35 Burst results for "Spleen"

Please Say a Prayer for Eric's Father

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:18 min | 2 months ago

Please Say a Prayer for Eric's Father

"My dad, who will be 95 in June, he has for years struggled with low blood platelets. It's really like a potentially fatal condition. And the doctors have tried everything over the years and it's been up and down and up and down. Really crazy stuff. He hadn't had, he had to have his spleen removed. That was like one of this last ditch efforts about three years ago. He's been through all kinds of stuff and the platelets again are way down. Like nonexistent levels. It's really dangerous. It's really bad. He's undergoing some treatment today and tomorrow, but it's all inconclusive. So I just want to say to people, I would, to use the Christian term, I covet your prayers for my dad, Nick metaxas, that his platelet count would be raised up because it is really, it's tough stuff. And I think people can imagine if you say, hey, Eric, what's going on in your life? What's important to you? Nothing's more important than my mom and dad. I love them, I think as much as you could love your parents, they've just been amazing. Parents to me and I just want to ask that really shamelessly ask people to pray for my dad, Nicholas metaxas for his health right now because of his platelets.

Eric Nicholas Metaxas Nick Metaxas June 95 Tomorrow Today Christian Three Years Ago ONE Years
Pennsylvania School Board Member Calls Parents 'Village Idiots'

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:58 min | 3 months ago

Pennsylvania School Board Member Calls Parents 'Village Idiots'

"There's this incredible op-ed that was written by Richard Robinson. Which is probably never heard of him before. I hadn't either until this story came out. He is a school board member on the York suburban school district board. That is in York county, Pennsylvania. Now, I know your county better than most. It is not a suburb of Philadelphia. It's out about a little bit west of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. It's in a more rural part of Pennsylvania. It's about an hour and a half north of Baltimore is where York is. And not far from Harrisburg. The state capitol. Well, this school board member, Richard Robinson, wrote a op-ed an opinion piece. He said, no, I do not work for you parents. York suburban school district board member, Richard Robinson wrote an op-ed. He said that the ability to be able to show up to school board meetings is the following. The provision gives residents of a school district the chance to vent their spleens about exorbitant taxes or demand subjects be taught properly the way they were during the most frigid period of the Civil War. In the past, more often than not nobody showed up, but not these days as social media outlets and national news broadcasts and our local newspapers tell us school boards are now the new battleground in the fight for America's future amen they are. This bothers Richard Robinson, he says parents who show up and give public comment have, quote, the collective intelligence of a village idiot. Now remember, this guy wrote this. He's not some mistake. It's not some caught on camera Mike. No, he wrote this in an opinion piece. Some members of my community. Here is my community. Appear to interpret this part of broad board meetings as the occasion to tell board members, why they have the collective intelligence of village idiot, and how the school district ought to be addressing real problems. He continues by saying far too many elected officials have shown over the past two years that the consent of the governed is a little more than an inconvenient speed bump on the road to advancing their unpopular agendas. Mocking and dismissing the concerns of community may be cathartic for petty dictators, but it's not a path to electoral success. This is what Nicole Neely said in response to Richard Robinson. She said that and she runs the parents defending education. This article continues. Richard Robinson by saying, with all due respect to the men and women who come up to me and say, I'm a taxpayer you work for me. Robinson the school board member says, no, I don't. I don't work for you. I was elected by the people who voted to represent you. What? No, so I don't work for you. I was elected by the people who voted to represent you.

Richard Robinson York Suburban School District Pennsylvania York County Harrisburg Lancaster Philadelphia Baltimore ED York Nicole Neely America Mike Robinson
"spleen" Discussed on Antibuddies

Antibuddies

06:50 min | 7 months ago

"spleen" Discussed on Antibuddies

"An t-cells shoddy early phases of development. Guam's asked us through progressively differentiated stages as multi potential. Virginia's cells or mp's than floyd primes multi potential. Virginia genitals are out. Mpp's ilene for progenitor cell e alkies at the e. l. p. Cop stages dot's virginia's leave the bone marrow and migrate to assignments to complete that developments. Living a bee's opportunity to behind in mammals b. cells do not have an organ analogous to defy must enrich fee cells develop and mature to functioning cells at but even though birds do on this again is called the bursa of the therapist and be in diesels. Come from. I did not know that so sorry. Birds had their own little. I thought oh my god. This is amazing. First thing i learned any analogy. But i honestly did not know what birds meant. I just learned it. Yes like oh this. Is they say. Beast for bone marrow notes for bursa. I didn't know from birds. B. cells are birds. You heard it here first. Folks and with initiation of videri. Combination the b-cell progressively commits suicide switch and begins the process of receptor rearrangement followed by the visas election in differentiation that will come at eight formation of complete repertoire of functioning with obese besides tesol moscow must both pass through stages of positive section in which dole sells checkable receiving signals are retained addict spends of those which cannot undo cells must also survive the process of negative selection enriched lymphocytes with high affinity to self ambition a delete it. A positive selection in visa development remains enough to least collectivized processes in bizarre development. And unlike t-cells cells these cells do not undergo a strict selection with respect to that -bility to by self antigens but what happens to even cells in the splaine. You asked while similar is playing a strict because it is only it only screens for To the spleen unlike the sinusitis that the ad expressed by the Screens for every possible in our genome includes for and there's also no equivalent of the app per team. Visa selection has yet been discovered to light the topic. Expression of antigens in going barrack in order to the slick owner dilution of self engine specific details and diaz remain for future visa biologists to be investigated high levels of Expressed on the cell face and the necessary adhesion molecules to direct this Relation development of mature fully clube to sell For a few weeks to months and if it were laid on Tact in the context of cell l. and subsequent differentiation to antibody producing factories ad for the final anchin stimulated stages of Nation will discuss that envision suits That was a great comparison. I also wonder dat reason. We know so much more about beat do cells or the follicle cells compared to be one and the marginal zone. B cells is because these are the typical visas that help us in getting our immunity when we are immunized so they probably are more relevant to human health especially overtly when we think of course. I'm sure be won an emmy. Be doing something in the hindsight like in the background. We don't appreciate as much. Well i think. Yeah that's i think that's true of anything that is more innate like like we were always more interested in adaptive immunity. And you see more. Labs studying adaptive immunity. When in fact the innate immunity is doing like most of the heavy lifting in facts if you're missing innate immune cells or genes responsible for those most of the time you just die like either as a baby or an embryo. And that's why you know we don't seem to see a lot of diseases associated with it whereas we see a lot associated with dapitan unity. So just because you don't know about it doesn't mean it doesn't matter your that innate is to i land defense. It's because of the innate that the adaptive gets all the time to wrap up its defense if the innate wasn't holding off the patterson would be kept before we have. Antibodies coming out. Now right okay so now to end the episode natalie. How can we summarize everything. We have talked about today. Okay well i've got a couple of points for you. One the three major subsets of mature b cells according to their development. Route our view on b. cells b cells and marginals on b cells. These cell types also differ in their vcr diversity. Anatomical niche and the requirement for tesol help now immature b cells emerged from the bone marrow as transitional one that's t one b cells will circulate to the spleen the interaction with self antigens spleen can cause a practice of t. v. cells to prevent of unity surviving t one b cells then into the follicles. Were the level of igt expression increases. They finally become t two cells and then enter into either a fully be to sell. Which is the conventional be so we all know in love or become a marginal zone. C. e cell unlike t cells b cells do not need to be selected for their ability to recognize antigens in the context of mac antigens nor is there any primary immune organ like thymus at least in mammals for their maturation aside from the bone marrow which helps with all of ellipoid stop so. That's that's all you need to know a have one more thing what if they're called marginal zone selves because they have been marginalized by the immunologists. Mcp cells okay. I think this would be a good point to rep of the discussion. Thanks laws data and natalie for this wonderful discussion for audience. If you're interested in no more about our science communication anders please check out. antibodies dot. Org you can find our blogs journal clubs and bought gus there. If you have any questions or suggestions you can email us at antibodies. One not mail dot com with that. I'm your host jatin sharma signing off until we meet again bye-bye..

bility splaine Virginia Mpp Guam bursa floyd dole moscow virginia diaz emmy natalie patterson jatin sharma
"spleen" Discussed on Antibuddies

Antibuddies

07:44 min | 7 months ago

"spleen" Discussed on Antibuddies

"These hey i just think there was a heard. Type of transitional diesels call de tree what we know about that. T. three as a type of peace out that branches off off the teachers state so instead of becoming Diesel it goes off a different path. The problem is we do not know what the row t. three b. cells in how the human hybrid we'd know that we do about these cells that die usually offer ounces and diesels are also implicated in certain autoimmune diseases. Bornstein's a steady from amer university from the Jeremy boss the shell that. The teeth resells often extended in. Sally patients. Doesn't can you tell us about be one amazon. Now you're so far. We have discussed. The transitional safe and the development of mature maturation of be to mature follicle cells are synonymous however the other two important subsets that have been described. The have different functions and are located in disdained anatomical locations in the next session. We'll discuss the nature and biology of b. One and martinos won't be sales be one. Sales can be subdivided into be one a. and b. one b. cells yet immunologists. Sure lovemaking subsets out of everything. This one a and b when b subset is based on the expression of a surface marker called cd five for the sake of this episode and keeping everything simple deal only focus on e one. Acl's these cells are pheno typically end functionally distinct from b-to-b cells or the follicle cells. The first difference. We'll notice that the visas are mostly these b. one b. cells are mostly located in the pleural cavity. That is around the chest and in the better tony cavities. That is around the abdominal. There aren't many be one cells in the spleen other aspects that differ from b2b cells. Is that the b one. A repertoire is limited. Which means they don't have as much diversity in their be seller sceptre the follicle cells do oh why is dot yet. That is a quick question. These be one. Sales have very specific light and heavy chains that are rearranged and on top of that they don't express. Dd which is one of these enzymes required for adding n nuclei diversity. So this makes them less die worse compared to the b2b cells if they have a limited repertoire. These cells recognize despite their limited vcr diversity. These cells can still recognize self carbohydrate and lipid antigens such as phosphate alkaline exposed on aged ritter sides and episode excels. This allows these b cells to make antibodies that help in tagging dead cell debris with eventually gets cleared out by macrophages. I'll add a koufax tear serrano immune diseases are linked to the factors our inability of ourselves to clout dead cell debris. Oh wow that's so cool. So bar from Debris be when acl's can also recognize certain bacterial and viral antigens so you maintain that there are not as useful as do sales but looks like they have their own portfolio of tasks to do one. Outstanding characteristic of these cells is the fact that they can secrete. Antibodies in the absence of antigen stimulation. These antibodies are called natural. Antibodies the fact that these b cells can produce antigens even in the absence of antigen or these co stimulation makes them hybrid cell type between the adaptive and innate immune system as they are secreting constant amount of natural antibodies that protect us from different infections and also bag are dead cells for other different characteristic of these b cells is their origin as most of the b one cells originate during the embryonic development. Be one acl's are self-renewable. In the periphery and deer population is not dependent on the him. It avoid extent cell compartment in the bone marrow. Yep you heard it right. These cells take a completely different development part than what we have talked about in this episode and in the previous one this is still enigmatic and an active a off research. We just know so little about these. It would actually a pretty good episode. You like embryonic development of the union system. But i just. I'm just blown away that these cells don't even depend on t. Cells for help or even an antigen yet so fascinating and now that we have learned about interesting characteristics of be oneself specifically be one astles. Let's talk about marginals on visas. The marginal zone b cells also called 'em z. B. cells received their name by their location in the marginal zone. The outer region of divide bolt of the spleen. Their function has been described on recognizing bloodborne antigens. This is different from what the follicle cells are the b. to be cells typically respond. To which is antigens that are brought in by the lymphatic duty follicles something similar between marginal zone and be one b. Cells is that they can produce. Antibodies in absence of diesel hope as well regarding their origin. Marginal will cells are derived from him at apart except cells and like the follicle beat do cells and they also arise from d to transitional population. Wow so we just learned about b2b sells. You won't be cells and marginal b. cells all in one episode there. Do you want to give us some comparison between b. and t. cell development as we wrap up the series on lymphocyte development cheryl. Let's get into that in closing. This episode might be useful for our audience to reconsider points of comparison between the development of the two arms of the adaptive immune system b. n. t. cells both selling Odd journey in the fetus. And the new nate and in the neonates gamma delta t cells and b cells separated by their own particular niches to function as self-renewing populations into the death of the hosts it's kind of funny how the delta e. cells or gamma delta are so perfectly analogous to the b. one b. cells both of these appearing so early during the gamma delta. Don't need to interact with emmett. Seem accused to do their thing and here be oneself. Don need help from diesels. Do do their thing. Now that you guys mentioned it this to population. Stu seem analogous in the adult animal. Be teased development. Continue in the bone marrow as she knows so well at this point now studying. But he a poetic stem cells. Be.

amer university Bornstein Sally Jeremy amazon ritter cheryl emmett Don Stu
"spleen" Discussed on Antibuddies

