor. You know that Are already struggling to pay for for healthcare and then to have something like this that theoretically could be really cheap But you know making less accessible. That's disappointing but it is exciting to hear about a medical system. That where they're treating cannabis just like any other medicine or drug you know and that there's that shared Information and that you can catch things like that that there's It's more precautionary approach. I guess And that's that's Exciting to see. I'm I'm not familiar. With New York's canvas laws in general. So what are the conditions that New York will approve? Somebody for for medical cannabis right. So there's epilepsy There's PTSD chronic pain. Which is a big umbrella. Term Hunter Hayden could incorporate many different disease states a less Parkinson's disease which is Crohn's Colitis etc also substance abuse actually the abuse so patients that are trying to win off. Opiates are qualified as well. there's a there's a good amount autism is not on there no but You know patients with chronic pain that could be migraine. That could be pelvic pain round. That could be arthritis and like for example the cost of going back to 'cause I have a patient who is seven and he has seizures. He had about one hundred seizures easily a day and he is controlled now with canvas. The seizures maybe. He has a handful a month now but they spend about three grand a month. Yeah they spent about three grand a month on the on cannabis. Wow and what's your experience been regarding the getting more into like more modern work that you're doing where you've actually got this data but So there's this debate around you know isolated cabin weights versus quote unquote broad spectrum versus full spectrum. Which these terms aren't even really define said depending on who you talk to. They mean different things but Have you had any Have you noticed anything? Any trends. Between different types of cannabis products and their efficacy and Sort of the dosages Steph. And the reason I ask is because I've had some other clinicians. Tell me that. From their experience they feel that they're able to use lower dosages and get a fewer negative side effects with canned products. That have a broader phytochemicals diversity in them versus those that are very you know either isolated or distillates and stuff that have you know a very narrow range of of chemistry in them. Do you have any thoughts on that? Yeah so for me. of course full spectrum Seems to get a little more mileage. I find that the efficacy of full spectrum is a lot a goes along the way for patients and they spend actually less money because they need less over time I think with isolates patients tend to need a little bit more You know going back to that single molecule right. So you're pulling you're pulling this out of the plant the full plant and taking it out of context so you may not get all the benefits But I can see why isolates are used in food and beverage things like that for taste or if it's harder to standardize a full spectrum plant right so you know the same. Qr In Florida Will look different than that. Seed in New York or California right. You'RE NOT GONNA get the same thing so I can see why Certain industry professionals are more comfortable with isolates but I think full spectrum Spectrum is better. Yeah yeah well. You're another one to the list. Pretty much every clinician. I've talked to has has shared the same thing. I'm I'm yet to find anybody that has had a more positive experience with isolated canaveral. It's then full specter. Well I think we can all agree that we just need more research right and this research really needs to focus on the fundamental understanding of what's going on with the whole plant. Not just selecting out these individual molecules like. You're like we know what we're doing because we don't go and the and the thing is we're still looking at this field from disease target kill model. That thing allopathic were still looking at this from this. Allopathic reductive approach. Which is separating disease in two parts. Right we're still separating it we feel good about separating things by element and element and component. When we see the doctor. You're going to your endocrinologists. And then you're gonNA fall in different neurologist and all these doctors are not talking to each other because they're operating in separate silos so it's it's the thing with cannabinoid medicine and it's a disservice you know really. There's this whole universe of Regenerative Medicine Nutritional Medicine Preventive Integrative Medicine and we're not talking about that. Yeah no absolutely in this sort of segues into a really broad topic that I wanted to talk to you about is just alike these Plant based or even fungal based medicines in general in your mind sort of stepping back and looking at healthcare as a whole How do you conceptualize medicinal plants and those sort of things And maybe even To an extent to certain dietary supplements and stuff that are you know. Basically medicinal some of them medicinal plants that are just kind of ground up and capsulize but How does that fit in your mind of the whole picture of Healthcare broadly? Well it's it's goes back to what Kevin Spelman talked about in systems. Biology approach by. This is really again a wake-up care to our health system when we look at evidence based medicine you know it really overemphasizes randomized. Double Blind clinical control trials. It's look as the final quarter of clinical decision making when you look at Americans I mean more than forty percent of US belong to again a racial or ethnic minority. So what are these differences in genomes? How do we take a closer look at these these patients and how are they participating in these clinical trials? There's actually something really interesting. I want to bring up the. Nih actually has something. I'll send you the link. It's called all of us. Research Program talks about precision medicine. And I think this is the future of medicine. It's looking at all of us to participate into this database if you will and it's basically contributing your blood tests urine saliva test DNA test and they're looking at this database to start looking at. How do we get more precise medicine? You know going back to that. Deepak analogy you. Know why when you get bronchitis or you get a cold flu. Why are you going to take the same Z? Pack as I'M GONNA take. It might not work well and I think this is where plant medicine can really take. Hold as well because precision. Medicine can take into account plant based medicine and holistic healing. Yeah absolutely something. I'd like to see from you know maybe that would come from the FDA but some sort of better way of Studying in a sophisticated clinical way. How Medicinal Plants Can Be utilized in you know any particular treatment modality in other countries in some countries. They have a specific sort of pathway. You could get natural products approved as medicines and it's it's a lot harder in the United States. I don't know that I'd say it's impossible. But it is very difficult and it costs a lot of money and a lot of time and because of that. It's not worth it for a lot of companies to try to you. Know create some basic standardized botanical extract and. Try to get that approved as a medicine when they could go further and get some isolated compounds create a very unique formulation. That has a much stronger patent on it. You know that they can run with for ten years or whatever. Exactly there's just there's not enough studies on plant pharmacogenetics and we just we need to look at really Geno. Mix More to I mean for one big thing that I see in my clinic is that African Americans and Puerto Ricans for example. They don't respond well to common asthma. Asthma Controller medications as well as as other other ethnic groups. So this might you know this is something we might think about when we talk about plant pharmacogenetics you know. Maybe there's something in the genome that we need to take out so we don't overprescribe exactly. Yeah that's the future of Medicine. It's looking at these different. I mean we. We don't know anything right. Yup Yup well. There's you know that classic idea that I try to bring up time and time again but you know the more you learn and the more you study usually what happens is you start to learn how much you don't know you know. And and that's to me. That's what wisdom is recognizing. You know your own sort of boundaries and recognizing that there is you know Kevin put it well this dark information dark data pharmacology that we just don't understand and and looking at studies you know in-vitro or even you know wrote in in Vivo models. They just they. Don't give us the full picture and something as An interview released recently with Jason Miller is a traditional Chinese medicine. Practitioner he was talking about the difference between efficacy ineffectiveness research. And you know that going to something you said just a little bit ago that will most research is targeted on disease. What drugs can influence a disease in a particular way not what treatment modalities as a whole might lead to a better outcome for a person because yeah you might knock out that disease. But what's going to be the consequence for that person's wellbeing you know then you know long into the future and everything and that was something I really resonated with. When he said that is absolutely like our star focus has been. We've had such an extreme tunnel vision on disease and not overall patient care and wellness in its totality. Exactly there's no talk about prevention. What about the terrain? That's reading the disease you know. Why is it certain? There's certain people that will be more prone to cancer than others right so we need to look at Medicine from this preventative perspective. And you know we don't talk about that in healthcare because we there's no time and you know. My colleagues are seeing thirty patients a day. It's a factory it. Maybe you have five minutes with your doctor and you can't get all your questions in and you're going to have to wait until the next visit which is going to be two months from now. Well yeah and I know just for my own experience that I'll have questions thought of that. I WANNA ask my doctor when I go in. And then in the moment when they say so. Do you have any other questions? I'm like I don't remember you know and then you get home and you're like Dang. I wish I would've asked this and that and you know at that's such a common experience I think for so many people and you know when you're in the room and you know maybe the physicians sharing some new information with you and so you're processing that and trying to remember you know it's just it's hard when you've only got like ten minutes maybe a facetime and that's it it's it's yeah it's really really hard going back to the thing about your interactions with patients when they're coming in and kind of getting on their purse their perspective. What are some of the most common questions that you received from patients about cannabis and And this leads into another question. I have about Sort of common misconceptions. We'll start just with sort of the common questions you receive about cannabis. The biggest thing is most patients wanting to come in as wanting to use them. You know throughout the day and at night as well they wanna be able to use something without being impaired. Ram. I think that's the biggest thing you know. Everyone is working. Everyone's they might not have nine to five but they're doing stuff at home they're they're taking care of their own parents or their children or friends. So it's impairment. That's the thing they come in. They say okay. I need something for X Y and Z. But I don't WanNa be impaired. Yeah and have you identified sort of some ideal? Cbd THC RATIOS THAT HELP. People avoid feeling impaired most patients then take cd or preceding dominant. Formula are not impaired but there are patients that do take. Cd that feel impaired. And that's usually the same patients that are sensitive to advil for example and so the I'll just have them switch and had them take it during the evening but microdosing is the biggest thing. If you're taking cabinet medicine maybe the first couple of weeks you feel different. You might feel a little bit groggier but over time your body gets used to it and you feel less of those side effects. Yeah Yeah exactly. And so leading into the next question. What are some of the most common misconceptions that sometimes you have to confront when either either from patients that come in and sort of have a rough understanding? And maybe it's not quite aligned with reality or from your colleagues. Potentially that have misconceptions about cannabis and its its role in. Canvas. What are some of those that you run into a lot of? I think with all the hype and you know. This is really unprecedented. There's nothing in the world. That's taken both recreationally medicinally so I think a lot of patients come in thinking. This is going to be it. This is going to be the end. All be all and they have really high expectations of working because of everything they've read online and my neighbor took it and she's free of cancer now or know stops the Parkinson's tremor so it must be able to stop fibromyalgia pain too so It doesn't work for everything and everyone. It's not that silver bullet of you really have to do other things in combination with the canal medicine. Yeah yeah absolutely. And would you say? That's maybe Kinda wanted the big things that you wish. Everyone knew about cannabis before. Engaging is that it's not a silver bullet absolutely absolutely and you might not find one. Product will work you know forever so I usually have. Patients like pick two to three different favourite cannabis products that work or close to working and they switch off. You know every quarter because our body gets sensitized to it you know and I always compare this to allergy medication. You might find that. Zertec WORKS FOR ONE SEASON. And then you gotTA switch over to. Claritin Right and same thing with your ECHINACEA vitamin C. Or your magnesium. You need to take you know. Take a break and switch off the good thing about you know. Our system is that we can exercise increase. Our Nando might levels we can get acupuncture massage and our levels will increase so there are different things that we can do with cabinet medicine so yeah yeah absolutely and What is something throughout your experience with patients that has surprised you either an outcome or however you want to think about that question but you know you've been doing this awhile now Do you have any examples of some things that went differently than you expected or That an outcome came about that. You really learned a lot from that kind of surprised you. What's what's really surprising and really refreshing. Is that patients that might not have been into holistic or integrative medicine when they try cannabis and it works gum. It's really empowering for them. For the first time they feel like I can take control of my health. Like I can have this conversation where it does a little bit and then I can do other. And it really opens their mind. I think for integrative medicine implant medicine and these are patients that have been on ten medications their whole life and keep going back to the doctor and says okay yes. I will take this new med one. Another medication yes. And they're very compliant and obedient but when they've had enough and they've tried cannabis and it works and they start to get off the other medications they find very empowering they find that like. Oh my God like I don't I don't have to rely on pharmaceuticals having that conversation about nutrition and exercise is very empowering because they don't have to rely on going to the MD and writing that next script. Yeah Yeah and that's something that Has Been really exciting for me to on the sort of the educator side is seeing you know when I teach somebody about The cannabis plant and the chemistry. How it affects the body all these sort of things and And then I can use that as a stepping stone to say oh and then. There's these other plants that have these similar compounds and act similarly then it's like Whoa didn't realize you know that. Echinacea has these alkaline that interacting cabinet system in Turkey till mushrooms. The polysaccharide peptide is interactive and flavonoids. In general a lot of them are you know tugging on that and You know that Beta carry off lean inches in so many plant oils. Black Pepper's the most common one that gets talked about but like Oh that's now sort of being thought of as a cannabinoid you know it just opens this doorway into appreciating food and medicinal plants in a totally different way that for whatever reason they just weren't able to you know there was sort of this invisible wall that they couldn't get past to see how very real all of all of those dynamics are And that's that's something that gives me a lot of fulfillment as an educator is like yes like you're going beyond cannabis now and that's I've mentioned before that you know this podcast and the work that I do. It's really a Trojan horse to talk about these other areas of health and wellness. And and I I al- also followed that up by saying I'm not the best example of someone taking care of their health. I do what I can. But there's plenty I'm deficient on. So I have the Educator Syndrome of like do as I say not as I do please but Cardi Cigarette Right. It is about plants and it's like all right. I'm running low on time. GotTa grab some fast food. I was at shake shack with my kids. The other side. I saw a patient hard. Exactly I know right. We're all human. There's only so much we can do. But you're right. You're right and it's exciting. It's exciting to see when people can connect those dots and start to see. You know coming all the way back around to like this. Integrative medicine approach to see their movement and their diet and supplements you know the tea they drink all of these things as being part of health care and something. I've mentioned before in another interview but we at least it seems like it's changing now and we talked about this earlier that a lot of times we grow up thinking that you know you eat food stay alive you take supplements if you have a nutritional deficiency of some sort and you take drugs to get better from illness and such a weird broken model That's it's GonNa take time culturally for us to kind of get past that but I knew as a kid. That's what I sort of absorbed from what I was taught and exposed to and then I got older. It's like Dang Okay. This is all totally wrong. The great thing is that you have platforms like this to educate and to each so so many so many people. And there's wonderful practitioners ancillary practitioners. I mean you have Janet Champagne epigenetics nurse. Practitioners nurses health coaches chiropractors match paths. Ironic medicine plant. Plant a specialist. You know look at Calvin on my gosh knows a lot more than your normal. Md Yeah so you don't have to go to your md all the time. I mean there's all these great resources that are at your fingertips right. Yeah Yeah exactly and I guess so to get into another question I wanted to ask you is on. This is the topic of resources. What are some of your preferred learning resources regarding cannabis? Oh my goodness well. I have this resource. Oh my gosh. You're making blood. There's there's some really great resources out there. It's the also the thing is there's also misinformation right so a lot of A lot of cut and paste We're sort of echoing the same thing but there's there's some really great resources I I'll I'll send you a link and maybe you can put it in your show notes. Yes absolutely yeah. That'd be great but something. I always try to tease out of my guests to try to understand what you found most valuable and try to connect people to that that'd be great And now taking a step back and looking at sort of Canada science and canvas research as a whole What sort of interests you the most? And what do you hope to see? From the future of cannabis research will my goodness ally question a huge question. I mean for the thing about thing about research especially for plant. Medicine is that not everything is going to fit into a box and I just had this conversation with Kevin a couple of weeks ago and we're trying I mean the thing about the thing about research is that research has to be double blind. Research HAS TO BE RANDOM CONTROLLED. And then what are you gonNa make of a plant that has different compounds that you can't standardize so it's almost like mother. Nature's laughing at US right. Yeah Yeah and then you look at the different receptors. There's I there's a really great receptor map that I use in my presentations of the and how different different final cannabinoid effect. And there's just it's just scattered everywhere you can't it's like we're where blip there's no way to wrap your head around it and that goes back to Dr Pharmacology. I mean look thing about plant medicine. There's there's no way to wrap your head around this research and that's why I Talked about that. Nih Platform because we if we can contribute the different information the genomics our blood our urine our DNA. We can really look at precision medicine. Individualized medicine and that's not what we have right now. Yeah Yeah and it makes me wonder you know if we're in the situation where were sort of like a bacteria trying to understand a human you know like there's this barrier to understanding that you can just like really never get across and it makes me wonder if and I mean I know to an extent this is true that you know the role of Ai and machine learning is going to become really invaluable to help us Try to extend that sort of boundary that we have to work with. Because you're right. There's so much data so much information. There's no one human brain that's going to be able to synthesize all of that and digest it and then work with it It's I think it's going to take some help From something beyond what what we're capable of and maybe that's a good role for a and healthcare is like this. Nih data-gathering Initiative to get all this data together in one place where it can be you know manipulated and analysed and everything and then maybe we sick the AI bots on it and then try to figure out what wisdom they can pull out of it and teach us Because otherwise I mean. Can you imagine how much time it just time alone? Not You know. I don't know if you're like me like any study I read. You know you've got to read it Multiple Times. Try to like understand the pieces. You missed and how things fit together and you know so just the time alone is an impossible feat for anyone to overcome exactly and I mean in the important thing to know as we scale up is that you know we can't simply based on data either. You know there's a there's a sweet spot and how do we use is successfully all right? So we're not. We're not looking at false correlations but you don't understand what's happening behind it so I think I think I think that's the future. Yeah yeah that's such a good point to bring up there are. There are things to our human experience that we're not gonNA be able to quantify that is going to be able to to pick from so finding that blend and maybe that's when we upload our consciousnesses robots and so we can make the ultimate doctors but yeah absolutely. There's there's a balance there for sure. And they're they're things to our experience and wisdom and things that you know is not going to be able to overcome so yeah absolutely well I don't want to keep you too much longer. You've already been very gracious with your time. We've been going for almost an hour and fifteen minutes now but I wanted to ask you if there's you know in the last several minutes that we have here. Is there anything that we haven't talked about that? You'd like to get into and if so let's do it and if not then I'll just kind of hand the platform over to you to talk about anything regarding how people can learn more about your work and Contact you or anything else you WANNA share. Can you now thank you? This is so much fun. I've enjoyed it at the time. I know we can talk for hours. I know but we covered a lot of really great pertinent information. I definitely would love to get back on. Maybe in a few months and see if things have changed and we can chat again but patients can find me get Dr June Chin Dot Com D. R. June Chen Dot Com. Perfect awesome. Well ONCE AGAIN. Thank you so much and yeah. I definitely would love to reconnect with you. And at some point I'M GONNA make my way out to New York and then we'll have to procreate and get your family over here. Yeah Yeah we're determined. It's just a matter of time so sounds good. Well thanks so much and For those of you listening or watching. If you WANNA learn more about curious about cannabis you can go to see a sea. Podcast DOT COM. And you'll find all the episodes as well as links to like our youtube and Oliver Social media platforms around facebook instagram and twitter. And thanks so much for listening and tuning in. And I'll talk to you soon. Thanks bye bye. If you WANNA learn more about cannabis you can check out the curious about Canada's book available now on Amazon Dot Com and other online retailers. The curious about cannabis podcast is presented by natural learning enterprises a science education company dedicated to the enhancement of public scientific literacy through education about the natural world. Curious about cannabis is just one of several learning initiatives produced by natural learning enterprises to learn more go to www dot natural learning enterprises dot com or connect with me on facebook instagram or twitter.

