37 Burst results for "Spielberg"

Fresh update on "spielberg" discussed on Spider-Dan & The Secret Bores

Spider-Dan & The Secret Bores

00:32 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "spielberg" discussed on Spider-Dan & The Secret Bores

"I mean, you know, considering it's the first, it's this film is a landmark film purely for this. The first completely computer generated character. Mind-blowing, isn't it? Yeah. And it works. Obviously, like we said, compared to nowadays, but at the time, it must have been something special. They did Jurassic Park. Spielberg went back and looked at this in several other films that had used the CGI prior to him doing that just to make sure he can get that technique right and obviously worked out very well for Jurassic Park. But yeah, I think you're right, it's not just like a flat camera shooting forward, play around with the angles. I love that the glass kind of vibrates before the night comes forward. He's got this bloody sword, and it is terrifying. You kind of, you kind of get that these are hallucinations, but I think they are really help it stay away from those classic kind of Sherlock Holmes stories where it's just like, you know, elementary dear Watson, I'll explain everything.

Jurassic Park Spielberg Sherlock Holmes Watson
Fresh update on "spielberg" discussed on The Crypto Conversation

The Crypto Conversation

00:58 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "spielberg" discussed on The Crypto Conversation

"To nudge and sort of gamify and encourage people to do the right thing or the better thing. And I think move to earn is gonna have a real place at the table for that and surprisingly you will probably find even public sector actors that tend to be really slow at this stuff starting to embrace it and get behind it. Maybe in the next ten years, you will be able to travel for free around the world on public and quasi public transportation services just burning your wheel coin in return for your lifestyle choices to go green. I love it. All right, and the flip side of that. The flip side of looking ten years out, of course, is a quote by William Gibson also famous a famous quote ace of course. The future is already here. It's just not evenly distributed. And can you think of an example void of the future being here right now, but most people just aren't really aware of it. You know, my answer would actually be around climate. So I wrote a book called climate capitalism in 2011, so that was literally more than ten years ago. And you know, we keep talking about climate change and climate action and more and more people are worried about it. And what I would say is that there's a information asymmetry regarding the evidence of climate change and our role in it and there's information asymmetry regarding the solutions to it. But the solutions are there. You know, think about what we're trying to do with I am Alvin wheel coin. You know, there are millions of green vehicles in the world. Tens of millions, scooters, bikes, electric vehicles of all kinds, transfer rail, public transit, and yet it's all because it's all fragmented, people tend to default to whatever they know best, which might be their private car might be a normal combustion engine. So just taking on on a personal scale, but on every scale, energy, food systems, a production systems with 3D printing, like there's so many pathways that exist today with existing technologies that if we could kill this information asymmetry problem, make access more permissionless to all of these systems, make them more seamlessly connected, we could rapidly accelerate a path to a low carbon economy and not what a lot of people think means that, well, at the sacrifice of our economic well-being, that is crap. Like the reality is we can improve our quality of life, improve our economies and accelerate our low carbon economy, all at the same time. And in crypto, we call that refi regenerative finance, and we like to believe that we're part of that solution and trying to bring those kinds of solutions to scale. Bring it on isn't a refi refi going to be huge over the next decade. All right, well, time to close this out though, boy. Finally, what is your favorite science fiction book film or TV show? I think this is the recency effect. So it might not be my favorite of all time, but it's my favorite right now. Actually, I'm gonna just for fun. I'll give you one really old school and then one very new school. So I took my daughter to see the ET, the ET movie from Steven Spielberg from the 80s. And I don't know, there's so many cool things about that movie that when you watch it again, even as like an older adult compared to when I saw it as a kid, you're like, wow, Steven was really onto something with that one. So I'll put that one in as an old school favorite. And then a new school favorite. I'm not sure if you know this show, but it's called manifest. I think I haven't seen it, but I think that it's on Netflix and it's about the light manifest of a bunch of people. I don't know, something that they land in a different reality, right? Yeah, you disappear for 5 years. I won't say anymore because some of your listeners might want to watch it and don't know the where it goes, but I got really hooked on that one. My family and I like to watch series together, but you know I travel for work a decent amount and I had to find a series that I would watch on my own when I'm traveling and I ended up choosing that. So when I'm not listening to your podcast and those from some others when I'm traveling, I'm watching manifest. So that's my latest favorite. All right, I'm adding it to the list and yeah I mean ET of course an iconic movie from the 80s certainly you know I don't know boy you and I were probably maybe of a similar generation so well, if not I'm generation X so of course yeah ET I saw that as yeah probably as a kid in the 80s and I don't know if I've actually ever seen it again since a boy. I have considered you know because I have a son he's 12 years old so if we were going to watch that as a family probably need to do that before he gets too old and cynical. It's a great family movie to watch. My daughter just loved it and she thought ET was so cute, which of course he is. So but there's so many lessons in there that it's like wow you know I didn't pick up on them as a child but you know regarding how we are as humans and our desire to sort of own and control things and you don't have this alien that lands on the earth and all these scientists want to go and kill them and dissect them and you know these innocent kids want to save him from being dissected and the empathy, so many so many things you can learn from watching that as a child or as an adult. So yeah, I would recommend finding a finding your old VCR. Pull that out. Awesome. And I just, to me, boy, I'm sure you and your family have probably watched Stranger Things, but Stranger Things did such a great job of taking inspiration from so many of those kind of classic 80s movies and ETB. You are so you don't know how right you are and I guess have you seen Stranger Things as well? Of course. Yeah, so my daughter wanted us to watch Stranger Things. So we got hooked on it. And when we took her to watch ET, she we left the movie, she said, this is so much like Stranger Things. And at first I didn't make all the, she made the connections before I did. And I started reflecting. I'm like, wow, is she right? And I'm like, she's so right. I wanted to look it up on Google and what you just said, you validated as well that actually they were the directors of Stranger Things were inspired by Steven Spielberg's movies, including ET, and yeah, there's tons of