Antibuddies

07:45 min | 7 months ago

"spleen" Discussed on Antibuddies

"Gd you hygiene. I'm into wendy cells and lower mature b cells. Yes something like that. While tied to remember these like single marker expression for cell types out. We should be aware that you know. A single marker isn't necessarily a reliable way to identify sal and that's why we use multiple markers when identifying anything whether that be obese l. a. t. cell or even non immune cells like neurons so that was all the obligatory alphabet soup of any analogy. But for those of you not laboring over your potential flow. Saitama tree panels here the critical things you need to know about. T. one and t to be cells so t- ones will gradually become t. Two's and t two's will eventually become a mature b cell. There's no skipping steps. This takes about three or four days and mostly occurs in the spleen. However there are some exceptions. Some b cells emerged from the bone marrow as t. two's already with is even discussion about immunology. If there were Exception to i know however t to be cells can also up regulate expression of chemokine receptors. So it's t two's but not the t. Ones that can recirculating the lymphatic and interbail follicles in the secondary lymphoid organs. Like spleen and lymph nodes. I have a question. Why do be so won't go so badly in these lymphoid structures anyway. What could be the motive behind the ending up in lymphoid organ rather than just roaming in the bloodstream. All the time. Well i mean. I guess you can never answer y questioned in biology. That suggests that we know you know what the end point is going to be but we can. We can still speculate a it. May it may. Because like the odds of finding the right antigen is pretty high in ellipoid oregon. Since our lymphatic system makes sure that a sample of each corner in our body and it's massive organ system reaches some lymphoid organ to screen for pathogens of their antigens which actually if you wanna know fun facts at like we have these mice and we tattoo their toes so we can tell which one mice are and the draining lymph node from. That tattoo is always blue. Because you know the all the oath dendritic cells in the back of ages stuff are bringing like tattoo income with a battle right. Isn't that amazing. Therefore anyway it is in the b. cells and even a t. cells best interest to go into lymphoid organ. Where can find that antigen and feel good about itself bipolar. It can finally achieve its purpose in life which many other michel s- will only be able to dream about as they carry out their mundane chores and stare into the void. That only an ant phil. That's dave natalie. It really is now who remembers their splenetic architecture. Nobody not me. Yeah nobody Well okay the spleen has a red poll that filters blood and it has a white pope for immune stuff. The white pulp is made of three parts. That's the hurry. Artioli win ford sheath which we call pals or short follicles and the marginal zone So that was the males who were talk as i joke today exactly so the perry artioli lymphoid As the name suggests are concentric layers of cells around the arteries that through the spleen. So within the pals lymph lymphocytes will congregate into a structure called. Follicles was usually have distinct b. n. t. cells zones. And this is where germinal. Senator structures will form after antigen recognition. So we'll probably talk about germinal centers future episode. When i said that he won cells become t to in the spleen. This is the place the t. One sees us cells into the spleen through the pals. Then they go through kind of screening to make sure that they are auto reactive. Consider this Process analogous to what happens to vima sites in mus T one b cells undergo negative selection in the pows. So i eat those b cells that are that signal to strongly through their be. Cr actually go through ape doses. In fact we lose about half to three quarters of our transitional b. cells this way whatever t- won't be cells survive the screening will go into the follicle where most of them will turn into t to be sells. The cool thing is that t to be cells. Can't die by antigen induced ape octoberfest kinda like single positive thymus sites in the vitus. Is there a reason why. T- to be cells cannot go through antigen induced apoptosis while not one basal scan. It may be due to increased expression of bbc l. xl in t two cells so bcl xl stands for b. cell lymphoma extra-large. Which does sound like my mcdonald's order. But i actually the job is to prevent a popped asus inside the b. cells as you can guess from the name it's also found to be up regulated in certain types of lymphomas in fact bath. Survival factor that we talked about before also helps to increase bcl xl expression inside b. cells. And i mentioned that t two's express more baff. Receptor t one b cells. So that could probably explain the difference to tanks what happens after the cells have entered the follicle so the follicle is also where most transitional t to e cells can become mature an inter back into the blood circulation however some t to be cells into the third space. The marginal zone. Which i think is better than the twilight zone anyway. The marginal zone it borders the red pulp and the palce and some people think it should be like its own thing considered. Its own thing. It's full of special types of macrophages and special b. cells which scan circulating blood for antigens in process down any antigens they encounter think like a giant. Tsa security line for blood. But i don't wanna get too much into the marginal zone. B cells as jeff will tell us more about them later. What's also interesting. Is that signaling. Downstream of the be cr seems to change to these developmental stages we can actually measure that change by concentrations of calcium india cycled bliss royal which is a lipid second messenger that helps to promote the Act inside a skeleton rearrangements maceration and survival of these b cells in t one b cells if the vcr signaling too strong there's calcium release and low production of dia cycle and the t. One will die. But in the t to be sell you can have way more calcium and way more Israel but now they're gonna live so this is an interesting example of how drastically cell can rewire it signals when it goes through a developmental stage. I'm gonna let you on a secret that typical super specific antibody producing diesel. We immunologist love talk about that. We dominate referred to as the though is actually cau- abi to the cell off flake. Leesville that the name be two implies that there's also be one b. cells right. Yes exactly that. Three times of visas after the t to development stage be von Be and then and then so be cells. Justin will talk about the wind. Medina's on diesels later in this episode. And for now if you focus on the b. two cells. I liked that name. Because it reminds me of beaches dell's bombard super strategic and hi tech and this mature Be two cells can enter the follicle respond to.

michel s dave natalie Artioli perry artioli Saitama cell lymphoma oregon phil ford asus mcdonald bbc Tsa jeff india Leesville Israel Medina Justin
"spleen" Discussed on Antibuddies

Antibuddies

05:13 min | 7 months ago

"spleen" Discussed on Antibuddies

"Evening afternoon. Oh yeah that's only evening for thera. Yes in the last episode. We talked about the process of b-cell development in the bone marrow and a how a stem cell decides to become obese inside the bone marrow. It would be useful to listen to that episode. I if you haven't already. Meanwhile there can you help me review. What all we learned in the last episode shar jetton villa in that Humid pine stem cells downs for a fight. The transcription factor. I p one Each way participate in the early stages of the lineage development. You one guys to sell in direction of lymphoid lineage and then Recruits prompted with module encompass to ensure accessibility of b cell related genes Expression regulate cell cycle control. And then newland. I assign receptor signaling along with some other factors in the bone marrow E f one or the l. e. b. cell factor wine riches with fired for the latest steps in the differentiation pathway. Next be self because grasp through an audit series of developmental stops in the bone marrow before reaching maturity away to classify these developing these cells at each state of on development is through high diffraction analysis that these cells are inside this john expression of cd thirty cd forty three. Dp wine and cd. Twenty four lastly b. cells in the ranjha specifically unresponsive by process like undulation. Angie once this visa has developed in the bone marrow we can call. It immature diesel. I'll ever It's journey is not complete here. The next step in the wife would be solved with take lies in the spleen. And that's what's been talk about this episode. Hey guys before we start. Do you wanna hear a very cute fact Did you know that actually the spleen in addition to its role in claes in essential role in making friends. Really yeah because it's full of pals if you don't know what pals are don't worry we'll be covering that a little bit later on but suffice it to say It's a really important part clinic. architecture so this is in fact a job. That's a very technical to johnson. Can you tell us a. How does a feazel exit went barrow. What is the mechanism behind us. That's an excellent question. We talked about hard. Sell step up into immature basal in the bone marrow. Before these immature. B cells start expressing akemi receptor called s. one b. Our our fingers seen one phosphate receptor. This sceptre allows the b. cells to migrate towards its ligand which is s one. Be or finger seen one phosphate. Can you guess which type of cells express be no. I'm curious which types of cell to express one p lame one very important cell type here. The red blood cells are known to store and release s one p since the bloodstream is full of. Rbc's there is plenty of s won't be in the bloodstream to attract. These immature b cells to leave the bone marrow and continue their adventure. These immature b cells in the blood are called transitional b. cells and researchers have classified these transition b. cells into three categories t one t two and three b. cells this classification is based on the kind of protein markers they express on their surface. Let's begin talking about the to well-studied transition b-cell types. I the d one and d to be cells. Natalie can you tell us something about these type of transition b. cells. yeah sure just as youths transition through in their personality before finally settling into who they really are so to do b. cells go through t one and t two before becoming fully mature if you want to characterize t one t to you might notice that compared to t one t to have more Membrane imma globulin d. That's gd expression as well as cd. Twenty one were services. Both complement receptor in. Abc are co receptor. Now t to be cells also express that baff receptor in bath is e cell. Activating factor which was actually new important. Tanf family site a guy that promotes b. cell survivor survival. To remember when marker to identify transition basil's friends amateurs state what what should it be. Utterly.

jetton villa newland Angie barrow johnson Rbc Natalie Abc basil
"spleen" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

Acupuncture is my Life

03:48 min | 9 months ago

"spleen" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

"Knows where empty patterns would is deficient but now you can have full pads with his excess with his coal dampness affecting display again a patient would appear with poor appetite feeling of fullness now in epa cash eum or abdomen a feeling cold and the epa gas. Gm which improves with the application of heat and it'll be like a feeling of heaviness in the head and body would sweet taste in their mouth or absence of taste though we know there's that we loose stools tiredness nausea a dima a dull white complexion with excessive white badgen discharge these symptoms of cold dampness that has affected the spleen where an acupuncturist will look to resolve this dampness and expel colt. Keep in mind. I start getting into specific diseases. A lot of these symptoms on manifestations going to become clear. And i'll even do one moist damp heat affecting spleen since i did damp damp..

"spleen" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

Acupuncture is my Life

03:58 min | 9 months ago

"spleen" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

"You just want to lie down but this time you wanna be ruled out for you wanna be under a blanket or something like that. And they'll be pale complexion with a dima. Coal limps all right. So remember that these things are important this pattern. Like i said it's the same spleens he deficiency. The only difference is the exposure cold and damp environment noun acupuncturist in this case with generally look to tone affi- and warm spleen young next to spleen. She's sinking now. This is interesting because if you ever suffer from any type of prolapse we organs begin to drop. There's your underlying reality of spoon she deficiency. You need cheat. Hold the organs in place so which spleens she's sinking they'll be poor appetite again spleen he'd deficiency slide abdominal distension after eating tiredness pale complexion. Now this weakness of the limbs with loose stools ben is depression a tendency to obesity a bearing down sensation in the abdomen. And let's say prolapse of the stomach. The uterus prolapse. Oh anus prolapse of the bladder frequent in urgent urination as well as mineralogy and when he symptoms present in acupunctures automatically knows this person is suffering from spleen she sinking spleen is weak. It's not holding the organs up and place. So i said she ascends it goes up to cheer the spleen goes up so an acupuncturist who look to tone affi- spleen she and raised another pattern could be spleen not controlling blood guys member. These symptoms their report l. spleen not controlling the precursor again spleen she'd deficiency with we poor appetite slide abdominal distension after eating tiredness pale salad complexion dinners weakness of the lambs loose stools depression. And then there'll be blood spots under the skin they'll also be blood in your urine and stools as well as excessive uterine bleeding. Now when in acupunctures sees this patient he or she would know. This is spleen not performing. Its function of controlling blood k. And the treatment protocol to an acupuncturist would be tone of finding spleen chee and basically stopping the bleeding. The more serious pattern here is playing blood deficiency because again spleen cheat efficiency appetite slight abdominal distension after eating tiredness dull pale complexion doll because deployed deficiency weakness of the limbs loose stool depression then body in scanty periods or aiming area along with insomnia. That's a clear indicator those are clear. Indicate tours of spleen blood deficiency wiz acupunctures with tony against spleen. Chief is well. He or she would nourish the blood. Then you can even have a full pattern..

stools depression depression obesity insomnia tony
"spleen" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

Acupuncture is my Life

04:43 min | 9 months ago

"spleen" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

"After eating it'd be tiredness that we designed ally down pale complexion weakness of the limbs loose stools in a time. This happened to a new like lada greasy foods. Just keep that in the back yet. Now dying. I already spoke. I just finished. How does that correspond. Deficiency excessive consumption of cold foods again can hinder spleen function of transformation and transporting and lead to split he'd deficiency because again the spleen prefers warm foods. And also if you eat at oftentimes like dinner is at five six o'clock but you eat dinner at night. Breakfast is usually between west. Do arrange seven ten. Am but you eating breakfast twelve note. Okay this this puts a strain on the spleens capacity to perform transformation and transporting which would then lead to swing teed deficiency okay but now when it comes to emotional strain again. Pensive ness and worry tend to weaken spleen which leads cheat efficient and the climate prolonged exposure dampness. Whether it's from the weather where you live or your life habits this can weaken spleen and lead to split deficiency right. So i want you to remember that. I also want you to keep in mind just a little side note here. When comes to chronic diseases chronic diseases ten to have an underlying pattern of soclean t. deficiency because chronic diseases tend to the spleen lead into spleen she deficiency and this is the reason why dampness and flam are frequent consequence of chronic disease spleen. She's weakened this leads to the formation dampness and flab. That's a little side should do me a favor. Try and remember trying to remember that. Now as you sees a get into other platt patterns. I want you to keep in mind plenty. Deficiencies usually the precursor of these other. Plant patent especially empty patterns such spleen young deficiency spleen sinking spleen holding the blood spleen blood deficiency. But when it comes to split she'd efficiency and acupuncturist would generally look to tone fai spleen cheesy spleen yang deficiency it carries somewhat similar symptoms of spleen she'd deficiency which are poor appetite slight abdominal distension after eating tiredness. Desire to lie down. But this time when you lie down you want to curl up. There will be a pale complexion. We usa lambs loose stool and you'll feel cold along with coal lambs and they'll be pima of the extremities and sometimes even the face there'll be face will be puffy and remember then young discussion. I had early. If you don't go back to visit it guys gotta remember this. Youngest represents heat yin represents coal when you think of union yang when youngest balance as i stated in young episode. You have normal body temperature ranging between ninety point six ninety eight point seven but when one becomes deficient the other appears access so cold young as hot and in this case you have spleen young deficiency so that means that the heat is deficient so his exit appears excess colt. This is why the patient will lie down he'll be split cheat deficiency as i say that poor appetite abdominal distension tightness..

chronic diseases chronic disea chronic disease spleen blood spleen blood deficiency usa
"spleen" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

Acupuncture is my Life

03:51 min | 9 months ago

"spleen" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

"Tends to weaken a person's spleen. And i get this from college students especially and even attorneys politicians. They'll come into the acupuncture. My life clinic and i know right off the bat deficiency spleens have been affected pensive. Nece now guess what another emotion can affect the spleen in. Its worry for the most part. Worry tends to injured alongs primarily but it also affects the spleen as well because it like forms like a not you know both push cina not whereas in other words. She will stagnate along with that. If again if a person's diet his regulars well it also we clean sheet deficiency and when it affects the spleen for the most part caused stagnation in digestive system with symptoms of abdominal distension and pain. But speaking of diet let me jump right into diet. She spleen is in charge of as i stated earlier transforming and transporting food diet plays an extremely important role in spleen disharmony age. Notice how when you incorporated regular diet with emotions what it does okay so she displaying prefers warm and dry types of food. And when i say warm i mean both in terms of temperature as well as its energy. And i'm going to get into eastern attrition and discuss the importance of temperature energy of foods. And when you should eat them in when you should but all foods you can basically classify them as either warmer heart cool cold okay. Thanks. let's say examples of one food or meat especially red me. Red meat is warm and most spices as well. Examples of co foods of all raw foods such as salads and fruit with just a few exceptions and vegetables just a few exceptions as well as ice cold drinks and excessive consumption of coal foods tends to impair the transformation transporting process of the spleen causing digestive problems and interior not exterior interior dampness. An s when you begin to get that like full heavy sensation to you and you know it affects stools And you'll see you feel flemish in a way a lotta times. Dampening to have this accompanies limit as well. But the general courses for spleen disharmony harmony again can be due to an exterior pathogenic factor. He motioned in diet. Now let me get into some specific patterns and the basic underlying pattern of all spleen problems spleen cheat deficiency now have you ever suffering from screen she deficiency. You'll have a poor appetite. There'll be slight abdominal distension..

