35 Burst results for "Spinal Cord Injury"

Brain Implants Let Paralyzed Man Write on a Screen Using Thoughts Alone

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Brain Implants Let Paralyzed Man Write on a Screen Using Thoughts Alone

"A man who lost all movement below the neck after a spinal cord injury in 2007 was able to write again with his mind. Stanford University. Researchers use artificial intelligence software and a brain computer interface to help the man with immobilized limbs to communicate by text When the man who has implanted with two microchips in his brain imagined he was using his hand to write on a note pad. The computer converted his thoughts into text on a computer screen. I cannot even begin to

Spinal Cord Injury Stanford University
What Is  Regenerative Medicine? With Dr. Jordanna Quinn

Break The Rules

02:05 min | 1 year ago

What Is Regenerative Medicine? With Dr. Jordanna Quinn

"Well hello hello. Hello welcome to another edition of the break us podcast where we talked about riding the noise in the health fitness world. And today i by dr quinn medicine woman on the show which is one of my favorites growing up. Dr quinn is in the house and clinton is a specialist in regenerative medicine which sounds really cool theory. She's going to be explaining us to f- today what about she's a board certified physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist and especially training in Medicine optional medicine In her background as well orthopedic Kind of helping people rehabilitation with rehabilitation is house. You got started and then found the lovely world. That's optional medicine. Helping people get the root causes of multiple issues Extensive experience with athletes of all types in particular professional and amateur and she enjoys helping her patients stay. Bill look better way working closely with focusing exactly on their goal what their goals are ending helping them figure out the right modalities treatments. Iv therapy said expanded or hormone n beyond in her practice. She's just pretty much about us. And dr quinn. Thanks so much for coming on the show talking about some regenerative medicine which i know is near and dear to your heart. Give us a little bit of background. I had on who you are. What got you doing the work. You're doing in the yeah. I mean it's a. I'll try to be brief. It's it can be a long story. But i found physical medicine rehab. I wanted to be a doctor my whole life and when i was in medical school foul in love with physical medicine and rehab physical medicine and rehab is the study of anything that makes you not move normally so i need from orthopedic injuries to spinal cord injuries brain injuries. You know rheumatological conditions neurologic conditions. Anything physically makes you not move normally and that was near and dear to my heart just growing up athletes

Dr Quinn Clinton House Bill Spinal Cord Injuries Brain Inj
Jonathan Tsay on early-phase spinal cord injury clinical research

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

02:23 min | 1 year ago

Jonathan Tsay on early-phase spinal cord injury clinical research

"Today. I'll be speaking with dr jonathan cy about his recent paper in the journal neuro rehabilitation enrolled repair titled five features to look for in early phase clinical intervention studies. Dr tsai who goes by. Jt has a doctor of physical therapy degree from northwestern university. And he's currently working on his phd with dr rich ivory at the condition and action lab at uc berkeley and so in the interest of full disclosure jt. And i know each other already from his days. At northwestern where i'm on faculty i can you to discuss listeners. We're in for treats i know. Jt to be smart and an analytical thinker and so whether you are interested in spinal cord injury rehabilitation or neurologic rehabilitation or frankly any rehabilitation where motor learning is at play. I think you're gonna find something that you can use in today's discussion and so jt. Welcome to discuss. Thanks rachel and i do want to say a big part of analytical was attributed to my education and northwestern university they did not sponsor this show but i i do i do think a big part of my training and north western really helped me think through difficult problems especially in the credit. Well mine too. So i guess there we are So let's let's talk about your paper in this paper. Put forward a set of recommendations for how clinicians can identify early. Phase intervention studies that will bring immediate value to their clinical practice which is really important topic and so can you talk about what led you to put these recommendations forward In the first place why. Why do we need them. Yeah so when. I was reading the clinical literature and pt school Had a pain point and the pain point was that i wanted to quickly and efficiently and effectively evaluate papers that might not necessarily fall. as a clinical practice guideline a systematic review or a large scale randomized controlled trial. How do i evaluate quickly evaluate Papers that are more early phase had a lower and offer some novel insights that i can translate quickly To the clinic

Dr Jonathan Cy Dr Tsai Dr Rich Uc Berkeley Northwestern University Spinal Cord Injury Rachel
"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

"Today. I'll be speaking with dr jonathan cy about his recent paper in the journal neuro rehabilitation enrolled repair titled five features to look for in early phase clinical intervention studies. Dr tsai who goes by. Jt has a doctor of physical therapy degree from northwestern university. And he's currently working on his phd with dr rich ivory at the condition and action lab at uc berkeley and so in the interest of full disclosure jt. And i know each other already from his days. At northwestern where i'm on faculty i can you to discuss listeners. We're in for treats i know. Jt to be smart and an analytical thinker and so whether you are interested in spinal cord injury rehabilitation or neurologic rehabilitation or frankly any rehabilitation where motor learning is at play. I think you're gonna find something that you can use in today's discussion and so jt. Welcome to discuss. Thanks rachel and i do want to say a big part of analytical was attributed to my education and northwestern university they did not sponsor this show but i i do i do think a big part of my training and north western really helped me think through difficult problems especially in the credit. Well mine too. So i guess there we are So let's let's talk about your paper in this paper. Put forward a set of recommendations for how clinicians can identify early. Phase intervention studies that will bring immediate value to their clinical practice which is really important topic and so can you talk about what led you to put these recommendations forward In the first place why. Why do we need them. Yeah so when. I was reading the clinical literature and pt school Had a pain point and the pain point was that i wanted to quickly and efficiently and effectively evaluate papers that might not necessarily fall. as a clinical practice guideline a systematic review or a large scale randomized controlled trial. How do i evaluate quickly evaluate Papers that are more early phase had a lower and offer some novel insights that i can translate quickly To the clinic

rachel tsai today Jt five features uc berkeley rich ivory neuro rehabilitation northwestern first place north western each northwestern university
Former Dallas Maverick Shawn Bradley paralyzed after car hit his bike

WBAP Morning News

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Former Dallas Maverick Shawn Bradley paralyzed after car hit his bike

"Bradley Bradley is is paralyzed paralyzed following following a bicycle accident in January, The former seven FT six Center was riding his bike in ST George, Utah, when he was struck from behind by a car Bradley has undergone and neck fusion surgery, and doctors have told them his road to recovery will be difficult, Doctor. Say Bradley has a traumatic spinal cord injury, and the Mavericks announced today that he had been hospitalized for the past eight weeks. Chad Dixon WBF P.

Bradley Bradley Bradley St George Utah Mavericks Chad Dixon Wbf P.
Former Dallas Mavericks Center Shaun Bradley Paralyzed By Car Wreck

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Former Dallas Mavericks Center Shaun Bradley Paralyzed By Car Wreck

"Dallas Mavericks center Shawn Bradley is paralyzed after being hit by a vehicle while riding his bike near his Utah home in January. According to a statement distributed by his former team. The accident caused a traumatic spinal cord injury after undergoing neck fusion surgery. The 48 year old Bradley has spent the last eight weeks hospitalized and undergoing

Shawn Bradley Dallas Mavericks Utah Bradley
A.J. receiving treatment in Atlanta

WBZ Morning News

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

A.J. receiving treatment in Atlanta

"News. The Catholic Central League has announced their all Star team and a J. Quetta. Bishop being named to that elite group Quite a suffering a severe spinal cord injury recently being treated at a rehabilitation clinic in Atlanta. I go fund me page has now raised more than $950,000. For ages, Family six or

Catholic Central League Quetta Bishop Atlanta
Boston Area's Bishop Feehan Hockey Team Returns To Ice After Teammate's Serious Injury

WBZ Afternoon News

01:11 min | 1 year ago

Boston Area's Bishop Feehan Hockey Team Returns To Ice After Teammate's Serious Injury

"One high school hockey team from Attleboro is back on the ice for the first time since an accident put one of their teammates in the hospital or details from WBZ TV Stephanie Chan. It was an emotional return to the rink, the bishop fiend Boys hockey team, rallying together an Attleboro after their beloved teammate A. J. Quetta suffered Spinal cord injury during a game on Tuesday there coach Kevin Dunn. It was very uplifting. I thought that they had ages to sister speak, that was that was very much been very, very difficult for them. The high school senior remains in critical condition after undergoing surgery in Boston. The outpouring of support has been overwhelming A go fund me for Quetta has raised more than $600,000 to help with medical expenses. While the Bruins amplify the fund raising efforts no, the sports Community. You know the hockey community and in the end the Patriots to be as generous as they are, and it's absolutely you know, words can really describe it. It will be a long road to recovery for the 18 year old senior He certainly won't be alone. Had his sisters let the crowd in prayer before Yesterday's

Attleboro WBZ Stephanie Chan Hockey A. J. Quetta Kevin Dunn Spinal Cord Quetta Bruins Boston Patriots
Interview with Kristin Musselman about Reactive Balance

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

05:47 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Kristin Musselman about Reactive Balance