William Gibson Alvin Steven Spielberg Netflix Steven Google
Which Is the Best 'Indiana Jones' Movie?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:52 min | Last week

Which Is the Best 'Indiana Jones' Movie?

"While we play our final cut from raiders as we move on to the temple of doom, talk to me. Which is your favorite. Yeah, well I was going to ask you here. So for me, I love grail, I find temple, you know, when kids are being whipped to kind of like, you know, Spielberg, George, what are you doing here? And raiders is just perfection. I mean, raiders, as you said, it's just, it's like a symphony, the pieces just fit together. So raiders is the one. Let me answer it this way. Raiders is the one I could watch whenever. I mean, there's no time I would not want to watch it. I wouldn't say the same about temple, for example. How about you? No, I don't understand. There are some people who temple of doom. That is their favorite indie film. And I personally, I don't get it. Because the creeps. There's value here. I mean, there's a lot of value in this movie. Apparently the chase in the cars or whatever they were, the mine cars. This was supposed to be in the first film. They couldn't figure out manage had to work it in. Well, they ran out of money and time. Is that what happened? Yeah. Yeah, yeah. They may have just written my entire film, they may have just written this entire film around that one stunt, you know, thinking, oh, this is cool. What are we going to do around this? But it does sort of harken back to those old cereals. We're back in the day. So there is something valuable about it. It did. There was a lot of copying of this kind of theme in the 80s. You saw a lot of other properties using this kind of theme after this. And it was a little creepy for sure. For me, last crusade is the funniest one. And therefore, that's the one I can watch the most often. Because I can watch anything with comedy over and over again. As long as I forget the jokes.

Raiders Spielberg George Harken
Sebastian and Chris Kohls Talk Spielberg's 'Raiders of the Lost Ark'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:03 min | Last week

Sebastian and Chris Kohls Talk Spielberg's 'Raiders of the Lost Ark'

"We go on, you mentioned you got very entertained last week or you entertained yourself by porkins, one of the Star Wars characters, who is in raiders, right? Easy. Oh yeah, he is. Of course he is. At the beginning, in the college, one of the government agents. One of the men from the ministry from the defense ministry Department of Defense. That's poor kids. I didn't even that never clicked until this moment. That's amazing. Didn't either of you ever go to Sunday school? And that guy's face is colleagues face. It looks like he's eating a lemon when he asks. Such a superb scene. I mean, just the chalkboard, the headpiece of the staff of ra, and then he opens the book and magically, that book with 2000 pages opens on the page with a picture of the ARP, right? Just happens to open on that page and you know what, that's the great thing about those movies. I've never thought about how a magical moment that is until just now. It definitely occurs to me that that was weird. But, you know, back then, in the 80s, that was kind of how things were done. You just did things for convenience sometimes, but I'm watching this documentary how they made it. They put so much work into it. They really loved the craft of filmmaking. You know what's interesting about raiders in that documentary I watched Steven Spielberg says that George Lucas wrote Raiders of the Lost Ark based on his own actual beliefs about what happened to the ark. He wrote an adventure story around his own research about the ark believing that the ark is available to be discovered somewhere. Well, there is a theory that it is in Ethiopia. Have you followed that? Graham Hancock's book, there is a church in Ethiopia that says they have the ark and every year once a year, they bring it out and they have a parade, but it is covered in only one man is ever allowed into the sanctum. Are you familiar with? I am, yeah, yeah, I've read about this, yeah. All right.

