15 Burst results for "Spitzer Space Telescope"

"spitzer space telescope" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

04:13 min | 3 months ago

"spitzer space telescope" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"A web space telescope is expected to reveal a new exoplanet photo. By Jeffrey kluger. At some point, things were destined to settle down in the glass and mission control room at the space telescope science institute in Baltimore, Maryland, for much of this year the institute has been the center of the astronomical world. After all, it is there that each image captured by the new James Webb Space Telescope, first arrives, including the dazzling batch received and released in July. But the real work the institute team does, analyzing the scientific data embedded in the pictures, is quieter, less flashy stuff. Still, this week as NASA reports, that quiet was broken by a new analysis of one of the July images, and as time has just learned, Webb will stir even more excitement soon with a much anticipated first of its kind photo release. Together, the space telescope science institute teams continued photo analysis will tell us more than ever about solar systems beyond our own. And the possibility that life could exist there. To begin, this week, space telescope science institute researchers announced that Webb had taken a big step in its search for biology's chemical fingerprints on distant exoplanets, a planet's orbiting other stars. The discovery of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere of a planet known as wasp 39 B it marks the first clear detection of CO2 in the atmosphere of any planet outside of the 8 that circle our own sun. Wasp 39 B is what astronomers rather unscientifically refer to as a puffy planet. With a diameter 1.3 times that of Jupiter, but a mass only one quarter as great. It also orbits so close to its parent star that the atmosphere reaches a broiling 900°C equal to 1600°F. The presence of organic chemistry, notwithstanding, wasp 39 B is thus not the kind of place astronomers would expect to go looking for life. Still, the presence of CO2 on the planet, combined with water vapor, sodium, and potassium that the Hubble and spitzer space telescopes had already discovered there is one more bit of proof that the universe is, among other things, a giant organic chemistry set. One in which the stuff of biology is found pretty much anywhere. That holds promise for similar discoveries on rockier, more temperate worlds, where life could take hold. Detecting such a clear signal of carbon dioxide a wasp 39 B, bodes well for the detection of atmospheres on smaller, terrestrial sized planets, set astronomer Natalie batalha, of the University of California at Santa Cruz, who leads the team that made the discovery in a statement. With more than 5000 exoplanets having been spotted throughout the galaxy, astronomers now believe that virtually every star in the universe is circled by at least one planet, and many, like our own sun, by a whole litter of them. That's a lot of places for a biology to take hold. Meantime, expect bigger news from Webb in the coming weeks, and a lot more hoopla descending on the space telescope science institute mission control. While astronomers have been able to study the atmosphere of exoplanets by analyzing the changes in the wavelength of light that streams through the air of the planet, as it passes in front of its parent star, no one has ever captured a picture of an exoplanet itself. That, NASA administrator Bill Nelson told time and a conversation last week is about the change, thanks to Webb. Just a sneak preview, he said, the next photo you're going to get from Webb is of an exoplanet. I don't know when they're coming out with it, and I haven't seen it yet, but it's just opening up all new understanding of the universe to us..

space telescope science instit Jeffrey kluger Webb James Webb NASA Baltimore Maryland Natalie batalha Santa Cruz University of California Bill Nelson
"spitzer space telescope" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