"Welcome to discuss. Discussions and spinal cord injury sci where we bring you interviews with researchers and clinical leaders in spinal cord injury rehabilitation. I'm rachel tappin. today. I'll be speaking with dr kristen muscleman who is last author on a recent paper in the journal spinal cord along with co co-authors. Catherine chan jaywalking less journal. Unger angela you and k musani the papers titled reactive stepping after a forward fall in people living with incomplete spinal cord injury or disease. Dr muscleman is a physical therapist and scientists with the neural engineering and therapeutics team at the cato institute which is the research arm of the toronto rehabilitation institute. She's assistant professor in the department of physical therapy and rehabilitation sciences institute at university of toronto. She's active in the canadian physiotherapy association and now of course and the american physical therapy association with this very podcast. And she's academic lead of the walking measures group and the canadian community of practice for the practice spinal cord institute so welcome. Kristen muscleman. thanks rachel so much for having me. It's a pleasure to be here. I'm so happy to have you so. Let's start by talking about balance after spinal cord injury and i wanna talk about reactive balance in particular where the person needs to recover from a loss of balance. Can you just describe for us in general. What do we know. Or i guess. More specifically what did we know prior to this to this study in this area. Sure well react to balance. It's a key part of our posture control system. And as you kind of mentioned it really is our last line of defense against a fall so to try to recover balance that's been lost and so refers to our ability to reduce control of The movement of our center of mass where or to pull our center of mass back within our basis support and we we can do this through movement at the ankles hips. You know which we've Often called the ankle hit strategies or you can do it by taking Rapid reactive steps to try to increase our base of support. And it's this Rapid reactor stepping that. We've focused on in our research and you know surprisingly we actually don't know that much about reactive balance control after spinal cord injury We do know that. In other neurological populations like individuals living with the effects of stroke. The inability to take a reactive step is associated with the occurrence of falls And as many of those listening are aware people cred injury. Do you have a lot of falls as well. So a recent meta analysis found that seventy eight percent of the ambulance chasers with spinal cord. Injury will fall each year so it's definitely reasonable to expect that reactive balance control is impaired after injury but specifically what aspects are impaired wasn't known for example are there deficits related to the timing of the movements and muscle activation or insider their spatial deficits. So you know for example. Maybe they can't take a big enough react to step to appropriately reposition their center of mass. So those are some of the questions that we had. I'm going into doing this research. Great boy and i can certainly point to as a clinician. You're supporting things that i felt like. I knew already as i would experience that in the clinic of people having lots of difficulty with reactive balance after spinal cord injury and looking to the research literature and really having a hard time understanding how to proceed so for reinforcing or validating. The experience that i've had at least you study your your group did the study. And so what did you do. And what were the results. Yes what we wanted to do was to characterize reactive stepping in and people who are living with incomplete spinal cord injury so as a first step We compared their to stepping ability to out of age and sex matched individuals who have a spinal cord injury and what we decided to do in this for study is focus on two aspects of reactor stepping so i is is a behavioral response which just simply looks at. How are the participants recovering their balance after appreciation. So can they take a single step like most people who haven't neurological damage do or do they need to take several steps to reposition that center of mass in their basis support or are they unable to recover their balanced. So that's the behavioral piece that we looked at And then the second piece we looked at were these temporal parameters of reactive stepping so this includes things like the onset of muscle activity and legs And also the reaction time so you know. How quickly can they respond for that. We look at the length of time. Between the onset of the nation and then the actual movement That's elicited so in this case you know lifting off the switch a reactive step but what we needed to figure out how to look at this behavior in a standardized way and so we use a lot based assessment That's called the released test And this has been used with the stroke population it's also been used previously in older adults And basically what it does it simulates a forward fall of course in a safe way so if you just try to picture yourself standing and you're in a safety harness that's gonna prevent us from from hitting the ground if you were to lose your balance That saves you harnesses around your trunk. And then what we do. Is we attach a horizontal cable to the back of the safety harness right around the level of your lower back and then not cable which is about a meter long. It's attached to the wall behind you and you get asked to lean forward from your ankles as best as you can until about. Ten percent of your body weight is supported by that cable.

Spinal Cord Injury Rachel Tappin Dr Kristen Muscleman Spinal Cord Along With Co Co Catherine Chan Jaywalking Less Journal Unger Angela K Musani Spinal Cord Injury Or Disease Dr Muscleman Toronto Rehabilitation Institu Department Of Physical Therapy Canadian Physiotherapy Associa Practice Spinal Cord Institute Kristen Muscleman American Physical Therapy Asso Cato Institute University Of Toronto Rachel
Breakthrough at Home Pain and Mental Health Relief with Richard Hanbury, Founder Sana Health, Inc

Outcomes Rocket

04:57 min | 1 year ago

Breakthrough at Home Pain and Mental Health Relief with Richard Hanbury, Founder Sana Health, Inc

"Walk back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez. Here and today. I have the privilege of hosting richard henry. He is the founder of saana health. remonstration platform for pain relief and deepak station. Richard develop the technology behind saana to eradicate his own life threatening pain. Problem following a spinal cord injury from a jeep crash near saana in yemen and nineteen. Ninety-two richard has an mba. From the wharton school in healthcare and also a law degree from the college of law in london the original benchtop device removed all his nerve damage pain in three months saving his life. He has spent twenty five years developing the sonnet technology from the original benchtop device to the current device undergoing clinical trials sonnet uses pulsed light and sound and a heart rate variability feedback loop to guide the user in a deep state of relaxation. Clinical trials have been completed in opioid use disorder and fibromyalgia and sauna is launching in fibromyalgia and twenty twenty one however is available today and richard is going. Tell us more about it. And i'm just really excited to have the opportunity to interview richard and have them bring forth this technology to to the the world richard such a pleasure to have you here today to be thank it. Yeah and so before we dive into saana and it saana dot. Io folks if you're curious tell us a little bit about you and what got you into healthcare thank you yes as a nineteen year old kid. I was traveling in in the yemen. And i was given a choice of a head on collision in my jeep next to a petrol truck or two gulf bridge and i chose gulf a bridge. 'cause i figured We would either way. There would be so remains to find if i went to the bridge. Say dance with dry riverbeds sixty foot dying and cheap crumpled up A results in spun good injuries from thc ten. Which is betty button level plus a traumatic brain injury and they say old. That was why. I had to be medevac k. I was clinically dead for eight minutes back to matt intercom a middle of that resulted in damaged problem that was say sparrows given a five year life expectancy sarabia. It was the question of near figure. Something i myself or old. I say that was the mother of invention necessity. It's unbelievable i mean that is crazy. So you're driving a jeep and there's this truck just heading straight at you and you're like explosive beth falloffs bridge and you just made the choice. I mean like when that happened. Richard to win you actually remember like what point jr actually start remembering what happened and gained consciousness. And how did they find you so it was semi passenger was burglary but was in good enough shape to festival shine in arabic. So the people watching the right to danger. Petrol cigarettes is they were running. Schools tile passwords lit cigarettes. In khao is everything was checked in the gasoline tank Say yeah ben. E managed to get them to throw away the cigarettes publicized and transported us to vote what they very loosely called the hospital. And that's my friend. Got the insurance companies to send them back pain coming up. Unbelievable i mean. I mean that is just unbelievable Era miracle the be here spell. And i'm sure that the road to recovery was not easy for you and you know lots of gain. You said i had to do something about this. And that was the beginning of sauna and so you've made leaps and bounds. Since the beginning you're recovered very happy for you. Richard and As i'm sure your family is to so now you have this device and this company. Why don't you tell us a little bit more about what it is how it works and that way the listeners could get educated on it including myself suddenly say basically. All pain is some combination of central mediation. Which has had brain prices pain and prefer plain. Which is the signal coming into the brain. Now with mike pain i had sponging. Tbi and i was on very extreme faction where it was all about how the brain was pricing pain signal. But it wasn't really paints were coming up from my spine. It was essentially corrupt. Data stream is very similar to what you get with phantom limb. Actually being told her in pain is being told your visits we had signal. That doesn't quite make sense. Say with me. I was very rainy. Lucky the original device was able to wipe all by damage pain

Richard Saana Health Saana Wharton School In Healthcare Yemen Fibromyalgia Richard Henry Matt Intercom Marquez Sarabia Spinal Cord Injury College Of Law Beth Falloffs London Betty JR BEN Mike
VA hospital in Aurora receives Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

VA hospital in Aurora receives Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine

"The first two people at the V. A hospital in Aurora will receive the covert vaccine today, the hospital says, the first to pee We're getting the vaccine this morning will be an ICU nurse and a spinal cord injury patients. Frontline staff at the hospital and other high risk patients will then be the priority for the 975 doses. The hospital received yesterday. As of this morning 160 people here with of a have signed up to get their shots. The second required dose for those getting it today will be delivered here at the

Aurora Spinal Cord Injury
201: We Pay Our Respects To Travis Roy & Talk About The Recent News Surrounding The Boston Bruins - burst 01

Black N' Gold Hockey Podcast

04:09 min | 1 year ago

201: We Pay Our Respects To Travis Roy & Talk About The Recent News Surrounding The Boston Bruins - burst 01