Defense Ministry Department Of Raiders Lost Ark Steven Spielberg George Lucas Ethiopia Graham Hancock
Feast and famine for Disney at Thanksgiving box office

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last week

Feast and famine for Disney at Thanksgiving box office

"A family film expected to soar at the box office this Thanksgiving holiday weekend was more like a flop. Wow. What kind of airship is that? Turkeys don't fly well and neither did the Disney animated film strange world, failing to gain altitude among moviegoers. It took in less than $19 million in its first 5 days in North America. Despite a reported production cost of $180 million. That kept Black Panther Wakanda forever, another Disney film at the top of the box office, then strange world, the Korean War epic devotion was in third place the menu in fourth followed by Steven Spielberg's the fable man's. I'm Jackie Quinn

Disney North America Steven Spielberg Jackie Quinn
"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

03:49 min | 2 weeks ago

"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

"Well, how much are you doing kind of like cinema history and importance? And even there, that's kind of tough because there's both significant and Spielberg's career in different ways. They're both significant and cinema history in different ways. I feel like you guys did Saving Private Ryan on the rewatchables fairly recently and that was like a fan vote if I recall. One of the biggest episodes we've ever done on the show. Yeah. So that had a real mainstream ongoing mainstream moment, I think. People still love it to this day. No question. Yeah. In a way that close encounters is just older. It is older. The iconography of close encounters, the way it is such a personal movie for him, especially on this fable man's podcast. Yeah, but we have more of those and even on the we have another movie that scratches a lot of the itch of close encounters. That's fair. Still left. That's fair. So close encounters and then Saving Private Ryan. And Saving Private Ryan is 5. I'll just say if it were me personally, I would put ET at 6. Fuck off. Honestly? I think he T should be four. Fuck off again. What's wrong with you? It's

Spielberg Ryan
"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:26 min | 2 weeks ago

"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

"List. I'm just saying Richard Dreyfuss and Holly, I think it gets more shit than it deserves, but I am not there are other hills I want to die on today and it's not the always hill. So put it, put it where you want it. What's a hill you want to die on for number 29? Either tintin or bridges spies. No great. Tintin is then. You know, I was just talking with my wife about tintin because our pediatrician, the artwork in their offices, and maybe I'm giving away which pediatrician's office I go to. In our pediatrician's office, there are all manner of herge illustrations. That's a fancy pediatrician's office. I love the idea that Sean fantasy obsessive is now going to go to all the pediatricians office so that he can make sure they go. Ours is Disney only. I mean, I have nothing against Disney. But it made me think, do we need to be exposing our daughter to tintin more? And I don't know. I'm not a big fan of that film either. So how about ten ten 29, I feel like we maybe have overlooked the terminal in the bottom rung. I was waiting. And eternal defenders here? No. It's the bottom bottom section for me. Again, there's this whole chunk of time where I'm like, Steven, what are you doing? Are we sure that warhorse is worse than the terminal? I feel like war horse. Just for Amanda's dad. I came here with a point of view. And this is my point of view. Okay. We'll do tint in a 29 at 28. We're going to go with the terminal. I think this is actually now where it gets really hard. I have a lot of love and respect for most of these films. I think probably the post comes next. That would be my gut. Wow. So you guys really like the bridge of spies. Is British by is a high on your list? I think it's not like it. It's not in the bottom quartile. Okay. It's probably in the second quartile. What do you think of that? The post, sure, I'm happy to put that there. Okay. It's a little rude, but is it? To whom? The caftan that Meryl Streep wears in that film? Yeah. It's a Meryl Streep. Tom Hanks? Democracy, not dying in darkness? All true things, I respect everything about what you just said, but maybe and I like that movie. What are we talking about? Listen, I know. I'm just saying. What about dual, which I don't think wrongs at the bottom, it is very early integral to his success, but I don't think it belongs high on the list. I agree. I think 26 for dual feels like the right place. Yeah. Which is an acknowledgment of its achievement as a TV movie. You know what's tricky?