Nece abdominal distension pain
"spleen" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

Acupuncture is my Life

03:34 min | 9 months ago

"spleen" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

"And it just feels damp like this is sort of like this sticky feeling in most times not income together with heat. You know that considered exterior dampness. Okay but it can affect the body in different ways to do to environmental circumstances or even life habits such as living in a damp area as i just explained dampness outside and you're constantly faced with that well you can have a damp house mold and mildew also wearing wet clothes after swimming or exercising and when it comes to wear a wet clothes like i've had patients where the closed wouldn't be fully dry after they attempted to dry them but because he had to leave the house to go to work or they were in a rush to go somewhere they would put it on and it's still slightly damp and then by the time they get home forget sick this pain heaviness sensation to the body but another wave yourself being affected by life habits is sitting on damp surfaces like a wet ground. Imagine shitting on the ground and it's wet for an extended period of time you ever sit poolside and your wet bathing shoot bathing trunks and your side of the pool is wet. So trucks pay attention. Notice that after a certain point in time you you just naturally want to get up that your body telling you unconsciously standup because establish is not good for you okay. But in general as an exterior pathogenic factor that being dampness the spleen being affected by exterior damage usually gives rise to let's say abdominal fullness lack of appetite nausea and even a feeling of heaviness right. Now it comes to emotion. How can emotions affect the spleen to an acupuncturist. One emotion is pensive. Nece which is of course over thinking things like really just thinking too much brooding or thinking about the past and even obsessive. Thank you break. Up with someone at u. district you obsess with. How can i lose them. And so forth. That's obsessive thing because pensive. Nece tends to stagnate she and a lot of times other than liver. It affects spleen as well as the lungs and also under certain circumstances when let's say patients diet is not good or two regular pensive. Nece can now lead to spleen sheet deficiency life okay so understand included under the term of pensive nasa also. Excessive use of mind and study you can stubby too much concentrating memorizing too much over a long period of time..

Nece swimming nausea nasa
"spleen" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

Acupuncture is my Life

04:08 min | 9 months ago

"spleen" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

"Fai person spleen is part of the patient treatment protocol but before. Doing show in acupuncturists may. Let's say take a look at a person's lips that to support the diagnosis of spleen she. Oh spleen blood deficiency because the spleen manifest lips has stated you see which clean blood or spleen. Cheese is in a healthy state. The lips would be very moist and lustrous but win. Splitting blood is deficient. The lips tend to present his pale and when spleen yen is deficient. The lips tend to be dry. Okay i hope he was able to get something from the so far. Now i wouldn't get into discussing patterns. Now when i say patterns these disharmonies which lead to different types of disorders potentially cry diseases or different types of diseases when something goes wrong with displaying. Because i want you to remember. The most important function of displaying is that of transporting transforming foods as well as fluid and. That's the clean usable fluids. So any spleen disharmony will therefore always influence or affect the digestive process in a negative way and examples of that. Let's say there's a problem with your speen spleen the function of your spleen. You can experience symptoms such as let's say abdominal distension lack of appetite and loose stools to keep in mind like if you experience any of those symptoms. What should now be able to ring a. There's something wrong with my spooning. So when i go see my acupuncturist we can discuss this. Because i'm aware of it now. Also keep in mind. As i stated this spleen controls muscles initially sponsor for transporting absences from food chee derive for food to the muscles throughout the body in particular four limbs so a disharmony with spleen again can cause a potion of tire which is generally a common shipped Spleen deficiency now what can represent will be the course of a spleen pattern spleen disharmony. Okay one is exterior. Pathogenic factors too can be emotional strain and three can be. As as a result of poor diet and patterns. That can develop. As a result of these courses can be let's say spleen she'd deficiency spleen young deficiency splint she sinking spleen not controlling blood spleen blood deficiency. Those are empty patterns. And i'm going to explain these patterns to you so you can start putting two together. And then you have several august who full basic full patterns like let's say cold dampness and reading the spleen or damp heat invading spleen as. I said we're going to explain all of this to you. But when it comes to what can cause problems with the spleen. As i stated exterior pathogenic factors the spleen is easily affected by what can be considered external dampness now. External dampness can be a result of you..

blood spleen blood deficiency
"spleen" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

Acupuncture is my Life

05:51 min | 9 months ago

"spleen" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

"Hello everyone and welcome back to the acupunctures. My life show. Now today i plan to discuss the functions of the spleen now remember. I'm going through each. And every one of the internal organs for reason and that reason is because in later episodes. I plan to discuss diseases how they check the human body how it is diagnosed by an acupuncturist as well as treated and unless you understand the basic functions of the internal organs from an acupuncturist perspective. It'll confuse you throw you off and Which isn't good. Of course all right. And i also want you understand as a state. Licensed board certified doctor of acupuncture the internal organs to an acupuncturist in eastern medicine functions. Quite differently to that of the internal organs. It's overall concept in western medicine. Okay so before discussing the functions of the spleen. I'm gonna ask that you momentarily. Attempt to block your understanding of the western concept of the internal organs completely ready now an acupuncturist understands the functions of the spleen to be that the spleen governs the transformation as well as the transporting of food essences chee as well as fluids. You see the spleen also controls the ascending of ci within the body as well as it controls the blood so chee that is made from food essences by the spleen goes up. Keep that in mind because his spleen and his stomach represent the core of the human organism and all essences and chee are derived from that and spleen since it's chee up and a stomach since it's cheap down so please remember to that because when i again when i get into diseases it will all make sense. It'll explain as to why. Some individuals experience diarrhea constipation vomiting heartburn and so forth. And so on. But i can't use jump right into without getting you to understand.

diarrhea constipation vomiting
Jets' Curry to miss season due to blood disorder

ESPN Radio

00:09 sec | 9 months ago

Jets' Curry to miss season due to blood disorder

"Game. Jets defensive end Vinny Curry will miss the season after being diagnosed with a rare blood disorder. Curry had his spleen removed and then developed Other

Vinny Curry Rare Blood Disorder Jets Curry
Physical Symptoms of Fat Loss

The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

02:31 min | 9 months ago

Physical Symptoms of Fat Loss

"Know everybody's going to be different with with what they experience. I don't know about eight. I've never heard aches as like really something related to fat loss. I would be concerned about an ache inside your body that you're having all the time so i don't know about that left upper. I don't know what that could be. So if you continue to have pain check with your doctor about that. You're gallbladders on the right right. I was just thinking like what is on your left. Upper your stomach or small intestines just found the coolest picture. Ever the left upper. Is your spleen colon. Left kidney increase. Is that where your spleen is. According to this picture. Okay so in the left. Lumber is you're descending colon and left kidney so yeah you might wanna check with dr gallbladders on the right but okay. I didn't know where the spleen was. I couldn't answer that for a million dollars. I would have thought the spleen was somewhere else. It's also in the the center top so it's like the center top to the left. Yep so i wouldn't think that would be something to just let go or assume that it's normal. I would not seem normal as far as that. What you're talking about that beads. Or ps under the skin. Yes i actually felt that. What is that what's happening. I don't know but that's something that you that you'll you'll feel right under the skin like i'll feel it on my abdomen like a little. It feels like you're rubbing a little something. I don't know what's happening like. I said but yeah people have reported. It smells you know. Yeah you talked about. Dna about ketosis breath. You'll certainly have different odors in your breath. Based on that as far as things coming out in your sweat urine that could also be related to if you're detoxing something because we know that toxins are stored in our fat cells and so as you're releasing fat. Whatever was in their stashed away. Whenever you stored that fat is gonna come out and if you were exposed to something weird during that time your body packed it away. You might be smelling it as it's coming back out. I did notice when i was in deep ketosis that my urine would have a certain kind of a smell to it. That sounds lovely to say right. Let's talk about the way our urine smells. But anyway it's just something like whenever i would do atkins for example back in the day i would always try to do atkins. There was a certain smell but always been long with that after a few days. So tim

Dr Gallbladders Atkins TIM
The Dangers of Emotional Stress Impacting Your Physical Well-Being

Ben Greenfield Fitness

02:04 min | 1 year ago

The Dangers of Emotional Stress Impacting Your Physical Well-Being

"Scientists actually discovered that emotional stress. Similar to adorn experience can be a trigger for the growth of tumors as a matter of fact any sort of trauma emotional or physical stress can act as literal pathway between cancerous mutations bringing them together in a potentially fatal combination for example at yale university scientists have discovered that everyday emotional stress is a trigger for the growth tumors. The finding showed that conditions for developing cancer can be significantly affected by your emotional environment including everyday work and family stress in other words. Your risk of developing cancer can be positively or negatively affected by your emotional environment including everyday work physical emotional and relationship stress. The traditional chinese medical view of cancer ideology has long held that emotions are a major contributing factor for cancer author. Son vignon writes in his book cancer treatment and prevention according to our understanding of the tumor patient most have suppression of emotions. They tend to hold in their anger. Although some patients have good results after treatment emotional stimulation can cause them to decline again and then the previous treatment would have been in vain. Some people have a severe phobia about cancer before they know the real disease. They have a lot of suspicion. They know they have cancer. Their whole spirit breaks down. This kind of spiritual state is very bad for treatment. In the book prevention and treatment of carcinoma in traditional chinese medicine. Jiakun gives ten recommendations for cancer prevention in addition to a good environment and personal hygiene proper amounts of physical activity and rest good eating habits and healthy food and avoiding smoking. He states that emotional changes such as worry. Fear hesitation anger irritation and nervousness should be presented mental exhaustion. It's harmful and life should be enriched with entertainment. Chinese medicine author sheila ming and she pecan also mentioned the ideology of various cancers and their book experience in treating carcinomas with traditional chinese medicine. They say the etiological factors of the disease involved chiefly the disturbance of the seven emotions especially melancholy anxiety and anger which are liable to impair the spleen and

Cancer Cancerous Mutations Tumors Son Vignon Yale University Jiakun Phobia Carcinoma Sheila Ming
Vaccines are rolling out - so when will cases drop?

Coronacast

04:28 min | 1 year ago

Vaccines are rolling out - so when will cases drop?

"Now the vaccine rollouts have begun globally. How soon do we expect to see a corresponding drop in cases of covid and also in deaths. Well fun issued save at overnight yesterday. Israel at the moment is just newspaper reports but it comes from the israeli ministry of health and large health provider. One called cloudy another one called mcabe healthcare. And what they're doing in. Israel is that there are electrically recording. All the vaccines as we will do in australia but it's integrated into people's medical records. So they really do have very good integrated electronic medical records and in fact one of the reasons. They're getting so much vaccine from pfizer is that they've done a deal with they. Give the data back to pfizer. So they've got what's called post marketing surveillance in. They get dot back on the performance of the vaccine. So what they've shown on and what they're saying it hasn't been published yet. Is that after the first. Does i think it's roughly in about two hundred thousand people aged over sixty five. But in those people compares to members of the health funds who have not yet had the vaccine. They've seen a significant reduction. Perhaps a fifty percent reduction in covid nineteen infection not disease but infection so this people specifically yes because they're rolling it out in priorities so older people in federal people are giving it first before others get it as well and so. This is their first data. It's a bit like. I don't know if you remember meghan. But near the beginning of the pandemic britain used their coordinated electronic records centralized electronic medical records in hospitals to be able to huge randomized control trials on a vast scale during the first wave. They were able to show that hydroxychloroquine didn't work. The anti retrovirals for hiv didn't work but that dixon methods to steroid did work and the turned around incredibly quickly during that first wave and is this huge advantage when you have a population willing to accept electronic medical records and that's what the israelis are doing. So they've got records of people who have not yet had the vaccine versus people have so if you like it's a real world not quite randomized but it's a real world trial and again not published in any scientific journal. Yet the early indications are that pfizer vaccine after the first does is showing reduced transmission to a significant extent which is really great. Yeah because the focus when we're talking about vaccines is so about a moving herd immunity which is obviously something that lots of people very keen for for all sorts of reasons but this is a really fast positive outcome where you literally saving people's lives. Yeah it's early could be wrong. Still got to run the ruler over it scientifically but it is a good early sign and presumably reflects the daughter. they're handing back to pfizer. So israel is getting the fires a shot and we've also had reports over the last few days that a man in the us who got the a shot has died shortly afterwards. And i think some question marks around whether or not it was anything to do with the shot or chance. What do we know about that. All we know about his newspaper reports from the new york times of luton to it. So it's really impossible to be absolutely sure what's going on if the newspaper and it's an issue. If the newspaper report is accurate then this is a doctor who got it. And three days after the vaccine started to develop little red spots on his skin cope tiki and these are assigned that. Your blood isn't clotting very well. He recognized that presented and his platelets had dropped precipitously and they find it very hard to raise his platelet levels. They thought this was an immune reaction which was reducing. His platelets platelets the little fragments. Which are essential for blood clotting and it does occur to drugs and it has occurred with covid nineteen by the way so covid nineteen disease itself can cause a precipitous. Drop to your platelets and serious hemorrhage and they were about to again. According to the newspaper report remove his spleen. Which is where they presume that the platelets were being broken down but he died of a cerebral hemorrhage beforehand. So the question here is causing effect. Is it the vaccine or is it a

Pfizer Israeli Ministry Of Health And Israel Meghan Australia Dixon Britain HIV Luton The New York Times United States
What the immune response to the coronavirus says about the prospects for a vaccine

The Guardian's Science Weekly

12:52 min | 1 year ago

What the immune response to the coronavirus says about the prospects for a vaccine