cannabis medical cannabis Pain Medications California Md United States Regenerative Medicine Nutritio Jason Miller Dr. Jun Chen autoimmune disease spondylitis Canada AIDS New York Wendy researcher Kevin Spelman marijuana
ID3 Tags Do Not Boost SEO for Your Podcast

Ask the Podcast Coach

1:00:46 hr | 1 year ago

ID3 Tags Do Not Boost SEO for Your Podcast

"Ask The podcast coach for July Eleventh Two thousand and twenty less year. There it is, it's that music means it is Saturday morning. It's time for asked the podcast coach. Where you get your podcast. Questions answered live I'm Dave Jackson from the School of Podcasting, Dot Com joining me right over there, the one and only Jim Colson from the average Guy Dot TV Jim. How's it going? Buddy earnings. Dave happy Saturday morning. A little scratchy I think it's a maybe it's allergies or something. You know it's that time of the year. A little scratchy voice this morning, so as podcasters right? We gotta learn to kind of push it too hard. When you get the because you can, you can really. Yeah. I know. I right now. In hopped up on ibuprofen. Generic kind I have a weird thing going on where I am not sleeping well and keep waking up. Why been sleeping on my stomach, which is not good for me and I? Wake up and I'm just like in so. Yeah, you're that well. You know what what's good for both. It's right. It's time for the morning tour morning. Poor brought to you by podcast branding dot Co, if you're looking to basically look great in general, whether that's your podcast, art, work or a website, or if you have an e book cover anything you need, mark has got you covered. He's an award winning graphic artist for thirteen years. He's a podcast her and the other thing is. He's a really cool guy. Going to give you a the scenes stuff. He's the guy that not only designed the logo behind me. The school podcasting one I have A. A new show grow your community and he's. We showed it here on the show, and I went to make the first artwork for my first official episode, and I was like Oh this would work so good if I didn't have the hands and the little paper dolls things I could put the and I just said Hey I. Don't know if I need to pay unions like. Can I get them version this with just grow your community at the top and he was nice enough to do that, so I duNno I kinda go! That's a revision. Probably paid for that, but he was a a super nice guy. The other thing is you know that Marcus actually the guy that's designing your arm work. We talked about that last week with some. What do you call that fraud I guess I. Prefer Odd. Yeah, when people are saying that's I. Did this you I know you didn't so? Check him out over podcast branding dot co and let him know that Jim and Dave sent so. No I don't want any false advertising. either. Maybe coffee's not good for you for you. Good for me, not good for you and your. CICA, Ivy profiling coffee. It's good to know, but. Yeah, it's. Feel better man I is just one of the things I'm. Kicks in but man in the morning. It's weird things like this like looking down in Kinda turning my neck, but the good thing is, it's raining here and I was so glad because a I have to do my taxes today and be. I can't go ride my bike, so that's. Keeps you forces? You indoors keeps you that way not to things to two tough things on a podcast. One is if you're not sleeping well. Like I know I just don't do my best work. Yeah, I don't I. Don't talk as well I don't produce as well I. Don't edit as well. I don't I just don't. It's tough when you're when you're exhausted. I have stopped doing the late late night podcast at just because of that like once I start getting tired I'm like you know what I'm. I'm done. I can't yeah. I can't do this anymore. I need to be rested. kind of when I do that. It just kind of throws you off your game. You know and so think that rest is I. I've said on the show here. I have trouble sleeping as well in. It's gotten better. I ironically weirdly has gotten better during the pandemic. Man When I'm not sleeping while it's tough, so. Get Get your sleep. Get your rest. I think it's really important as podcasters that we we don't. We don't get on the microphone. 'cause you get kind of angry to. Randy says well, that explains why not do anything. Granny's amazing he he gets like an hour asleep at night, somehow still functions. He does like I can't do that. I would've I I. Didn't think you're you're you're a better man than me? I had a randy moment where I woke up at three in the morning. And could not go back to sleep till about six. When is when I usually kind of almost think about getting up and it was just like. It's weird where Sometimes you just can't turn your brain off, so that's always fun, yeah! Well I mean there's lots of things that can cause that right Fiz besides physical ailments, right and just distress anxiety I mean. Not I mean the world's pretty calm right now, so I don't know anybody who's worried. I was. I was talking to Harry Duran yesterday and Stanley just because I hadn't you know it's like hey, norm I would have seen you once or twice. In Nevada, but like why don't we get zoom in touch base and Hairy Natalie. You're in Minneapolis like they're. They're like Oh. Yeah that stuff you're seeing on the news. That's about five blocks that way and I was like. Man That's that's kind of crazy, crazy crazy time. Yeah, but crazy crazy. Yeah, I. Do want to say I want WanNa take credit for a story James Crinoline. Let me throw this in the Chat Room I. So many people obsess over eighty-three three tags, and I was kind of like an incessant much eighty-three. Three tax ID tags for SEO now. If you're new eighty-three I was used the analogy of a tree, cut down a tree. You look at the rings on the inside. It'll tell you a little bit about the life of the tree. If you cut open an MP three file, you'll see I three tags and i. kind was like how I can't connect the dots that. Google, somehow looking inside an MP three file to boost SEO and so James Kremlin mentioned that in a facebook group and he did a test in basically came to the conclusion that No, they don't help Seo there. He and he was making a joke of like they work rate on your Rio P. Three player. He goes. But the SEO no, the. The! The only time I had a real I remember that before I had Oh, an eye, river, I rivers were big back in two thousand, six, zero great, because it was an MP three player, and you could plug a microphone into it and record, so it was. Or throat at somebody and kill them. It's like a brick. Big Big box box. The big box I had one that was about the size of my thumb. I want to say it had like two hundred and fifty six K. of memory in it, so you could make technically yeah, when I say gigs. K.. K Yeah Yeah that would be nothing yeah. But you know you could throw. Twenty songs on it or whatever and at eleven yards yeah, well an MP threes. Were you know I remember this is ninety, seven, ninety, six, ninety seven, when the MP three, Kinda was getting more and more popular, and I remember people ripping those things. It took him like an album would take a whole day, terrip. Tell Ya all day. You, know Coach Dave here says electron devices are distractions. And were killing me. I switched to a writing tablet. No led lights and a big difference in sleep I have I did the thing now on the computer? Where I'm always? It's always weird when all of a sudden my screen stars to turn orange. And it's something we blew light or whatever in that. Mode, yeah, I kinda like that because it otherwise you know there are times I remember when I was growing up and I was in my twenties and I built this little recording studio in my basement I remember one night I was just down there and you know programming drum machines, and all this other stuff and I looked up. It was like four fifteen in the morning and I was like wait. How did that happen? You know and I I. Don't do it quite to that extreme, but there are times when I've looked up on. My weight is to thirty I should be in bed, and so by having my screen start to change colors I'm like Oh, it's getting close to. Time. I should probably wrap up whatever I'm doing. I, I have a I'm used some home automation. Turn off this light above me at a certain time of the night. As a reminder, right, it just goes off and say okay. I need to get you know that's the that is the by the way that's the last straw for me like when that goes off. I know it's it's like okay. Get up, no matter what you're doing. Get up and go to bed because it's like Dave I'm Sean MP three tag. It can pop up really quick Oh what I could never figure out back to this MP3 discussion. Right and show you got these. You've got these various file name. Artists right album artist. What are people jamming in here that that? They think they're getting s like which I. I don't see anything. In comments, right, I don't see anything in here is. Jamming in here well, usually it's the title the author, but especially the comments. They think comments like they'll jam keywords in their comments and things like that, but the other thing. That's just kind of odd about it is again. This was a big deal probably up through I. Don't know two thousand eight. Maybe I forget what apple just quit using them. And I'm always and I mean they're. They're intense like I need to update. My ID tags like I'm missing out on Seo when I was like I. Don't think you are well. Why can't they just update? Why can't they use a tool like MP3 tag and updates them and push them forward I would. What's the big? What's the big deal it's? That's well. It's it's not so much how to do. Ninety three tag is is the fact that they just feel. They're missing out on SEO bringing. Yeah and I'm always like well. You can like with Lipson and blueberry. You can actually click a button, and it will add the tags for you based on what you have in your episode so I was always like customer like I'll just click that button and click publish. It'll middle push righty three tags right in there, and they're like yeah, but I need to enter it in the key words and I might No, no, no, you don't like. Yeah, so that's always. It was just saying that I'm always like. I don't think so I think you're. And they're just. That's the thing it's. It's a they're doing it for. Seo Stuff and then be there just intense like like if I don't get this in in the next ten minutes. I'm going to quit my podcast and the my. well that MP3 tag really makes it easy by the way if you update this morning I was uploading my podcast and I noticed last week or two weeks ago I think it was two weeks ago. When I post I I must have been sleep in her hammered or something I had I'd move some titles around of stuff. It was just a mess so I just went back in and fixed it, and then he just load all three, and over item on your on your server, and you're done, and so that that MP three tag has just been in I. I include him just because I think. I think it's the right thing to do to have the title and copyright some other stuff information in there i. don't obsess about it. It's something I do. Something I've always included. It's in my workflow so I just do it. I. Don't put much in there I. Don't think anybody's GonNa. Find it that way, but inaccurately. Download the file. Yeah, which I'm do then they have all the information. They need to populate whatever player they're using. That's IT I. Always put in the author. Will the the name of the podcast the name of the episode the episode number. The author is is in this case gave Jackson College Colson, and then the comments light. It's like for more information. Go to ask the podcast coach Dot. com slash three two in this case. That's a good idea. And that's it really you know Dan says and chat room. He goes I. Don't use spotify, but I had a listener mentioned the artist tag on my show wasn't there. That might be based on the author field. In whatever your media host is whatever you use to make your feed, so I used that button on Lipson now but wasn't aware players like spotify. Even use them. Yeah, that's a new one off to look I. don't I didn't know that they did the only thing I know right now. That uses them is overcast uses the image that's it. Everything else is coming from your your feed, but usually the. The artist is based on the author field. So I think it's good practice like. Regardless of who use where the US in power presser your engine, Lipson to populated, or whatever that if you have a blank field I spent a little time figuring out like wh. What's IT intended for? Because they probably didn't program for no reason like it's probably there because it populates somewhere, you know you might WanNa 'cause I. I know like if you're gonNA, Power Press and all the different options. You have to fill out stuff eventually like enough. I can't. I can't put any more information. This thing you know. I'm just GONNA lead a blank. You might I could be okay. You know, but in like, in this case where spotify issues and I want to do just a little bit of research just to make sure you're taking advantage of all the fields were just found out that in its new because it's a new service. I'm using pod page for some of my podcasts, and this is that tool where you just basically submit your rss feed and build a website it. It's actually pretty cool and But, in Lipson, and in power press, there's always a subtitle field and I'll be I I cannot find where that shows up anywhere I. I know one point. If you were in apple itunes and you hovered over the I button. It might show I. Mean you really had to dig for? And I don't know that it's being used anywhere. It's still there but pod pages now using that as kind of like a little baby summary, and I'm like Oh, I need to put something in their net show back in there and yeah, that's a good. Good I think it's a good idea to spend early. Spend some time researching. Yeah, the working cows podcast is podcast. Addict uses the images well there. You go so I know there's a few in in I'm with you Jim Mike. It takes all of two seconds to add the ID three tags especially. Jim showed me the cool trick if you're using. WHAT DOES IT MP3 tag? Yeah? The only showed. Yeah is you can right click on your last episode and go copy tag then click on the file. That doesn't have any tags. Go Pace Tags, so it gives you all the tags from last week while the author, the name of the episode that stays the same, so you just change the title and the episode number in anything else in the comments and you're good to go so super fast. I spend twenty seconds on ninety-three tax, so I don't even know you know you're in fact so bad. Sometimes you know. I try to update the copyright information to keep the year or in some cases you know it has a year field. And I've gone two or three months like the yours changed, and it's gone two or three months of the old year in there because I. don't even check it I just copy paste change. The episode number changed the title. Christmas I love the point you made Dave where you generally said that you never know if one day they do use this data and only takes a few minutes. Yeah, 'cause in the same way that one day we just woke up and guess what nobody's using these anymore and we're like what. They might just someday go. Hey, you know what it'd be cool for used those things again so I just keep putting them there. In case things which back because you just never know with with with technology working cows podcasts is I also have a surprising number of people who download the file directly from a play on my website so I figured is good for. For that Info to be populated and whatever they're using. Yeah, that's that's really where it gets us. Because at that point, it's not in a feed anymore, so it puts it there and it's. It's not like the end of the world if it's not there like I know on a windows machine. If you downloaded I think news media players, still the defaults I don't know Hers Own Groove Yeah I think they're groove. Player replaced that I'll have to see what happens, but I know in windows. Media Player used to get what I affectionately referred to as the grey music, not death, which is just this grey music note and it would come up and again it just it's not. It doesn't stop it from playing. Just like if everybody else has an image in you, don't people are GonNa go like what's what's wrong with his. What's with this grey music? Note thing so it's not. Not the end of the world, but it is kind of A. If it. If it took me five minutes to do, I'd be like. I don't know we'll see, but it is. That's where it comes into play as if somebody. It is a little annoying. If I've got an MP, three file that I'm playing from some are whatever is in it just as the name of the file dot MP three. There's no, there's absolutely no information. It'd be kind of Nice. You know, it's not hard to put it in. I guess there's a balance right. Don't obsess about it. Don't put nothing. Villain boy and I always name my file something so that I know what it is, so if I look and ask the podcast coach it is, it's something like atpc Blah Blah Blah yeah. Here we go I scroll down ATC underscore twenty twenty dash two eight eight meaning that the episode number Dash Over Dash Eleven, so it's April eleventh now where that comes into play and usually. Does is if for some reason, use which media hosts. And then later now, sometimes you can do some cool things. This is why one of my criteria for media is. Don't change my final name. Because if if you change the file name I can't do a cool finding. Replace like. Let's say I moved from Lipson to power press I can say hey, find everything that's feeds dot traffic dot Lipson dot whatever? And then my file name I can say find that and replace with power press dot feed slash whatever and Boom I. my websites updated, but if you change my final name. Or and then the fun part is. If you're trying to figure out what file is. What if you've got the? The date in your file you can go to and and say Oh, here's the one from April eleventh. This is the file and you uploaded that whole nine yards, so it's I've only had to do that. I think twice in fifteen years where I was playing with something and I was like Oh. They changed everything. So that's it's a very very mish. You now need but. It's like backup. You know you. Don't it a like when you need it, you need it, so that's one of those kinds of things that you want to make sure you get right and just check from time to time, but but you know I. Yeah, go ahead and I'm just glad you brought that up. I was listening to the no agenda show today and bangs in the chat room was talking about how pulled Tiktok. The new version of The I don't WanNa get into. Politics for the new episode of the no agenda show. There's this big shot. Smarty Pants Guy, explaining all the things that like the not the Chinese people. Chinese government is Yerma the Equifax hack. Yeah that was that was the Chinese army. Yeah, and they just go through a whole bunch of stuff, and that's so Mike and that's why I'm not putting Tiktok on my phone. But. They also mentioned that there was this guy. I don't I've never heard of him apparently huge youtuber and got completely d platforms, and he was saying he did a video and he's like. Hey, he was doing a patriotic thing like. Hey, if you WANNA, support me over here. Blah Blah Blah, and he goes. I've lost hundreds or thousands of videos, and all these comments and they were kind of saying the same thing I did like. Don't you save your content? I've seen