Richard Dreyfuss Disney Tintin Holly Sean Meryl Streep Steven Amanda Tom Hanks The post
"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:20 min | 2 weeks ago

"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

"I would agree with you, Sean, we're not for that audience award win at tiff, which is also such a strong bellwether. You know what I mean? So again, it's too early to know. And no one will remember the predictions we make on this podcast, but I think if it's just does decently at the box office, it's gonna win. That's what I think. I think this conversation has convinced me that it's not gonna win, because we are all fairly confident in it. And we're like, wow, what else will go? And as you both have pointed out correctly, that is just like, you know, there's four months of nuttery ahead. So because it makes so much sense, it's probably not going to win. So he's got two best director wins. I could definitely see a world in which he wins best director and not best picture in this case. Because of the admiration for him and also putting him in league with not to spoil something significant in the film, but a handful of other people that his sort of his icons is heroes that play a significant part in this story. They're not very many people that have three Academy Awards fewer directors still. He's so powerful at this point that if he wanted to use his political push, which it feels like he does want to use this year, I just don't see who stops him, you know? You make him sound like a Mussolini or something. Yeah. He's been out there as his advocate for movies in the theater, all the sort of stuff that we want, you know, we want to be talking about as lovers of cinema. He is, as you say, this a bunker figure in Hollywood and has been for so long. The trains will run on time and Spielberg will win the director Oscar. Is Michelle Williams, should she be nominated for best actress or is that category fraud? I understand that category fraud is like a crucial part of awards discourse every year, but I can't get that mad about it. Of course, she's the best actress. You want her in supporting the movie hinges around her. She's in more than half of it. It's fine by me. I feel like wives and mother roles are even disregarding screen time are often dropped in the supporting category. And the category fraud usually works the other direction, where a woman who is clearly the lead of a film drops into the supporting because it seems like an easier race to win. And so I kind of admire that Michelle's like, I'm gonna go for the tougher win here and go up against Cate Blanchett, et cetera, whoever else is in that category this year. And so no, I don't think it's why do you think it's category Fred, Sean? I mean, this is the story of Sammy fable, man. This is not the story of mitzi fable. And I think she is, of course, a perhaps the signature figure in his life certainly his young life,

Sean Academy Awards Michelle Williams Spielberg Oscar Hollywood Cate Blanchett Michelle Sammy fable mitzi fable Fred
"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:37 min | 2 weeks ago

"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

"On how commercially successful this is. I think if a lot of people see this and people are talking about it, then yes, no question. But if this says a small opening, the way that frankly west side story did, then perhaps not. But what is true, what I think is wild, honestly, is that Steven Spielberg wants that Oscar. Like he put this film into competition at tiff, it's the first time he's ever put a film into competition at any film festival ever. Won the audience award that's always a good move. For a film, right? He's out there given the AO Scott and New York Times profile, the Terry gross fresh air interview. He's there's already been so many panels in Q&A's and it's November that he has given for this film. It's weird that it's a little odd that it's a Thanksgiving open 'cause often Spielberg opens his movies in Christmas. Christmas. So I'm interested that this is Christmas is too late to win an Oscar these days. I know exactly. So again, I think it's just all very and I'm fascinated by that because I'm like, you know, you go back and watch one of my favorite YouTube clips to ever watch as Steven Spielberg reacting to not getting the best director nomination for jaws. Someone was filling him that day, et cetera. It's on YouTube. It's like three and a half minutes thereabouts and so he talks his nominee for best picture. It only gets four nominations overall and he gives this little rant about commercial backlash. She's like, this is commercial backlash. They want you to be successful, but not too successful in all this sort of stuff. And then he spent years chasing the Oscar with empire of the sun and color purple and all the stuff. And then obviously he's had his Oscars. So what is it now that he's like, I want another one, or I want it for this project. Like I'm very curious about that. What do you think? I mean, to me, it's very clear. It's like validate my entire life by giving me the Academy Award for the story of my life. Which I frankly don't blame him for. Amanda, just we haven't seen everything, but we're getting real close. We're almost there. There's only a couple of big outstanding titles. Based on everything that you've seen based on what you know about what's going on here, is this going to win best picture? Based on what I know, what I know is nothing. Like the Oscars are just absolutely out of control at this point. In September, I think I said to you point blank like, oh, it'll be fable months. Like fable minutes will just win the Oscar there will be a lot of brouhaha and a lot of bad vibes in an Oscar season as they always are. It seems. And then people will vote for the feel good movie about the importance of cinema.