07:10 min | 6 months ago

"spitzer space telescope" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Where you're going. Good. I'll let you finish. Yes. Thank you, did the best job ever. We love them because the fuel that we needed to get to where we went was minimal and that means that we have over 20 years of fuel and that was the major limiter to our time frame. And now we just have to wait for one of those single point failures to fail and that's probably going to be it's going to happen before the fuel runs out. So yeah, we're looking at maybe hitting 20 years. That's fantastic. It was a 5 year mission. 5 and a half years, maybe ten, and now it's 20. Yeah. So Naomi, what's your biggest hope for the James Webb with regard to your research specifically? What is it that you think in ten years, you'll be looking back and go, this is what we discovered. Yeah, so my PhD was using the spitzer space telescope and that kind of asked the question why is as Uranus spins? Why is it changing in its brightness? Like what's happening? And we can't answer that question until we have James Webb. So my specific research will gain a whole paper about why it was changing when it was spinning, hopefully. And that's going to be a big deal. And then hopefully that kind of thing is going to ask more questions that can only be answered with these missions, hopefully, that are going to happen soon. And so in ten years time, I'm hoping that there'll be a mission on the way to Uranus and actually to answer those questions. Awesome. Well, Naomi was wonderful talking with you. We love talking about the scientists who are excited about their work. And we're all excited about James Webb. Maybe once you do get that next paper out, we'll have you back on the show to tell us what you found. Yeah, that would be great. This is a great fun. Thank you for having me. Thank you. Take care. It's time for science or fiction. Each week I come up with three science news items or facts to real in one face in the next challenge by panelist skeptics tell me which one is the fake. You guys remember the theme from last work, which one is bigger? I like that so much. I decided to similar themed this week, which one is older, which is older. Okay. Okay. Here we go. Yeah. Item number one. The first cities predate evidence for iron use by about 5000 years. Item number two, the first dinosaur walked the earth 40 million years before the emergence of the first true trees. And item number three, the first firearm was invented about 900 years after the first steam engine. Jago first. The first cities predate evidence for iron use by about 5000 years. I mean, can I ask you what your definition of a city is? That's a very good question because the experts that don't agree on what the definition of a city is, there's no very specific operational definition, and it actually is also a little bit depending on context, but the first generally agreed upon cities. We'll say. I mean, I could imagine that that is possible. I'm just thinking about early cities. I mean, iron, I wouldn't say as a requirement, but I don't know. I just feel like at that point in a civilization when they're manipulating iron. It helps. Anyway, you know, there's a lot to unpack there. Let me just move forward now. The first dinosaur walked the earth 40 million years before the emergence of the first true trees. What I do know is that sharks predate trees and there might be a dinosaur version of a shark. I love that stamp. Right? I mean, it's pretty providing a version of a shark. I would love therapy. You know, I would say it's a shark a sore. You know what I mean? They're basically dinosaurs right now. You know what I mean? Like they're that old. But yeah, so when you say dinosaurs, Steve, you're talking about the clade dinosaur, the evolutionary glade. Two blade. All right, so the only thing that saying something is a dinosaur would refer to probably gotcha. All right. That one does have a technical operational definition. That's why when I think about the creatures that we're living 40 million years before trees came around. I don't know if that was the time of the dinosaurs. So that's another one. That's one like, wow. At the really put a lot more a lot more time than I have right now, that a good last one here, the first firearm was invented about 900 years after the first steam engine. I think that one is science. Wait, 900 years? Yeah, you see? This is a good Steve. This is really, really good. I don't have a toehold anywhere on any of this. The first firearm was vented 900, almost a thousand years after the first steam engine. Wow, now I'm doing a complete reversal on that one. All right, I have to make up my mind. Yes, you do. I'm going to say that I think that the dinosaur one is the fiction because I of all the reading that I've done on dinosaurs. I don't think that they existed that long ago because trees are incredibly old. Okay, Evan. Okay, cities versus iron use, 5000 years, huh? Yeah, because I think Jay kind of hit on it. The definition of cities that can be kind of nebulous, so I think it could make a case in which that would be a span of time that would be 5000 years. The other two I'm having problems with both of them. Dinosaurs walking the earth 40 million years before the emergence of the first true trees, true trees, I think is, you know, what kind of you have to know there. What were there like Proto trees before true trees, something like that? So that gets very messy. And then the first dinosaur walked the earth, you know, so what crawled out of the muck and technically walked and it was 40 million years before the emergence of the trees, what the hell did they eat? I mean, if not each other. So that's the problem I'm having with that one. But I'm also having a problem with the first firearm invented about 900 years after the first theme engine. That sounds reversed to me. Wouldn't the first, when the first firearm? You define firearm. We think 900 years after the first steam engine. So what the steam engine, there was a steam engine in if the first firearm was in the 12th century or something like that, the first theme engine was, what, 300 for 400? Is that right? That can't be right either. Both two and three are fiction, both. But which one is more? I don't know. I guess I'll go with the firearm one is the fiction..

James Webb Naomi spitzer Jago Steve Evan Jay
"spitzer space telescope" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