people do this like there's a great feature in Hindenburg where you can go, Hey, file published this Lipson in. It'll actually publish it to Lipson, and if you wanted to, it'll take here. We go again with eighty-three tags. Take your ID three tags and turn that into the episode, so it's literally like one. Click publish done the only thing I don't like about that feature. Is the file only existent on Lipson? There's no local copy so I always export. To my hard drive, and then or I'll I'll throw it into dropbox or media fire. Boo, go drive or whatever you want, but I always do you keep copies of all your old files? Like eight or nine copy so files. In fact I have about two terabytes of. For for the podcasts stuff. Yeah, I'm doing this for about ten years so. Two terabytes include some other stuff, but a lot of podcast files in Dave I. Actually Sink so I have a I have a storage here. That's like a terabyte cash drive, and then it backs up to back place so that I've got them current files. I'm using here and then everything's on back place, so it's about a two terabyte backup so last weekend. Weekend I had some problems actually two weeks ago, I moved some things around on a box. It caused a conflict. The I had a sinking application that went between the one box and grow tobacco those up because I have a local. I've a full Okapi available while serve the original full local copy, and then we are back placed at three to backup. Show but The backup broke the sink broke, and so the sink was trying to download the entire Cadillac. I remember you a everything to by threat everything, and so I had six at six terabytes in ten days I had six terabytes of bandwidth usage. Cox Only gives me one. Had to quickly call them and say hey, and there's like well. I didn't talk about this on the show last week, right? To know I think he did yeah over I, found this out. If you go over the only charge hundred dollars so. I thought it was going to be more so anyway. We got that figured out so those backups like yeah, it's important you have him and it's important. Check on them from. Daniel from the audacity to podcast is I just filled up my five terabyte archive hard-drive. That's a lot of data. Brain assist you guys save your raw projects I. Have Every project file still wonder if I need anything? But the published N. three I used to do two things I used to I wouldn't save the project, but I would exported as a wave file, but I found that kind of works in less. You want that one thing. Because a lot of times with my stuff. I have transitioned music, so if I just want that segment, it starts off with music. That's fading out and I'm like Oh so now I. Just Save It's one of those things where I'm kind of putting all my eggs in a basket I will save. The why exported is an MP three and then I save the Hindenburg project so for some reason. Hindenburg just quit working on windows I'm screwed I've got my finished MP three, but I don't have and then I have anything that uses. Files like the question of the month. I have all those files, and that's the one thing i. like about Hindenburg when you hit, Save, and you pick a place for two to save your project inputs all the files that are in that particular file in one folder, and so again and in brain says Hindenburg does put all the way so in theory I could just delete everything else in that folder. The thing I kind of think of is hard drives our cheap, so if I ever really run. Yeah. Here's the problem though that is that okay, so the sweet spot right now is about a ten terabyte external drive there about two hundred bucks to fifteen to say. By so in Daniel's case, he's got five terabytes just runs out, so he goes buys ten terabyte drive like we're starting to get to the point now where that's a lot of data and when it fails. If you don't have it replicated someplace else, it's not a matter of losing it. You Still Miami probably will, but the time it takes to recover. Some of that is is enormous because the foul transfer speeds haven't caught up to the storage, so the storage is big, but we're still not I mean if people are doing this the a USB three. It's GonNa take a while, so be all I'm a big Fan I'm a big fan of more smaller drives. And and using some kind of Lake stable drive pool, or some of those kinds of technologies to pull those drives together, so if one goes bad, you're not losing like version of raid or addressable or a Sinology or something, a Nas- device some time. That takes multiple two or three terabyte drives which are cheap by the way they're super cheap there sixty bucks. And in stripes those show fund drive goes bad which they do. Have a lot of hard drives and they do go bad from time to time. You don't lose everything. You don't have to recover it again. Even if you got to the cloud, you know these two terabytes have in the cloud David. It still took two days driving. Through all those right you know took two days in a break and the two days at a break. So. The just if you have that much data, there's just some things to consider a more than just. Space is just the first consideration. Then how do I move around? It's why I keep a full second copy. Local is because if the one of my primary server goes down and I can't get to that information I can always download it from backlash because it's in the cloud. When Act to access to it right away and I. Don't WanNa. Wait for it or I, don't I. Don't want you know I i. that's just for me I want to keep two copies local. There, you go, and then you and Brennan are getting some sort of inside. He just just say unrated and I'm like Oh yeah. We talk a lot about on home gadget geeks. Jokingly! Took more of a show joke. About unrated, we talk about unread. It's very popular kind of product that does it for, but it's pretty nerdy like your average person's not just GONNA set up on radio and make it work I. Think podcasters if you don't own some kind of Nasr. If you're doing a lot of this, I like I. Keep the raw file I. Keep the edited Lost This edition for the Audio. I make two copies of the video of video large video small. in the MP3 itself when it's done from from a a phonic keep I keep all those. That's the thing I keep. I think it if you do something like that you need to. Have you probably need to have something more than A. Two Terabyte External Seagate, hard drive which. the edge. Your backup in I did this for my sister I said he can't go by a two terabyte drive. We're GONNA. Use It as a backup, so she bought at plugged it in. She moved all our files to the two terabyte drive. She goes okay. It's backed up like no. That's not. That's not a backup. You can't just because it's on a backup. Backup drive doesn't mean it's backed up. We need to move into the cloud and have a second copy somewhere else locally. That's it. That's the key. It's gotta be someplace else because if you have a backup on a two terabyte, drive in your apartment goes up in flames. Congratulations. You've now lost two copies of your well. Yeah, it's got to have it off site. Something offsite as well but I recommend if going to be doing this as applied castor, you need to spend a little time, low investment and getting like a ass, device, analogies or great. They worked for most people they're. Drop dead simple, and it's a little bit of investment. You're probably talking eight hundred thousand dollars to house. Yeah well, yeah, but how? How much is your podcast worth to you? How I always used to say? How long should I go without a backup on go how much time you got to restore it go because it's a pain in the bud, so I wanted to to point out something here and I found it interesting. This is something Jim and I have talked about a lot and I. Don't think you're no. You're not gonna be able to read that. Let me read this to you. Because we've always talked about how if you're going to have a co host and things like that because this is I put this in. My trello is not going to end well. The guy says if you have a full-time job than anyone else, decide to add a second day to your podcasting for content. And what was the turnout? It's something like I've tried with my team so far with good results we go live and do a nice long show and do a show, but recently we had we added a second day, and now I have no quote days off i. feel this is not good, a good feel for me yet, but my team and I think but my team. Team I think feels different I have a job that is offered me a promotion with lots of new training and potential income. My team with no fault of their own has made me feel selfish for being reluctant for adding a second day. I'm looking for any advisor inside. I took my first off night from the show after forty one episodes, and didn't and did not get good feedback, which has made me feel unhappy and pressured. I did not want them to think I love what we do less. I did not want them to think I love what we do less than them, but I also feel like I'm burning out. Help, so what are your thoughts on? That GM and the the comments are kind of interesting. Yeah, well, this is a tough. This is the tough one because it it. There's no great answer for it. You know you need to free your own health. You need to make the decisions you need to make to be able to. I battle this conversation all the time at The Gallup podcasts that we've done this year, so it as of July, first I'd already done fifty for the year I did fifty all of last year, so were were on pace to double our production number for for twenty twenty right. I've I've kind of had some thoughts like? Does that like that's affecting the way. I feel about doing home gadget geeks in on. Well I really busy right and so like. Yeah, it's you have to think through. In this case, this person has other people who are may are applying downward pressure, right? You know we really WANNA. Do this and. I think you just have to have an open honest conversation with US folks. That's it and then I dug through the comments, and apparently some of the episodes are four hours long. And I'm like okay, and then what was interesting is his Co. host popped in. Who is Josh and he says if he wants to take time off, he can. No one ever said he can't lol. What he isn't explaining. Is We just literally added Wednesdays and how to talk about adding more content not one week after it was added, he is saying you need time off. Timing is frustrating, so we talk about it on the show and then later says I. Look at the PODCAST Like A. A band. We're only as strong as our weakest link. I work sixty seventy hours a week to which point I want to go. Why are you doing a podcast? But okay I was in bands well before the podcast for me, just me. The only thing ever wanted a break from was my real job. My podcast, my band there you know basically outlets for me, but the one thing I thought was interesting. because the guy had said they didn't get good feedback when he wasn't there. He goes that not good feedback. US ribbing on him for not coming in he goes. Buddy did decide to call into the show three times. He goes, which is fine, but I thought he needed the day off and that's what it is went. This is not going to end well. Now I hope they have good agreements in place. Yeah, I was just like so and the other thing I thought of if they're doing for our shows. I'm pretty sure you could cut that down to two and not really miss out on, because the other thing that means they're doing eight hours of podcast a week. And I'm like. Either a number one, if I'm going to paint with a really wide brush. I'm saying that podcast isn't as good as it could be because. Four hours is a lot of time to to hold somebody's attention. And I. They didn't to their credit. They didn't say what their show was his. You're not allowed to promote yourself in the facebook group, but I would love to know what it was, but but brandon brings up a great question. Does the audience want a second show? That's you know that's really what it comes down to but I. Just just the way it was going on, and then when then when the guy comes in, and he's like my here's what I think's going on. I think this guy said Hey. I can't do a show on Wednesday. And expected them to go. Okay well, then we're not and they went okay. We'll just do one without you and he went. And I think is ego got maybe just a little bruised. I duNno, but it's just. Are. We sure this isn't David Lee Roth right before we know. It does sound like it. I sell like the lead singer WHO's popular? Who's kind of the voice on the show? Kinda wants to go solo, but doesn't WANNA. I WANNA do a side project, but I'm not leaving the band and they went now. Sorry, go ahead. I! Kinda need a break. I mean it's of the Ross. I just I needed I kind of need a break, but then does it lose control of you know when they do on their own. They kinda then the lead singers kind of showing up like Oh, I just needed a break I. it yeah, well okay no judgment in there where making fun of it and an sorry if. It is hard to You know. If you started something. To leave it I was the editor of the student newsletter when I was in college, and I, we went from having no office and nothing to. We had an office. We had staff and I really build up was kind of cool, and then it dawned on me if I really wanted to. I Dunno graduate I was going to have to go back to being just a writer in when I left the first thing to do was changed the name of the newsletter and I was like my baby. What are you doing, so it's hard to leave. He had a question. The chat room from a liquidity. She says how does someone even Apple podcasts review? If they don't have an Iphone, the answer is. You don't. You can't I don't know that there's an tunes on a on a desktop. You might be. About it, yeah, no, you can. But on an iphone I guess that would be and I don't know that you can on because there's that kind of weird web version of Apple podcasts Yeah I. Don't think he can one. We'd have to look the certainly. The the high tunes is a barrier to entry like Oh. Oh my God, that's like a twenty five minute install and installs a whole bunch of other things in the process. not grade on window again went so Dan. That's how you do I tunes on desktop, and if there are if they have a mack. You know chances are if they have a mack. The desktop isn't available. Then that is a I'm pretty sure I'm ninety percent sure. You're not getting the review. Please, keep in mind. Reviews. Do not help you get found. They are only social proof they feel good though they. Speaking of feeling good I need any some more coffee. Daniel before we do that, Daniel says you can't leave rating to reuse through apple podcasts website. That's what I was thinking of, but yeah gyms ready for. We're halfway through and I'm. GonNa Miss Four Go. And are. The mid poor is brought to you by are awesome supporters which you can be at by going. Ask The podcast coach Dot com slash awesome speaking of that. Today, I wanNA. Say at one o'clock. We're having A. What do you office hours? Is what I call it for the school podcasting if you want to. If you have a question, but your your little shy, and you don't want to do it in public. We have I guess around table. You would call it for the the patrons today We have the teacher's pet. If you need some one on one consulting at a discounted rate that is still open, but we want to thank our twenty dollar supporters and I you know what I'm. We're GONNA. Come back to these websites maybe later in the. The Po- show I WANNA I wanNA play with something today, but in that is if I go to these websites like debt, shepherd dot, com, which is Greg does about teaching financial wellness. If I go there, can I contact him? Can I subscribe to the show in Can I listen? That's my WanNa. Do this with some websites today? Glenda Geek Hiebert will who will be on the school podcasting. If not this week next week, you can find him over to Horse Radio Network Dot Com, he just completed his two thousand five hundred Earth show I was of one of his podcasts. Max Trescott over. Aviation News Talk Dot Com. Shane it's spy dot, com who also congratulations to Shane. was featured in some magazine in England. So! How cool is that? Because of his podcast, so congratulations to that also awesome people like. In life in the Carolinas PODCAST DOT COM Kim, Kardashian toastmasters dot net and Ed Sullivan at Sonic. CUPCAKE DOT com, and if you'd like to be an awesome supporter, because Davis paying his taxes, it'd be a really good time to do that. as the podcast coach dot, com slash awesome. You get access to the video version of the show as well as the Po- show and like I, said you get basically. Free Group coaching on on a monthly basis of check out. The podcast coach Dot com slash awesome. He can I make more comment on this. This review itunes review thing. I've I've seen a couple of there. I think because it's hard to get reviews in and I just don't think we know they don't really matter that much. They're nice like they're nice. They're not meaningless. It's not negative. You should get him if you can, but I think if you're going to spend your capital with your listeners on doing something a. c., t. a. of some kind. Don't leave a review. Have them tell someone else and? Have them say in a in unnoticed Two two guys that I listened to on entertainment podcast. Say this now. They say share this with a friend like if you'RE GONNA if you're gonNA, give them to do one action, I think way more powerful than any review. Your arrogant. Aleve I I. Don't think for the most part people leave reviews or user reviews like they use Amazon reviews. Go Amazon. Go to buy something like Oh if there's any question about the quality, scroll down to the reviews right I'm not sure that happens as. As, often I'm sure happens I just I'm not sure it happens as often in the in the podcast role again I know it happens. I'M GONNA. Get angry emails. Always check every say. Okay, okay, good good for you guy that you do that but I. Think people telling other people as a way better way. If you'RE GONNA, use get one CPA. have him tell somebody else. Yeah, this is sharing on the screen here I'm. I'm not sure what this is. Episode Seven Zero Eight School, a podcasting com slash seven eight. I interviewed airing Newsham. Who's the CO founder of magnificent noise, but he also worked for NPR. He's a big shot smarty pants. He's got a book called. Make Noise Creator's guide to podcasting and one of the things. He was helping a client, and they were trying to grow their audience, and they never asked people. Hey, could you tell somebody else? Else about the show and he said if you could do that maybe once a month, because he said he was doing all this call to action of by this, and by that he goes. What are you just not ask them to buy something and say hey instead. Can you tell a friend? And he said the guy called him back line goes. There's gotta be something wrong. It's like why he goes because my numbers almost tripled. And he's like yeah that that'd be just tell people to tell the people because birds of a feather flock together and I'm working with a tool now where I can kind of rain emily, pick. Calls to action in almost all the minor like. If you found this helpful to you, know somebody else who might like this. Do me a favor and tell them about it. So you know speaking of that? Tell your friends if you're listening right now. Throw your friends about the podcast co mornings nine thirty central. Ten, Thirty Eastern, we'd love to have in Click on the. Right down there, right? It's right