Oscar AO Scott Steven Spielberg Terry gross YouTube Spielberg New York Times Oscars Academy Award Amanda
"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

03:31 min | 2 weeks ago

"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

"What did you all think about the sort of high school Ness of this movie? Well, can we talk about Chloe east, who is the actress who plays his high school paramore of sorts, Monica? Just an absolutely scene stealing movie stealing performance. Which, to me, when you said Shaun that it turns from like, I'm not sure about this section of the movie too. I totally get it. It's a 100% because of her. It's when she shows up. Yeah, she's hilarious and unlocks a different key of what Sammy character is looking for and how he sees like movies and who he's trying to be in the world and also brings a huge amount of humor. So credit to her. She was fantastic. I turned Amanda Joanna after that after the movie ended and I said, this is why I married my high school girlfriend when we were talking about the Monica character. Your high school love has a real power over you, you know? There's something there. Judd Hirsch plays a really significant role in this film. He has a scene that I think is less than 8 minutes long, but there is quite a bit of Oscar buzz in best supporting actor. He's of course been nominated in the past. We shouldn't spoil that scene, but I think we should maybe give some context to it. John, what did you think of it? First of all, before you ask, Judd hersh himself from the stage of tiff was like, I don't know why Steven Spielberg cast me in this movie and Steven said Independence Day. So you're looking for the Judd first performance that unlocks this movie. Really beautiful. Independence Day. This again, there are so many moments in this movie that shouldn't work, right? That you're like, is this too much? And then so how do all those movies roll those moments settle back down into a movie that almost feels like conventionally sentimental when you have these bigger swing moments like the Judd Hirsch sequence? I don't know. What do you think, Amanda? That's a good question. I think some of it is just the benefit of the doubt, right? And which also Spielberg has earned and can pay out, right? That you just kind of go on the ride because there were many moments in this where whether it's Michelle Williams performance or suddenly we're recreating happy days or whatever. And I'm just like, everyone's like, huh, okay, now we're doing this. And every time it works out, right? And I guess that some of that is just craft and Spielberg's ability. And some of that is just how we respond to it. I don't think, you know, obviously it's a deeply autobiographical film, so no one but Steven Spielberg could make this movie, but also no one but Steven Spielberg could get people to go on this emotional ride, which is really kind of what it is. It's like, you know, an emotional

Judd Hirsch Chloe east Amanda Joanna Monica Judd hersh Shaun Sammy Steven Spielberg Oscar Judd Spielberg Steven John Michelle Williams Amanda
"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:30 min | 2 weeks ago

"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

"Amanda broadly. I think what's interesting when you look at the larger Spielberg filmography is that the era where he made the movies that I like the most that are at the top of my personal ranking are the eras is that error of a stranger from his father when I think there was this anger and also this questioning this wondering. And so he was after something and Amanda's pointed out there's all these movies like ET like close encounters that are about the absent dad that are about him trying to figure out something that is hurting him. And we talk a lot about artists and how is pain necessary for great art and then the question is when you become when you're on top of the world for as long as you can Spielberg has been on top of the world. Are you still capable of great art or are you too comfortable to create great art? And I would say this film at the end of his long career, it's not over, obviously, but at this point at the end of his long career, is a rebuke of that question, because I do think that there is great art in this film, but I think there is a moment as even Spielberg's life when he reconciles with his father when he starts having, he has like 7 kids when he starts having those kids when he exits his Peter Pan era that the accusation that was thrown on him early in his career that he was Arrested Development that child would wonder we loved watching the world through his childlike wonderment eyes and then there's a time when he became a dad became involved in his family and his marriage and I do think maybe his work wasn't quite as good when that happened that I'm not saying that's ideal, but I think for an artist like Steven Spielberg, some of that lack that absence of the warmth of family was driving some of his highest highs in his artistic career. Yeah, that's like me after I won too many movie drafts. I just got complacent. I was sitting on top of the mountain. And I thought, how can I mix it up? How can I make things interesting? I need to go to a different phase. But I'm back on top.