06:20 min | 6 months ago

"spitzer space telescope" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Uranus because it's a great icebreaker. I love that. We're going to say something else. It really makes people listen and it makes kids laugh and why wouldn't you want that? So yeah, and I spent the last four years studying the gases of Uranus. I'm very pleased to love it. Yeast of the ridicule. So that's great. My son's gonna love this podcast. But it's hard, like when bob's bob basically asked, how deep are we going to dive into Uranus? I was looking at some pictures. I don't know if these are real or not. But I was looking at like Hubble compared to web, right? And I guess they're showing like the same piece of space. And I don't know if this is real, though. Like, I don't know if this was like a simulation on how much sharper it is or whatever, but do those pictures really exist or are those just showing you projections? What it is, but it's not real. Yeah, so there was an image going round or two images going around that was spitzer compared to web. And that's a real one. Because and it's a real comparison of the same field of sky and that's a really great picture because it shows how much more signal that we're getting and all of the details that you can see and the resolution is much better and it's very, very exciting, especially for people who are looking in the mid infrared like I was talking about before. Yeah, I've seen that picture. Those two pictures and oh my God, it's the difference between looking at something completely blurry and looking at something that's in focus. Yeah. Yes. Exactly. And yeah, they haven't even started. So it's really exciting that that's just, you know, that's just like they turned it on and pointed it at something convenient. So imagine what they can do with time and investing the science into it. Now, as high res and amazing as James Webb is and it certainly is. It's a marvel. But when you think, you know, when you think about, oh man, if only, or I can't wait until what kind of resolution, what kind of what kind of things would you love to see that even James Webb just does not is nowhere near having the capability of discerning. Honestly, I don't know. I mean, all of the questions that we got for the James Webb Space Telescope came from the spitzer space telescope. So until we answer questions with James Webb, will we know what questions we have for our next generation. Yes, exactly. Exactly. We don't know what we don't know. How about that for an answer, but I like it. I like it. What would you want to look at that's even better than the one that we're just celebrating now? Like, come on, come on, Jake. Bob, let the James Webb settle in, man. Let it let it do its magic. Yes, it has settled in, but I can't help but think as awesome as that is, what can our grandkids, what are they going to be looking at? I can't help but thinking they already have the planned one. Or they're planning it. It's like the Louvre slash had X and it looks like a giant James Webb. Oh gosh. So scientists are just as impatient as well. I kind of doubt that 'cause I'm thinking about like solar gravitational lenses. So that's kind of many generations down the road, but let's look at the exoplanet a hundred light years away and look at the continents. That's the kind of stuff I dream about, but you know what James Webb is good too. No, but seriously, I am for studying the outer planets, right? I mean, they think a probe is going to give us you're right there. That's true. Any telescope near earth. So I guess what I'm asking is, when are we going to probe Uranus? Steve. Well, actually, you mentioned this. We had something called the planetary decadal and that means that the national Academy of Sciences announced kind of what the priorities of science should be for NASA and NASA usually follows it. And they said that the priority mission, the flagship mission of the next decade should be a Uranus orbiter and probe. So you won't have to wait long. Oh my goodness. Awesome. It has been a while. Since Voyager. Exactly. I would imagine that that would be on the short list. Naomi Naomi will Hubble help James Webb like fine stuff. It's Hubble gonna be turned into kind of like let's have Hubble look first and then we'll have James Webb come in with the big guns. A spotter telescope? They're actually very complimentary, so it's not gonna even act as its sidekick. It's gonna be its partner. It's going to be looking with it because Hubble looks in the visible. So in the same light that we look in and it also looks in the UV, which is even further towards the blue. And then it also looks at a shorter range of the near infrared. And so that means that we can look at a planet in this entire range, and that's really exciting for scientists because lots of different things happen in each of the bands all the way from UV through to the mid infrared and it means that you can deduce lots of different scientific conclusions and do science better with more wavelengths. Hubble's Hubble's not dead. I know, the Hubble lasted way longer than I thought it was going to. 30 two? Is it 32? Still kicking. It's the same age as me. Yeah. Yeah, you can't have those problems with web, though. Yeah, exactly. It's pretty far away. It's a bit too far away to go for a servicing mission, yeah. Do we know how long it'll last? We know how long it could last, so when it went up, the ESA, so the European space agency were in charge of an Airbus. I don't remember. They shot it off and launched it. They killed it. And he did so well..

James Webb spitzer bob Naomi Naomi NASA Jake Bob national Academy of Sciences Steve ESA Airbus
"spitzer space telescope" Discussed on Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"spitzer space telescope" Discussed on Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