down there. Click on the like button yeah. It's free is free. It helps us. Yeah, if you have a question and you want to jump on in just to ask the podcast coach Dot com slash, join and all Have you jump on? You can ask your question live and last week we had Half from sonnet cupcake Ed came in at Sullivan Ed Sullivan. How can you forget Ed Sullivan? That's big show really very. The Guy Had A. There's a the lead guitar player from Motley. CRUE has in. It's like. It's like a really hard to pronounce disease. It's like Sill Yungas night. As could've Scotty to and the lead singer from. It's where your your your spine starts to fuse together to where you can't bend yet. It's Nasty and the Lead Guitar Player of Motley Crue has that which is why they have to really think about is he gonNA make it if they're going to tour, because it's painful, and so did Ed Sullivan so if you ever wonder why that guy kind of when he says like the tolls and you're like Benny moves weird. He could move his back. And I was like I did not know that, but I all over not are not are yeah. Because I forget the name of the show Jason is the host He does a show about that that particular disease, so here we go again with a a kind of You know a niece show, but he says it's. It's helpful for other people like that so. here's a fun question Anna Link If I say man Jim was really pissed off about something. Is that explicit. It is for some yeah, and that's still it still is in some communities. It is still very. That's vulgar. That's. Not many, not many. There's not many laughed better pulling James Kremlin being the Brit that he. The term sucks is too by the way that that is when you say man narrowly sucked. That is there. There are still some parts where that's considered offensive. Yeah! But this is in this is not the James put a link and I didn't look at it, but somewhere he had a chart where it showed off to go back into facebook and find it, but There was they were talking about different channels of the BBC. It kind of depends on What channel was on like before? BBC Four says yes. That's offensive BBC three depending on where it was in the country. Things like that Yeah, and then. Daniels. Is it appropriate that that's my whole thing? Usually if you have to ask, that's my general rule. You have to ask it. Yeah just. Buzz. Just market explicit, you know. I know people. Get all cranked up about that like oil. It's not available in some markets than in. I know India's one of them, and so that's where on three billion people. But like if you're questionable, mark that thing explicit. Like. Don't don't youtube approached to. This has been more of the. Is it appropriate? Are you designing content just for children right? That's Kinda. That's Kinda the way they separated that now they have a no or a yes to that now it. It's good to dig in kind of figure out. What are they asking here like wh Whoa? What are they because I started thinking like well? No, I make good contents appropriate for children. That's. That's not what they're asking. They're asking is the content you're creating designed to be to be four children they want. They want to monitor that. They WANNA make sure no weird stuff. That's kind of looks like it's children's stuff, but it's really not what they're trying to get trying to get at. So make sure on Youtube. They've been most people have a youtube channel. Figure this out by now because they blasted us with spam. Ileana got it figured out, but but PR- pretty. Crazy. Then the other thing I thought I would bring up. We've talked about this per nauseam. You can't play you know Selene Dion. You can't play Taylor Swift. You can't play any music. Pretty much period unless it's you know royalty free. Blah Blah Blah and I forget why I heard this. I I might have been a zoom meeting, but there is a company that was created. To go out and find. Like unlicensed music. And apparently they've launched because I'm going to say I worked at Lipson four years. I think I've seen to take down notices because like somebody who was planning eminem and Blah Blah Blah on Friday. There were four. In one day. And I was like Whoa so if you have. Unlicensed if you're playing Elton, John, and your podcast. I'm just letting you know they're. They're coming for you. So and and what they do is because it came from rob, is they? It goes up to so goes up to a VP goes over listened to your show. Here's Elton John and what he does is he removes it because it's a it's. It's from the RIA, and he removes that he doesn't delete it, but he pulls it out of your feed, so it's no longer public, and then notifies you and says hey. Don't do that so I. Don't know how many strikes you get. If if the case where we would ever remove you but I do know because we don't want to get sued. We remove the file from the public so That's probably something we're going to hear more about 'cause like I said I haven't seen that many period into have four game. It's getting busy travel. gluten-free says in a chat room few on youtube some so some GARF- Gatien. If you select that for children, they turn off commenting which makes sense right. There's some special scrutiny going on right now in Youtube because they've had some problems with this, so don't don't get any indication like like the. There's really intense scrutiny going on youtube right now, so it's It's just kind of having a bank says they've revamped at off to go in and take a look I. I've been kind of ignoring the comments in there, because like it just seem like for three months. I couldn't get them to stop reminding me no, I don't make content. I don't make conference content for children. Stop asking me because they just kept asking and ask you and asking even though I set the the perimeters you'll, isn't it? It's I think. Think, you have to check it. You have to do it on every video. Don't you have to now check this out for Dole I think you can I think now. This was from a from a month or two ago, and they're changing stuff all the time, but I thought. If you selected at a default level in your settings, then everything going forward, and then you still can change it at I. Think you can change it a level. You'd WANNA listen. I'm not a lawyer on this one. You're going to want to check here. You'RE GONNA. Check your own. Youtube settings in dive. Dive into this as well to make sure you understand the point is. You need to be paying attention I think on that. Yeah and it's it's just. There we go liquidity scissors a place. You can select for audio's Yeah I. Think you can. That makes life a whole lot easier. I will to go to go back to the explicit right. That's just kind of one of the things he kind of just. Don't don't try to get through. Don't turn it oh. Don't try to get past the system on this one just. To follow the rules. There's a novel idea all the rules yeah. And I like we kind of said earlier I think you know. It's I remember the one time. At, a guy lives in contact me and he was explaining. that he was using the F. Word as an adjective oh yeah, not a verb right and I was changes the meaning. It's still the F word my. Wake News. It's still that word by the way it's still our, even if you try to change like hey in my vocabulary, doesn't it still that were? It is, it is funny I've I've got a bunch of friends. In the UK, and there's a few words that I use are aren't necessarily. They're not bad, but they're not necessarily appropriate at times and I say them I don't mean to say them and they think. They can occur in when I do kind of thing. So it's this is the tough. The tough part about as as quickly as podcasting became a global. You know global reach. it really does highlight the differences we have in languages and understanding, and in I just I like it when people just tell me I know should probably say that and I don't okay. I'll have that next time. I will I I still I'm still learning on this and You know it it It. It's a process. Right? Absolutely the other news that happened this week. I didn't even have that. Melissa just dawned on me. STITCHER got bought again. A from they were. I WanNa, see cw scribes the people that owned. A whole bunch of stuff they were newspaper people, and they turned into audio in media, people and they got bought by UCLA by serious. WHO also owns Pandora owns stitcher saw. Be Interested to see. What happens to? Like the whole. Are they going to do the same model? Because I know you can go over there and you can get all of Marin stuff. you know not just the last fifty. Five bucks a month. You can get all cone stuff. Yada Yada Yada and I'm just like on the other hand I did hear again on James. Cridland pod news dot net that. I don't know if it's the first show, but it's definitely the one I've heard of. That is leaving luminary like they're now making their show public, so I was like Oh this this could be. Luminary just keeps barring more money. And now you see somebody jumping ship and Mike. ooh, that's that's not a good sign. I could be wrong, but it just like so. Gabrielle has a comment here about the the whole kid thing says. As someone who worked in kids TV for years. You really want to know your PS and QS when it comes to kid content I would suggest checking out US UPA the children's. Privacy Act so. Yeah it's it's a special place that really needs special consideration and be really really careful moving into that space. I think sometimes. We just assumed while their kids while no, we need to be. We need to be very careful in space. And, then going back to the serious thing, series versus spotify spotify just did A. Huge deal. With some AD company, whose name is escaping me and I want to see it was like twenty million dollars, but that that ad company deals with things like Pepsi Coke and things like that. Which James was saying. It sounds like a lot of money until you realize that they do like. Billions of dollars of advertising twenty million is like a drop in the bucket, but it just goes to show you and then I saw. In an article where spotify? Is Testing. Interactive ads and I'm not sure how well these are going to work, but the idea is that as you're listening on the spotify. APP and an ad comes up for. You know whatever Pepsi you can click a button. And it would take you to their website of some sort, and I was like it's interesting. I don't know how that's GonNa work because like I listened to a lot of podcast is week while I was riding a bike, and my my phone is all my arm. I'm not touching any buttons. I got the on auto play. But it's just it's just more. Things are GONNA. Big. Money's coming in. We'll see that the ads are really cranking up on youtube like I i. can't I can't watch a video a twenty minute video with any less than six to eight ads in a now well in, and then a buddy of mine has ad blocking turned on on his browser, and on Youtube which we you know we use to upload. Our podcast for Gallup he's. He was having functionality problems because he was blocking the ATS. In there's just there. He Goes Jim. They're everywhere and I started looking I kind of ignore ads now just because they've been in space so long. You know you kind of stop seeing them. But the I I started looking I'm like. Wow, they are everywhere, so youtube is definitely you know, and then every other time I log in there asking me. Hey, do you WANNA do the one month trial of whatever the latest flavor of their paid services to get ad free youtube. So there there I, it seems to me. I don't know if they are not but to me. It seems like they are. They have really cranked up the number of ADS that you're getting in a in a show now. Yeah I I'm it's one of those things where it'll be interesting to see I know I did a thing once on Conan? O'Brien and I found out that twenty five percent of his show. Was Ads now granted. He does his best to keep them somewhat entertaining and stuff, but I was like he should rename his show Conan. O'Brien needs some cash apparently. This is interesting. Coach Dave says. When he was in Puerto Rico station because I discovered the chill and signed. With the index finger out is also called Toro. Index Finger about this. This is hang loose, right? That's hang loose index finger is. Yeah, there's like this. The one that nearly got. The better known as the Ronnie James Deal. This is of right in in sign language. I think it is I think this this, and this is Ronnie James Dio which or hook them horns, hook them horns, or if you're Italian, you're giving them the melodic. It's the allies, so that's where people go. Satan like no, it's. It's two fingers pointing in the air. Come on now. bangs brings up a good point, he says maybe some of this is with the whole spotify ad deals because facebook is pulling at and I heard this on the news worthy. That's my to news things in the morning when I listen I listen to the news worthy with I wanNA say Amanda superfund show and then James Crillon and. They did thing on facebook where they audited themselves like facebook. All handpicked auditors to see how well they're removing hate speech and things are for that. And the the report came out, and it was like well how you guys doing on that and the answer was. Not good at all, like really really bad, which is causing more people to then WanNa? PULL THEIR ADS off of facebook's. If you ever thought of advertising on facebook and don't mind maybe apparently occasionally being next to some hate speech. It's gotTa to be dirt cheap right now. I would think I don't know we'll see. It's also Is everybody talks about this like? Is this going to be the end of facebook and I'm like I don't know what we'll have to see you know Dana says YouTube is now adding mid roll ads on an eight minute video used to be ten minutes to do that. The mid roll interesting, so it seems like I watched. There's a guy I watch every day and he has like. Eighteen to twenty minute you know videos and I swear I'm getting like six ads like says that is the middle middle and mineral mineral mineral I swear I'm getting I swear it's every three minutes well. They're getting ads. There's a type of ad now called. I think he's just called interruption, and and it's literally like five seconds. Where like you're watching a video? And then all of a sudden out of nowhere, it's like. Dave Jim on every Saturday morning at ten thirty eastern standard time as the podcast coach. Dot Com slash live, and then it goes back to the video. It's like just a little like. Hey, we want to interrupt what you're doing because you're probably enjoying that to annoy you with this Ad. And I'm just like it's getting kind of ridiculous. Yeah, just to be honest and it used to be. You could see a little yellow line was coming to show you where the ads worst like Pope Youtube video and you're like up. Watching that that does not seem to be the case anymore. Unless I'm missing something, it just seems like I'll be watching something and I. Don't know if they get to pick where the ads are or not, but it's just like you know about the time. Things are getting really good and like all right. Hold on got to watch this guy you know. Get His boner pill all right next. Banks since room I pay the premium protection. Does that kind of sounds mafia? Like someone's coming like hey, if you don't want the ads and you're GonNa live in the neighborhood. I can protect you from those I could i. I can make sure they never bother you again. there it is I. Mean Listen. It's the typical. We knew this was coming like. If you did not know, this was coming with Youtube. Wake up because this is how they all go right it all starts free it all starts open, and then they began to monetize that look. You. WanNa. Have a nice listening excuse. It'll be a shame if something happened to that Nice. Clearance in the ASEAN. If you got ads every two minutes instead of five, it's only ten days. We can protect you. Have you back on Tuesday? You never know Jesus everybody it's. you know. I started watching what I rarely watch TV anymore. It's like if it is like youtube just added more channels and said Oh by the way we're raising your price and I'm like Do I have to go back to Hulu now and it's it's kind of a hassle. I'm not even I'm not even looking into it. It's like it wasn't a huge raise, but I found a show and it's weird because I'm watching a show. It's on comedy central, but I don't think it was actually ever on comedy central the reason being they dropped the F bomb all the time and I'm like you can't wait why it's called corporate and it's kind of. A more extreme version of the office. And I just it was kind of like. Hey, if you like this, you like this and I started watching it and it's kind of like if people were working for Amazon and they just by companies and crush them, and my favorite was, they had a whole thing on. women would love it where there's a to like executives. One is a female in this. One guy was talking about how like her tone. And she really was just talking normal, and then he was like I. Never I never might tone his always perfect in this office and I never intimidate anyone with my voice. Okay, so they make some interesting points but it was just I it dawned on me late. I'm kind of watching TV. But I still think I'm watching just basically a youtube videos that were on comedy central so Danny greatly well man. That's second. Half went fast Dave. It wasn't super. Fast Holy. I know time flies when you're on talk. He's good was a good conversation Mike? I enjoyed that youtube conversation because that's some. Good stuff there's some there's some changing things happening there I think we need to pay attention. It's GonNa be fun to watch. Just 'cause they keep you know I, keep hearing about more people getting e platform that whole nine yards. It's a bit concerned it. You know I I watch for the Gallup stuff that we do all the time. I just I just have to be really really careful because that's a big platform for us. So, Jim, what's coming up on the average Guy Dot TV. Yeah, my buddy. Paul Barron is back. Ball is a good friend of the show a tesla owner. He he's he. He's a gadget Geek. And we cover about nineteen topics in and our minutes, and it was super great, so if you need something to kind of burn two hours, and you WanNa talk to head over. To posted now finally, this is the first time in about six months. I've got no posted before the show, so it's already right now. They go and on the school podcasting. It's GonNa be one of two things one. It will be a discussion with not only Glenda Geek Hiebert but also his co host, because as I mentioned earlier, they just did they. They just recorded their two thousand five hundred episode of horses in the morning, and so my question to him was like like. How do you do that? Not Burn out like how do you keep finding topics and things like that? So it will either be that interview or I've had this in my brain of kind of been working on this in the. Back of my head for a while, and that is i. hear this question all the time. What our, podcast best practices. And it was like. All right, but I'm kind of worried about that. Because a lot of it is stuff I've said. A million times. Maybe all I've got a bunch of notes in evernote on that so I haven't decided. The thing is I recorded the episode with squad cast, so the cool thing is I have three files for the the Glenn Interview. which also means it's a little more fun to to et it, so that's why it might not be until till next week, but stick around for some polls. Show because Gyms GonNa talk about the mole.