"And please don't forget to use code c l e S50 that's clns 50 betonline.ag online wagering experts. Excellent banks mark and we'll get right into it. And first we start with a little bit of sadness. We actually this past week Travis Roy Pollard bus University hockey player who was tragically paralyzed in this first shift with a Boston University Terriers back. It was Nineteen ninety-five actually passed away at the age of forty-five. He was suction an advocate for in and help so many people in his situation and you know, I actually met Travis years ago working in Boston sports radio in his dad Lazy Boy And You Know Travis is just a a good human being who used to tragic, you know situation to really help others and turn something positive from it and off and he he died unexpectedly having a procedure that usually does I guess I read correctly and it's too bad that obviously it's hard to have a long life with their but he used Every bit of the second Ziad to help other people so it was it was too bad and I don't know why if you have any thoughts so we'll start with Mark on Travis Roy. Yeah a total inspiration to those people with spinal cord injuries. And when what he did, you know, it was above him to to make sure that you know news and information and and the the research was it was more involved in into his everyday life and it wasn't about him. I was by everybody else. So the kind heartedness that that guy put through for so many years after that accident so long ago after what was it 11 seconds and his first shift, you know, that's that's really tough. So but what the Legacy that he took it back, you know, it's just amazing and and hopefully the foundation keeps going and we can you know, somehow find a a resolution to these injuries so dead. It's it's really sad. I mean New England lost a very good hockey player a great person and an advocate that that, you know will never be forgotten. So I thought to go out to our family and friends. I had the pleasure of meeting Travis at a fundraiser that he put on in the Back Bay at a restaurant. I can't remember but I met him shook his hand and and it was very nice, you know, so sad sad week in in New England Hockey have your thoughts on Travis. Yeah. I didn't have the pleasure of meeting him. But I do just remove it seemed like it was so long ago, but it really feels like the other day cuz again, I love being you know on bu hockey girl and I just remember being so pumped like this kid mean they're coming in, you know, whatever and I just I think he speaks to what what real heroes are like, do you know what I mean that you take a tragedy and like Mark said it was no after that after you know, he's you know started healing and whenever it wasn't about him it was about everyone else to like what to do about spinal cord injuries or safety and you know, like making hockey Steve. So these kind of thing, you know, whatever enough just a big voice and if anything Wednesday, you know help, you know, the Travis right foundation just what he did with this foundation and I will watch something with Chris Drury when it was being inducted into the Hockey Hall that I like American Hockey Hall of Fame and it was like a clip and he specifically talked to him. He was a teammate of had this, you know, and just a great person and everyone who met him said that and just all the work he did so my heart really does go to his family and home. Thank you Travis because you know the type of Heroes and role models that we need in the world right like you it's not what happens. It's what you do with it. Right and he modeled that so thoughts and prayers to the family and it is a big job. I just been doing them by just everyone you know what I mean because he wasn't true warrior hero in any ways very true and recipes Travis try for sure on to the

Travis Travis Roy Travis Roy Pollard Hockey Boston University Terriers New England Hockey Mark Back Bay Chris Drury Boston Hockey Hall American Hockey Hall Of Fame New England Ziad
Volunteer in AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine trial dies in Brazil

Building Michigan

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Volunteer in AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine trial dies in Brazil

"In AstraZeneca's covert 19 vaccine trial has died in Brazil. AstraZeneca's phase three clinical trial put on hold in early September after study participant in the United Kingdom. Developed a spinal cord injury. The trials have since rape have been resumed both in the UK and Brazil

Astrazeneca Brazil United Kingdom Rape
Interview with bio-mechanics expert Lisa McFadden, PhD

Moving2Live

06:35 min | 1 year ago

Interview with bio-mechanics expert Lisa McFadden, PhD

"Welcome back to another edition of moving to live our ethos movement is a lifestyle notches activity. We tried to interview professionals across the movement spectrum because we understand at the end of the day, anybody who is involved in movement either wants their clients patients or athletes to either move more or move better whether it's to move with less pain or to move more efficiently. Some of our best guests come from recommendations from other guests and a big. Thank you to Andy Gillam who recommended today's guest Lisa McFadden they arresting thing with podcasting is i. now have lineage of three people in a row starting with Brian Gary To. To Doctrine McFadden today hopefully two or three more as far as I can trace it's not who you know is who you know who knows somebody. So Dr McFadden thank you for taking time to talk to moving to live this afternoon. Absolutely thank you for having me. My favorite question I always ask on moving deliver the first one I. Always ask is to get an elevator. You get to talking because the elevators really slow because somebody's pressing all the buttons and they say, so what do you do what your thirty second? Not In a negative way elevator spiel my name is Lisa McFadden and I. I'll man and this one's a Turkey one I wear lots of different hats But yeah so. The way I look at what I do is I really put science into practice whether it's with athletes or with patients and Meyer expertise is in bio mechanics. So I like to used by mechanics to help people move better and then I also liked to inspire whether that's inspiring communities around science or whether that's inspiring. Students through mentorship in education. Right. Now, if I'm correct your in South Dakota. Yes that's correct. I work at Stanford Health See Falls South Dakota. And I know we were chatting a little bit before we started recording and both of us grew up in upstate new. York and I have to be honest I never thought I would end up in Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania, I never thought I would go to Grad School in Alabama and I would imagine that there's an interesting story going all the way from New York state with multiple stops all the way to South Dakota and I would imagine if you're anybody else like anybody else in the movement field is probably a few more stops along the way before you retire. Well, it's funny. I almost ended up in Pittsburgh. Along my way and I've spent some time in Alabama on a couple of different business trip. So it sounds like we've got a similar. Set of journeys But yes I I grew up in upstate New York in a little town called the sweet go not quite as little as where I heard you up. But? Yes. So I grew up on Lake Ontario My Dad was a doctor in I. Always always wanted to be a doctor specifically pediatric Orthopedic Surgeon, and my dad always told me no, you do not He said you really WanNa be an engineer and I said, no, No, no dad engineers are big nerds. And he said you're really good at math and you you have passion for this and I. Really suggest you become an engineer. So I very boldly went to the University of Rochester Pre and applied math saying you're wrong dad. But you know had a had a moment of clarity probably after my first year I did realize and did some self reflection and thought you know the type of. Mother that I wanted to be in the type of you don't grown up that I wanted to be really do not not focus around having call and prioritizing patients, which is absolutely something that you have to do but really being able to have a little bit of flexibility in In my lifestyle and so I finally listen to my father after a long time of not and. decided that I would actually transfer into biomedical engineering where I ended up focusing on bio mechanics as my concentration with minors in mechanical engineering and applied math. throughout my Undergrad I really really enjoyed all of that and so as I started thinking about what was next I started getting really interested in robotics and in two that feel that was emerging back. Then decided that I really wanted to go and get a PhD in that. So I had been at ski resorts I grew up ski racing and I was in Montana with our family on vacation and watched a bunch of ski. Racers who had disabilities whether they were in a sit ski or whether they were missing leg skiing and I was just very inspired I looked at them versus like while they're amazing. They're they're better skiers than I am and then you could see that as soon as they were off the hill where they were excelling the rollout of daily life challenges. So I started getting really interested in prostates wanting to kind of help people that you needed additional help outside of. Being Super, rockstar athletes to help them in their daily lives and so robotics was sort of that pathway for me. My senior design project ended up being a surgical robot and then I ended up getting into Carnegie Mellon at the Robotics Institute which is where I almost went to Grad School and then the University of Utah in my husband and I. Boyfriend at the time looked at each other and said, we should go skiing. So, Kinda took that wildcard robotics institute was number one ended the US at the time but decided to go out to Utah where they had just one anger from the NSF in robotics, and so I was in the bio engineering department and kind of hybrid into mechanical engineering. So I really took courses and had faculty the Committee from both worlds and I was able to do there was. My my PhD was focused on spinal cord injuries and what we were working on with functional electrical stimulation, supporting an array of electrodes and putting them into the peripheral muscles, and then stimulating those and my job was to figure out what the mechanics looked like. So creating models of the limb and then creating control algorithms to figure out how we can control this limbs yet somebody to go from sitting to standing. And to do it in a way that they didn't get tired while they were standing because the way our muscles work. If you contract one all the way, you might get yourself to go into a specific movement but then that muscles eventually wanting to fatigue and you can't can't sustain it. So what does that look like as well?