"There are structures in the world that feel like they've been there since the beginning of time. Petra and Jordan, the Great Pyramid of Giza, and Italy's coliseum are so much a part of the fabric of history that it's almost impossible to imagine the world without them we know almost nothing about the individuals who toiled away at their construction. All we have is the evidence of their work, incredible achievements in human engineering, but there is an equally amazing achievement that isn't often listed among other wonders. Yet, despite its relative obscurity, its existence has captivated archeologists for generations, mainly because of how it got there. It's called nan madol, meaning within the intervals, and it can be found over 1300 miles northeast of Papua New Guinea in the Pacific Ocean. Nan madol is just off the eastern coast of Pompeii as part of the Federated States of Micronesia. It is, or was a city that was built inside a lagoon and is comprised of nearly a hundred man-made stone islets, all of which are connected by a series of canals. This unique composition has earned it the nickname the Venice of the Pacific. Each stone weighs on average about 5 tons. There are stones so big they can reach 5 times that amount, which is what has baffled experts for so long. How were people able to build nan madol at all? It's possible that the entirety of the island's population was required to move such large stones, but nobody knows for sure. Those who live near Nando believe, however, that the original inhabitants had help from two sorcerers, Felicia pa and olo chappa. Brothers who had come to the area in a big canoe. They'd wanted to build an altar to the God of agriculture where they could worship. This alter eventually became nan madol. They were able to move the stones into place, they said, with the help of a flying dragon. Despite the story, no food grows on nan madol due to the lack of viable soil and fresh water. Instead everything must be sailed in from the mainland. Another legend claims that the island existed before people ever lived there. It suggests that the giant stones floated into place by themselves as if they had been moved by spectral hands, hence Nando's other nickname. The city of ghosts. Unfortunately, there is no definitive proof of how the island came to be. There are no written historical records, only the stories told by one generation to the next, scientists believe the truth is far less paranormal and that the stones were floated from Pompeii to Nam madol on bamboo rafts. And searching for historical documents has proven difficult as a local king once proclaimed that digging enamel would be considered breaking the law, an offense punishable by death. In fact, this declaration has invited speculation about a curse upon the island for anyone who dares disobey it. In 1907, a German governor named Viktor Berg decided to ignore the king's demand. Berg traveled to nah mandel and ventured inside a tomb, one that had been said to be the resting place for the remains of several ancient giants. Hours later, after the sun had gone down, the island became a hotbed of spiritual turbulence, lightning illuminated the sky, heavy rains drenched Berg as the sound of a conch shell blared in the distance. The next day, he was found dead. A German Doctor Who examined Berg's body could not determine a cause of death, but the locals knew what had happened, Berg had insulted the gods, and had paid for it with his life. The mystery surrounding nan madol has not lessened over the years. If anything it has only grown, and the island has gone on to inspire musicians, television writers and authors as well. Perhaps most notably, H. P. Lovecraft, creator of the cthulhu mythos, based the creature's home of role on nan madol, specifically the island's origin story. Nematode is the stuff of legends. We may never know how it really got here, but one thing is certain. It isn't going anywhere anytime soon. Because those stones are really heavy. This episode was made possible by shudder. Love a good fright starts streaming and screaming with shutter from the legendary monsters that fuel your nightmares to under the radar haunts and critically acclaimed exclusives discover what polygon calls a horror movie Paradise. And what Roger Ebert dot com says is one of the best streaming services in the world. Staffed with chilling content, all created by the industry's top horror experts. Shutters library of frightening films and eerie series cover the entire horror spectrum, meaning there's something for every type of fan. Come experience highly anticipated new releases like superhost seance starring Suki Waterhouse and the boule brothers Dracula. Plus, don't miss out on creep show, slasher flesh and blood and other mussy shutter exclusives available ad free and on the platforms you're already on. Sign up today at shutter dot com, shutter, so good, it's scary. NASA has captured a lot of strange and interesting things on camera. In the fall of 2014, they released a picture of the sun with its most active regions highlighted. It happened to form an eerie visage of a jack-o'-lantern. Two years later, the spitzer space telescope caught a glimpse of two nebulae that bore an uncanny resemblance to the USS enterprise ships from the original Star Trek series and its follow-up the next generation. These phenomena can be explained as pareidolia, also known as the tendency to see familiar objects or faces in inanimate things. But there was one subject photographed by NASA that defied explanation. It was massive, stretching over two miles long, and nobody knew how it got there. It was first noticed by pilot trex Smith, who had been flying over southern Australia in June of 1998. It was a geoglyph, a design made in the land that could be seen from a distance, and it depicted an Aboriginal man poised to throw a stick or a boomerang. The figure came to be known as the Maori man named for the township of Marie where it was found. Australians flocked to see the Maori man for themselves until the local government closed it down. But that didn't stop planes from flying overhead to catch photos for themselves. A picture taken by NASA's landsat 5 satellites in May of that year had showed nothing on the plateau. No man, not even a hint of an outline. A few weeks later, though the satellite snapped another shot and there it was. The Maori man in all its glory, as if it had appeared out of thin air. After its discovery, anonymous press releases were distributed to the Australian press. They contain phrases like your state of SA and Queensland Barrier Reef, none of which were used by those who lived there. It appeared that the Maori man had been made by outsiders, namely, Americans. How did they know that it had been Americans behind the geoglyph? Because the releases also mentioned something called the great serpent mound. The great serpent mound was a 1300 foot long ancient Native American effigy in Ohio, but although it had been a rich cultural site for ohioans, few outside the U.S. were even aware of its existence. From there, things only got stranger. In July of 1998, a glass jar was found near the Maori man. Inside was a satellite image of the site, as well as a United States flag, and a note mentioning the branch davidian religious group, the same sect that had been involved in a deadly siege with the U.S. government in Waco, Texas, 5 years earlier..

nan madol Berg Nan madol Felicia pa olo chappa Great Pyramid of Giza Nam madol Viktor Berg Micronesia Petra Pompeii Papua New Guinea Pacific Ocean Nando Suki Waterhouse Jordan Italy
"spitzer space telescope" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"spitzer space telescope" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Things very rewarding, and that's actually lead our species to thrive. In 1924 British explorer George Mallory attempted to become the first person to reach the summit of Mount Everest, unfortunately perished during his quest. Who were the first adventurers to successfully reach the summit of Mount Everts and live. This one is open it. You got a few Yodels before we give the answer The answer, Sir Edmund Hillary and his Sherpa tends ignore day in 1953. Even though we climbed the highest point on Earth, humans didn't stop. We wanted to go higher outer space is the ultimate challenge. Tougher than any other. We've taken off. Who was the first American astronaut to reach outer space. John Glenn be Gus Grissom. See Alan Shepard? The answer is C for cool guy Alan Shepard on May 5th 1961 Shepherd successfully rocketed into outer space, beautiful new and survived the landing. After Shepard. We kept going one launch at a time to 1009. NASA launched a super dope telescope in space. This bad boy was designed to find other planets in our galaxy that could support life like art. What's the name of this life seeking telescope? Hey, Kepler Space Telescope, The Hubble Space Telescope. See Spitzer Space Telescope. It's a tough one. I know. Awesome answer is a the Kepler Space Telescope. Kepler Space Telescope simply.