WanNa Lipson Youtube Jim apple spotify US facebook Dave Jackson Ed Sullivan Coach Dave Daniel James allergies Jim Mike James Kremlin Dan ibuprofen
#1337, Cody Myler, Deborah Keston, Whole Person Integrative Eating

One Life Radio Podcast

45:59 min | 9 months ago

#1337, Cody Myler, Deborah Keston, Whole Person Integrative Eating

"The content of the following program is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice diagnosis treatment or cure always consult your physician or a health professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. One Life Radio is brought to you by our sponsors. Great companies like Sun Warrior the pioneers plant based protein from the Sun to the plant to you go to Sun Warrior Dot Com to learn more about all the products and use the Code Oh l. are for twenty percents off your order and Biomedica makers of Tariff Flora, a novel broad spectrum, symbiotic combining spore form probiotics, and advance food base ancient prebiotics find tariff Laura, and the full line of products at environmental dot Com casteran pilots the new standard in pet. Food the only complete line of USDA organically certified pet crazy water infused by mother nature, not some Random Factory Paleo magazine. Now, all digital go to Paleo magazine Dot Com to subscribe the wellbeing journal Veg. World. Magazine. The International Society of Sports Nutrition and Thornton Research visit our dispensary at one life radio. Dot. Com for twenty percent off and free shipping. You can find more information on all of our sponsors including links to listener discounts on the one life radio DOT com sponsor page. Thank you for listening to one life radio. Baby. Do you WANNA go higher baby. You're in the right place you're listening to one live radio. This is Bernadette junior broadcasting live from Dallas Texas on Iheartmedia as well as M. E. T. in southern California on ABC News? Talk how you doing today junior doing so good. It's so nice outside I had the windows down it was beautiful I know such a good mood. I think it was like fifty five or something this morning. And I got out one of my favorite for sweaters and I. Just I'm a sweater girl always have been from growing up. In. UPSTATE NEW YORK. You know and so yeah, I love the fall I was born in the fall in November and so it's a and they say that the typically the. The The season of the year that you're born in is typically your favorite time of year. So when's your birthday mines in April and I? I, love spring so. There were two for two. Well. We've got a fantastic show coming up today. We really do I. Know I say that all the time, but we really have some amazing guests on the show at the half we've got Debra casten. She is an international nutrition researcher, an award winning author with medical and health rider with she's has a specialty in preventing and reversing obesity and heart disease and her new book. She's going to be talking about it, which is whole person integrative eating. It's going to be a really really good couple of segments with her so stay tuned and of course one I, my all time favorite on the planet is with us today Cody Meyler how you doing today, cody. How you doing I'm good and you know one of the reasons you're one of my favorite people is because you're always so positive and I love and appreciate that about you. Thank you very much. That's one of my biggest traits I try try to push on to everybody. And you're a good storyteller too. So let me introduce you. Cody. is also known as Akito Cowboy and he is a health and fitness expert trainer instructor and business owner. He holds a bachelors in exercise psychology and a masters in Sports, Management and over twenty different fitness certifications and twenty nine thousand nine cody founded the national athletic. Kito Association Neca as it's known and Aka hosting the first Kito Carnivore bodybuilding competition. So he is the owner as well of annex t rep fitness, a twenty four hour workout facility offering specialized workout and nutrition programs designed around and individuals, needs, and fitness level. So cody's website is. Flex Dot Com and that's M.. Y.. E. R.. Flex. Dot. com or on instagram at meyler underscore flex and it's always a pleasure to have you on the show and I love in particular what we're talking about today because so many people deal with this and we're talking about back pain. Okay. The Do's and don'ts of exercising after a back injury. So you have firsthand experience with this cody living with a back injury, and so can you tell our listeners about your injury and how it affected your day to day life? Yeah, absolutely. So the first thing I want to make clear is some people confused spondylosis and spotty low license says the same thing spondylosis. Yeah basically that is just the wear and tear of the vertebrae just kinda every day. Just as you get older the wear and tear Bondi license is actual fracture in one of the vertebras. Stress Fracture. They also call Scotty fracture because when you look at at in x Ray and you see inside the vertebrae if it looks like a Scottish terrier dog and where the collar would be, that's where the fracture is on the X. Ray. Really where the Pars of the Vertebrae is and that is what I have. Wow. You're taking me into the deepwater right out of the gate. I have never heard either one of those words. But of course, I'm not a doctor and I've never had a back injury list not a not a major one I've had minor ones where you wake up and you're or after or when I was pregnant or after you have a baby, you know sometimes your back hurts a lot not that you would know anything about that being guy but. But yeah. But. So many people deal with this. Okay. So after you got your diagnosis of what type of. Injury you had in your back. You know what changes did you make to your workout? Well, you know. First of all, it took about six months before I could even walk in I mean that that was crazy. One of the hardest things to do every day was just to get out of bed just raising my leg just get out of bed walk was the hardest thing I dreaded that every day but you know the very, very, very first thing that I would just tell anybody that's doing. It's about six percent of the population that actually deal with the this actual particular back injury It's more predominantly in males adolescent males is definitely in women but more predominantly in adolescent males and males that play in sports, which that was exactly me. I found out about this when I was doing my preseason workouts when I was playing college basketball I was squatting four hundred and twenty five pounds and as I came up a hyper extend my back and all of a sudden I felt like a knife just went through my lower back and that's when we found out I had spongy Alexis. Every. Over that name, it's kind of funny. It almost sounds like noodle or something. Kinda in. So what I would tell number one is. Weight Management Weight Management because when you have kind of a little bit of a belly I know the second I've gained an extra five or ten pounds because it just puts the pressure on my lower back at it creates an anterior pelvic tilt and so the number one thing I tell people that have this is you've got to control your weight. That's number one that will. Alleviate so much pain because this particular injury never heals it's a fracture that always sits there. Oh Wow, and they happened to me when I turned forty in. November, it happened to me when I was twenty years old. Wow. So yeah, it's definitely something that you have to manage the rest of your life Number one is white management. Well, yeah, and you know I have to tell you know anytime that I have been a little overweight whether I mean I don't think I've ever weighed more than twenty pounds and I do right now. And I. Don't even know how much wakes I don't believe myself I go by. The what Hello. Are you there. Know. What's going on? This happened the other day to it's part of live radio and you know that's cool and I'll say it again we are live and that's one of the great things about this show that I love so much. We put it on the line every single day, and if you know a little mistake here and there is actually good because it lets everyone know that we're real but cody and speaking real that's certainly you. So we lost connection for a little bit. What were you saying? Could you recap what you were just saying? Yeah. So so the number one thing I said was was white management. And then have number two as far as how did that change my workouts you ass I really had to be more cognizant about movements that were full rotational movements even though I continued and I kept playing another three more years of college basketball, other year pro basketball. After this injury I really really really have to watch myself in rotational movements so that that was definitely something outside of you know my workouts that I definitely You know you just you just got to be cognizant even even in everyday life when you're picking up something, you don't want him turn to too much. Thing is you will you hear stories I said, you hear stories all the time where someone says I bent over to pick up the newspaper or whatever you know and threw my back out or I went to make my bed and threw my back out and what I was going to say before we had that little interruption there the technical difficulty is that I know personally. When I have been a little overweight and I have any extra belly fat or you know I don't sit up straight in what I'm getting at is if you're apps aren't strong, you can't and your and your gluts as well. Your ads and your gluts are responsible for a lot of stabilization in your back right absolutely and and and it's not just the avs and. A lot of people focus on the transverse dominant, the bigger core muscles. It's actually the intercostal muscles. It's those inner girdle muscles that are underneath the transverse dominance, and so the movements that you do to strengthen those are more like planks are would try would shops. Now again, with the woodshop shops, you have to do more of a three quarter A. Half rotation you can't do for tation. If you have this injury if you're doing crunches when you do crunches, put your feet on top of the ability ball to keep that lower back flat and do your crunches that way one, the other exercise that I highly recommend people do and it sounds Corny but I'm telling you it will just just. Harden the inside those intercostal muscles take stability ball. Against, the wall and straighten your arms out and I want you to push against that ball as hard as you can for one minute. Your core is going to flex its almost like a An extreme plankton in a way is way harder than applying. Lean up against that. Yeah. Yeah. I'm having trouble visualizing that maybe you could put together a little video for us to put on social afternoon. Because I think a lot of people need to hear this in order to get as strong as they. Can you know and have 'cause it really you know back pain is no way to live a miserable life and and if you can do it or yeah and you know firsthand I it's just have a couple of friends that also right now are dealing with major back problems and it's just it's no way to live, and so any information that you can share with us is is is much appreciated I know for myself and our listeners. So so should weight training be avoided when you have a back injury no, not at all I, I still feel fully. One hundred percent that you need to do weight training. It's still just watching yourself watching the movement watching over rotation that's it, but you still absolutely should do weight training Another thing that is very common that you see in people that have this injury is they have very tight or overactive hamstrings. So that's another thing is don't you know you? You work your hamstrings out but just as much you need to stretch them out as well. I would love to see a video I can't wait because it's so important it is, and sometimes it's really hard to visualize as well but we're going to break. We're GONNA come back more coming up with Cody Milo we're talking about the do's and don'ts of exercising after a back injury stay tuned. Everyone you're listening to one life radio. Check. Checkbook. Maybe. Keeping. In their swim wear going through the. Truck. If you need advice limited. Get. My one was a little everyone. Welcome back to one life radio. This is Bernadette with junior and dear friend cody miler of you're just now joining us cody miler is also known as the Kia Cowboy and is a health and fitness expert trainer instructor and business owner. You can find him at Meyler flex dot com that's meyler flex dot com or on instagram at. Underscore flex today we're talking about the do's and don'ts of exercising after a back injury. Okay. So What exercises should be avoided if you suffer from a back injury or chronic back injury, what are the ones you absolutely should never do or just for general back injuries I personally. You see a lot of people do these setups and they. They don't have their back fully supported all the way. So I would refrain away from doing like a full setup like the old school military style set up A lot of that is because you're your ads really aren't pulling a lot if they aren't strong enough So I, I would I would stay away from that And then depending on what injury it is you know those rotational movements it's just it just really depends You know how how far in the rotation how many degrees you need to go a one movement that I think everybody should do. Is a very easy one. It doesn't matter what age you are and where you're at, you can do it in a hotel in your room and the gym just get a piece of PVC pipe. And sit down you gotTA. Make sure that you're sitting down either on your sofa a chair whatever you don't WanNa do this standing. And just literally put that PVC pipe over your shoulder put your arms over and rotate for for fifteen minutes. Just twist back and forth you've talked about that before and I've totally forgotten about it but it doesn't. It doesn't have to be a PVC pipe it could be a broom could net anything can be a Burma. PVC. You you just don't want it to be really waited because you know again you're trying to stay tight and all you're doing is is focusing on those intercostal muscles and after about ten minutes you're gonNA, fill them start to wear down and how quickly should you do it again, another video I think is in the making here. I will totally put a video together for you guys. It's not fast. Advocate I would imagine has to be. Not Too fast but not too slow, and during while you're doing it, what is the name of the exercise? Is there a name for the trunk? ROTATION CD rotation. So you have to be seated when you do not standing. Yeah and the reason why I want everybody to sit is because when they stand they, they let their hips rotate with their shoulders sometime and you want your hips stationary Gotcha. Yeah. That is true. I do these things with the exercise bands and that's one of the hardest things is to keep your legs stabilized fall into it with your hip so I I, know exactly what we're talking about. So what are some exercises that help with back pain? I would think that cycling and swimming would be good options to keep yourself and walking right all three of those. No. Absolutely those are those are great. I love swimming for Sure I. Love Swimming does that you know that's getting your diaphragm that's getting everything that that's around that vertebrae You know all those intercostal muscles again, everything's just flexing and keeping control plus you do get some rotation in there. Yeah. No, I and rotation is important. It is it keeps your body. What should I spry? You know you got to be able to move it shake I say but you gotta be careful when you dance you don't get too crazy because you could throw your back out little too wild. Speaking stretching. So what about stretching stretching important Oh. Yeah. I harp on that my clients they probably want to beat me overhead with a broom because I. I am constantly on them about stretching foam rolling getting a massage. Absolutely I mean it all forms from static to foam rolling to you know absolutely you need to stretch out getting massage to is is so good to detach your body get. Get deep into the muscles, and it's just it's and it feels so good both you know emotionally and physically or maybe not emotionally mentally just feels good. You know to get everything in your body moving and fluid right? Absolutely. So. How do you know if you if you're back pain is stress or something more serious? One little test that you can do it for for my case was spongy low license is you can stand on one foot. Lean. Back a little bit and then lean towards the leg to the I like the leg that you're standing on lane that direction and if you feel pretty good patch. That's a sign that to sign and try both on your left and right side, and that's a possible sign that you do have something going on in that lower vertebrae area and the spondylosis. That is the that is the fracture one, right? Yes. Yeah. The L.. Y. As s that's the that's the hairline fracture the the L. O. SIS that is just the the wear and tear of the actual vertebrae. Bondi means Verte Vertebrae Gotcha. That's fancy. So. Okay. So we already talked about the importance of a strong core and I one hundred percent I personally when my core is not strong stuff just hurts and so but. It can help alleviate or even prevent back pain and injury. Can it absolutely? There's there's no doubt about it I. I can totally tell when I've taken two three weeks off from doing anything I. Immediately, my back pain is just if fires back up and then once I start to get back on my routine watch my weight. It goes away. Yeah, do you take any supplements to keep inflammation down in your body I do take a lot of Collagen I take about fifteen grams of Collagen a day just so that way you know you got all the the little Collagen and everything that's in between all the vertebrae and that's the last thing I want to do is lose some of that that cartilage in college in between there 'cause then I will be big pain. So I I do take that. Yeah. There's a great product by Sunway or to one of our sponsors that is Vegan. Plant based in its Collagen protein peptides a it's a building formula to build Collagen in your skin naturally so I take Turmeric every single day pretty much cumin. You know I do the meriva thorn one typically or sometimes I'll do the guy tumor if I'm too lazy to order online and just want a quick run out of it and I want to get some quick but there's a lot of great