Lisa Mcfadden South Dakota Pittsburgh New York Engineer Alabama Grad School Andy Gillam Brian Gary To Stanford Health See Falls Robotics Institute Lake Ontario Carnegie Mellon University Of Rochester Meyer York United States
"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

"He was able to show that now they were able to respond to intermittent hypoxia. So there's a linkage between hypoxia and used a pass city mechanisms and inflammation mechanisms. We were particularly interested in that because individuals. With spinal cord injury has been shown that they have Chronic sub-grade inflammation which is independent off any active infection that they have so just a sparkled entity by itself changes the immune system in such a way that they a a local inflammation solar first efforts to do this work was with i proven so we gave be proven to individuals and over or so before giving hypoxia and then we give them a hypoxia and we either give ibuprofen all Placebo and we found that there were no differences between the two groups when they're senior person are placebo. No no change so there are two reasons why this could have happened. And i'm just building up to the reason why we did a study One is backed by boop rufin. Works in a different manner than asteroid the mechanisms between the two Are different so if you use the cytokines but it would not affect. ns gabby pets. Boone's cox inhibitor. And not a strong inhibitor off. The nf petipa just other pets. Second reason this that it tends producing inflammation by giving ibuprofen. You need longer. Duration of ibuprofen intake in other words an individual. Take them for at least one day. Every eight hours for them to be able to reduce the inflammation so maybe we were not successful. Introducing inflammation and. That's why we did not see an effect or maybe it was the past. We were targeting was not the appropriate patsy. That's what we did not see it affect so then we decided to go to a corticosteroid and pakistan is one of the most common available corticosteroid. It's also extremely strong. Inhibitors inflammation and we've entered the highest. Does that was possible and Basically in other words. I'm trying to say we threw the kitchen sink at it so we give sixty milligrams those off patterns alone and that is sufficient to reduce inflammation within a short duration of time. So we give any our before giving hypoxia and the control sweep individuals received either deceived a placebo and the same individuals came in at least a week apart and vanda my studio. See the the cbo. So that's how the reasoning behind why we decided to add the end inflammatory like penicillin into the question. It so when you added the produce loan what was the result by introducing the inflammation in these individuals We're able to See an increased end by affect I mean ankle. Torque that was over Primary outcome measure even bid or the dow fairness alone. Most individuals had an effect. They all had a significant effect by significant effect..

inflammation boop rufin gabby pets hypoxia spinal cord injury Boone vanda my studio pakistan cbo
"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

"Pre-treatment enhances intermittent hypoxia induced plasticity in persons with chronic incomplete. Spinal cord injury. Dr milan do is research scientist at the shirley ryan ability lab and an assistant professor in the department of physical medicine and rehabilitation at northwestern university. The primary focus of his research is.

Dr milan hypoxia shirley ryan ability lab Spinal cord injury northwestern university
Steelers' Shazier retiring 'from the game I love'

NFL Live

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Steelers' Shazier retiring 'from the game I love'

"Former steeler Ryan shazier officially announced his retirement today he suffered a devastating spinal cord injury in two thousand seventeen has remained a part of the steelers organization on the reserve retired list since he's fought. So hard hoping to play the game he loves again and he was asked today if he would let his sons play football in the future, take a listen. Immobile as love enough and you WANNA play on clay on I almost feel like. Football is the reason I got hurt upon. Is more of myself while appalling should give me a little

Football Ryan Shazier Steelers
A Gamified Therapy System Helps People with Brain Injury Recover

The Bio Report

08:05 min | 1 year ago

A Gamified Therapy System Helps People with Brain Injury Recover

"John, thanks for joining us. It's a pleasure to be here. We're going to talk about mine motion, Go Neuro Rehabilitation and gamification complain improving outcomes for patients. Let's start with my motion. Go itself Oh. What exactly is it? Right. So Go is is one of the platforms produced by mine maze and it was specifically designed to be asked of technological advances in assist to physical therapists. That's the way to think about it. and it is as you say, a game of five platform. Which? allows. Patients to interrupt with therapists virus set of games on a screen. which are than the movements picked up by a camera has been used mostly is in the connect camera you know that probably from. Microsoft and so essentially, you should see it as. A camera picking up the movement to the patient while they play games projected onto the screen. With the computer present as well. So the therapists can program the game's changed at levels watch the patient play and record their movements for subsequent analysis for follow up. How how does it work? What's what is the patient due to use this? So the the patient will stand. In front or sit in front of a screen that movements we picked up by a camera. And then there's twenty seven games that they can pick from usually picked by the therapist and those games will Consists of games for the upper body lower body. And basically the standard. Movements and strategies therapist of used for time immemorial have now been turned into a quantifiable game old form. That the patient COMPLA- so for example, the patient and be a little octopus which is on the screen in a water channel, and then they can crouch up and down and up and down crouching movement they make will lead to a thrust of illegal octopus as it goes up the water channel, for example. So it's essentially bringing gamification quantification and standardization. Onto the repertoire of treatments at therapists have always had. And from a neurological point of view what's happening to someone who's using it? Well, I think it's very important. To sort of take a step back and you should ask that question what's happening to a patient when they're getting regular therapy right and you know we feel like what is happening during regular therapy is a patience on learning. To use what they have left after the damage to optimize their movements and retrain and what this game is doing is upping the efficiency. Of that approach. So I think the way to think about. Is. For example, you know you lose your right arm, you learn how to write with your left arm that's called compensation. Now. Think about doing that within the arm, just getting better with what you have left and so it's kind of motor learning. That, this platform encouraging. In patients and they also probably do a little bit more than motor aligning depending on when they get this treatment, you get it very early off a stroke you can actually probably get reversal of your deficit. And this allows you to practice in that setting as well. But see it as a kind of training device. For Motor learning off brain injury what are the range of conditions it's intended to treat? I think to the degree that therapists around the world are fairly generalized and who they look after, and there's a considerable lap in the set of movements and techniques that they use that this platform although has been specifically designed as a neurological platform and with originally devised for patients after stroke that means Article Jane, it be used in spinal cord injury brain injury And probably extend into other conditions, Multiple Sclerosis Parkinson's disease and at Hopkins it's being used. For Orthopedics and may be used, the cardiac patients sets quite general in so much that therapists are used to treating many different kinds of patients to surgery after injury. So I think quite general.

Microsoft John Jane Parkinson Hopkins
"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

"So then when i designed my syria i know what the things are. I need to change. They sit within the half a model. And i can still use the hopper model because a half a model tells me stuff. I should be measuring while in implementing my behavior change techniques a complicated. Is that kind of makes sense that we can still use these series but the behavior change will help us point to which theory might be best to use and why so in in fact it sounds like them. The two are a bit complimentary that they can work. It can work with both of them together as you think about how to proceed either with the patient or patient population. Yeah that's it. And it's scientists at your theory geek. Like me you'll always wanna have a theory guiding it. And i can still there that theory on or you're a clinician or a public health promoter. And you're not so fussed about the testing this theory or this theoretical piece you can still use behavior change wheel to figure out exactly what behavior change technique. You wanna do and you can have the confidence that when you make that decision. It's based on. It's based on theory behind the scenes and also on evidence by how the behavior change technique is linked to the problem. You're trying to solve excellent boy. I've got some reading to do so. I can actually. I've i have one more question for you so can you. What advice do you have four. Cincinnati will think about clinical pbs in the clinic out there who may want to incorporate more updated behavior change theories or models into their practice. Say as they help their patients with spinal cord injury since this is the spinal cord injury six podcast but so we'll say patients with spinal cord injury with incorporating long-term physical activity of some sort into their lives. Like how how can these more updated. Theories helped them and tools to help them do that. Yes well then. I want you to resources first of all on my lab's website swan. Sei action canada dot ca. We have a proactive tool kit. And if an intervention of behavior change intervention developed using the half a model and the behavior change wheel that specifically for physiotherapists who want to change physical activity behavior in their clients with spinal cord injury so the manual provides sort of how to of how to do that. And then we have an accompanying paper that describes how we went through all those theoretical processes to to make it. So i think that gives like a an evidence based example to see To see how theory can be used to to or how can they implemented in practice And then i'm going to suggest anything that you go to the website for the behavior change wheel and just see what i've been talking about. How identifying barriers and opportunities can can be linked to behavior change techniques I recognize that over time behavior. Change has got more complicated than it used to be. But i think that's a good thing. I think for a long time people underestimated how difficult behavior change was. And as you said at the outset of discussion while it's tough and i think those of us who are trying to help people change their behavior. I think we have a responsibility. Just appreciate how complex it is. If it was easy we would have all done by now..

spinal cord injury syria pbs Cincinnati canada ca
"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

"Dr kathleen martin guinness from episode five. We talked about the international spinal cord injury scientific exercise guidelines. Well she agreed to stick around and talk with me about health. Behavior change three two and seriously does her bag. And it's important stuff for pt's to know if we can't do a great job of helping our patients with spinal cord. Injury incorporate healthy physical activity behaviors into their lives. Like what is it. We think we're doing anyway right so stick around as we talk behavior. Change theory and spoiler alert. She gives them specific resources with concrete action. Items at the end and joy. Okay so kathleen. Can we talk about behavior. Change theory of this. You know it's an area. I i am familiar with your work. I know scenario that. You've done a lot of work in. And i have questions and i'd love to give you some context of where i'm coming from and and i think a lot of my colleagues are coming from as well so a clinical practice is primarily with people with chronic disabilities many with spinal cord injury and in an outpatient setting. And i found that my my background in physical therapy has prepared me well to be able to advise and train my patients in the like what and how to perform physical activities really of all sorts but to have a meaningful impact. Most of these types of activities need to be long-term changes. And what i've struggled with more is how best to partner with my patients to help them. Incorporate changes that they want to make into their lives longer term. When i talked to other physical therapists out there. I don't think i'm alone in that struggle and so the question of how anyone makes any life. Change is a complex one with many possible answers. And so it's important that we clinicians. And i have a feeling here then preaching to the choir on this but i think it's important that we clinicians don't just tell someone to go about making a life change the way that we think we would do it. We need to be thinking about. What does our patient need to make this change if they decide to do so. And so from my standpoint. I think that having frameworks for how we think about these kinds of problems is an important way to navigate that complexity..