Alan Shepard John Glenn Gus Grissom George Mallory NASA Earth Mount Everest 1953 Mount Everts 1924 Shepard May 5th 1961 British Shepherd first first person Kepler Space Telescope American first adventurers Hubble Space Telescope
"spitzer space telescope" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"spitzer space telescope" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Future spacecraft land on distant worlds. A few of the stories to tell you about this week at nasa we launched a new interactive website. Highlighting land sat nine the joint nasa and us geological survey satellite mission is targeted for launch september sixteenth from california's vandenberg space force base lands at nine. We'll continue the programs critical role in monitoring and managing land resources such as agricultural crops water and forests needed to sustain human life or more details visit massive dot gov slash lance at nine. The next spacex resupply mission to the international space station will carry a variety of nasa science investigations including a study on preventing and treating bone density loss at investigation aimed at detecting and mitigating vision disorders. And a new robotic arm demonstration that has potential uses on earth including for disaster relief. The mission is currently targeted for launch august. Twenty eighth from our kennedy space center in florida. The team working on the umbrella like adaptable deployable entry and placement technology or adept. Heat shield designed to deliver science payloads on future missions to mars and beyond is testing out a new material called spider. We've it is a woven. Fabric may think will improve the integrity of the heat shield and make it safer for larger vehicles to safely pass through the atmospheres of more distant locations on august nineteenth. We observed the one hundred birthday of late star trek creator. Gene roddenberry with a panel discussion about the groundbreaking shows legacy of inspiration. Hope and diversity is son rod roddenberry moderated the panel which included star trek actor and activist. George decay as well. As members of nasr's diverse workforce opening remarks for the hit were provided by nasa administrator. Bill nelson it also featured a nineteen seventy six recording in which gene roddenbury talked about the impact. He hoped the show would have on diversity and inclusion. The whole show was an attempt to say that humanity will reach maturity and wisdom on the day that it begins not just to tolerate but to take a delight in differences in ideas and differences in life forms. We transmitted roddenbury's recorded remarks into space for the agencies deep space network asked the panel. Discussion was happening. Astronomers have spotted a group of young stars and star forming gas clouds sticking out of one of our milky way. Galaxy's spiral arms like a splinter from a piece of lumber this previously unrecognized feature of the galaxies sagittarius arm stretches some three thousand light years and was found with help from nasa spitzer space telescope prior to its retirement.

nasa gene roddenbury international space station rod roddenberry kennedy space center california nasr Bill nelson florida roddenbury us George Galaxy
"spitzer space telescope" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"spitzer space telescope" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"A new study claims. The first stas began shining between two hundred fifty and three hundred and fifty million years after the big bang. Thirteen point eight. Two billion years ago. The findings reported in the monthly notices the roster society abased study of six of the most distant galaxies currently known galaxies whose light has taken almost the entire existence of the universe to reach here. The authors found that the distance of these galaxies away from earth corresponded to a look. Back time of more than thirty billion years an era when the universe was only five hundred and fifty million years old analyzing images from the hobbling spitzer space telescopes the authors were able to calculate the age of each of these galaxies ranging from somewhere around two hundred to three hundred million years and that allow them to estimate when they first formed stars the birth of the first ever stars known as cosmic dorn was a key event in the evolution of the universe. See it mac. The end of the cosmic dark ages the time before the first star sean and the ultraviolet light from those very first is triggered the beginning of cosmic reorganization the process that would eventually make the universe transparent and look the way it does today to determine the age of cosmic dawn the authors allies stylized from the galaxies as recorded by the hobbling spitzer space telescopes. They were looking for a macher in this spectrum which is indicative of the presence of tummy hydrogen in stellar atmospheres. This provided an estimate of the age of the stars see the hydrogen signature increases in strength as the still population ages but then it diminishes again when galaxies all around a billion years at age dependence arises because the more massive population three stars which contribute to this signal burn through their nuclear fuel fairly rapidly and therefore the i die one of the study's authors remand maya from university college london and the max planck institute in heidelberg says the same age indicators used to date stars earned still a neighborhood in the milky way and it can just as easily be used date extremely remote galaxies in the very early universe using this indicator astronomers could infer that the six galaxies hosting the stars must've already between two hundred three hundred million years old in analyzing the data from avalanche spitzer the authors needed to estimate the redshift of each galaxy which indicates their cosmological distance and hence the lookback time at which they were being observed. Redshift is a signature of how much the universe has expanded since the big bang to achieve this myron colleagues undertook spectroscopy measurements using a full armory of powerful ground based telescopes these included alma. The atacama large millimeter submillimeter array radio telescope. Vlt or very large telescope array. The twin kick telescopes in hawaii. And the i south telescope combining these measurements. Allow the team to confirm that looking at these. Galaxies corresponded to looking back in time to when the universe was just five hundred and fifty million years old over the past. Decade astronomers have been push back the frontiers of what they can observe two time when the universe was just four percent of its age however you to the limits of transparency and its atmosphere and the capabilities of the hobbling spitzer space telescopes. Astronomers of now pretty. Well reached the limit of their abilities with the present technology. However all that should change with the launch in november of nasr's new hobble replacement the james webb space telescope the authors believed james webb will have the capability to directly witnessed the cosmic dawn and the birth of the very first stars between two hundred fifty and three hundred and fifty million years after the very beginning of the universe..