"With a number vaccine candidates against the corona virus sharing promising results in clinical trials and a growing number of studies elving into our mean response to infection. The spotlight has turned once again. On the body's defense mechanisms. I think two questions that really relate to the ability of the vaccine to protect us and our ability to fight off a second infection and so that is the quality of the immune response and the duration of the immune response this week. I'm joined by professor. Eleanor riley from the university of edinburgh to dove into these questions and more. I'm nichole davis. Welcome to science. Weekly ellena you came onto the podcast in july and talk to us about immunity and covid nineteen specifically the relationship between antibodies and immunity. So let's start with a recap on the major players in the immune system that are of interest when it comes to an immune response and potentially immunity so antibodies are protein molecules that are produced by immune cells kobe cells and these cells live in our spleen and narrow and they secrete antibodies off. They've been exposed to a foreign organism such as virus. There are two types of cells that produce. Antibodies on short-lived cells that produce. Antibodies for a few weeks national to the first line response and then some of those cells transition into lonely cells that goto a bone marrow and can produce antibodies for months years. Possibly even to case and then on top of antibodies. have that can kill virus. Infected host cells t cells the two types of t cells one of which we think of such of the conductor of the orchestra of the immune system and these kotei health cells and they very much help the b. cells to make antibodies produce. Growth factors may direct the direction in which the be cells developed and they will still give them signals to turn into cells and then there are the cdte cells and they actively kill virus infected cells and then Antibodies can also bind to these specific cells and help them to kill cells so they recognize little bits of virus on the infected cell bind to the infected so and kill it and then there are cells which are less specific cells that we call macrophages are neutral fills and they just recognized that. Something's not quite right with the cell. They don't necessarily recognize the infected with the virus and they kill it actually or bits of the immune system work together a little bit like you need a whole orchestra to make a good tune when you need all of these cells working together to make a good news arms. And i know you said in july that at that point it was too early to tell how quickly people were losing their antibodies. And we've got to remember here that it's a relatively new virus. What's the latest research saying that seems to have been some movement on that now. What we're seeing is if you all the data together. There's an early peek in the antibodies wants. Lots and lots of antibodies are produced to mop up all virus. That's in your body and then as that virus goes away the antibodies start to decline a little bit. Because you don't need them any antibodies anymore and they settle into a of steady class. O of antibody production. And that's very typical. This kind of two phase response the only peak lots of antibodies followed by sort of standing level of antibodies. That nick for a long time. That's very typical of an antibody response and it sort of relates to the short lived long lived cells. You have lots of short-lived cells making lots of antibody that off and then the long lived cells who that fewer in numba keep on producing. Antibodies for much longer so yes. Let's talk about these long-lived b. cells in the no said the t. cells. What is research telling us about what happens to them and how. How long do they hang around for. So we don't have much data on those are actually quite difficult to look at in humans. They tend to live in the bone marrow for example not very accessible and so we tend to rely on mathematical modeling of the change in the dynamics of the antibody concentration to predict what's going to happen even though we haven't actually been able to see it because it hasn't gone on long enough so the moment the infants is that we have suggests that things are probably okay these cells behaving as we expect them to the was one pay published early on suggesting may be a little bit of a fault with the production of these long midsouth. But i'm not sure that that's been replicated in other studies. I think i saw a preprinted study. That hasn't been peer reviewed yet. Which jested that these visas and t so's lost for at least six months is that. What are the problems here in terms of measuring this so we only have six months data at the moment and the virus really hasn't been around that long so what we can say the moment. Is that the cells assisting for as long as we are able to measure them at the moment obviously in six months or another twelve months time. We'll be able to go back to those people and say have they still got those cells. Yes or no. But in the meantime just looking at the change in the dynamics of the response and mapping it onto what we know the other viruses. My prediction is that these that there will be some long lift immunity to this virus. He said there might be some long term protection. How long term are we talking here. I mean i've seen a lot of people saying well current viruses such as that of course common code some codes of course by coronavirus is of course the protection only lasts for say a year or so. Do we think that our protection against the corona virus that causes covid nineteen mike baxter timeframe or or could it be longer. I think it's very difficult to say at the moment. Say all of the data. We have suggests that these antibody responses are going to be at least as long lived as response of corona viruses. And possibly i might think even probably going to last longer your immune response tends to be proportional to the level of threat that you face so the common cold corona viruses really only colonize our upper respiratory tract so on nose throat and so the virus doesn't go very deep into apology and we make rather grief that effective noon response nose and throat that controls it this coq nineteen causing virus goes much deeper into our bodies it goes down into our lungs into bronchial and therefore the immune response tends to be stronger and they struggle we call systemic immune responses do tend to last longer because they are recognizing that there is a more serious threat that has to be dealt with. Do we know if factors like ethnicity gender age factor in the scale of the immune response. She said stronger. Immune response to your first. Infection is is more likely to me. You have great protection against the second infection. Those factors correlated at all. There's very little day to so far on ethnic differences in the immune response the data. That's coming after the vaccine trials suggests that there aren't any major differences in at between ethnic groups in terms of whether the vaccine protects them will not but we haven't yet seen lab data on their antibody responses with at t cell responses. There is a lot of genetic variation in the immune response. People be aware that some people unfortunately have very severe genetically determined immunodeficiencies. That's just the tip of the iceberg of genetic variation in the immune response and some of those differences do have geographical and ethnic components to that certain genes that either make good or bad immune response on more common or less common in groups countries. But we don't yet know if any of that is going to influence really the totality of their immune responses. We just don't have any evidence much by age. It feels like ages is. It's very important given that the older you are the more risque from caveat nineteen so there are two components to that one is whether you are able to make an immune response again's a virus. You've never seen before and there is. I think really quite good evidence that you ability to make a completely new immune response does decline as you get older. The other component is that a lot of the disease we say in coke nineteen excessive inflammation. And there's also evidence that we get older with less good controlling inflammation so it's a little bit of a double whammy as we get older way are less able to make an immune response to a new virus such as the covid nineteen virus and if we then get the viral infection where less good at controlling the inflammation that it causes a so we know there are several different vaccines. Which looking very promising. You have the rene vaccines at you have vaccines which used a chimp. Virus to bring genetic material from the corona virus into cells. The question is is the immune response that generated the same as it would have been to a natural infection and do the t. cells and so on hang around in the same way. The vaccine is just a tiny component of viruses this spike protein which is on the surface of the virus and so if you vaccinated with spike protein. You make antibodies in tesol responses just to that protein. If you get the virus itself then you get many many more pro teams that you're exposed to a new may make antibodies to some of those. So you responded more limited but you might also say that your response is more focused because it's actually antibodies to spike coaching a really important for neutralizing the virus so the vaccine in juices a narrow immune response but one would hope it would also be focused on therefore stronger on the base the matter and would it be expected that this will provoke a stronger. Immune response natural infection. I've heard some people say that actually vaccine can producer a strong response it coun- if they initial infection is quite mild say with virus like sauce covy to which induces very mild infections in some people i would expect the vaccine to tobacco to jason mewes which is much stronger than you would get after nascent dramatic or mild infection. People get serious dose of coca to make a very strong immune response. And i doubt if the vaccine it doesn't need to be any strong national adopt if it is when it comes to and viruses the coups common code. It's been some concern that these viruses somehow elude the memory b cells. and so. that's why even though we have thousand cells to to the common cold viruses. We will often get reinfected with them. I wonder if they're those same concerns about the coronavirus behind covid nineteen so there is a little basic data. There's one paper that suggests that the sauce kofi to virus that causes covid nineteen disables particular pathway in the b. cell response leading to a poor long term memory response but these experiments done in the lab in a in a in a petrie dish. And i think it's too early to know if that's really what happens in humans so i think we do need to be a little bit cautious and we need to be aware that it might happen. Good news is that the proteins that are believed to cause that problem are not present in the vaccine so even if it's a problem in natural infection it shouldn't be a problem with a vaccine

Elving Eleanor Riley Nichole Davis University Of Edinburgh Mike Baxter Inflammation Nick Cold Infection Mild Infection Jason Mewes
Retailers get creative to reinvent holiday shopping amid COVID-19 pandemic

Bloomberg Daybreak Weekend

05:41 min | 1 year ago

Retailers get creative to reinvent holiday shopping amid COVID-19 pandemic

"War. Let's bring in Bloomberg intelligence consumer analyst Put him Doyle. Always a pleasure to talk to you pulling him. You always you're the one who always goes out to the Friday morning after Thanksgiving and stands in the malls and kind of takes the pulse of consumers out there. How is Black Friday with this the first black Friday of the pandemic? How are things gonna look different? Yes, the first and I really hope the last It's going to be very different. You know, People are still very hesitant to go to stores. Retailers are shifting their promotions online. The typical doorbuster deals that you would see you know hundreds of people line up for are not going to be there anymore because the story's can't Allow as much traffic into them. So this year, you know, I'll be probably roaming parking lots and maybe going into the stories depending on how the virus looks and then really checking online. I mean, we've seen retailers promote black Friday deals much earlier this year, in fact, even phasing them out over multiple days to get consumers interested in new promotions on a day to day basis. It was a lot of people out of work. I wonder if there's just gonna be the spending power there on the part of the American consumer. At the American consumer, we think still has the appetite to spend. What we're really seeing is spending shifts. So if you think about last year on Divan the years before we had seen those people had gone away from buying gifts that you can wrap in a box to experiences so whether it was a restaurant gift check or whether the spa package or whether it was A travel package. It was more based on experiences this here with all that being limited and really something that you know people are shying away from its going to focus back on gifts. And that's a positive for the retailers that I cover the shift to online remind everybody it's ah, in terms of the margins for the retailers. It's tougher because what you gotta pay for shipping, right? Yeah, you do. I mean, Yeah, You're absolutely right. Shipping costs are up, and not only is it just because of the higher penetration that we're going to see across the board but also carry a rate cousin rising and there are surcharges given the high in demand of expected over holiday. That's that, though for those retailers have brick and mortar locations. They've done a fantastic job at rolling out curbside pick up this year, and we think that can help alleviate some of those shipping costs. Not all but definitely some. And the other thing I'd say about margins you know, going into the holiday season is inventory. What we've heard from the retailers over the past week is inventory is very lean across the retail landscape. So if anything, we think merchandise margins will be better and sales. You know, retailers may be giving up some sales because they won't be able to chief into the demand. If demand does accelerate, uncertain products or categories, Okay, lean inventory, because was it a supply chain thing? Well, they've just stop in ordering as much all years since the start of the pandemic in March, when they slashed orders. As much as 50% or more. They've been slow to pick up that piece. Given the uncertainty around depend, Emmick, so inventories are relatively low. What did we learn so far from the earnings that we did get? We learned that sales, you know online continue to remain strong up double digits. We learned that story. Sales are still weak but are improving. Retailers have pushed black Friday earlier, so some of them like Macy's had said that they had seen Holiday. A gift purchases moving in talked over, which helped three Q at the expense of four. Q. We've also learned that it's going to be very uncertain Holiday period. You know, Black Friday is this week and retailers while they're pushing for our mind fails, it won't be like never before. It will be different in the holiday season will be spread out over multiple shopping days with no one. They really dominating anymore. Well, what's the key? How they navigating the pandemic at these places Right now? It's really about maintaining your inventory discipline. I mean, and I think that's where retailers have executed pretty well. We don't want to see them over by where they have toe over, promote to get merchandise out, because I just mean That you're giving away merchandise at a lower cost, and therefore your margins are going to bleed. And so is your bottom line, and you won't be able to generate cash flow. So we think inventory management is critical. I'm on the retail front during this pandemic is any one thing that really stood out for you that as an analyst really kind of surprised you. Yeah, I think the retailers have honestly done a much better job. I'm advocating this pandemic that I would have started March. I really do. I think you know they've gone from sales being down 70 80% to now being down roughly 20% and keeping inventory spleen protecting their margin. And regenerating cash flow. In fact, many of them have started to pay down their revolvers, which they had taken out of the start of the pandemic, which are all really encouraging, considering that we're still in the heat of the pandemic and cases they're still vice. Okay, Before you go, I get an answer, which says there's some hot gift this year. Are you looking for headphones? Are you looking for apple watches? Are you looking for kitchen upon looking for anything? I just didn't want to settle down with a bottle of wine and a good book. But what does everybody else want home stuff right, everyone looking at home category. They're staying at home, looking at active where they wanna be comfortable, and they're looking at making themselves Well and look it by investing in beauty and personal care. Those air the hot categories. In addition, Telectronics and toys which are always hot over the holidays and get it early, I guess right, get it early because shipping delays are expected, Yes, Yes, put put him him always always a a pleasure pleasure to to talk talk to to you. you. Bloomberg Bloomberg intelligence intelligence

Emmick Doyle Bloomberg Macy Telectronics Apple Bloomberg Bloomberg
Dr. Chris Winter On Why Your Sleep is Broken and How to Fix It

Untangle

05:11 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Chris Winter On Why Your Sleep is Broken and How to Fix It