brands out there but I do think that tumor is so critical for health period like across the board would you agree though? Yeah. Absolutely I mean you know you I in Sean Wells we totally agree with that. I there anything else like you always hear about what does it glucose? Glucose. A Mine Cosa mean because mine. Yeah. Yeah and that that's really really good for recovery. You know especially if you're if you're sore after. Kind Kinda help cut cut that soreness dot com down a little bit and recover faster. Well, an Omega threes to they're good for everything. You know we everybody should be taking Omega threes everyday or try to get it in their diet. So important because it all works together you know you have to, you have to nurture the body, the mind the spirits you to exercise keep things moving right? Absolutely. Everything's gotta be balanced the everything if one thing falls off, everything falls off your no, it's true. It's totally true and so and. You know but you know if you don't let it go too far. You know you don't spin out of control if you keep it in check like I remember Watson this is one of her things. She says never more three days without exercising. Even if it's just going for a fifteen minute walk, you have to keep your body and your mind moving forward herbs -solutely I totally agree with that. Yeah. Well, you know we're almost at a time, but do you have any other tips for dealing with back injury outside of the gym? and. Just again that that right there like what you were just finishing off with you just guy. Keep up with it. Every day or every other day just put a little bit of time in there. It doesn't take a whole lot just a little bit of time and it will make a big difference in your in your back pain and then stretching making sure that you're stretching don't forget about that. They'll make a big difference in your lower back pain as well. I no. A lot of people out there have office jobs and I guarantee you their slouching show shoulders forward. They got a anterior pelvic tilt. They're probably sitting right there in if they just A. Focus on that alone every day on how to sit correctly, that will make a big difference in their life as well. And Vitamin D.'s and other one too. It's so critical for your overall health and longevity It helps fight viruses and it just keeps your immune system strong Everybody's talking about it all over the world. Now you know vitamin D has never gotten the press that it really deserves. It's really Oh yeah, sure. Well, it's a hormone but it but it is critical in your immune health and your inflammation and that. So cody, great to have you back with us and you have a great day and tell, Chris. I said. All right are will you have a good one? Thanks, cody. We're going to go to break when we come back. We have Deborah casten coming up she is an. Nutrition researcher and award winning author stay tuned everyone you're listening to one life radio. Bird. Ready set less stove danced for. Joy It just can't sit. Honey honey come ride. Kate. What. Lot of stuff many. Men Pay by. Kid. The. With this kids against. Just. Look I. AM going to. Keep it up you make. Joe McCarthy was. Willie? Picked Premiums. Welcome back everyone you're listening to one life radio. This is Bernadette with junior and I have deborah on the line. She is an international nutrition researcher award winning author and Medical Health Rider with with a specialty in preventing and reversing obesity and Heart Disease Deborah has published more than four hundred nutrition and health articles. Her first book feeding the body nourishing the soul received a first place gold award in the spirituality category from the. Independent Publisher Book Awards her latest book whole. Person Integrative eating has been honored with a number one gold best book award in the Health Category. By the book excellence awards she is a VIP contributor at Ariana. HUFFINGTON's thrive global and Deborah is married to behavioral scientists and Co or author of whole person integrative eating. That's Larry Shirts. He's a PhD. So great to have you on the show Debra and I absolutely love your book. My other pleasure, and thank you for your kind words. Well, they're they're they're genuine. They're very genuine. Your website is integrative eating dot com that's integrative aiding dot com. Okay. So let's dive into this. Your book was so interesting it really really was and I did the the overeating style self-assessment quiz a couple of them. But so much information beautiful information in your book I might add. So thank you. You're welcome how to build a healthier relationship with food eating and weight. So many people want to master this. So how does the whole person integrative eating program work? Thank you for asking my mission is to help the many people who struggle with their weight. And My Book Hold Person Integrated Reading Science Beck program that gives you the. Skills. You need to hold even reverse over eating and being overweight. and. My book shows you how to do this step by step by nursing all of you literally body mind and soul each time we eat. So you can lose weight, keep it off, and the way it works is this we have a quiz in the book called what's your over eating style and that you mentioned Bernadette and you can discover your trouble. By filling out this seventy six item what's your overeating stuck quiz? And after you discover your trouble-spots, make the decision on where you want to start with over eating style you want to start with and read the whole person integrative eating step by step chapter about how to overcome your overeating style. Yeah. It's a fabulous book and I took a couple of the over the over eating style, a assessment test. I scored pretty well and I wasn't lying to myself. I've always followed a Mediterranean diet. That's what I was raised with and I know that that's you know a highly recommended. We talked about it actually yesterday with the blue zones and all of that, and you talk about that in your book as well. The importance of the Mediterranean Diet and also meditation I thought that was fascinating that you talked about a meditation in your book in in such scientific depth. Well, what we discovered is It's not only what you eat that contributes to overeating overweight and obesity. It's also how you eat and that means when we went on what I call my nutrition journey around the world and I researched ancient food wisdom from world religions. And also. Traditions such as yoga nutrition called on a yoga. And eastern healing systems for example I. You rated medicine and. In the and from India and all traditional Chinese medicine and Tibetan medicine. I discovered that before nutritional science developed in just two hundred years ago on the twentieth century. That's where people turn to get their guidelines for what and how to eat. When I put all this massive information together. I identified what I call four fastest, the food debt, and that is that food. A physically. But also emotionally spiritually and socially, and that's where your comment and and interest in meditation comes in because the three spiritual ingredients that I discovered that have been consistent over time for thousands of years before what I call eating by number, which is normal to all of us today most people eight with the three spiritual ingredients of mindful miss gratitude or appreciation from the heart and also. Eating with loving regard for food and the mindfulness meditation comes in in the whole person integrative eating program because mindfulness meditation from Buddhism. Actually has been shown to decrease the odds of overeating and increase the odds of weight loss. Yeah. I. Mean it's fascinating. In, the book I'm reading from the book the first the first reveal that the amount of time each person spent meditating was directly linked with the amount of weight loss regardless of whether participants change their dietary fat intake or their exercise habits, and it goes on to say that, in fact, those who did not change their dietary fat intake but increase their stress management practice by as much as six hours per per week lost an average of almost twenty pounds for men and more than twelve pounds for women. That's really sounding. It has a huge effect on the way food is metabolized eating with a mindfulness. Consciousness when you're eating a meditative consciousness and the whole person integrative eating guideline for the spiritual ingredient of mindfulness is to bring moment to moment non judgmental awareness. To every aspect of meal and what you're quoting research, you're quoting Bernadette if from research by a physician named Dean Cornish and Larry, sure, wits has been and behavioral scientists is also the CO author of Whole Person Integrative Eating Larry was dean or Initiatives Director of research almost twenty years. I was the nutritionist on Ding oranges for clinical trial for reversing heart disease and they showed is you can actually halt and reverse. Plaque. In the arteries heart disease. By following four ingredients in that includes a no fat at a plant based Diet. And also social support. Eating with I'm being with others. And also what is Cold Stress Management Yoga and Meditation and Dr Or Initiatives Program and also exercise physical activity some kind of physical activity and what we discovered is that Adhering to the no fat at a plant based. Diet. And even. More significant, doing more and more yoga and meditation every week six hours. You mentioned lead to weight loss as a natural side effect. Of Following the program and what I know and what I write about no person integrative eating if that the consciousness eating in a calm meditative frame of mind affects the way in which food is metabolize and intern that helps you eat less and Eat and way less. Yeah. No I I know the family meal is one of the most important things to me in my life. Personally, it is the time where I reconnect with my daughters and just have a peaceful time in in my in my home and and it was very important to my mother and father as well growing up and I feel like you said, gratitude. We used to bless every single meal and have gratitude and that in itself put you in a frame of mind when you eat where you really have such incredible appreciation and just a calm about where you are in your life in the presence where you sit in your home with your family or your friends whoever it may be and just appreciate what you have before you in your life, right? I I'm smiling because when you tell us about your experience eating with your family and appreciating food in in blessing it I your your voices relaxed and and yet they're at your dinner table. So I'm Kinda smiling. But yes, you bring up the another ingredient, which is gratitude of whole person integrative eating and most of us have learned to. Relate to food as as something calories that we count and obsessing about food and being overly concerned about the best way to eat what to eat, how to eat and the opposite of what I call food fretting. The guiding and over concern about what how you're eating? The opposite of that is gratitude to fill and flood your your entire being in your heart. With gratitude and delight and appreciation for the gift of nourishment. That is food. That is how we related to food for thousands of years before. All of us have been. CONDITIONED TO BE CONCERNED ABOUT IT instead of enjoying it absolutely and. What you just said reminded me of apart in your book called Heart Intelligence and your health. We're going to go to break when we come back and we'll talk about that and other so much I wanna ask you so I think that would be a good place to start when we get back right absolutely looking forward to it. All right. We'll be right back everyone more coming up with Deborah casten she is an incredible author and we will be right back you're listening to one Life Radio Is. Welcome back everybody you're listening to one life radio. This is Bernadette with junior and our special guests continuing on Deborah casten. She is an international nutrition researcher award winning author and Medical Health Writer with a specialty in preventing and reversing obesity and Heart Disease Deborah has published more than four hundred nutrition and health articles. Her first book feeding the body nourishing the soul received the first place gold award in the spirituality category from the Independent Publisher, book? Awards her. Latest. Book Whole Person Integrative Eating has been honored with a number one gold best book award in the category. By the Book Excellence Awards, she is a VIP contributor to area huffington's. Thrive global and Deborah is married to behavioral scientist and Co author of her book are their book the whole person, integrative eating Larry Shirts. He's a PhD so great to have you on the show I absolutely love your book, and so we're going to get right back to it in the book talk about heart, intelligence and your health, how is our heart intelligence related to our Health Tabora? Well, I'll give you an unusual research. Study that was done by Co author and husband Larry Sure wits to give you an example of this. Larry did research with. People who developed heart disease? And he did this with thousands of studies and interviews done with men at the time who developed heart disease over time and what he he discovered is when these? Men developed heart disease were given an open ended interview meaning not Questions with yes or no, but they can answer questions anyway they wanted. But he discovered. The men who answered these open ended questions with constant and many references to I. Me My and mine. which Larry Kohl's self involvement. We're the ones who developed heart disease over. Ten Twenty Years And if they had a heart attack. They were prone to die from the heart attack. Then those who are not self involved who did not answer questions with I me my in mind. So what that tells us is what that tells us is being other involved. means. There's something going on that is protective in some way. And that relates to the concept of appreciation and appreciating food from the heart not in your head with. Oh, thanks. Okay. So Great. This is wonderful. Really Flooding Your Heart Center Shaqra in. India. And your whole being with gratitude and appreciation. Changes the. Of Your mind body I don't separate them anymore. And what we know in terms of toll person integrative eating. That changing your thinking from food Friday, which again is what we've all been taught to do count calories and it and limit what we're doing and restricting what we're doing. If we go back to the blessing of food, but you said you and your family evolved with and you grew up with your family still does. that. Means being aware of the food on your plate, the mystery of life in the foods nourishment in the food. And you're not feeling yourself up with Oh that's carbs and. That's bad for me. You know I was good today and I'll always bad today. You're not feeling yourself with judgment and and self involved thinking your attention and is on gratitude for the food before you and that reduces. Your odds of overeating. And gaining weight that is what our research has shown, which we have published and Deuba reviewed medical journals. Wow. It's so interesting and oh my Gosh I. Love just loving this talk that we're having today sincerely, just really loving it and I feel like the message that you have is so important in your book whole Person Integrative. Eating. So let me ask you this. We've only got about four minutes. What is the ancient food wisdom approach to eating the ancient food wisdom approach to eating is what Ho Person Integrative Reading Model and program ask for overcoming, overeating, overweight and obesity, and to give you a concept and I understand we have four minutes. Whole Person Integrative. Eating is based on the original meaning of the Word Diet from twenty five hundred years ago during the time of PA critise tees. The Greek physician hippocrates who lived about twenty, five hundred years ago, and during that time the word Diet meant way of life and over the Millennia, it traveled throughout Europe and came to mean what it means to all of us today a regimented restricted way of eating whole person integrative eating is what I call a dietary lifestyle the seven components of whole person integrative eating because it's based on the ancient meaning of the word Diet, which is way of life, and that's why I call it dietary lifestyle. Seven ingredients are based on. Science, but its ancient food wisdom validated and verified by modern nutritional science, and that's what whole person integrative eating is the seven overeating style that we've identified. Are The new normal wave eating such as. Anybody, it will be familiar with them emotional eating. Fast food is them tasks snacking doing things? while. You're eating instead of eating mindfully since we disregard we were so surprised to discover that. Not Tasting your food not enjoying it not. Looking at the colors and the antidote to that is the whole person integrative eating ancient food wisdom of actually flavoring food with loving regard and taking time to taste. The overeating style food fretting I mentioned dieting and over concern about what to eat the antidote is gratitude. Eating a pleasant atmosphere. Instead of in your car or while you're filling up your tank with with gasoline and also what you mentioned Bernadette even with others in a pleasant atmosphere, we all learned to eat alone by ourselves and one of life's greatest pleasures is to eat with others in a pleasant atmosphere. So Ho- person integrative eating is the ancient antidote validated by science. About what and how can eat and it's? About taking time to enjoy your food and eating food. So it is a positive pleasurable. Sensual delight instead of something to be feared and counted ignored, and that's what Hope Person Integrative reading is it the antidote to the seven overeating styles what a beautiful message what a beautiful show. Diet a way of life. I. Love It. I hope you'll come back. This was a fascinating attack that we had today. Thank you so much deborah I really appreciate pleasure. All right. Thank you everyone I encourage you to get the book whole person integrative eating it is fabulous. You just heard Deborah speak about it Debra Debra, casten check it out I. Got Mine at Amazon Dot Com. Everyone. Thank you so much for listening. Have a wonderful day. It's beautiful outside it can always be beautiful though, right because you live in your head, you get one body you get one mind and you get one life.