spitzer max planck institute dorn sean heidelberg myron london hawaii james webb nasr
"spitzer space telescope" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

06:44 min | 1 year ago

"spitzer space telescope" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"You're seeing in the sky are actually clusters of baby stars. Mhm Little baby stars. If you looked at Astrophysical Journal last month, the stars and the clusters are about 100,000 years old Was that the April 13th? Uh, issue? Yes. Okay. The one with Neil DeGrasse Tyson on the cover without a shirt on. Oh, yeah. Yes. That was the one. Um, they talk about it. Grace Wolf chases. An astronomer at the Planetary Science Institute lives in Illinois. For, um, comparison. These these young stars about 100,000 years old. Our star. Our sun is about 4.6 billion years old, which in star world is considered kind of middle aged. Um the stars that are forming in the Orion Nebula are already three million years old, so they might be like preteen, Perhaps. They first thought that the yellow balls that they were seeing were precursors to gas bubbles blown around massive young stars, But this new study suggests that they're actually these clusters of small. Very young stars. That's what I've always thought they were, um Here's an interesting thing. There. He was a space telescope that used to be named after Todd Spitzer, the the Orange County district attorney. The Spitzer Space telescope, which worked until last year, and I don't know what happened to it, but they could see the cosmos in infrared light, and that's how they determined that it wasn't just yellow balls of light that these were actually Yellow balls that were little sons was the Spitzer Space telescope designed to study itself like, uh, Want to look at itself and then No, I don't think I don't know. It depends on whether how the mirrors were placed, I suppose. Speaking of space. Can you make a satellite out of wood? You Bachir world's first wooden satellite aims to prove that plywood can survive space because that is an age old question. That question has been going on since the dawn of time. Can plywood survive space? Sure it has. They're talking about a small it's only about four inch square satellite scheduled for a fall launch at Rocket Lab Electron rocket in New Zealand. Getting to orbit is only part of the problem as with every space adventure. They say that once it's there, the team's going to monitor this little cube to see how the plywood build stands up to the cold to the heat to the solar radiation to the vacuum of space. Would sat was the brainchild of Jari McKinnon, co founder of Cube Set Replica Kit Company of Arctic Aeronautics. And what they want to do. The plywood satellites only non wood parts are the aluminum rails that need to release the satellite into space and then expand this selfie stick that it's going to have that's going to hold a camera that's pointed back in the body so they can keep track of any damage that that happens. But they're just using birch plywood panels. To come up with a satellite. And I'm hoping that they wait to buy that birch for a couple of months. Maybe the prices go back down, because I don't know if you've seen them lately. I don't know. How often would you say you go and buy A Uh, Panel of I don't know. Three quarter inch birch plywood I've now this may be shock to you, Uh, because, you know You think you know someone right? I have never once in my life, but a piece of plywood. Never. Not once. Uh, I know that shocks you because you see me as a d I y you know, weekend Home Depot Warrior, Right? The the rule about home Depot to and stop me. If I'm wrong is it's never just one trip. Uh, it depends. One trip. It depends if you plan it out, right? You can get by with one trip. For me, man. Sometimes the PCP pipe? Yes, the PCP pie. It's not the right size and I got to go back for that return trip. Yeah. And then I do the walk of shame to the returns. Death. No, no, no. Don't ever go back to the returns down and they're like what you screw up, and I'm like, guys. I did it again. My PCP pipe was the wrong he measurement VC, right? PVC, not PCP. Try to bring your PCP pipe back to Home Depot, and you're not going to get very far. Even if you explain, uh, three quarters. I guess I needed a one inch pipe. You know what story? I always think about when I hear the words. Home Depot is how Oscar used to work there, and he said that people would go in there and just Do horrific things in the bathroom. Blow it up, blow it apart to shred because the assumption is m. My wife had said, although I don't know if this is ever true, my wife had said That appears to be a clean bathroom, public bathroom for a woman because the majority of customers assuming now making a total generalization now Well, for example, if you're going to go into the contractor side of the Home Depot or Lowe's, or whatever the chances are Because you know, even the construction business hasn't caught up with 2021. It's going to be generally men, and they're the ones who are going to blow apart that bathroom, the women's bathroom, on the other hand, probably untouched. Most of the probably a real nice place. Probably clean. Maybe, uh, maybe some. You know, nebulizer is in there or what are those called things that does shoot him? No, not soap thing that Chris used to have in the office. Essential oils, essential oils. That's what I'm thinking of. Sure, they got some of those bubbling up somewhere in the back. Bathroom and Home Depot. We'll talk about the twilight Zone in the ocean and how cave people conquered the dark nebulizer. That's for like asthma, isn't it? That's like what Petro sleeps in. Uh, yes. No. Yes. All right, Coming up. Next. More strange Science. Gary, Indiana will continue. Brian Rumen has an update. Long Beach has raised the fine for lighting fireworks to more than $20,000 ahead of the Fourth of July. Tennis Star in 20 Time Grand Slam champion Rafael Nadal has pulled out of Wimbledon and the Olympics and Cal OSHA is expected to vote today on new mass guidelines for the workplace. This report brought to you by DnB dot CIA dot gov Sunny this afternoon in the L. A basin highs in the eighties inland, one hundreds in the valleys. There's trouble on the one Oh one.