"Chris. It's great to have you on entangled today. thanks so much for being here. Thank you so much. I appreciate it. I want to start by asking you this question as a neurologist. How did you originally become so interested in sleep and the problems that we all have with sleep. The short answer is is all very accidental. But this is something kind of intoxicating about sleep. It's very easy to have fun with well. It's funny. I mean it's good news bad news right because people love to talk about sleep because we have so many challenges with it if it were simple hey spleen split big can take it out if you do. This is not even necessary exactly but you can't like not sleep. Let's talk about that. That's an important sentence right there. You just said yeah. And i mean i personally have had sleep problems forever so i'm super excited about getting some of this information. I did love your book. Although i'm still not sleeping perfectly but i'm still not doing i'm supposed to be doing so that's air. Why does so many of us have sleep challenges to begin with. There's a couple of answers that one is. I think that for the first time we have generations. Now that are looking at sleep as a modifiable. Variable and not a trait okay. You're going to have to say more about that. What does that mean by that. Is i think that probably in the past if you slept poorly just kinda slept poorly. Didn't really think much of it and now with the idea. That sleep is its own science. There's all kinds of things you can do can alter the lighting you can do a sleep study to determine if there's something wrong with your sleep versus there's nothing i can do about the fact that i'm short of sort of big years and i've green is like those things are traits. I can't fix those. I don't know maybe a hundred years from now they won't be and you can choose your own hide. You can easily genetically altered your colored. This has now come into this idea. That sleep is a science not just sort of a casual observation. I also think there's a lot more out there. That is impacting our sleep. Where twenty four hour culture now. We're always awake where shift were culture. We can eat whenever we went to. We can watch. Game of thrones starting right now until sometime at the end of next week one episode after another of these. Were not things that we had. The cell phone is a huge issue with us right now. Our access to information and all these things were not a problem in the past. It was sort of boring to stay up all night. And you're living in a cabin. That had a whale fat lantern and papas fiddle on the wall. Like that was it. It was nothing to really do. And you work really hard all day while you had sunlight so there were things are naturally regulated our sleep a lot better than we have right now not mention the chemicals we put in our body cetera et cetera. So i think a lot of excitement about technology and moving into the future. But there's also some drawbacks particularly when it comes to a biological organism. The probably wasn't meant to do a lot of things doing right. Now when you talk about. Binge watching game of thrones or cell phones. Do you think that these. Let's call it addiction. Or even the lure of these entertainments options are these causing more insomnia in our culture right now. Or how do you see that connection. I think it's really important right off the bat define when insomnia is just. We're all very clear. I've got a bunch of slide shows that i've done for people. One of my favorite slides is a series of headlines that have come out of the last few years and they literally go like from forbes magazine and very reputable sources. why forty million. Americans can't sleep and the next one for the new york times. It says fifty million americans can't sleep and here's why we're talking about insomnia. We're not talking about people who can't sleep that doesn't exist. And that's very important thing. Say there are people out there who dissatisfied with their sleep. Have certain drawbacks or obstacles are trying to overcome but nobody out. There can't sleep and it's important because that's what most people associate in their mind with the idea of insomnia on song note that is that's when somebody can't sleep and that's not what insomnia is insomnia. Really is more of an individual who is not sleeping in a way. They want to or at a time they want to. They have gone to bed at eleven o'clock and it's taken them two hours to fall asleep. They woken up at two in the morning and is taking them an hour to get back to sleep so heart one is. You're not sleeping in the way you want to part two. Is you have to have a negative emotional response to it. Meaning if i meet somebody who says takes me two hours to fall. Asleep by next question is always. How do you feel about that. If the individual says auto remind can alight lying in bed away thinking about my day planning out my weekend. Forget what to do my wife or anniversary thinking about my celebrity crush. Your whatever it is. It takes the emotional upset to really create insomnia care so do phones does. Game of thrones create more insomnia probably but it also creates the flip side of insomnia. So when you're looking at the people that we treat clinic we treat. I can't sleep. We also treat. I can't stay awake

Insomnia Chris Forbes Magazine New York Times
DNA & EOs with Dr. Lindsey Elmore

The Essential Oil Revolution

06:30 min | 1 year ago

DNA & EOs with Dr. Lindsey Elmore

"All Right folks, I'm here with Dr Lindsay Elmore. One of my favorite human beings on this planet, she's a speaker author, brand strategist podcast host am world renown wellness expert, she translates. Science into understandable stories and travels the world educating audiences about natural wellness Lindsey. Welcome back to the show. Thanks for back. Absolutely thanks for having me back. It's an honour. Well, you're one of my favorite guests becoming a recurring us which I love so I'm glad that you're here today and I'm super excited to talk about this particular topic of DNA and what our DNA can tell us about essential oils, and we've actually had a number of guests on the show before to to cover this topic. But I feel like you're gonNA just sort. Sort of put the icing on top of everything and make it click in people's minds because that's what you're best at just breaking down complicated things and making them simple. So this is part of your thirty podcasts in thirty days. Tell us a little bit more about that. Well I recently started a podcast called the Lindsay elmore show, and I, some of my guests have been have been educating me on how you can. Can Get your podcast out there. If you go on a podcast tour and a few months ago, I was at an event called pod Max and one of the speakers was a writer for four herbs and she had written an article about how she accomplished doing thirty podcasts in thirty days, and I just thought, wow, that sounds really hard and I decided why not give it a try and book as many as you. You can get the word out there and really share all the different facets you know. I. Love Essential Oil. So I'm excited to be here to talk to your audience, but we're also looking at podcast that encompass all of the entrepreneurship that I do the Vegan cooking yoga. Even my new little cat. We've applied to some to some broadcast to talk about you know my first couple of weeks having a kitten and so. A great way I, don't know. So it's a great way to meet New People and to share topics that I care about right. Well, I, love how the podcast world is. So multifaceted in that way, like we are human beings, we are complex creatures and we are both passionate, right. So have been able to find. There's a podcast there for everything. So whatever little passion or hobby or? Or thing that's like in your heart that you want express share with the world. There's a show out there to do just that for people who are hungry for that information, which is one of the reasons I just love podcast. Absolutely. I. Completely agree there. We have come across some crazy crazy podcast and we even applied to one and there was only about the health benefits of olives. Like was like, how do you have a podcast only about that? But there is legitimate podcast for anyone and everyone. That's hilarious. I'M GONNA have to add that into my book that I'm writing about podcast. Dina's is just an example how niche you can make these things. So. Let's dive into the Science DNA. Tell us what gives us like the kindergarten version of what is DNA, and what can you tell us about our bodies. So DNA is basically A. For your body, every single person has DNA and there are building blocks of DNA called base pairs, and we each have about three point two, billion base pairs of DNA, and what we have is these base pairs make called genes. So there's a sequence of the base pairs that make gene the gene in codes, a part of your body bit either contributes to the structure of your body. So you can have a gene that helps to encode for tissues or four bones or for tea. Or you can have genes that encode for the function of your body, and so this could be perhaps an enzyme or it could be a spleen soul that is destined to help clean your blood cells. So DNA it's a blueprint, it's built of base pairs that make up jeans, and then genes encode the structure and function of our bodies. Okay. So with that basis of information there how why, and what, why do? Do essential oils differ in their benefit based on different DNA types like I used to think that all essential oils just kinda did the same thing to everyone and then I started using essential oils in seen how center oils did different things in different people's bodies and I'm like Oh. Why is that his dad because of our DNA? Well, it could be because of your DNA. So within your, DNA, we have. Have things, called snips and the snips Stanford single nuclear tied Holly. MORPHISM 's this is a really fancy term that basically means mutations. We are all mutants because we don't all have matching. DNA. That's what makes us human? That's what makes us beautiful in diverse. So mutation has a bad connotation to it, but really, and truly all mutation is is where they're within those base pairs that are building your DNA there. there. Is a change with one of those base pairs and that is called a single nucleotides polymorphism. So when we look at the population as a whole, we can identify what is the most common nuclear tied sequence within our DNA. This tells us at every single point within the DNA, what is considered the normal trait? Some people have different nucleotides. That's where those snips comment those single nucleotide polymorphisms. So these abnormals. Tides lead to our genetic mutations. Some of them are benign. So some of them don't make any difference. You know you and I could have two different SNIPS and our bodies still functions

Dr Lindsay Elmore Lindsay Elmore Brand Strategist Morphism Writer Dina Holly
DNA & EOs with Dr. Lindsey Elmore

The Essential Oil Revolution

04:28 min | 1 year ago

DNA & EOs with Dr. Lindsey Elmore

"All Right folks, I'm here with Dr Lindsay Elmore. One of my favorite human beings on this planet, she's a speaker author, brand strategist podcast host am world renown wellness expert, she translates. Science into understandable stories and travels the world educating audiences about natural wellness Lindsey. Welcome back to the show. Thanks for back. Absolutely thanks for having me back. It's an honour. Well, you're one of my favorite guests becoming a recurring us which I love so I'm glad that you're here today and I'm super excited to talk about this particular topic of DNA and what our DNA can tell us about essential oils, and we've actually had a number of guests on the show before to to cover this topic. But I feel like you're gonNA just sort. Sort of put the icing on top of everything and make it click in people's minds because that's what you're best at just breaking down complicated things and making them simple. So this is part of your thirty podcasts in thirty days. Tell us a little bit more about that. Well I recently started a podcast called the Lindsay elmore show, and I, some of my guests have been have been educating me on how you can. Can Get your podcast out there. If you go on a podcast tour and a few months ago, I was at an event called pod Max and one of the speakers was a writer for four herbs and she had written an article about how she accomplished doing thirty podcasts in thirty days, and I just thought, wow, that sounds really hard and I decided why not give it a try and book as many as you. You can get the word out there and really share all the different facets you know. I. Love Essential Oil. So I'm excited to be here to talk to your audience, but we're also looking at podcast that encompass all of the entrepreneurship that I do the Vegan cooking yoga. Even my new little cat. We've applied to some to some broadcast to talk about you know my first couple of weeks having a kitten and so. A great way I, don't know. So it's a great way to meet New People and to share topics that I care about right. Well, I, love how the podcast world is. So multifaceted in that way, like we are human beings, we are complex creatures and we are both passionate, right. So have been able to find. There's a podcast there for everything. So whatever little passion or hobby or? Or thing that's like in your heart that you want express share with the world. There's a show out there to do just that for people who are hungry for that information, which is one of the reasons I just love podcast. Absolutely. I. Completely agree there. We have come across some crazy crazy podcast and we even applied to one and there was only about the health benefits of olives. Like was like, how do you have a podcast only about that? But there is legitimate podcast for anyone and everyone. That's hilarious. I'M GONNA have to add that into my book that I'm writing about podcast. Dina's is just an example how niche you can make these things. So. Let's dive into the Science DNA. Tell us what gives us like the kindergarten version of what is DNA, and what can you tell us about our bodies. So DNA is basically A. For your body, every single person has DNA and there are building blocks of DNA called base pairs, and we each have about three point two, billion base pairs of DNA, and what we have is these base pairs make called genes. So there's a sequence of the base pairs that make gene the gene in codes, a part of your body bit either contributes to the structure of your body. So you can have a gene that helps to encode for tissues or four bones or for tea. Or you can have genes that encode for the function of your body, and so this could be perhaps an enzyme or it could be a spleen soul that is destined to help clean your blood cells. So DNA it's a blueprint, it's built of base pairs that make up jeans, and then genes encode the structure and function

Dr Lindsay Elmore Lindsay Elmore Brand Strategist Writer Dina
The Woman Who Shot Andy Warhol

Hostage

03:44 min | 2 years ago

The Woman Who Shot Andy Warhol

"Our first clip is from podcast original female criminals covering the attempted murder of one of the most well known American artists of the twentieth century. Andy Warhol writer in Radical Feminist Valerie solanas befriended warhol in nineteen sixty seven through the New York Avant Garde art scene. He showed an interest in producing one of her plays titled Up Your Ass at invited her into his inner circle of artists and influencers influencers at the factory but in nineteen sixty eight. The pair had a falling out. Valerie became convinced that Warhol was trying to steal her ideas and pass them off as his own in paranoia fueled rage. She confronted Warhol in his studio armed with a thirty two caliber revolver it. She pulled out her gun aimed at Warhol's back while he was on the phone and fired before Anyone could stop her when the first shot went off no one in the studio realized what was happening Amaya. Yeah thought sniper had fired through the window. He threw himself on the ground Hughes on the other hand thought. The sound was an explosion from the offices of the Communist leanest party located two floors above them. More Hall was the only one who realized what was happening. Though her first shot had missed missed him he turned the sound and when he saw Valerie was holding a smoking gun he yelled Valerie. Don't do it no no. Oh but his words couldn't deter her Valerie wasn't discovered marksman her second shot also missed however over the third bullet struck Warhol in the abdomen hitting his left lung spleen stomach liver and sopha guess before exiting his back he collapsed to the ground. At which point Valerie turned to a Maya. He was the only bystander who hadn't taken cover making him a perfect target for Valerie. She fired twice more one shot hit but miraculously passed through Maya without damaging any organs Valerie then approached Hughes pointing the gun directly directly at him. He begged for his life but Valerie told him simply. I have to shoot you. She aimed the gun at his chest at such a close range. It was impossible for her to miss. But fate intervened the gun jammed and as has she tried to get it working again. The elevator doors opened Hughes realizing that Valerie was distracted and agitated told her to just take the elevator and leave. Valerie did exactly that Morrissey and Hughes immediately called nine nine one one. When the paramedics arrived and saw the blood they believed that Warhol was already dead no one could have survived the injuries he'd sustained Amaya had to convince them? That warhol was still breathing and that he needed immediate medical treatment. Finally the first first responders loaded warhol into their ambulance at the hospital. His heart stopped at four fifty one PM. The doctors doctors declared him legally dead but they were able to resuscitate him by massaging his heart and rushed him into emergency

Valerie Solanas Andy Warhol Hughes Warhol New York Avant Garde Writer Amaya Morrissey
"spleen" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