Dr kathleen martin guinness kathleen spinal cord injury
"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

"I think the short answer is yes absolutely but they key ingredient is to know your audience and engage your audience. So if your target audience sark clinicians. The clinicians needs to be at the table. But i think even if your target audience if just clinicians you still need to have a spinal cord injury. People that lived experience at the table. I think that that's non negotiable that some for those of us who don't have a spinal. Gee i think sometimes we we miss things that we no matter how much time we may have spent working in a clinical setting with a person with sei or the research setting. There are just so many things we don't know or appreciate about living every day with a spinal cord injury and having people without experience at the table Will will give you a broader sense. You'll see things that you just hadn't anticipated by not having that experience at the table And i think the other thing is to always have the evidence in mind when people guidelines. But i always say look you better be prepared to defend those guidelines for the rest of your life because there will always be people who criticize the guideline or have questions about it and in that situation myself but my back is always the evidence. What's the evidence. Say i think the more because they truly scientific evidence or best practices that are using clinical care The less we are opening ourselves to criticisms about what we've put in the guidelines recommendations and the guidelines clo- kathleen. You're singing matutuine. I'm certain there's colleagues of mine who are feeling validated for that as well. So if you if you have that evidence piece in the stakeholder involvement to fall back on i would imagine the criticisms will still come from someone. But you're in a place that you can defend what you've done and then it still holds up. I what i believe in you. Know one of the best examples is when we were developing the guidelines. I always got pushback. Why not one hundred fifty minutes per week and sitting at our table when we did the final international panel on the espn exercise guidelines. I had two people at my panel with lived experience of spinal cord injury and there was some opposition. Know that we should just be..

kathleen espn spinal cord injury
"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

"Be discouraging as well and and it's so if you really if you said he thinks about the various people with sti say for example people want to go to the gym And they don't have their own private vehicle need to organize We special Buses that people disabilities can order but they can only order them a maximum number of times per week highly scheduled. There's no way a person could get to a gym if they didn't have home based equipment and everything takes longer when you have a spinal cord injury. There really are fewer hours in the day for people with for the rest of the population and trying to squeeze one hundred fifty minutes per week in it. It's just not feasible for so many people with fbi. Yeah shoot when when. I think about like a physical therapy home exercise program. I've had physical therapy when someone gave me ten exercises. Oh shoot now. I'm like making a confession here. But the i didn't do any of them. But someone gives me three exercises in like one hundred percent you know and it's a variation on that theme isn't it like. This is a doable thing. At the at the fewer times per week that cetera. Yeah and then. Is there a reason so as you talk about that minimum amount basically that someone with a spinal cord injury needs to do in order to see a benefit. Is that a different minimum for somebody with a spinal cord injury. Say than somebody without and if so. Do we know anything about the mechanism. That is yeah great question. And that's something. I need to clarify because the the current evidence that there probably isn't a true minimum. You know that that. I hate i hate to say it but you know that there's this philosophy that anything is better than nothing something better than nothing And while that may be true. I think it's important for people with spinal cord injury to know. What's the bare minimum. I need to do in order to get you know meaningful improvements. And i think we're all like that was without an se. Just tell me the minimum. What's the bare minimum. I need to do to reduce my risk of cardiovascular disease or prevent cancer and.

fbi spinal cord injury cardiovascular disease cancer
"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

"These guidelines and there's also the guidelines from the exercise and sports science australian position statement could you briefly highlight differences between the two. Why should why should people with spinal cord injury. and then of course we as clinicians. Why should we be using one set of recommendations over the other between yours and the other groups. Yeah that's a great question. And i get asked about a lot so first of all. I think it's important to clarify that. Israeli and guidelines are simply the w. h. the world health organization physical activity guidelines that are put forth but the whole population of the world which is one hundred fifty minutes of a much bigger sensitivity per week plus strength training twice a week. The attorney guidelines were generated by a small group of scientists who looked at the scientific literature and People with sei as well as able popular able bodied population and ultimately Suggested that the who recommendation should be carried over to the people living with spinal cord injury. Now i i've been working there for over twenty years i've I'm a behavioral scientist. I'm really interested in what physical activity behavior of people spinal cord injury do. And i've looked at the the physical activity profiles over three days and seven days. Probably a probably seven thousand people living with spinal cord injury over the past twenty years. I've got a really good understanding of what people with the i do. And we know for sure that fifty percent of people living with final cord injuries. Do no exercise whatsoever. You not a minute. So i was back in twenty. Seven is the first time i worked sunsets collectively guidelines for people with spinal cord injury and We version that you now know. The scientific exercise guidelines guidelines that we have faded and twenty seventeen and really what drives those times with a bit of a different philosophical slant on physical activity guideline development for people with sei. So i really believe that physical activity guidelines should be developed taking into consideration the needs the values the preferences of the people.

spinal cord injury world health organization
Katie Adamson on how the YMCA is like an Iceburg

HIT Like a Girl

06:51 min | 2 years ago

Katie Adamson on how the YMCA is like an Iceburg

"My Name Is Katie. Adamson and I am Vice President of Health Partnerships in policy at the YMCA The USA. I have been at the Y. For fifteen years that I've been in the space for thirty so old I am about prevention and at the Y. We're about community health and so a bit different from the conference. I think I'm a bit of an outlier in terms of that. But that's kind of exciting. So I started my career out working for elected officials and so the first one was Pat Schroeder from Colorado and she stealth helped start the congressional women's caucus and children's caucus and she was one of the first graduates of Harvard law school too. She was a super big innovator in women's rights and I also got to work for a member of parliament and Ireland row when I was yeah when I was there. He brought the whole government down for itchy rights again so it was kind of neat to see the parliament go down because he felt like everyone should get access to HIV care and treatment. Ap Don't mind my asking. When is this like right out of college? He was right out of college. Okay now. They're probably more progressive in the United States. Went back then. They weren't that guy that I worked for a very desmond. He introduced contraception into Ireland around the pope. While that kind of tells you he was a real meek guy I was lucky to work for him and then came back and went back to pat. Schroeder's Office. I had been an intern for her. And I said I still want to work on the hill. Can you help me find a job in so Bernie? Sanders had just been elected so when I worked for him. Nobody who was now. Everybody knows who he is. And Bernie's known a lot more. His super super liberal left issues but he was a huge and continues to be a huge advocate for prevention and that the system is skewed and needs to be right-sized towards bigger investment in prevention. So that really influenced me a lot and for him. I worked on those issues primarily and we introduced legislation to establish national cancer registry in this country so that we you know we have more baseball statistics about guys in the world series than we do about women who got breast cancer and so the idea was if you could really kind of capture when people were diagnosed how they were diagnosed that public health could intervene catch it earlier do better screening referral. Things like that so we were able to pass. That legislation helped him get reelected helped him work with Republicans which he had to do in order to get reelected so I was doing a lot of work at the time for him to increase funding for prevention and so the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. You know we're the only federal agency outside of Washington and we don't have anyone to help us. Educate the hill about what we do. Would you come work for us so took us about me about a year to get that job? But then I gotta go down to the Centers for Disease Control and help them come up and educate members of Congress about what the problems were and how big of an issue diabetes and cancer arthritis and all these issues were for the nation and how we needed to be doing more and building more programs in communities and that was an incredible experience for me. I came back and I work for some law firms as I was A nonprofit lobbyists basically so it was a law firm for profit. But I I worked for twenty nonprofits and I had to get all of them federal money. Wow so it's very hard. That's a huge responsibility was back in the earmark days and those are really good earmarks. I worked for Christopher and Dana. Reeve when they were alive. Superman and Dino's goal was that no one would ever have to make more than one phone call after a family member had become paralyzed because she was in a privileged position. She had all the access to anything. You could need in in terms of getting help for Chris. It took her like twenty six phone calls to get just a few things answered and so we built this entire center to help people living with paralysis. Get ACCESS TO CARE and information. Our Son had an issue so I've actually reached out to the Christopher Dana Reeve's foundation in having left the hospital after six months day with something that turned their lives upside down there just tremendous. Aren't they incredible? They really are and ours was not an interest spinal cord injury issue. It was non interested central nervous system but the people over there are just a pleasure to work with. I'm so glad to hear that because I was a long time ago so I'm so glad there's still doing three. Oh yes I was lucky enough to also work for Queen Noor of Jordan. Tell us more cues one of our clients and she and her husband when he was alive did so much to get rid of landmines in Jordan. And she helped takeover after. Diana died so she took over and ran the landmines survivor network and they'd won the Nobel Peace Prize with a group of others. Trying to get land mines out of the ground but they also started a landmine survivor. Peer Support Network around the world and so when they start this peer support network around the world. They helped landmines fibers. Get jobs and be able to survive as a lot of people few lose a lamb in another country. You're completely ostracized because you're not value to your family anymore. So long story short one of my clients was Ymca. When I was working at the law firm for just six months and I was about ready to get married and have a family and I needed to slow down because it was a really busy work so I came to the YMCA. And I've been there for fifteen years and so when I came to the YMCA. It was a really good time because the why was looking at trying to take the network of twenty seven hundred wise in the country and ten thousand communities we reach and drive the ship in the direction of prevention and control of chronic disease. And we've done this a few times in our history before during World War One and World War Two. We won the Nobel Peace Prize for our work during wartime a lot of people. Don't know that you know that. Yeah we were on the ground helping prisoners of war sadly were giving him some cigarettes and some donuts but back then we didn't have the science and that was part of what we did but we did a lot of social support the why was also on the Japanese internment camps providing health and well being in recreation so really got a lot of history in this country for things we've done and collectively tried to respond to community crisis a needs later when women were going back to work and we had latchkey kid problems. Why became one of the leading provider childcare? So the why was looking at it. It's makeup and saying we have challenge here. We are hello being organization we wake up everyday thing about spirit mind and body for all and we're losing the war here and if we're not part of the solution part of the problem so how do we get everybody moving in the same direction so that was kind of when I got to be hired and so it was Super Fun. Time to start helping our wise be connected to the innovators and so we worked with Folks like the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and we taught wise. How do plan do study? Act Really How to evaluate your work how to change the building so people felt welcome when they came in so they didn't see this gym equipment Or get a tour of the why they saw coffee and people sitting down and talking