Brian Rumen Jari McKinnon Rafael Nadal Todd Spitzer New Zealand Lowe Illinois Arctic Aeronautics Planetary Science Institute Olympics April 13th home Depot Grace Wolf Chris Wimbledon 20 Time L. A basin last year Neil DeGrasse Tyson 2021
"spitzer space telescope" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"spitzer space telescope" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Astronomers have compiled the most complete three dimensional map of brown dwarfs in still a neighborhood. The list of five hundred and twenty-five brown dwarves reported in the estra physical journal includes thirty eight which newly discovered brown dwarfs the failed stars objects. That don't have enough mass to undergo the core nuclear fusion process. Which makes the shine. They fill the gap between the largest planets. Which are about seventy five to eighty times. The mass of jupiter the most massive planet now solar system and spectral type m red dwarf stars which are the smaller stars having about zero point zero eight times the mass of our sun in fact some brown or actually begin their lives. As red dwarf stars but become brown wolves after losing too much of the amass the new list of nearby brown dwarves was compiled by a team of astronomers supported by thousands of citizen scientists volunteers in a program known as the backyard. World's planet nine collaboration by identifying these objects and then determining distances to all of them in the census astronomers have been able to build up three dimensional map of the distribution of cool brown dwarf in the suns local neighborhood. The new day to sit blends archive images from the kitt peak national observatory and the sarah talulah interamerican observatory with sky maps from this as wise wide field infrared survey explorer spacecraft and you distance measurements from this spitzer space telescope. The result is the best three dimensional map of the sons local neighborhood. Ever compiled one of the most intriguing results in the study that provides more evidence that the sun's look was still a neighborhood within roughly seven lies of the sun is rather unusual. Well most stars. In the milky way red dwarves earliest studies have revealed that the sounds nearest is a much more diverse. We different types of objects from sunlight stars the jubilee like brown dwarfs appear in roughly equal numbers and the new results at this disparity by ten up. Only extremely cold brown dwarf. Why zero eight five five which happens to be. The coldest known brown dwarf. Astronomers had expected to find several more within say sixty five light years of the sun given the new study sensitivity. But there hasn't been the case this space time still to come the dark energy survey releases. Its final day to sit and queensland company more space conducts a successful rocket. Engine taste all that and more coming.

thirty eight thousands of citizen scientist sixty five light years eighty times about seventy five zero zero eight times one five hundred and twenty-five b eight seven lies about zero point kitt peak nine collaboration ten up five three queensland estra physical sarah talulah
NASA shutting down space telescope, infrared eyes to cosmos

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:35 sec | 3 years ago

NASA shutting down space telescope, infrared eyes to cosmos

"NASA is pulling the plug on one of its greatest space observatories the Spitzer space telescope has been scanning the universe within for red eyes for sixteen years the end will come tomorrow when ground controllers put the spacecraft into permanent hibernation Spitzer peered through dusty clouds at stars and galaxies and uncovered a huge nearly invisible ring around Saturn the telescope also help discover seven earth size planets around a nearby star it's been in decline for years becoming increasingly difficult to operate while trailing earth around the sun S. last observation is expected

Nasa Spitzer Spitzer Space
An Eye Catching App

Innovation Now

01:19 min | 3 years ago

An Eye Catching App

"Put yourself in the orion nebula or travel to the center of the milky way galaxy. A new nasa app puts you in the space suit. This is innovation now. Bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future the nasa selfie app lets you generate snapshots of the yourself in a virtual space suit posing in front of more than thirty eye-catching locations. Thanks to images taken by nasr's spitzer space telescope spitzer was the fourth and final edition to nasr's great observatories program optimistically the team had hoped the telescope would stay alive live for five years in the harsh environment of space now celebrating more than fifteen years in space. Spitzer's infrared capabilities continue new to observe the universe in a different kind of light. The selfies app is available for both android and i._o._s. Devices the simple interface. Lets it's you snap a photo of yourself. Pick your background and even share on social media and for those who want more than just pretty pictures. The app also provides provides information about the science behind those stunning images for innovation now. I'm jennifer fully innovation now is.