11:30 min | 2 years ago

"spleen" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"More more Jeff in Richmond reaction. home I have lived in the Commonwealth of Virginia my entire forty four years of life only a meth head raider fan would be idiotic enough to think that a so cal ten would be a three in Virginia come on Jeff the same math this clouding your judgment into thinking the raid was a relevant has you thinking that so cal dimes are threes anywhere. Dan in Richmond. non bath had. he's in the same place the same Commonwealth he's also in Richmond. wrong I've been listening to you for a minute since nineteen ninety nine Jeff in Richmond is nostalgic he is always come in and stir things up he is N. O. G. crawler. war that guy our mondo. wrong. what you can take from Jeff's call is his wife is ugly got plastic surgery and then left him for a dude from Callie who S. at twenty ten Mustang. Stephen paychecks wore a Commonwealth ten being any woman with at least ten teeth. this email raids knock on wood if I'm with you knock on wood if you're with me yes I would but these checklists are expensive regards red. war the fake fake silk. body. sit in a room all alone. well it's a Sam Donald going down with mono is one of the more bizarre things ever I mean seriously it's already gifted us with one of the greatest television graphics ever. that iconic stare down. of Donald into the camera nodding slowly then aggressively pointing to the view with the words out indefinitely mononucleosis. national TV graphic. and if that's all that illness you've given us that would be more than enough I would say we don't deserve anymore but we got more because yesterday Sam Donald drop one of the best quotes in recent memory he's working his way back to health he's been cleared for non contact activities and of course the big question is how is his spleen. it's actually pretty tricky question because my knowledge the spleen is not something that you can stretch out or loosen up. were strengthened. you need the doctors to tell you when this plane is no longer in large and no longer and risk of rupturing. in other words as Donald said on a call yesterday that was recorded by S. and why you know I've been doing everything I can you know a Vista of an exercise in as much as I can so far and that's really it and then. since your second question you know let. on the specifics come out when they do owned coach case wants to wants to. go to disclose that information but you know for me is just about done with the doctors say like I said it's it's out of my control highest point at this point is going to do it is going to do. let me repeat that last part because he delivered it kind of straight that's pretty outstanding quote for me it's just about doing what the doctors say like I said it's out of my control my spleen at this point is going to do what it's going to do five point at this point is going to do it is going to do. my spleen is going to do what it's going to do. I'll be real I have no idea what a spleen does. but I do trust that it's going to do what is going to do you know like I always say spleen gonna spleen you cannot stop the spleen from doing spleen things that's just the spleen being this plane. my appendix is going to do its own thing Hey man don't get me started on my pancreas I never know what the hell that's going to do. spleen gonna spleen kidneys gonna kidney longs gun along lymph nodes got a lymph node. am I mean to get started on my tonsils weasels man always up to something. my spleen is just going to do what my spleen is going to do five point at this point gonna do it is going to do you just can't control the uncontrollable a Sam can I ask you this if your spleen is going to do what your spleen is going to do what if your spleen explodes. what if your spleen gonna spleen means that spleen gonna spoil owed. it might and for what so like a rushing back to a Superbowl team or a team it's competitive what's in that even matters maybe you get that thing another day or two or a week or two or a month or two make sure you're one hundred percent no one thousand percent the your spleen is not going to rupture or do whatever happens when a spleen ruptures. because it's not like taking the spike is gonna work one internal organ right can you hit the spleen with poor at all can you just ran that needle up in there wherever the spleen is. where he hit topically. it was some ointments he robin some appointments on your spleen so it does not explode. look I love Sam Donald I love the wants to be a leader I love that he wants to be the face of the franchise I love that he's taking that role really seriously. but it sounds like everybody's being pretty cavalier when it comes to an Oregon. nine a tactically it's not a vital organ but it's in Oregon I like all my organs I'm a say they're all vital. about this have you ever seen a photo of a ruptured spleen. I did a Google image search I wish I had not. I mean damn zero stars out of five would not recommend would not recommend would not recommend it rupturing your spleen or even doing a Google image search of a ruptured spleen it does not look like a party. what I'm saying is Sam Donald should take his time there's no rush the kind of guys I got a Wierd way differently than you and I Dave you pain and sacrifice differently they're wired differently either cut from a different cloth then you would die but here's what else I know that he was only three and as much as he wants to change that he'd be coming back to face the eagles or the cowboys in both of those teams have a really large dudes who will run it him tackle him knocked him to the ground and one of those tackles might be the tackle where his spleen is gonna spleen. anyone have a spleen and now the bad really bad. I've always said I'm never gonna tell anybody else what to do with their spleen but if it were me I'd be very careful when it comes to the spleen. I know the spleen is going to do what this planes going to do as one make sure that I keep dat spleen around so the spleen can do what this plane is supposed to do whatever the hell that is I'm no doctor but we wouldn't have spleen if we didn't need Spillane's so take care of your freaking splaine. the spleen is gonna do with this plane's gonna do. she wrote a little dirt on that's plain. what a few cryotherapy Spillane's. I wonder if they if he does it exploded spleen. what a simple mop and that blue tent to inspect what's left of that spleen. hi Wayne at this point is going to do it is going to do. is he going to the spleen tent. and zip up. I don't know Sam. for who for what. believe me do do not danger of losing your job no one's gonna think any less of you if you take another five or ten minutes because you're dealing with an enlarged spleen. I don't think that any jet is saying damn man we've all been there all right everybody here he's had an abnormally large spleen. come on man get back in the fight. the Los Angeles quickly Matt in LA Hey Matt what's up. regular or don't you thanks for the virus. number of leader nation now learning about that melting of gelatinous we know it's chip in Richmond. is morbidly obese. the quality grass we will be glad you re tractor trailer. suddenly landed badly. we can take action and DAO rip chopped into by chronic leader's speech. your. my cholesterol do what it came back I would have been taken away share on the regular check well should we send your urgent care because you're one chicken fried steak new appetizer for losing your battle with doubt in high cholesterol you puke. goodness thank you for that lord. or will board you're not young. and you shouldn't be server number and I will have need. we're in we're Eisenhower eliminating citrus women's died because of agent orange outro. yeah I think that's about LA calling up to college Jeff in Richmond really fat I think that was the purpose the called I'm not exactly sure. Jethro. all right when we return we resume the interview portion of the program we're talking charges football with ray Shawn Jenkins top of the hour we chase that with a conversation with my CBS colleague Nate Burleson and then on the back and I wanna talk vines has perfect and I've got time for phone calls one eight hundred six.

spleen ruptured spleen Sam Donald Jeff Richmond Google Richmond. Virginia Commonwealth Dan Los Angeles Callie Stephen paychecks mondo. Nate Burleson Spillane Wayne Oregon.
Jets' Sam Darnold cleared for non-contact, uncertain to play

The Rich Eisen Show

03:10 min | 2 years ago

Jets' Sam Darnold cleared for non-contact, uncertain to play

"Coach. Adam gays and a conference call today talked about the health of his quarterback. Sam darnold right now what they're telling us. Is E cabinet contact on tax. So if we were playing a game tomorrow or Wednesday he wouldn't be able to play because he hasn't been cleared for contact at what point in the week you have to make a determination. If Sam can't play of it you have have to get ready for what what is your cut off point with making the decision on. Sam Not Ideal. It's not ideal situation. That was the first question I asked as well. It'd be one thing if you're looking looking at a guy that has played in the league like twelve years or something that could be the whole week and all of a sudden get. The rug pulled out from under us. This is more of a situation of when you gotTa younger backup you know and if he was gonNA play so the sooner the better that I have an answer right now. It is what it is. I mean I just have to kind of preparing with the possibility of Sam going and then possibility that Luke my heel. That's the that's the honest truth right there and that's the unfortunate aspect for jet season that is going the tubular route fast. I can't imagine darnold who's just been cleared for non contact stuff getting out in the middle of the of the week and being able able to get up to speed for Philadelphia Eagles team that we saw was chasing down Aaron Rodgers last week. I wouldn't do that no chance yet. Darnold was asked all. I got this in his speech. Let me let me do this pleased. It would be a my honor to do this police mind because as you know my favorite great graphic in the history of Monday night football in the vast history of Monday night football is thank. You Are Los Angeles Broadcasting Center. They have it at the ready. It's it's it's that motion you the man point that they had Sam Darnold Ucayali in front of a green screen the middle of August probably longtime having no idea that the lift your arm seven point at the screen would be used for indefinitely mononucleosis graphic. Most jets graphic ever ever now has a quote to go with it as I tweeted out to go yeah yeah in answer to the question. Is your spleen still swollen now. It's Germane question for somebody who has mononucleosis because that is the crucial organ of your body. That's most affected by illness can't mess around with okay is your spleen still swollen a very rare. Germane question that's asked of a human being let alone an NFL quarterback. That's viewed as a savior of a franchise answer. It's out of my control. My spleens going to do what it's going to do. which is by the way a new record not just for the jets very jets not thing but overall the most unique twist of it is what it is right now in a by part my spleens? GonNa do what it's GonNa do not have a crystal ball. I'm only talking about the spleen that are here. My God what is happening don't mean to laugh except I do but look cases. Only gases only can only do what he's going to to. You is what it

SAM Darnold Sam Darnold Jets Mononucleosis Sam Darnold Ucayali Adam Gays Aaron Rodgers Los Angeles Broadcasting Cente Philadelphia Eagles NFL Luke Twelve Years
Dog's life

Correspondents Report

05:42 min | 2 years ago

Dog's life

"At the ABC in Pop Guinea Special Member of the team who is beloved by the correspondents who passed through her name is fully and she's a German shepherd tasked I with guarding the House and the office phooey recently had a health scare which prompted at PNG correspondent Natalie Whiting to question how it is that we can form such deep buns with animals so he loves going to the Abeche. She loves going anywhere really. It's always an adventure for very well. Not only it's been almost a fortnight since we lost that day. I ended up crying in a small examination room really crying ugly glee crying while the vet passed toilet paper to blow my nose been eating late everything yet so he has become a constant companion for me since I moved to PNG almost a year ago. She normally spends her days sleeping in the office. The evenings Lang Hang in the house and then the nights outside on God's easy if she's not with me she's following Majola around on the fourth correspondent London to pass through one two threes Ryan. She's an old dog. We think maybe nine or ten I knew I was arriving in her twilight es and I thought when I was prepared for that until the bit found chewing good out. We're back in that little examination room in the important speed so he's lying on the ground today. Having the stables removed from a long scar that now runs up it would be small Swedish after identifying the tumor in an x Ray. There was is no way to the vets to know if there were more tumors until they operate it before they started the surgery. Dr Claratyne warned me that in the worst case scenario Korea we may have to put her down sometimes with sputnik tomb as we get in Net and there's a lot of small tumors spread through the immense amount onto the other organs and and when we get in there and that's the case often I will stop bleeding from all of the hundreds of and they're the ones that we often need to sleep on the title. All that thought was absolutely devastating. It made me reflect on just how attached to the dog the days as can be long in this job and the stories can sometimes be really tough but there's always fully while she may be the IBC's guard dog. She human lot says an emotional support animal. They're very empathic especially dogs and cats who have been domesticated for thousands of years. dogs have developed developed a whole lot of muscles in faces that the primary role is to make faces to humans to communication the very a loyal that offer that big laugh events as a source of comfort when you're in a new environment such maybe to another country there's a lot of external stresses that are going on that your dogs and cats always therefore you full. They're always there for you and they opened a very good at sensing the days that you're not feeling well and providing that confident and very non judgmental confident so I think that's why we boom so readily to them so you'd be used to people like me having Accrai before you going into a pariah l. Yes and I always this is. GonNa sound a little bit terrible but when I'm doing a big procedure like this with someone who's very abundant to animals if I see that emotional response it helps me know that they understand the risk that mom is going on with the with the animal and so that can help you feel confident that you've communicated well to the clients that they understand what's going on with the animal but even a medical professional. I get a missed with my animals so we completely understand this. You know I think has sometimes society can be not so great supporting people through the animals sicknesses you get sick. Leave or anything like that spot. The fact that it is a huge major event concise on times the people in the vet clinic the only ones that really get it. We were fortunate that when they opened three up on the operating table. The vits didn't find widespread CANCEA also they were able to remove her spleen and the Chuma and I picked her up the next day she had shaved stomach a plastic the current around her head and she was a little bit confused but otherwise she was okay metal bits remain now honey we activate removed get to take the food you can go out in style instead of walking into everything. Oh yes A. B. Defile. He's been wearing the kind to two weeks now and she's always broken it by running into things with doors walls chairs. It's it's been a source of some laughter to ABC and the guards that work now with the staples rash and the cone own off. She's back to her old self. Go fully long. May you run Natalie Whiting there reporting from Port Moresby.

Natalie Whiting ABC A. B. Defile Dr Claratyne Ryan Abeche Lang Hang IBC Port Moresby Korea RAY Accrai London Two Weeks
"spleen" Discussed on Nuff Said: The Marvel, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D, and Comics Fan Podcast

Nuff Said: The Marvel, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D, and Comics Fan Podcast

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"spleen" Discussed on Nuff Said: The Marvel, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D, and Comics Fan Podcast

"It coming back. You know what i actually do the jazz hands at the end of that song swell you should as i hope our listeners do as well <hes> episode season three episode three aka. I have swamp which we ask the question. What is the south of one spleen splitting okay. He loves to do <hes> itching to get back out on the streets and find her attacker. Jessica jessica divide defies her doctor's advice jerrycan reconnects with her college flame. <hes> directed tonight is is anton cropper. <hes> brian michael benders and michael gaydos gets are <hes> marvel created by credits of course are stafford of this week is jesse harris lording it over pearl. Jesse is our story editing team aim of jay hoffman and jamie king lisa randolph is giving are created by or a written by credit and melissa rosenberg of course has that created be aided by credit <hes>. They're doing it backwards. So of course we forget jesse. Harris is of course our hearts showbusiness again. Okay so hello this episode we're dealing with <hes> jessica dealing with the trauma of being displeased and it's an interesting <music> aspect of this because i offer her doctor is wonderful. I think we can all agree with that. Yes he explains to you. Thank you can have a normal healthy life even without a spleen and.

jesse harris Jessica jessica anton cropper brian michael benders michael gaydos melissa rosenberg Jesse lisa randolph stafford jay hoffman jamie king
"spleen" Discussed on Capes and Lunatics

Capes and Lunatics

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"spleen" Discussed on Capes and Lunatics

"Here. There are no good people <hes> we have trish using incur superpower fame to actually <hes> help track down this missing art piece and abuse track down is is a taking liberty she stole the information passed out jessica and very <music> opportunistic and scavenger like about it. Yes well then. I guess it's part of tracking down but still but you know i don't feel like i want to give her too much. Air isn't gonna get you in the door. When the door is that she is she's patsy and as the they said earlier though <hes> <hes> with the person that she beat up and who settles out of court for fifty grant five hundred fan. It's like the image of you. Is you have money and you know you're someone that operates outside of the rules and so you know i think that in that way pat's he could get access to it in a way that that trish couldn't or not trish <hes> but that jessica could you know although we do get a jessica breaking again and accessing getting the thing and giving it to a trash and all that kind of stuff and then going to track the guy down this the thing i liked about this whole scene was how jessica finally gains a little bit of respect for her. I just okay maybe you can handle when she sees her somersault over the table and accomplish the task that she was there to do of finding the information on the computer and gets that's back into a chair without the guy notice. Oh look at this. Maybe she's not the helpless <hes> person. I thought she was yeah and it's sort of like <hes> does does a whole lot to repair their relationship little band well yeah you know i mean it's still going to be a long ways and you know it's still a lot more but they're they're starting. Thank you get to that point where they can have that grudging respect yeah jessica can see that this is someone she can lean on yeah they are friends and that there is work work to be done <hes> that was a nice moment even though she punched her in the mouth even but still it was almost like she respected her enough to punch in the mouth in a sense of what she's saying is no one thing i've learned now is no one is invulnerable right and she she respects her enough to be able to take punch exactly really cool so she does confront brandt and of course no idea and basically just thinks the super out to get you know he's been stabbed. People have bulletproof skin. You know it is kind of assumption of peoples. Aren't you bulletproof. You know <hes> where she's not you know but <hes> <hes> and once she realizes that she's like back to that dan and she winds up getting back with. I believe his name ernest peter graf his name. I don't remember i'm just gonna call him. Burger dues burger do oh by the way so we had a whole conversation about the last week i am not backing off of my original statement that a burgers entire point is that the grinding of me me you know removes any purpose of brian. What kind of cut immediate is that basically so basically what it is is is that if you're grinding of good cut of meat that needs it's pre- marbled which means you don't have to do as much to his going to say the the thing of it is is that because you're grinding it you're actually no longer using the natural texture of the meat and the fact is marvel so there's a certain amount of fat..

jessica trish ernest peter graf brian brandt pat dan
"spleen" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"spleen" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"To all the spleen has been clear that this is going to be the safest. That we were able to get a few extra minutes with AJ sing after the televise interview, and our reporters out of Delhi were able to get some more information out of him that has led to the stock surging this morning rising at least, and he indicates that there is a party interested has approached spice jet about possibly buying a stake in that airline, there have been rumors in the past that perhaps one of the Gulf carriers including Qatar might be interested. But again AJ sing saying he's taking advantage of adding more flights and more capacity. In the wake of the Jet Airways collapse. So Stephen Madison, I have been talking about those growth concerns. And of course air-traffic in many ways is really good. Litmus test of what's going on in the global economy? Not just in terms of passenger traffic. But also in terms of cargo traffic, walk us through very quickly. What executives have saying on the demand side of the airline equation. Well, absolutely. I mean, there's significant downside risks are baked in right now. And that's what I said. Particularly in cargo cargo bellies the the cargo holds are not flying as full as years pass, even lift towns. I talked to their CEO. They talked about, they were not as worried about the trade war affecting passengers, but cargo is a significant concern. And if this trade war continues and goes full blown, it's gonna take a bad situation for air cargo and make it much worse. So it is definitely a concern of the, the bottom.