Christopher Dana Reeve Centers For Disease Control An Pat Schroeder Ireland Parliament Bernie Vice President Of Health Partn Harvard Law School Colorado Adamson Breast Cancer United States Queen Noor Washington Intern Sanders Institute For Healthcare Impro
"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

"Cpg around if you'd included sub acute and chronic spinal cord injury. What's your sense. Do you think the recommendations would have ended up being different. Or how would they have been different. I think the recommendations would have been the same if we include some acute funchal injury. there are studies That are very well known. The skill trial for example found that spinal cord entered patients who are receiving support treadmill training Don't improve anymore than overground. Type training so That's not something that a lot of therapists who believe in byways turning wanna hear but that's probably unfortunately one of the answers that would come out of that The the number of articles is pretty low. Spunk and injury. This is such such a more rare disease and stroke for example So relying on those similar mechanisms of plasticity and acute onset disorder. Who's really how he felt. We could lump in with the other disorders sometimes early after injury with patients with incomplete spinal cord injury a lot of times. You're really considering prognosis. So it's less about the tool right. So yes i do. Think the active the recommendations will look the same question for improving walking outcomes of saint interventions. Think would look the same in sub acute. Sei the question is how the patient's going gonna respond Do they have the prognostic indicators. That walking independent walking is in the cards. I think that's sometimes clinicians. Have a hard time wrapping their head around and so the prognostic indicators and acute spinal cord injury that might be a different piece that would go into. Cpg that was specific to spinal cord injury. That isn't really the same for the whole group. Is that what you're saying. Yeah i mean i think. Certainly that's there's going to be you know there are some prognostic indicators for stroke and they're certainly prognostic indicators for walking for incomplete spinal cord injury I don't know much about bringing injury like specific tools or anything that are out..

chronic spinal cord injury onset disorder spinal cord injury stroke
"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

"To dr george hornby. In dr kerry hollarin' about a major effort on both of their parts the clinical practice guideline to improve locomotor function following chronic stroke incomplete spinal cord injury and brain injury. Which was recently published in the journal of neurologic physical therapy doctor. Hornby as a co author on this. Cpg he's also professor in the department of physical medicine and rehabilitation indiana university. School of medicine as well as the director of knowledge synthesis. For the academy of neurologic physical. Therapy welcome george. Thanks for having me. Absolutely and dr hollarin' collaborator and the cpg as well. And she's the co chair of the locomotor training knowledge translation force also through the academy of neurologic pt. She's also assistant. Professor physical therapy at washington university in st louis and welcome kerry. Thank you now. i'm. I'm hoping that we can get a bit in the weeds on this and how it should and will impact spinal cord injury rehabilitation in particular. Which means that. We're going to make an assumption that you dear listeners have already read this important paper. So it's currently open access in the january issue of jnp. The of neurologic therapy. If you haven't read it yet go read it. Our discussion today will be a whole lot. More interesting. if you do there's recommendations related to a variety of interventions to improve walking speed and distance and people with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury. Which is our focus today as well as chronic stroke and brain injuries. So really tough and with that kerry george. I have got questions for you too. I thought we'd start with the methodology a bit so for this. Cpg you included diagnoses of chronic incomplete spinal cord injuries stroke and brain injury and i certainly see the similarity between stroke and brain injury. Can you talk a bit about. Why include incomplete spinal cord injury in the mix and why not do a separate four spinal cord injury itself. I mean besides of course the extra work. But maybe you guys can talk a bit about that so i can go in address that so to answer the second part i. There's not a lot of richer. In spinal cord injury alone particularly with chronic balcon injury so we would have to increase the size of the scope of the punk practice. Guideline shoe Do a sub acute and acute injury. Which would have been fine. However the chance of the first part i think that From my perspective doing research and population for a bit and carry can speak to this from her clinical experience and research. I we felt that. Spock injury especially incomplete. Injury was somewhat similar to brain injury and stroke except of course the bilateral nature that you usually see they all present as upper motor neuron type disorders with creases weakness and spasms. Specificity coordination somewhat similar across these diagnosis. The idea that they're both they're all she's me Acute onset Set spahn quarter from other. Maybe spinal diseases like multiple sclerosis. That could be lumped in as the because they're more degenerative. That's how we addressed all three together. The other important factor is that we. I personally and i believe that others buy into this. Is that when you have a neurological disorder acute onset. You really are working with the spared nervous system that's available and the idea. There is that learning and plasticity in neural circuits is gonna rely on these circuits more so than different mechanisms of plassey in different diagnosis so because they presented somewhat similarly with the upper motor neuron type disorders. And because they're cute onset and positi is probably very similar across these disease prostes. We felt like we could combine them. I see you mentioned like you could have done a separate..

spinal cord injury dr george hornby dr kerry hollarin stroke incomplete spinal cord journal of neurologic physical brain injury department of physical medicin academy of neurologic physical dr hollarin academy of neurologic pt stroke kerry george Hornby School of medicine washington university st louis kerry george spahn spasms
"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

"That needs to happen for somebody to truly develop more functional and coordinated control the. It's exciting to think about. Just how then like the neuroscience and the motor learning and our clinical skills and and really patient i would imagine patient preferences on what their high priority goals are how that can really all interplay with this neat stuff. Yeah thinking and so what. What are the effects that you're seeing so far in terms of like. How much recovery is this helping people get or what types of recovery. Yeah i think it's really exciting. Now i'm you know. I tend to be an optimist by nature so take on with a grain of salt. But i know as a clinician. I've never seen the at outcomes in our in our clinical environment In the last twenty years that i've been able to see with just a few subjects Who are receiving transportation Electrical spinal cord stimulation so. I'm really excited but also cautiously optimistic understanding that we truly are in my mind in the infancy of understanding The mechanisms behind this. I think there's some great hypotheses out there and also some good literature to start to support those hypotheses. But i think you know again. It's still so early on to really understand this. But that's why. I chose the article review by two cola out because i think it really starts to build a nice mechanistic view on how this type of stimulation in combination with task specific training maybe able to activate dormant neural pathways even in the individuals with the most severe injuries. And you know as we talked earlier. That's the group that we really haven't in my mind that rate job from clinical or research perspective in figuring out how to to really help them cover You know so. Some authors that have been really critical in the early work Transportation use electrical stimulation. Spinal cord electrical stimulation edgerton You're a daraghmeh cinco prerogative And dimitri saying co have all published several papers together demonstrating the ability to restore voluntary movement in the lower extremities and individuals who are classified as motor complete injuries and in their papers the majority of the individuals that they've studied had Have very chronic injuries. And i think that's also important to recognize as well is that these dormant neurons may Actually still have electrical viability even years after spinal cord injury And i know froth those individuals out there who have chronic injuries you know. That's i think that's really exciting. The technologies we're developing today hopefully and it and the interventions we're developing today not only help the new injuries but also help those Individuals who had these injuries for quite some time but there was a nice paper from the reggie edgerton group that Devon that demonstrate improvement in upper extremity function and grip strength and individuals with cervical spinal cord injury when paired with transfer cheney electrical spinal cord stimulation with upper extremity training. And so. I think you know we're you know a lot of times. We all talk about walking and you know when a patient is i injured. That's often times the first thing they say. They're i'm gonna walk out of here but then as i think the injury Kind of matures people then start realizing how important their hands are not becomes done a priority one of the top priorities for them to get hand function back into get bowel and bladder function back. And so we've seen This literature building his body of literature building. That shows that maybe not only can it help with walking but it also can help a foul and bladder control and again with the upper extremity improvement in function And then there was also a paper published by raphael that supported improved trunks ability in individuals with spinal cord injury in response to this type of stimulation..