back injury Bernadette Deborah casten cody researcher Debra Debra heart disease overweight and obesity basketball spondylosis Co Dot Com Ho Person Integrative Reading Cody Meyler India Medical Health Rider TA NEW YORK Debra casten Dot
we are not our bodies. Part 1

atypical

28:18 min | 7 months ago

we are not our bodies. Part 1

"Hello, everybody, Matthew Lyle Mooney quick warning. We will be discussing child lost today. If you are going through a season. We want to be sensitive to that and let you know if this is not something you want to put in your ears. We understand go to the next one and we love you. So one of the first organized activities I ever did as a kid was ballet lessons ballet and tap did you know about me? You know, I did I knew that you took them. I didn't know that that was one of the first things you did what experience do you have with dance matt? Not a lot. I went to a to a Christian School Ginny and when you were going to dances we were not allowed to do so that stinks you really missed out on that mat and it was because of this apparently sad dance void in my youth that. I asked him to explain to me to us the idea of dance steps that build on one another because the stories will be sharing today. Well, they layer on kind of like that like dead steps. At least. I think they do hit. The last one I tried was the Macarena. Was it the Cabbage Patch? So the difference in freestyle and choreographies choreography, you're going to have set moves right for each count of the music and you can't start in life count seven and eight without doing counts one and two first so you may have a move for one two, three four and you have to learn that move and then you'll later on the next move 5678 and then you keep going from there and together. It makes the dance. I think the reason that we've had to kind of go with this dance idea is this is a really hard concept that we're trying to talk about Iraq. And so we're going to start at kind of what I'm calling Steph one healing and the jurors then we're going to go to step 2. Disability and the church and though it was not as we had planned step three became an episode all on its own. I'm Matthew Leila Mooney and I'm Jenny money. And this is a typical stories of our fragile and shared Humanity this season. We are focusing on those experiencing disability by looking at some of the things I have learned as a father and also as someone living and learning and Community with my friends with disability as you heard today, we're layering on some dance step step one healing and the chert off around December 16th. I Had just taken my weekly injection of chemotherapy and I'm sitting on the couch feeling terrible makes me feel really not needed for a day and scrolling through social media and I saw hashtag wake up Olive. I promise you we will return to why she was undergoing email, but for now back to the couch pictures of this little girl circulating all over social media and started looking into it and saw two years old Olive heiligenthal had died in her sleep on December 14th stopped breathing and her parents discovered that she had stopped breathing. Of course, they may call 911 and taken to hospital hospital where she was pronounced dead and her body then was taken to the County coroner's office were remained 4 a.m. is and Kelly olives mom called for their Community to pray for her Resurrection from the dead and they were believing that God would raise her and this request for not just a prayer for healing but prayer for raising all of from the dead was not just any person's request. This was someone quite known in faith circles. Yeah. So so it's a little girl that died Olive her mom is Callie heiligenthal who is a really well-known well-loved popular Bethel Music artists and they are part of Bethel Church in California, which is a church that people around the world follow and receive teaching from and View as a source of wisdom and encouragement but especially through their Ministry of Music their music is incredibly popular and this request to join them for prayer to wake up all of well it took off very quickly the call for forgot to wake up Olive became not just Kelly's call but the Cry of Bethel church and of Those whom are connected to it. And so I thought Pastor Bill Johnson, you know, made statements in support of this and of course, they're couched in a little bit of caveats, but she was a strong backing of them. But in the meantime and that chunk of days where everybody everybody were many many people are crying out for all of two. the dead there were tons of worship services with you know, ecstatic dancing and prayer crying out for this little girl to be raised and it became a a movement really Just a quick check in with you to let you know that I want to be so so tender with this as many of you know, many of you may not know Ginny and I thought I lost our first son Elliot and so I in no way want to make light of this loss and I'm so sorry for this family and further pain. And for what I thought I must be missing their daughter every day. And as I look back on that time, if you had told me that any prayer or anything that I could do with somehow bring Elliot back, I certainly would have done it. Just letting you know that Eventually, they'll Johnson made a statement Bill Johnson. You may remember the pastor at Bethel made a statement saying well, we have decided, you know, the family is going to be holding a memorial service. And that was that to be honest. I find myself torn between admiring their faith and bold choice though. This may not be my own Theology and also believing that there's just surfaced in this story an uncomfort and an unwillingness to accept suffering which can lead to some real problems. Of course. I'm sitting there baffled and I'm sitting there in my own weakness wrong with it. Very palpable with something that people have prayed for God to take away and hasn't been I told you that we'd get there and I'm going to let KJ Choi You Her diagnosis because well Ankylosing Spondylitis. So what Ankylosing Spondylitis ankylosis Spondylitis? Well, I tried and it is a civilian autoimmune disease that affects my spine and for me most of my joints and it causes a considerable amount of pain and stiffness fatigue wage and overtime degeneration. And it's something that doesn't have a cure. I have had for 11 years in those eleven years. I've had many seasons where I'm entirely disabled or bed-bound and I haven't had one day without a large amount of pain either and so it is during recovery from a sickening chemo treatment for this condition that KJ opens her phone to read and from her perspective this story of all of seems much bigger than the two weeks of please Prayers and worship Services. It seems to her indicative of a much larger Christian culture that pushes away pain in an attempt to circumvent offering at all costs the faith that is built upon the death and suffering of a man has now come to have a very awkward relationship with his call to follow him down that road. But what seems obvious from her perspective is that it is a Christian culture that has become uncomfortable with her mom. I did feel this just if it was such a juxtaposition to sit there and how I came across it and I came across it and the feeling grief for this family and also feeling Shock the refusal to accept her death and the way that so many Christian Life around particular country, but also around the world were jumping onto the social media bandwagon praying for all the way to wake up. I found honestly this is going to piss people off but I found it incredibly disturbing and revealing about what Christians believe about the nature of Miracles and our place within the story of the kingdom of God and where does suffering fit and so am I just was started paid it started paying attention and and tried to listen and and sit with it and sitting with the dog Only further Disturbed me, honestly. Now don't forget we're dancing here. We're layering on Three Steps step one as Christians. We believe that God can heal people. He's God in scripture seems to invite us to ask him for healing believing that he is able and yet certainly this idea of just wanting things around us healed cured and fixed Kathy service in us a desire not for his will to be done but really for our will to be done and if nothing else we can see from here that there is a relationship in our modern Western world where we had less pain and suffering than any time before us we seem to have grown more uncomfortable with any of it at all wage. I'm dancing right now as far as you know step to if you want to talk about coming face-to-face with those whose very lives push back against this school of thought whereby pain avoidance is pre-eminent. Then I want you to meet one of my friends testing testing setting up for the podcast got my mic got my coffee got the beautiful day. That is a Mecca and he will be our guide on step two of this day and age step to disability and the church and I am joining a Mecca on his porch in Tulsa Oklahoma, and if you were here with us, you would see that a Mecca a wheelchair because in 2009, he was an athlete playing in a football game and on a particular play a Mecca broke his neck which paralyzed him. From the chest down and in the aftermath of that I go from being this football player to now having a disability being a black man in a wheelchair and now living under the poverty line and so it's poverty is race is disability. And so imagine this with me if you will hear is back and he is relearning adjusting to his new normal in every way shape and form of this life that he now has and I asked him what did they look like in this church in the faith community that he had been a part of I've been raised in church for my entire life after my accident. There's such a crazy adjudged that is happening. Adjust to the way you view the world how the World Views you I was Twenty-One years old when I got hurt and in the blink of an eye now, I'm a wheelchair user. I'm depending on other people help for certain things. And so I've got to adjust and look at the world differently and one of my worlds being the church. I don't think that I was ready for what that was going to be. Like he didn't know what that was going to be like is the Mecca's understated kind way of saying he's got quite a few stories of what that was like of what it was like to be a man in a wheelchair going to church the hardest part of put this together was deciding on which story and Mecca would reach into the bucket of church stories that he's dealt with to share with us. I was in the I was at church and there are some preaching a great message someone preaching a message on finances and I'm like yo, like I don't want to this position that I'm in. I don't want to stay here forever and thought it was really rocking me and you know, so, you know what they're like, you know, if you if you want a break doing your finances, you know, you know come down and say, you know, you know song And it's it's a risk to go. You gotta get out of your own comfort zone to go down to the office. So it's like you know what I'm going to get out of my comfort zone and it's even a bigger risk when they you are, you know in a wheelchair cuz I got to navigate I got I was at the very top so I got to go get the elevator. Come down weave My Way Through People moved by the sermon in Mecca backs his wheelchair up drives his wheelchair to the elevator gets in the elevator doors closed doors open into Mecca rolls right down to the front of the church to be prayed for for his finances because of this sermon that has moved him. So I get to it front and I am closing my eyes and I'm thinking to my I'm I'm not focused on what is in my bank account what I'd like to see in my bank account. I'm asking I'm in prayer with God in the conversation. God about hey, I know that I'm in this particular position right now, but you know what? I I believe you I believe that this is not where I need to be. I believe that he can turn it around and all of a sudden I'm feeling the presence of people and so now people are like Thursday. I open my eyes and I'm like seeing people down on my at my legs holding my legs. Somebody started grabbing my hand and you know, they're praying for healing and it's like Yo, like that's not why I'm like I like and it's not that I don't want to be healed because obviously do but it's like, you know, like what what that's just you see a problem but it's a projection like you're projecting your what you think on to me for a Mecca it is easy to see from his wage perspective that it requires more faith not less to believe in a God and follow a God that won't give him what he begs for and what he asked for weather package is Olive a daughter that has passed away or a Mecca who has lost physical abilities the me and the church had a really interesting back-and-forth not that don't go to try still go to church, but I laid down a God and God's hand me and God have our relationship. Yes, the hard thing about religion is that wage? You know we end up blaming God for people's mistakes. And so I ultimately understand that people are people and God is God and so I don't want to judge God based on the actions of people wage. I've had people that