Stephen Madison Qatar Delhi Gulf CEO
What is a Vaccine Adjuvant?

One Life Radio Podcast

15:13 min | 3 years ago

What is a Vaccine Adjuvant?

"Our special guest today. Neil Z Miller. He is a medical research, journalist and the director of the think twice global vaccine institute. He has devoted the past thirty years to educating parents and health practitioners about vaccines encouraging and form consent and non mandatory laws. He is the author of several articles studies and books on vaccines, including Miller's review of critical vaccine studies. Neil has a degree in psychology and is a member of Mensa international. And it is always an honor. And pleasure to have you on one life radio. Welcome back. How you doing today? Neil grew. Thanks for having me back today. I appreciate it. I always appreciate your work and what you're doing to educate the world about vaccines and their safety today. Specifically, we're speaking about aluminum. So let's start with this basic question for people that really might not know a lot about vaccines that they. There, there are avent's added to them in order to make them more effective or for the delivery. So what exactly are ad edge of events? And what types of events are there will the main Atrovent that's being used in vaccines. Today is aluminum, and there's different types of aluminum, but, but the reason that the aluminum is added to vaccine is because the, the attenuated germ, okay. So basically, you've got the, the, the German self the, the micro organism that is likely to cause the disease. They take that microorganism and they attenuated or weaken it. And that's the main component of the vaccine, but it doesn't induce enough antibodies by itself, generally speaking with some vaccine. So they add aluminum which really just irritates the immune system. The immune system recognizes the, the aluminum as, as really as foreign object. And so it, it, it helps to awake in a higher concentration of anybody tires. So that's the main reason aluminum is Najim added too many vaccines to help stimulate a stronger immune response, and increase vaccine efficacy. But aluminum is taxing. Absolutely. In fact, there's no known biological purpose value or function for aluminum in the human body everywhere. That now by the way, it is very pervasive. One of the most pervasive elements on the earth, but it has no biological function. And so it, it's a neuro toxin and in fact, that's, that's what the mainly what the study's find. That's what I summarized, you know, like I said. Aluminum is added too many vaccines, and so children that received these vaccines are getting multiple doses of aluminum in an injectable form. Now, some people say that Lumina m- is not a big deal that, you know, you, but, but the, you have to differentiate between or orally, ingested aluminum and injected aluminum, we're warned to not even use aluminum foil anymore unless you like parchment paper in between because of the taxes city of aluminum other studies now that are showing a link between aluminum and Alzheimer's disease aluminum dementia, it, definitely, there's no question. There's literally there's literally thousands of studies showing that aluminum. I'm talking studies outside of the world of vaccine just. Thousands of studies that show that aluminum itself is a neuro toxin and is also capable of, of causing immune immune now functions. It's going next with this because I had read that numerous studies provided credible evidence that aluminum adversely affects important biological functions. Like neuro degenerative diseases and auto immune disorders up -solutely, that's the biggest problem is because it c- see when you when you ingest aluminum now luminous is dangerous to any kind of life-form, whether it's an animal, or human, and well we're animals as well, but. And that is dangerous. But when you ingest it as long as you don't ingest too much at once setting that most of that aluminum when I say most we're talking ninety nine point seven percent. You can you can eliminate it through the normal home in Tori functions of the body. But, but when, when that aluminum is injected the studies are showing that it lodges itself into different different organs of the body, and, and they're finding injected aluminum over a year later. They're finding it's still lots in different parts of the body, including the spleen and the brain it bypassed. Now here's the here's the interesting thing is some studies show that it's actually the smaller concentration. Of aluminum that are more dangerous, because they don't because the blood brain barrier does not block it. It's able to, to bypass the rain barrier and go directly into the brain. So this is off the record doctor medical doctor. Obviously, I'm not gonna say his name he didn't want it. He didn't he he, he doesn't even want to talk about it on the air, but told me off the record that there's no way that you can inject a child body with, with aluminum and it into a muscle and it not make its way to the brain. That's, that's absolutely. That's absolutely true. That's what the studies are showing. So, you know, I mean, I don't know why you can't speak on the record because he scares. There's plenty of studies that, that document that down fact in my book, and my latest book Miller's review of critical vaccine studies where I summarize over four hundred studies that are critical vaccines. I have a chapter in there on aluminum, and in that chapter, I summarize, I don't know one or two dozen probably about two dozen studies that, that document is the, the, the hazards of, of aluminum vaccines. For example. Here's a study that, that was conducted by Dr Chris Shaw. And Dr siege CJ, Thomas genyk aluminum in the central nervous system, toxin human as humans and animals vaccine edge in auto, immunity. This in summary, this study found that aluminum vaccines can cause autoimmune and early jiggle damage so that that's pretty common and just to tell you how common vaccines are for example, in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia and many other nations, infants and children, receive high quantities of Lumina for moldable injections of several vaccines. For example. Okay. The following vaccines contain aluminum, the tetanus vaccine would, you know, the that's combined the P? So, for example, they give babies diptheria tennis in plus vaccine that can. Aluminum the, the hib vaccine for influenza type b that contains aluminum hepatitis A contains aluminum hepatitis b contains aluminum and, and the pneumococcal vaccine contains aluminum. Now, they're giving these vaccines, for example. They're giving DTA. They're giving the protest fact seen at two months of age. They're also giving the, the hepatitis b vaccine, two months of age, they're giving the pneumococcal vaccine at two months of age, and they're giving the hib vaccine at two months of age. So these are four separate vaccines, each containing their own, high concentrations of aluminum. So, so it's so they're getting four high doses of aluminum, when they get their vaccine to two months of age. Then this is repeated again at at, at four months of age. And then again at six months of age. And so it's extremely. Concerning extremely dangerous and a recent study came out in his shown that today fifty four percent of all children, have a chronic ailment, which includes things like attention deficit disorder, which I have summarized studies showing that attention deficit disorder has been linked to the vaccines. And so, so these chronic ailments, people have to look around and say, what do you mean fifty four percent? We're talking with an half of all children today have kind of illnesses. Where's this coming from? Well, I'm working on a paper right now that has found evidence that all of these conditions. Okay, fifty four percent of the of children, have these chronic ailments. These are these are twenty two different ailments, okay that these children have, and all twenty two of these ailments, can be linked to vac. Seen damage. Well, so, so this is something needs to really, really get a handle on and really just recognize that when, when we say that when, when you hear people saying that vaccines, save lives. Well, if you look at. We know that with some flaxseeds they reduced the incidence of the disease. There's no question that when the measles, vaccine was introduced it reduced the number of cases of measles. But what are the trade offs? That's always what we need to look at. What are the trade offs, and, and the studies document that there's increased rates of diabetes increased rates of, of allergies increased rates of autoimmune diseases increased rates of, of learning disabilities, increased rates of so many different types of diseases. So we have to look at everything in from the larger picture, we can't just say that, that this particular vaccine was introduced lower the number of cases of disease at what cost, that's what always needs to be looked at. I'm reading the paper, according to the American Academy pediatrics, which is the AP aluminum is now being implicated as interfering with a variety of cellular metabolic processes in the nervous systems and another tissues. And so, you know, if the pediatric community knows this information. Why are they still pushing the agenda that all vaccines are proven safe? You know, I, I think that I think that there's just so much influenced by by big pharma, and you have to understand the regulatory agencies and I'm talking about the CDC the FDA and on international level, even the World Health Organization. These these workers Asians have been captured by by big pharma. They've been captured by the pharmaceutical industry and and what do I mean by that? I mean that there's so much evidence and document this in some of my papers and document. This in in. There's there's so much evidence right now that for example, in my in my book Miller's review of critical vaccine studies in the chapter on, on mercury mercury in vaccines. And by the way, there's still mercury Invex in vaccine or giving this to pregnant women and two infants. How ridiculous is that, that, but, but the point I'm making is the CDC in the year nineteen ninety nine they conducted their own study to look at at, at whether or not mercury in vaccines is dangerous. And, and they found that babies that got mercury in vaccines. What they did is they took a large group of kids, the and half of the kids got got got vaccines, with mercury and the other half of the kids got the same vaccines, except without the mercury, and then they've they've fast forwarded to, to, to several years later, and then they added up. How many kids in the wound group were eventually diagnosed with autism, and that the kids that got that those mercury containing vaccines were had had eight they were eight seven point six times more likely to be to have been diagnosed with autism. So, so we're talking about I high statistically significant study conducted by the CDC showing that mercury in vaccines will cause autism. Okay. So, so my point is, is that they did not remove mercury. They required it. They required. More people to actually get needed some from some scenes, and then required. More children to receive it and pregnant women to receive it. So, so what is the why am I mentioning this? Well, because it's important for everybody to know but also because it shows some insight into the fact that the that the CDs. C which is supposed to be a regulatory agency looking after for the health of every children has been captured by big pharma has been captured by the industry. They are just a marketing arm of the industry in my opinion, from for my research, the CDC and the FDA, and we'll help organization too, because there's a lot of evidence that the World Health Organization is covering up a lot of a lot of dangers associated with vaccines. So, so people need to realize that when you've got the, the American Academy of pediatrics you'd think, don't they don't they care about these children, the number that the thing that the Dr Blaylock he's, he's a neurosurgeon a brain surgeon. He, he did a forward to my other one of my other books fact, the vaccine safety manual doctor Blaylock in that foreword. He has he presented. He said amazing forward. He's, you know, it's an. Amazing bit of information. Yeah. One of the important things that he says, and he provides evidence for is that the vaccine program itself is sacrosanct above everything else, even above children's lives. The vaccine program must be saved at all costs. It

Neil Z Miller CDC Hib Vaccine Hepatitis B Vaccine World Health Organization Director American Academy Of Pediatrics Mensa International Doctor Blaylock FDA Alzheimer Tetanus Najim Dr Chris Shaw AP United States
"spleen" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

04:07 min | 3 years ago

"spleen" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"What does it actually do for the gut? Okay. So that actually does a lot of things. So one of the things that does is release histamine and histamine is important for a gut flow. So basically, you know, it'll increase the gut flow. So that's why something like guest, which is, you know, things stay there. It increases the flow of gut. You know of its hold Motilal is the technical term. And let's see what else it does with your good just jested juices stomach acidity. So things that are involved with digestion IBS C, which was like constipation will often because by less activation. Things are going slower. Okay. Got it got. So so in terms of the gut would that include things like like, the spleen the pancreas and liver or does it act upon those in a different way or just a Corolla? No, it does different things for different organs. So for the gut one more thing would be to release intrinsic factor, which helps you absorb twelve. But the things that I just mentioned for the good are just for the gut. Okay. Then for the spleen, it will let say, inhibit inflammation. Again, spleen is is part of your important part of your municipal so based on the organ and its functions. It will do things related to that organ. Okay. Gotcha. Yeah. So in terms of reducing inflammation. And we're talking about it like releasing anti inflammatory compounds really some kind of like anti-inflammatory neurotransmitter or how does that work? Yeah. So the main thing that does is release acetylcholine which is the anti inflammatory activates the cholinergic anti inflammatory pathway, and they'll do this in a bunch of different organs. Yeah. So whatever it makes me think sorta interrupt about Wim Hof the ice. Man who they've tested to be able to consciously reduce his his side akin levels. I know that a lot of what he's doing breath holding cold water immersion yoga meditation things like that all of those can be vaguely nerve stimulants. And it's possible that he's getting a big Sita coaling dump into his spleen to reduce some of these these side of inflammatory factors. Exactly. Yeah. There was a study that he conducted that show that various neurotransmitters went down not neurotransmitter cited king's sorry. So yeah, that could definitely be have to do with a lowering inflammation in the spleen like lowering the activation of the spleen and lowering inflammation in general in you also talk about how the Vegas nerve, you wrote this in an article about hell it hell it affects the bladder and also the sex Orden's. I thought the what it does teach. Those was pretty fascinating you go into that. Yes. So let's say for the sex. Oregon's it's more for women for women. It will help women. Let's say orgasm it might. It has some role infertility, and as far as let's say the bladder one affect of Vegas nerve stimulation like a side effect is your retention. I used to have used to peel the time could have been from low bagel simulation. So what about when when you talk about how it affects orgasms in women. Is it true that if you somehow stimulate Vegas nerve in like some of the body that it king? They can cause a woman have an orgasm. Yes. So the Vegas. Nervous connected all over the place. So if you stimulated at one place it could stimulated in another. And so yeah, it's a few. If you make a girl laugh. It could stimulate her another place. Interesting. Yeah. I've heard about that before. But, but I I hadn't really realize that it actually comes down to the Vegas nerve. It's super interesting. There's so many areas of health that it actually affects and obviously so many conditions that could assist with one of those couple of other questions before we jump into how to how to hack it. First of all hormones..