edgerton reggie edgerton group dimitri cervical spinal cord injury spinal cord injury Devon cheney raphael
"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

05:30 min | 2 years ago

"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

"Candy will be presenting a session on this topic titled neuro modulation in combination with task specific training to improve outcomes after spinal cord injury. So that'll be on friday february fourteenth. At eleven o'clock you should definitely check it out now before we start going into detail on transportation. Use electrical spinal cord stimulation. Think it might be a good idea for us to take a step back and redefine neuro modulation for anyone who hasn't yet listened to the last episode where we had a bit of a primer neuro modulation and i guess they feel like this is where we should cue the theme music again for less time on disgust kind of feature but so by way of definition normal deletion refers to techniques that changed the excitability of the nervous system in some way and generally the goal is to increase the baseline excitability of the nervous system. Normal techniques vary in the modality used such as electrical or magnetic stimulation or pharmacology and they vary in which part of the nervous system is being targeted To candy is there anything all that you'd like to add or change about that definition now. I think that's a great definition. I just think about it is targeted delivery of a simulation to the spinal cord with the goal of modulating court excitability or modulating generally as you set up regulating excitability. Nice well so let's go ahead and talk about trans cutaneous. Electrical spinal cord stimulation So can you. Maybe you can start with the with the problem. What's the problem that transportation use electrical spinal cord. Stimulation is trying to solve in the first place. I'm gonna talk to so little bit About history. i. I kinda brings us onto where we are today. But you know. I think as clinicians and us researchers we've all seen with the integration of activity based therapy approaches in the clinical environment over the last ten years People who have recovered to levels that have exceeded historical outcomes and we've read inexperienced evidence that support the various forms of locomotor training an electrical stimulation maybe beneficial for promoting walking recovery and or neurologic recovery and individuals with motor incomplete. Spinal cord injury And in turn helping them achieve greater levels of functional recovery independent and quality.

Spinal cord injury
"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

"Welcome to the third episode of disgust discussions and spinal cord. Injury sci where we bring you interviews with researchers and clinical leaders and spinal cord injury rehabilitation. I'm rachel tappin. Last time we talked about neeraj relation. Touched on various neuro modulation protocols. Today i'll be speaking with. Dr candy t for tiller for a deeper dive on one of those protocols. Trans cutaneous spinal cord stimulation dr t for tillers the director of physical therapy at craig. Hospital in englewood colorado. She's a board certified specialist in neurologic physical therapy and i guess. I'm feeling the need to tell you that she's just. She's one of those people who has an iron in every fire. I i met candy when we were on the spinal cord. Injury edge taskforce together and since then it seems that everyone. I encounter in the spinal cord injury. Rehab world has worked on something with candy at one point or another. She's been involved in numerous research projects including a current project involving transfer continuous electrical spinal cord stimulation. Welcome candy. thank you rachel. It's so nice to be able to chat with you today. And i appreciate the invitation and opportunity to speak with you and to talk about transportation. Transportationnation spinal cord electrical stimulation absolutely so for today's topic. I'll refer you to a paper that candy chose for us titled and yet it moves recovery of volition control after spinal cord injury from the journal. Progress in neurobiology from two thousand eighteen. The full citation is listed in the description of this podcast. Episode and for listeners will be attending the abtei's combined sections meeting denver next week..

Paralyzed man breaks world record for finishing a marathon in an exoskeleton suit

BBC World Service

04:12 min | 2 years ago

Paralyzed man breaks world record for finishing a marathon in an exoskeleton suit

"Are now in December two thousand five at the age of nineteen Adam Galinsky suffered a spinal cord injury that left him severely paralyzed the doctor said he would never be able to walk again but he has ten years later he was able to stand and walk using the re will cripple sync excess skeleton and now he's just beaten the world record for the fastest time to finish the marathon in that suit I often have felt it feels great I mean on one hand I feel very accomplished obviously but are also quite quite relieved to me this is my second time trying to break the record so there's very tough very hard record beat yeah I I've been training hard I had a great scene with people with me are the reason why I broke by such a large margin I didn't take any naps and go to sleep at all walk straight through for thirty three hours the sixty minutes yeah yeah it's I don't I don't recommend anyone doing that how do you I mean how do you trained to all not plan did you think right I'm not going to sleep or did your training involves snapping I'm kind of one of those people I don't really sleep that much as it is and I'm kind of a night out so so you know I I and it's one of things where I I had so much adrenaline going over my body so you know there was just one of those things where I just kind of plowed through it and for people who want to well tell us how you'll exome skeleton works just describe it for us so that we can visualize it yeah have you seen the movie terminator many times so I describe the like the lower half of the terminator suit I transfer out of out of my wheelchair into the exoskeleton I strap in about six or seven straps I wear this watch on my right hand wrist and this watch is like the brain remote control of the terminator XSLT suit it's got three settings a set standard walk when I put it in the US than stand mode it stands now and then when I put it in a walking out I have these two are precious I taps forward with each arm crutch and I cannot move my hips and ABS side to side and then there's a sensor in each a hip of the acts of skills and that takes up the movement in my abdominal and hips we spent six in a motor within the excess Skelton like itself so my ABS and hips a new issue eight the movement and then the leg of the axis Skelton actually physically moves my leg so it it's like man this machine incredible so it's your body that signals the suit to move essentially yeah yes yes definitely and it's been a long journey to this point hasn't sits okay you you do not let your disability to find you but it must have been incredibly tough down the is what one of the landmarks for you to this point meant landmarks well I think of them yes it's it's a probably quite a bunch of small landmarks four years ago was was a really big landmarks make out when I started to to use the excel skills and I went down to my annual checkup and they said Hey we we have this extra Skelton programs you want to try it out and it was kind of one of those aha moments that that you always hear about I tell people when I'm standing and walking in my exoskeleton I don't feel disabled but I don't feel able bodied I feel what I call re enable and all that really means is it's just what it feels to be empowered and when I feel empowered I I I can do anything that I put my mind to this kind of the the feeling that came over me rest stood up I don't please give us saying that re empowering the exoskeleton gave him and he took that feeling and he went on to beat the marathon record walked by somebody of excess skeleton sued by three hours over three hours when he did the math and in America recently pitchers of him all over the internet so that have a look at him in motion it's a thing a very humbling thing to look at on a

Adam Galinsky
Paralyzed man breaks world record for finishing a marathon in an exoskeleton suit

BBC World Service

04:12 min | 2 years ago

Paralyzed man breaks world record for finishing a marathon in an exoskeleton suit

"Are now in December two thousand five at the age of nineteen Adam Galinsky suffered a spinal cord injury that left him severely paralyzed the doctor said he would never be able to walk again but he has ten years later he was able to stand and walk using the re will cripple sync excess skeleton and now he's just beaten the world record for the fastest time to finish the marathon in that suit I often have felt it feels great I mean on one hand I feel very accomplished obviously but are also quite quite relieved to me this is my second time trying to break the record so there's very tough very hard record beat yeah I I've been training hard I had a great scene with people with me are the reason why I broke by such a large margin I didn't take any naps and go to sleep at all walk straight through for thirty three hours the sixty minutes yeah yeah it's I don't I don't recommend anyone doing that how do you I mean how do you trained to all not plan did you think right I'm not going to sleep or did your training involves snapping I'm kind of one of those people I don't really sleep that much as it is and I'm kind of a night out so so you know I I and it's one of things where I I had so much adrenaline going over my body so you know there was just one of those things where I just kind of plowed through it and for people who want to well tell us how you'll exome skeleton works just describe it for us so that we can visualize it yeah have you seen the movie terminator many times so I describe the like the lower half of the terminator suit I transfer out of out of my wheelchair into the exoskeleton I strap in about six or seven straps I wear this watch on my right hand wrist and this watch is like the brain remote control of the terminator XSLT suit it's got three settings a set standard walk when I put it in the US than stand mode it stands now and then when I put it in a walking out I have these two are precious I taps forward with each arm crutch and I cannot move my hips and ABS side to side and then there's a sensor in each a hip of the acts of skills and that takes up the movement in my abdominal and hips we spent six in a motor within the excess Skelton like itself so my ABS and hips a new issue eight the movement and then the leg of the axis Skelton actually physically moves my leg so it it's like man this machine incredible so it's your body that signals the suit to move essentially yeah yes yes definitely and it's been a long journey to this point hasn't sits okay you you do not let your disability to find you but it must have been incredibly tough down the is what one of the landmarks for you to this point meant landmarks well I think of them yes it's it's a probably quite a bunch of small landmarks four years ago was was a really big landmarks make out when I started to to use the excel skills and I went down to my annual checkup and they said Hey we we have this extra Skelton programs you want to try it out and it was kind of one of those aha moments that that you always hear about I tell people when I'm standing and walking in my exoskeleton I don't feel disabled but I don't feel able bodied I feel what I call re enable and all that really means is it's just what it feels to be empowered and when I feel empowered I I I can do anything that I put my mind to this kind of the the feeling that came over me rest stood up I don't please give us saying that re empowering the exoskeleton gave him and he took that feeling and he went on to beat the marathon record walked by somebody of excess skeleton sued by three hours over three hours when he did the math and in America recently pitchers of him all over the internet so that have a look at him in motion it's a thing a very humbling thing to look at on a