Spielberg Amanda Peter Pan Steven Spielberg
"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:49 min | 2 weeks ago

"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

"And comment on the Spielberg project, which is still my favorite type of movie, you know? As we know, I love to go to the movies to escape and have a good time and that ultimately things will mostly be okay. There are obviously exceptions to that, but that Spielberg magic, he connects the therapy that's to it. It's pretty amazing. What is so interesting to me is like in these and all these interviews that Spielberg is giving. He tends to shy away from that word therapy or therapeutic, and he keeps saying cathartic and sad. He's like, oh, it's on therapy. It was cathartic. And I almost wonder if he's been advised to say that on the award circuit so that it doesn't sound like a self indulgent project, but it is, it's therapy, right? And then it becomes therapy for all of us. I'm not in the talent divorce club, but I'm in the child of maybe my parents should have been divorced. And so that's an ancillary group, but you were born between 1960 and 2010. Thank you. I think the other thing that's kind of fascinating about it is janusz kaminski shot this movie at these shot many Spielberg movies and he's well known for this kind of hazy cloudy kind of golden light photography that Spielberg has used over and over again over the years. And honestly, that doesn't always work for me in his movies, but this is the first pure memory movie that Spielberg has made in a while. And so it almost feels like the rendition of what's happening inside of someone's mind as they reflect back on a moment in time. And so, you know, everyone's a little bit more beautiful. Everyone's got the right line at the right time. You know, there is clearly some invention going on here. It wouldn't be a movie if it didn't have that. But the way that the movie looks feels really in concert, I think, with the way that it's supposed to feel. And that's not always easy to pull off, especially because the movie in addition to looking like a memory is also just massively indebted and kind of citing clearly its influence to movie history. There are a couple of significant influences I mentioned the greatest show on earth, which ironically is widely considered one of, if not the worst best picture winner of all time. It's a Cecil B to mill movie about the circus. I like that movie. It's got a great Jimmy Stewart performance in it. I'm a fan of it. I agree with you about Jimmy Stewart, who plays a disgraced clown who never takes off his makeup. But I can't say I recommend the film, I just revisit it last night, but I really don't like it. But it's so great that someone like Spielberg, who is just such a sincere and kind of wins some figure when talking about the history of the movies,

Spielberg janusz kaminski Cecil B Jimmy Stewart
"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:10 min | 2 weeks ago

"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

"But this movie helped me founding member of the child of divorce club like understand why Steven Spielberg keeps making movies about divorce, you know? It helped me understand the rest of the ura and understand his emotional relationship to movies, which in a lot of ways mirrors mine or is underpins what he is trying to do in movies for everybody else, which I think is like a pretty fascinating and even profound project and one that I really respond to. So also I was just delightful time. Sean and I got to sit next to each other. He talked to me afterwards. It was lovely. Great time at the movies. Wow. Love to have conversations with my colleagues and friends. This is an interesting story because I think it does do what you just described Amanda. It kind of literalizes the two halves of the Spielberg storytelling brain, the fact that he is simultaneously such a powerful and sincere artistic figure, storyteller, and also that he is the kind of chief engineer of movie magic. In the last 30 or 40 years, and you know, it feels almost absurd to think about the binary that the film creates between mother and father and the way that he pulls, you know, quite deftly, 50 50 from their experience, or at least how he is remembering them and trying to recreate what they represented to him from his perspective as a child. Paul Dano plays his father in this film in Michelle Williams place his mother, that being said, you know, as a new parent, one of the most frequent conversations that I have with my wife is, oh, that's just like what you do, or that's just like what I do whenever my daughter does something very specific. And I think it's reasonable to tell a story this way to say like, I am better understanding myself. And I certainly feel like there's a therapist aspect to this too. He spent a lot of time thinking about what roles his parents, psychology played on the kind of man that he became. But I loved it. I loved the fact that it was willing to be so kind of bare naked about the way that he developed as a man and as a thinker. And as an artist because you can feel him pulling specifically from a sort of balletic and neurotic strains of his mother and the very kind of controlled and focused and pragmatic aspects of his father, what did you think of that Joanna the way that he rendered his parental figures in this movie? Yeah, I think that internal artist versus tech wizardry instinct and Spielberg is so interesting. I was rewatching the 2017 Spielberg Doc that's on HBO. I had seen it before, but I wanted to sort of refresh my memory of the Spielberg myth and he was talking about jaws.