would say your faith is not your faith is not strong enough. That's the reason why you're not out of the chair like the church. There's so much shame that that's a part of life of church that we have to have a conversation about Amy speaking specifically the people with disabilities really hurt people disability to church because you now dealing with the shame because people make it may seem even unconsciously people make it seem as if you know, your your burden is is yours to carry alone or it's your fault like or like God. Oh God, I would step in there and help you. If you you know, the, you know, this this could change your life to change if you and it's it's It's frustrating. I personally made the shift to not rely on the outcome. Like if I'm going to trust God and trust in God meant not looking at outcome like walking by faith. I was hoping that the church would be that but it it really felt as if the church is stuck in its way of viewing people as broken until I guess their view of healing comes and so I think it begs the question. How did we get here? How did we get to a place where we see people with disabilities as other issue is them as broken? I asked a Mecca to play Professor to take us all to class on this one. So grab a desk and a pencil maybe a backpack. I don't know schools yet the history of disability. We went we moved from the religious model to a medical model. But in the church is a combination of the religious and medical and what I mean by that is back in the day in the early early days off if someone had mental health issues or someone had a disability that was quote unquote. The devil sends to the forefather took possession, you know, you're possessed by the devil. So then you move away from that model to the medical model where you know, if you have a disability you you are something that needs to be fixed. And then in the church, you've got a combination of the two where you are something that meets your broken. So you need to be fixed and we haven't gotten to a place where you are human and you are a person and and you have your own hopes and dreams of speak to me as that don't speak to me. Don't don't look at me for what seemed like look at me for like what I bring what I bring to the table. And that is the point of step to where dancing and is dancing kind of happens in my life. Maybe you're stumbling a bit. Maybe you're nailing it. I don't need step to disability and the church. What if we saw our friends with disability not as something to be solved rather, we sought people with real gifts to offer us all of my friends with disability and certainly my daughter they have real flaws. They can be jerks. They can be self-centered because ding ding ding there us they're no different and in the same way, they have tremendous gifts to bring us as I survey the landscape of our modern church and l'm it the way we are viewed by the outside world. I see a church that home. muted the gifts of a certain population for far too long and is paying the price we need our friends with disabilities in our churches not dead so they can be healed but so that we can Because you know what? I dream in my mind that would happen instead when a Mecca went down front for prayer and that story. I wish instead that those that gathered around him would I asked would plead for him to pray for them that they would see his faith for what it was for what it must be someone who did not get what he asked for the most and yet still holds to a faith in his God because I think what this journey of putting together. This episode has taught me is that winning our friends with disabilities need to be healed to be cured to be fixed says more about us and what we want for us and our own lives than it does about what we offer our friends with disability, but it was KJ and a Mecca the ones walking through it and living it that helped me see that when it comes to disability. I think people are trying to sue their own discomfort and people with disabilities make people uncomfortable because they are now a little bit closer to home their own humanity and or and their own mortality even and that scares people and so they do whatever they can to to make their own discover. Go on your way. Even if it means dressing it up as me getting rid of yours like you're imposing discomfort on me further by trying to tell me that oh, you know what I just want to heal your pain did I tell you that I was in pain that I tell you that this that this was like an issue know you're speaking about it because you think it's an issue. We live in the office at the center of thinking that we can create the future that we want and that gets co-opted by the church and married into this gospel where God really is going to renew all things. So we collapse those together and Ed. We see suffering and we see bodies that have continuing disease disorders disabilities and what happens inside of us is that we feel anxious that that could happen to us to we spiritualize our anxiety and we use it like a song toward toward the person and families who are suffering by we think kindly crying out for their kids doing in their relief. When what if the way of the Gospel is actually two turned toward people who are suffering and have continuing weakness home and to say I want to see Jesus in you And so today through these two stories, we layered on to step step one healing and the church step to disability and the church. I was a dance and the thing that all of these stories today held in common were all of this complexity arises from our three stories today. These were all folks who wanted healing that was their stated desire next episode step three, we take on deeper deeper part of this dance my friends with disabilities who do not want to be healed. Thank you to KJ Ramsey and Emeka. You can find links to them and their work at the atypical life.com there or pretty much anywhere on the world wide web you could find information about KJ's book this too. Shall last. I'm Matthew Leila Mooney and this is a typical stories of our fragile and share a Humanity. Thank you so much for listening. We are truly thankful. If you like this and would like us to be able to share more stories like this one we would be so honored if you would like this share this song snail mail social media leave a review all of these help others to hear this story and we love you. But before we leave I asked them to imagine on one side was the church and they were walking towards the other side all of our friends with disability represented in a group and these two groups off. For walking towards each other. What would he stand in the middle of them and say put down your tools because even just in that visual I am I'm so glad that you brought the cuz as as I as I see that visual in visual what I know the church is coming with they're coming with hammers and hand screwdrivers and hand because what they see are people that need to be fixed and if I were talking to the Church of the whole I'd say put down your tools. Those are not people that need to be fixed if people to need to be hugged in and pulled in.

Mecca Matthew Leila Mooney Jenny money Kelly olives Callie heiligenthal Pastor Bill Johnson KJ Choi Elliot Bethel Church Bethel church Bill Johnson Steph Jenny autoimmune disease KJ Ginny Bethel eleven years football 11 years
Crystal Stull

CharVision

52:20 min | 2 years ago

Crystal Stull

"With the quicksilver car capital one you earn unlimited one point five percent cash eh anyway you said Ernie Unlimited one point five percent cashback what is today may twenty fourth two thousand nineteen in and and I'm reading for three drag queens and one of them's Nikki using with you guys to make sure I'm introducing them the right names so and today I have a very special guest who Komo so proud of you and crystals transgender what are you battling I can't even say it it's called ankylosing spondylitis something my doctor Doctor David Brownstein in Michigan wrote a book they when we have things in and they label it you know to something that we've put in our system so I think osteen dot com okay and wow so but we are pretty much a mixed group you sort of beyond this mission to spread visibility kind of you know well you know I do aware just put the Queens it's called reading with our goal is and I've done like eleven of them now we yeah exactly and we are souls the body says and it's important for everybody when mm to to watch it one day well actually my manager and she wing and she she likes she she really got into it because sexual preference we had in life it's just everybody's different that's me so much as the prejudice and the bigoted people that that well pretty much I actually so I've been battling had our first meeting I I started really going to the doctor and dealing with that and they the dietary regimens and things like that to try to control it but do they think any hormones it actually made the as it's actually made the as less aggressive and has actually is very very They're they're they're confused about my whole situation because no other Trans Person No other Trans Woman that has had this disease oh it's very interesting subside a little that's pretty phenomenal it's really you know because they were like we've never seen something like this never had a case happen so the big issue with this particular illnesses that bolt is over time my joints are slowly starting to feuds I'm sixty because my joints and my bones are wide shit yeah watch it originally met it was at home family and you how camera says St- and you know go pro operator whatever your you'll embrace female energy you know it was I struggled even at five you can't really comprehend that it's not something that you can it's hard to say somewhere in highschool is is when I really just new and you you go wait let me out of West all my goodness did you miss that person I don't not at all not at all right but ninety me and when you came to my show you had your ex girlfriend's mother you've come into your own you're exactly you're you're you're you're yourself now you're you're the beautiful that's my girlfriend Andrea she's she's first at each other sides all the time we're really compatible religious we just clip so sound and actually just not long ago she had uh-huh she has gone through the operation all everything she absolutely loves that I imagine being a prisoner in my own body it's something you really at least some parents are addressing this now at Young Ages in allowing it I think that's since starting their transition and and I'm like no I I knew when I was five like he's judy on I really just it would make me feel I think it would make me feel complete and I would be really because because it is that added complication my doctors have even told me Sir I healed the arthritis sock I mean I know from antibiotics and there's like a whole thing that it he he does he never ositive and see if there's a way to heal this are you I saw you you brought you came in with I I need to see that last season I just can't keep getting on HBO that's a whole other Freelance audio work and I I actually do modeling and that's fantastic I in Los Angeles Los Angeles they're they're called everybody using everything I have so it's it's all the years of still what your gifts out me no and you probably are even better at your waking up every morning to you I'm really I would sit I kid you not I was getting up and getting ready to get out the door and I would just sit there for a few minutes every title of if I get up right now that means I have to put on this facade unfair exactly an and every morning I did right and then you got a lot of Moxie to do that because I mean it's hard for a lot of accepted right by the public exactly and you know it's it's what's going on in our society I mean they're even trying to to frightening all the hard work we did in the sixties I don't understand I really don't I medical rights and privileges to transpeople and they're trying to get that passed the million transpeople presently just United States that such a small percentage and I really believe that we're that it I've it yourself exactly a month you know kids they're just how what what can you say from from crystal that whole `nother level I mean really it's on a whole `nother level it's amazing I just don't care it's everything's back to normal I'm comfortable I myself for the most part it's very I I feel liberated amazing Vit- somebody who is on the radio and in L. A. G. Member Him Tony Forgot his name David part of the transition process are you now while I've is a particular you know it's different for everybody but in my case it's that you know my doctor and I have to constantly kind of work at and make sure that my levels are okay and my bloodworks we've been going hard on that and it's amazing we're here Dr In I the amazing building with a lot of resources any trans person or pull it up anywhere it's very easy to find the Los Angeles. LGBT center transitioned that over For for their building but okay please in different people yeah so they understand your stand really do there's you know there's some trans that's a really great tool to really really great resource so important for people

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