"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

"Time independent plasticity biological process by which we aim to change the strength of sign up the connections between noodles We can actually you late strength. We can down regulate strength This process adjust the strength of synoptic connections based on the relative timing of a particular node on output. I know so an input of an action. potential This is the protocol that we have been using in our laboratory. Ads in two thousand and twelve This is the first time that this principle was used Target in the spinal cord in patients with spinal cord injury. I see and can you explain. Maybe a little bit more about what's involved. What are the logistics of doing this type of normal deletion at protocol that used the principles of spike. I'm independent. blessed in. Research is paired associative stimulation. So in this approach we use To type of stimulus for example one could be transplanted. Magnetic stimulation over the primary motor cortex To activate or elicit descending bullies that go down to the final score and this kind of magnetic stimulation stimulate pair with super maximal stimulation of peripheral nerve and that is stimulation of peripheral nerve activate aim to activate spinal motor noodles and dramatically so bullets go back to the spinal or so in our laboratory. We use these principles and this protocol and we aim to target Say no to this day in the spinal court in the connection between corticospinal style and modern on We aim to strengthen disconnection by just changing the relative timing at which magnetic stimulation and peripheral nervous stimulation supply and this follow principles of long term potential or long term depression. We can induce the some extent the phenomenon Both phenomenon if we are we are consistent with the principles of spike time dependent plasticity. But we do this Processes by fixity by just changing the timing of stimulation. Okay i'll see i'm gonna. I'm gonna try seeing this back to you to see if i'm understanding and hopefully this'll help listeners if they get it twice as well so you're using s or trans cranial magnetic stimulation basically to to elicit a response from the primary motor cortex so like from the upper motor neuron and the corticospinal tract. And then if you time that just right with the stimulation of the peripheral nerve which is which is then sending more ace ending volley from the lower motor neuron I guess sending volley from the the sensory neuron would be yeah. That's a good question. We tried to get very strongly dealers. So we try to activate the motor neurons and and the modern generate action potentials that go anti dramatically back to the spinal cord. They're right but of this. Send the boys that are both transplanted connectik stimulation and they're right but of anti-drunk bullies that are elicited by peripheral nervous stimulation of peripheral nerve and then play with the interval and this is what we use to try to strengthen the connection. Oh in the corticospinal pathway okay. I'm going to try this again now. So you're so you're using t to to fire the neurons in the primary motor cortex. You're all sort of from above the spinal cord and then you're also firing the peripheral nerve below the spinal cord and as if you time those two pieces just right. Compared to each other you can either get long term depression or potential action of that synapse..

spinal cord injury depression
"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

05:03 min | 3 years ago

"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

"To walking but as we know folks of spinal cord injury often what's more important to them Over walking would be other things like bowel and bladder and sexual function you know. Can these imaging techniques be supplement to help predict and manage those type of issues that also occur after spinal cord injury and so long story. Short is the i think these things will be supplemented the physical exam way. And if i can put in my plan to for as long as you're looking at us if you can look at the upper extremities to be much. Appreciated excellent sounds like a good collaboration. Sure yeah i'll keep throwing the ideas and you work them all out. How how about that deal. Yeah that's right. I'll take that deal and so on that note. I guess the this seems like a whole different way to look at emory data. Are there other patient populations that this is being used in or that you think it could be used in the future. We'll i think as far as the imaging techniques are concerned. Yes i mean this. These imaging techniques are being applied to other populations folks with cervical spun a lotta mile up the that comes to mind and multiple sclerosis is another is another kind of patient group that that these imaging techniques are kind of being trialed in or developed by. I think especially for any patient population. Another key here. is they these techniques. Need to be relatively simple to use right as we know from. Let's say the early apple products that the beauty was in the simplicity. Right the first ipod. I think the more complicated. These clinical prediction rules for walking or other outcome measures. The more complicated. The clinical prediction rule. The less likely. It's going to be used clinically right. So can our team and or others get these techniques to be fully automated a push of a button and using other technologies such as machine learning collaborating with folks that are skilled in fully automating and coding. Type of things can we. Can we do this to make it very simple and user-friendly for the clinician right. That's i think that's the challenge. Sure that was really important for for the clinic for it to be simple and for it to be time. Efficient times always Shortage in the clinic absolutely absolutely in reality. No one's going to sit and an adult colored for hours on a on a patient spinal cord when we know that motor. Scores are indeed helpful to predict right. But can we come up with ways to save time.

spinal cord injury multiple sclerosis apple Efficient times
"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

04:58 min | 3 years ago

"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

"The physical medicine rehabilitation world physiologists physical therapist radiologist. I think everyone just gotten to a normal clinical practice mode that did not include imaging for predicting in so that is kind of the norm even to this day. Okay so maybe the next best thing is for us to talk about is what you all did in your study. Go ahead and maybe take us through what y'all did. Okay so i just wanted to say Myself i definitely lean on heavily the entire team but for this podcast will speak on the behalf of the team we. We didn't necessarily do anything completely. I would say out of the ordinary which in my perspective. It's a good thing. Because as a physical therapist i wanna perform and be part of clinically relevant research right so the most exotic mri sequences might be publishable. But is it practical for any given patient to receive those types of sequences after spinal cord injury. So what we did was. We used to run the mill standard. What's called t two weighted mri sequences of a person's spinal cord damage on the cervical spine. The neck and we looked at a view. Kind of a bird's eye view or what we call imaging world and axial view and we look image by image or what we'd say slice by slice throughout the damage and we just wanted to we. We use the term adult coloring. We wanted to be able to characterize the damage on each slice so essentially. What we're doing is were drawing circles and coloring this damage. What's really nice about that particular study. Was we leveraged this open source. Software called the spinal cord toolbox. So it's it's up online Free of charge to use for research researchers like us and we could put the adult colored image of the spinal cord damage into this open source. Software the spinal cord toolbox. And it's a little bit more sophisticated in that but the output is characterizing each individual's spinal cord damage according to wear along specific tract of the spinal cord..

spinal cord injury
"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

04:57 min | 3 years ago

"spinal cord injury" Discussed on Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

"Tappin. Today dr andrew smith is joining us from regis university in denver where he's an assistant professor in the school of physical therapy. Welcome andrew thank you. Dr tap great to be here and excited contribute. What i can to discus. We'll be talking about research that andrew has been doing related to mri improving our ability to determine prognosis for walking and people who have had a spinal cord injury. We'll discuss the results of his study. Lateral corticospinal tract damage correlates with motor output in incomplete spinal cord injury which was published in the archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation last year in two thousand eighteen. So andrew i maybe to set the stage here a little bit. Could you talk to us about what's currently happening in the clinic to help predict whether people will walk or how well they'll be able to walk after a spinal cord injury. Yes so ritual what what typically happens after injury is even in the intensive care unit. Typically motor scores are so the patient will be lying supine and the physicians and the team will come and say hey can you. Are you able to move your limbs especially the legs if you're considering walking. Then they go through specific tests and measures that are found and published by the american spinal cord injury association and now they're considered international standards. And what you get from. That is a standardized motor score for the right leg in the left leg and that's typically used to determine a patient's feature ability to walk now. This is good and and we are team. Doesn't want to necessarily downplay this. It's very important and continues to be the most important predictor of walking but what we found is that patients often want a bit more information than what they can currently do when they are being assessed. So other questions come up. What if the patient sedated. What if the patient has a severe lower extremity fracture where they can't contract muscles are they shouldn't because it's a country patient is has continued spinal shock which typically happens after one of these injuries where they're not able to voluntarily move their limbs yet but perhaps could in the future so we found a few problem areas and that's where our research began to take shape and aiming to address those problem areas That's interesting my background is really an rehabilitation and setting 's and i hadn't thought too much about just how much the medical situation in acute care could really impact our ability to even have an idea of what they can do from motor standpoint in those really critical early days. So as you talk about how we're predicting how well someone's going to be able to walk in the future. I'm not really hearing anything about imaging. Can you give us some background there. You know why. Why doesn't imaging match up with what's going to be coming on the line. As far as the person's motor recovery goes when thinking about imaging and why it is not currently being emphasized for predicting things like walking..

Tappin dr andrew smith andrew regis university american spinal cord injury as spinal cord injury denver spinal shock