Steven Spielberg Spielberg Paul Dano Sean Amanda Michelle Williams Joanna Spielberg Doc HBO
"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

01:36 min | 2 weeks ago

"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

"The time has come to get ready for the 2022 World Cup and what better way to prepare than by revisiting the World Cup's most amazing goals. I'm Brian Phillips. I'm making a podcast about the history of the men's World Cup told through the stories of 22 iconic goals. The show's called 22 goals. It's out now on the ringer podcast network and we're having so much fun. From hits like NCIS and ghosts to halo in the Star Trek franchise. Survivor and the challenge to paw patrol and SpongeBob SquarePants. Paramount makes some of the world's most

"spielberg" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

04:37 min | 2 weeks ago

"spielberg" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Has poured into the fable man's stands apart. If the movie version of his mother, Michelle Williams, is the movie's flickering light, his father, as brought to life with suitable mid century gravity by Paul diano, is kind of an anchor. One, that Spielberg couldn't fully appreciate as a teenager. He knows better now. Spielberg is essentially an autodidact, though he took film classes in college, he didn't go to film school, and though his father, a hardworking electrical engineer, who was instrumental in the early days of computer development, warned him against pursuing filmmaking for a living, he's also the one who put the camera in his son's hand. In adulthood, Spielberg and his father fell out for a time, though the rift didn't last. Thanks largely, he says, to the urging of his wife, Kate Capshaw. Arnold Spielberg died in 2020 at 103. One of the catalysts of their reconciliation, a cachet of love letters, Spielberg found that Arnold had written to Leah when he was stationed overseas in World War II before they were married, which father and son went through together. The fable man's deals with the later more contentious years of this love story between Leah and Arnold. Their movie counterparts are named mitzi and Bert and Seth Rogen is Benny loey, the movie version of Bernie Adler. Spielberg describes his mother as an extrovert. A born entertainer she was an accomplished classical pianist. She loved to dance. My mom always referred to herself as Peter Pan, the little girl who never wanted to grow up. His voice virtually fills the air with light as he speaks of her. She loved being in our lives as her friend. More than our mom. She befriended us more than parented us. In one of the most gorgeous and haunting scenes in the fable man's, set during a family camping trip with uncle Benny in tow, Williams as mitzi, whirls and twirls in a Gauzy Mexican dress, exactly the sort of thing, a cool bohemian mom of her era would wear. As she dances, she's backlit by the headlights of the family's parked station wagon. Her daughters, like little generals urge her to stop. Everyone can see through her dress, but the men, including Sammy, the movie's version of awkward boy genius Stephen, played by Gabriel Labelle, watched enchanted. Sammy captures it all with his 8 millimeter camera.

Spielberg Paul diano Kate Capshaw Arnold Spielberg Michelle Williams Leah Benny loey Arnold Bernie Adler mitzi Seth Rogen Bert Peter Pan Benny Williams Sammy Gabriel Labelle Stephen
 Man who inspired Spielberg's 'The Terminal' dies at Paris airport

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 weeks ago

Man who inspired Spielberg's 'The Terminal' dies at Paris airport

"An Iranian man who lived for 18 years in Paris's Charles De Gaulle airport has died in the airport that he long called home Died after a heart attack in the airport's terminal two F the Iranian man saga idly inspired the Steven Spielberg film the terminal starring Tom Hanks Naseri lived in the airport's terminal one from 1988 until 2006 first in legal limbo because he liked residency papers and later by apparent choice For years necessary slept on a red plastic bench making friends with airport workers and showering and staff facilities Many said the years of living in the windowless space took a toll on his mental states in

Charles De Gaulle Airport Tom Hanks Naseri Steven Spielberg Heart Attack Paris
On this week's AP Religion Roundup, in the midst of an uptick in threats against Jewish school and houses of worship, Hollywood takes a constructive look at antisemitism in American life.

AP News Radio

02:01 min | 3 weeks ago

On this week's AP Religion Roundup, in the midst of an uptick in threats against Jewish school and houses of worship, Hollywood takes a constructive look at antisemitism in American life.