Vegas histamine Wim Hof Oregon acetylcholine king
How Spleens Can Multiply

Curiosity Daily

01:47 min | 3 years ago

How Spleens Can Multiply

"Did you know that your spleen can multiply so you can end up with extra spleens. No, you don't even know what your spleen does do you. Okay. No problem. I got you. Your spleen is an Oregon it's about four inches long. That sits in the upper left side of your abdomen that plays a big role in your immune system, it stores, platelets and white blood cells. And it's also where old red blood cell. Dell's get recycled the spleen also recognizes certain types of harmful bacteria that caused pneumonia and meningitis so it gives your immune system time to make antibodies without a spleen about half a percent of people develop a deadly blood infection called sepsis. That's pretty good work for an organ that doesn't get much attention. Now back to the original point about having multiple spleens. According to a two thousand fourteen study published in the Malaysian journal of Medical Sciences about one in five people have multiple spleens this happens, thanks to a process called splendid basis. And it happens when you rupture your original spleen, which is pretty fragile when this happens cells from the spleen scattered throughout the abdomen. If the cells land somewhere with a lot of blood vessels. They grow into tiny extra spleens called splinter punk Ulli. But they're also known as accessory spleens so fashionable they don't really have a function. But they're not usually harmful still if you undergo a splenectomy physician suggest taking out any accessories. Spleens in the process. Having those extra spleens could come with complications like developing necrosis tissue death or being misread as another massive tissue. Oh, and as far as we know the spleen is the only organ that can do this. You're not going to be generating accessory hearts anytime soon. The takeaway your spleen is special end unique. I mean, I want my excessive spleens to have

Oregon Malaysian Journal Of Medical S Dell Pneumonia Meningitis Four Inches
Flags: whose is best?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

10:39 min | 3 years ago

Flags: whose is best?

"Us. Very few people whether they're happy admitting it or not are entirely indifferent to the hoisting of the country's flag. For a survey of what different flags mean to the people of different nations. We consulted the riot Asli multinational stuff here at monocle. I'm the foreign editor here at Monaco. Canada's flag the maple leaf was introduced in the sixties as way to set itself apart from the Union, Jack, which was on our previous leg since. Then it's probably most notable around the world as being spotted on backpackers backpacks as this rose in the seventies. When Canadians did not want to be mistaken for Americans during the Vietnam war when they were traveling, and that's continued on through the Iraq war and even today. I'm actually betting with Trump. There's been a bump in backpack sport in Canada flex. I'm Stephanie's Kia, and though I may not sound like it. I grew up in the United States where the flag is held in sacred esteem when we were very young we were told that it was not allowed to touch the ground and friends of mine who attended senior schools at after I left had to swear allegiance to it. It's a symbol that is everywhere in public life. You'll see it in the grocery store and at the gas station. I'm Karen Miller. And I'm the culture editor at Monaco. Now unity is not an easy thing to combine Italian politics or for that matter in its citizens national identity, but it is that precious and rare feeling that the Italian flag represents and celebrates over the years. It has naturally been used by people in all signs of the political spectrum from partisans to fascists, but somehow it has managed not to become just a preserve of far-right and theorists. It remains overall a benign and relatively neutral symbol of Italy's institutions its constitution and its young Republic, not particularly incendiary symbol. And when was the last time anything to do with the Todd politics felt fairly sedate? I'm Ben violent a producer and present at monocle twenty four. Now, I've got to say that the Estonian flag has long been a fairly contentious issue. Although overwhelmingly it is seen as a positive symbol. I would say that considering that indigenous Australians aren't necessarily represented on the flag. He can lead to a bit of misunderstanding to the types of issues that indigenous people do phase now importantly indigenous people do have their own flag. And that is why the respected among the strains as well. It's often seen at sporting events and the international events as well. So it's not as if there is no representation whatsoever. But when Austria tries to pitch it's flag as one fly, the represents all stray liens one. Does get the feeling that. Actually, there are a large number of stray into might feel as though in fact, they're not represented by that one single flag. I'm page and I'm a research app. One cool twenty full, and I am from the exotic southwest suburbs of London for me the Union Jack is actually quite an aesthetic flag, very bold colors at symmetrical and very recognizable. But it's still interesting. It's not just a Colo this sort of intricacy to the pattern. In fact, it's service Leszek that I chose the Union Jack to be on my bed sheets at my in my first year of university. And I studied in Dublin this proved slightly problematic as any later that I sort of realized that the eight hundred years or so of oppression was a factor. I should have considered before the junk on my bed sheets. And I think that's why maybe people feel a little bit uncomfortable about the Union Jack of it is so closely associated with the Royal family and colonialism, and it's got that nasty hangover sense about her. I'm your lane if affair and where I'm from. A nation is divided as Belgium split between the Flemish in the north and the loons in the south the flag has hardly anything to do with patriotism. It is almost exclusively used at sporting events. When at least we're little while the nation feels United even separatists don't mind waiting the Belgian flag and the World Cup from his will be merely seen as supporting the Red Devils. This is the foreign desk on monocle twenty four I'm joined once again by two Marshall, and we wanted to close out the program by by trying to set the oh, I'm sure not at all vexed question of whose flag of all the countries in the world ease best. I've drawn up a little list of my own come up with five that I really liked for various reasons be interested to see if they overlap with yours, we have not shared notes. Maybe if we start with what what are your top five over there? Okay. To be boring. I'll have to say that it is subjective. And if you'd say what are the best flags that work? I would give you different lists giving them even example. I like the Kenyan flag because the designs crying good. But the the the shield in the middle of it is a mess, I warrior shield now the messiah only about one point five percent of the Kenyan population. If it'd been a shield who are about twenty percent poppulation that would be a serious problem. It would be a bad fly. Leg because why do they went into the mess? I nobody's really bothered is simply something. Oh, yeah. It's symbol of our nation. So it's a good flag, Mozambique. It's on my list right for bad flags. I hope I caught like, okay. Well, I think it's a bad flack because it's got an AK forty seven on it, which isn't good. I believe but also because it's so similar to the flag of from yellow which was the organization that took on joined the independence fight full moat, Mozambique. But the problem is they represented overwhelmingly woman, particularly ethnic grouping in Mozambique. And so they pretty much said right off lag is now going be the national flag. So I think that's also that's a negative flag. Right. Good flexible flex. I. That's through the good flags. I like the Japanese flag simple, but effective, and when you know, a will the sun never sets, and you know, that behind Japan there is nothing except the sea. And then that sun, which is why I love the Macedonian flag is just mad. It's on my list. Okay. The sunburst it comes from Alexander. The great that they think was Macedonian, of course, the Greek student agree. It's just so not in the grouping of European flags each their South Korea is nice. It's not on my list. But it's in the Yang light. So over there in eastern and the little things in each corner. Actually, they mean, something to the South Koreans Brazil. Yeah. Good co- bit fussy. If you wanna talk, I let's believes but. The stars on the Brazil flag are in the position. They were on the day that independence was declared in the sky, which I like an I also liked the colors. But that's where the subjective thing in how we imbue meaning to it. I like the Brazilian football team and they play in those colors. And so it's kind of more attractive was in and of itself is just blue green Italy simply because it's such a fantastic lease simple and beautiful flag that immediately says good food. Bit again, that's the reverse engineered projection things. Actually, I also had on my list. I had Pakistan's flag, which I think is is simple and beautiful until the story of the country and has become trees. Placing the little stripe down the left hand side of the flagpole side is to include all the minorities of the indeed. So I I think it's a lovely flag. The practice may not have worked out quite like the theory. But I do like to play it's important that you have there. It's like I said the American flag doesn't always live up to its idea until the factors is if it's the thirteen stripes for the thirteen colonies, and they fought for liberty against the oppressive Brits. So in the flag is the concept of liberty. And it's important to have it there. Even if you don't always live up to its value. The ones I have mostly in aversion to flags which have the map of the country on them. So that Cyprus and Kosovo I think Cambodia's is annoying because it's just being tourist attraction in the middle of Bosnia. And Kosovo both looked like they were designed by committees. Try not to upset. Anybody and I guess understand. Also, I know the man who designed the Bosnian flag so much will pass it on to. Which might your list of disagreeable, Mozambique for reasons that we've gone into ready in the K forty-seven Greenland. It's just read in top and white at the bottom. And then the circle in the middle of it, which is white at the top. It's just boring. Uganda? Uganda's is black horizontal stripes. Black yellow red followed by black yellow red. It's like you've taken the German flag in the Belgian flagging sewn them together. And in the middle is this bird. It looks like a sort of chicken, you get an Endo's. It's actually the crane which is a national vase just it's just too fussy Nigeria. Green white green. Great country. But no such a like, and then Antarctica again the same guy that designed the Bosnian flag design how to hand in designing the talk to flag two thousand and two NET simply on a blue background for neutrality. And then the shape of enter Antarctica on it. It's just the best for like in the world. But the best flag in the world. I think we have agreed is Macedonia's. No, we have. Agreed. It's yorkshire. Is there a Yorkshire flank? We'll call is what's on light blue background with the white rose of Yorkshire Brian there in the middle, which I happen to have exactly the same thing. Tattooed on my right shoulder. So officially then the best flag in the world is Yorkshire Macedonia. Running a close second for my lecture notes on social thank you for. But he's it for this episode of the foreign desk went back next week and lookout for the foreign disc spleen available every Wednesday the foreign desk is produced by Yanni Goffin and Bill Bill so edits the program. My name's Andrew Miller. Thanks very much for listening until next time. Goodbye.

Monocle Editor Monaco Mozambique Canada Uganda Karen Miller United States Iraq Antarctica Donald Trump Jack Yorkshire Macedonia US. Italy Austria Belgium
"spleen" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"spleen" Discussed on WCPT 820

"We want to remind you that the telephone number here is three two three four six eight eleven thirty five you can call and talk to us because we've got so much to talk about. But first we want to introduce someone incredible. In the studio with us. It's our friend comedian and activists Derek levels. Welcome to the show. Good morning. Good morning. Stanley. Now, you are here. Also because you have your new podcast this year. Yeah, I'm launching. I'm watching a podcast like everybody else, Los Angeles nineteen. So the podcast is is called a man's spleen yourself. So the idea is basically like dues need to be do doing more of the heavy lifting. You know, having hard conversations holding ourselves accountable. And so I thought like well me being who I am like how do I contribute to that? Without like taking up space or taking up space from women who have already been doing that kind of work for ever. Well, make my own. Yeah. So the idea is to basically like talk about the the intricacies of patriarchy and how they've affected guests on a personal level. And how they've been able to deal with that fantastic. Look forward man's playing yourself in on item, Stitcher soundcloud. So here's the thing. Welcome hat number one. Happy new year. The week. We could still say happy new all year actually, say I was going to ask. Ask that question. How long can you tell you way into how long can you officially say? Happy new year the first. Tony USO butterflies and rainbows me. You are just come on. Tony, no Cleveland Christmas music. You can play Christmas music in July, the twenty six it's done. I do agree with electric has to come down January second. Yeah. No, I love when you start seeing trees out in March. Yes, April, and it's like, y'all know better than that are giving life at that point. Oh, my putting awards on them. Adduced award. Just the Lord's been like put a little pizza ever go you one. Now this prepping early for next year. One. Here's the thing. We okay so happy new year. Excuse me. Tony. Okay. And but here we are. We just welcomed in the one hundred sixteenth congress with I mean, one hundred women Nancy Pelosi. If you did not hear Akeem Jeffries. Introducing Nancy Pelosi we have got to play that for you right now today, a sophisticated strategist a legendary legislator of voice for the voiceless a defender of the disenfranchise a powerful profound prophetic principal public servant. And that's why we stand squarely behind her today. Let me be clear House Democrats are down with NDP..

Nancy Pelosi Tony USO Akeem Jeffries Los Angeles Stanley principal
Would Cannibalism Have Been Calorically Worthwhile?

BrainStuff

04:15 min | 3 years ago

Would Cannibalism Have Been Calorically Worthwhile?

"Hello. I'm Anna Faris, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these ci- history and culture food entering is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like. And how we can find more of those things on our first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts. Welcome to bring stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff. I'm more in vocal bomb, and you've likely heard of Palio diet, the trendy regimens name is short for paleolithic and supposedly mimics the nutrition of ancient humans who lived about ten thousand years ago, cave, people eight meats, seafoods nuts and a few fruits and vegetables. Oh, and one other food source that doesn't show up on today's protein focused food, blogs other people archaeologists in western Europe have evidence that the precursors to modern humans eight their neighbors during the paleo ethic era. Most experts though have debated whether cannibalism was essential for the survival of these hominids, or whether it was part of ritualistic ceremonies to be classified as nutritional cannibalism, the people that paleolithic clans eight needed to be well nutritious. So just how many calories are in thi- or an ear. Archaeologist James Cole of the university of Brighton in England decided to find out Bing of the diagrams of cattle and pigs that illustrate. Different cuts of meat Cole mapped out the human body, then determined caloric count within each segment showing how much energy they would transfer. If consumed the results were published in the journal scientific reports a thi-, for instance, contains a hefty thirteen thousand three hundred fifty calories while the spleen is a modest one hundred and thirty overall the average human body has anywhere from one hundred twenty five thousand to one hundred and forty four thousand consumable calories. Some parts may take longer to digest you'll rack up ten thousand two hundred eighty calories from humans going alone. While others are snack size like the kidneys and contain about three hundred and eighty calories. The brain spinal cord and nerves were thinking Stu would be the most appropriate cooking method. Here will provide you with two thousand seven hundred calories and the bones contain about twenty five thousand bone. Broth is so untrendy right now after all despite all this talk of ancient eating habits coal concluded that other humans were probably not a nutritive meal of choice compared to competing. Available food sources one single willy mammoth, for example, containing a whopping three point six million calories would have given an entire tribe food for about eight weeks a human on the other hand would have provided enough calories for tribe to subside for only half a day, leaving everyone to wonder what's for dinner after just a few hours. Cole concludes that because of the relatively meagre calorie counts of the human body people. Eight other people for social or cultural reasons not for their health. So modern paleo dieters can breathe a sigh of relief there. Recipe. Books should continue to skip this particular ingredient. Stays episode was written by Lori L dove and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other food for thought topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hello. I'm Anna, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these signs history and culture food entering is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer, dealing Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we liked and how we can find more of those things on our first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts.

James Cole Laurin Vogel Dilling Fagin Anna Faris Asheville North Carolina Apple Producer Europe STU University Of Brighton England Lori L Tyler Clang Seventy Year Thirteen Thousand Three Hundre Ten Thousand Two Hundred Eight Two Thousand Seven Hundred Cal