Spitzer Nasr Fifteen Years Five Years
NASA Shuts Down Spitzer Space Telescope After 16 Years

SPACE NEWS POD

02:31 min | 3 years ago

NASA Shuts Down Spitzer Space Telescope After 16 Years

"Spitzer space telescope, according to NASA will be decommissioned on January thirtieth of twenty twenty now that is due to the space telescope aging. And this is due to decreased functionality you see Spitzer. It has to rotate two point it's antenna towards the earth to transmit data back to us. And when it does this, it causes its solar panels to turn away from the sun in during. That time the space craft relies on internal solar power in a battery to operate. So every year, that Spitzer has been out there, it's there's solar panels have been tilting further and further away from the sun in scientists at NASA worried that continuing to operate Spitzer would deplete his energy source completely. And if this happens like in the middle of it experiment, they might not be able to retrieve the data that's already on Spitzer, so they need to basically save energy in order to shoot that data back to earth in Spitzer is amazing. Right. So Spitzer was only supposed to last five years in it. Lasted in additional eleven years, in during that time Spitzer gave us some of the most stunning images of Saturn's rings clusters of stars and. A small black hole from a nearby dwarf galaxy amongst a lot of other images. You can check them all out on NASA. It's all free to download free to check out. You can go to NASA dot gov in search for Spitzer or all the Spitzer news and all the everything that's happened with Spitzer throughout its time throughout at sixteen years exoplanets, galaxies everything Nobili stars solar systems. It's all there. Now Spitzer gave us some amazing data some amazing science, but it's going to be replaced by the James Webb space telescope, which is going to launch in twenty twenty one in the James Webb space telescope that J W. It's different than the Spitzer space telescope. It's going to be an L to a second Legrand's point. And it will orbit the sun, one point five million kilometers. It's about a million miles away from the earth

Spitzer James Webb Space Telescope Nasa Legrand Twenty Twenty Five Million Kilometers Sixteen Years Eleven Years Five Years
Put Yourself in Space

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 4 years ago

Put Yourself in Space

"They put yourself in the Orion nebula or travel to the center of the Milky Way. Galaxy a new NASA app puts you in the space suit. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future the NASA Celtics app lets you generate snapshots of yourself in a virtual space suit posing in front of more than thirty eye-catching locations. Thanks to images taken by Nasr's Spitzer space telescope Spitzer was the fourth and final edition to Nasr's great observatories program optimistic -ly the team had hoped. The telescope would stay alive for five years in the harsh environment of space now celebrating more than fifteen years in space. Spitzer's infrared capabilities continue to observe the universe in a different kind of light. The self is app is available for both Android and I o s devices the simple interface. It's you snap. A photo of yourself pick your background and even share on social media, and for those who want more than just pretty pictures the app. Also provides information about the science behind those stunning images for innovation. Now. I'm Jennifer fully innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V. Visit us online at innovation now dot US.

Spitzer Nasa Nasr Orion Nebula National Institute Of Aerospac Jennifer Fifteen Years Five Years
NASA Selfies

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 4 years ago

NASA Selfies

"They put yourself in the Orion nebula or travel to the center of the Milky Way. Galaxy a new NASA app puts you in the space suit. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future the NASA Celtics app lets you generate snapshots of yourself in a virtual space suit posing in front of more than thirty eye-catching locations. Thanks to images taken by Nasr's Spitzer space telescope Spitzer was the fourth and final edition to Nasr's great observatories program optimistic -ly the team had hoped. The telescope would stay alive for five years in the harsh environment of space now celebrating more than fifteen years in space. Spitzer's infrared capabilities continue to observe the universe in a different kind of light. The self is app is available for both Android and I o s devices the simple interface. It's you snap. A photo of yourself pick your background and even share on social media, and for those who want more than just pretty pictures the app. Also provides information about the science behind those stunning images for innovation. Now. I'm Jennifer fully innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V. Visit us online at innovation now dot US.

Spitzer Nasa Nasr Orion Nebula National Institute Of Aerospac Jennifer Fifteen Years Five Years
Spitzers Gift

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 4 years ago

Spitzers Gift

"The Spitzer space telescope youngest member of Nasr's family of great observatories just turned fifteen Susan avation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future instead of calling it quits when Spitzer's supply of instrument cooling liquid helium ran out the observatory began using its infrared instruments to detect heat radiation emitted by warm objects rather than cold ones as a result Spitzer has far exceeded its life expectancy allowing scientists to witness star birth or find planets around other stars. Here's Dr Michael Warriner Spitzer project. Scientists are no conception at all be doing this for fifteen years as successfully as we have we've created a tremendous scientific instruments which produced a fantastic legacy that people use for generations. Another highlighted Spitzer in one which is certainly totally unexpected was our to map off the distribution stars through our. So Spitzer's gift to us is a beautiful map of the Milky Way. A three hundred sixty degree look at this part of the universe. We call for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer poet innovation. Now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V.

Dr Michael Warriner Spitzer Spitzer Space Susan Avation Nasr National Institute Of Aerospac Nasa Three Hundred Sixty Degree Fifteen Years