"On this week's AP religion roundup In the midst of an uptick in threats against Jewish schools and houses of worship Hollywood takes a constructive look at anti semitism in America Last week the FBI issued a statewide alert in New Jersey That spurred heightened security at Jewish synagogues and schools Public warnings about threats against Jewish institutions aren't unusual Now TV and film studios are turning their focus toward the uptick in anti semitism We were gonna make Steven Spielberg's semi autobiographical film the fable men's focuses on the director's family and the roots of his film career Fables actor Seth Rogen says he relates closely to the movie segments on anti semitism I'm very aware that the only reason my family is in this country is 'cause people hate Jewish people and we're trying to murder us He says it's shaped his own life and career Honestly I think it is very meaningful that of all the things Stephen could put in his film and focus on his life that he chose to include the story of kind of overcoming antisemitism On the small screen viewers of the calling on the peacock service quickly learned the new show isn't a typical police procedural This job it would be easy to lose faith in humanity Detective Abraham is a scholar of human behavior from his study of philosophy and his orthodox Jewish faith This is not a detective that I've ever ever seen on TV And I also didn't think that will come on TV Actor Jeff wilber spoke to AP about his role as a Torah cloning detective In a Jewish detective was biggest strengths is believing in humanity and this is what leads him to solve the most inhumane crimes Matthew tinker the show's executive producer says he hopes the show will help dispel hate and misunderstanding It's beginning a conversation which at the end of the day is what leads to any acceptance in this world I'm Walter ratliff

Steven Spielberg Seth Rogen FBI Detective Abraham Hollywood New Jersey America Jeff Wilber Stephen Matthew Tinker AP Walter Ratliff
What Director John Woo Got Wrong in 'Windtalkers'

Key Battles of American History

01:49 min | 7 months ago

What Director John Woo Got Wrong in 'Windtalkers'

"Where there's negatives is these combat scenes are filmed like action sequences in action movies. And I personally don't like that. Because I feel like it cheapens the combat. I prefer a cinema verite style. So if you watch, if you watch Saving Private Ryan, if you watch full metal jacket, if you watch Black Hawk down a little bit, but really the first two films, if you watched 1917, where it's a very flat documentary type style of filmmaking where you're and although chance Malik was stylized in what he did, he doesn't use slow motions. He doesn't use tracking sequences in these elaborate elaborate, the guys are jumping around and flying through the air. It's a very realistic form, even though it's a very stylized film in thin red line. But Saving Private Ryan is one of the better films Spielberg doesn't use those slow motion sequences except when you're showing disorientation and things like that. He doesn't use the her sweeping heroic music and the leaping and the jumping. The band and brothers series on the HBO and the Pacific as well, which is the companion series. There's a very good job of capturing combat from a realistic perspective. And I think that is more appropriate for a war film. I think that John whoo is a great action director, but he films these sequences as action sequences. And we'll talk some more about what he intended from the film and what we got. From the studio later, but I think that's the real problem with this. One of the real problems. There's a couple, but that's one of the real problems is this very cliched. It's very action cliche film techniques and it doesn't help the

Ryan Malik Spielberg John Whoo HBO
Do Yourself a Favor and Watch 'Fandango'

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:31 min | 10 months ago

Do Yourself a Favor and Watch 'Fandango'

"Earlier yesterday I was thinking about movies that I love that aren't mentioned a lot. I made sure to count the film that a young Kevin Costner started and it's a movie named Fandango. This is one of those crazy things in my life. I think a Fandango the next guy got next day Gary brooker dies. And then I got a story about me and Debbie and Ivan the bushes. But Fandango is a movie 1985, kind of a comedy, it was originally a student film made by a guy named Kevin Reynolds. It was a parody of Greek life that is Alma mater of Baylor university, but because his father was the president in Baylor, he didn't want to portray the institution in an unfavorable light and he made believe it was about the University of Texas and the film is now a cult classic. If you haven't seen Fandango, try to find it, Steven Spielberg saw the film and he helped fund a feature length comedy about 5 college students from Texas in 1971 who go on a last road trip together. That's what Fandango's about. And celebrate the privilege of youth. And if I didn't just describe what I had in the bushes with Debbie and Yvonne, if that's not the privilege of views, I don't know what is. And these guys go off and face graduation, marriage, the draft of the Vietnam War. It's very poignant. So do yourself a favor. Find that film, it's really sweet and beautiful. And I mean, what film strong a young Kevin Costner isn't. But it is a real magical film. It's a real sleeper.

Gary Brooker Kevin Reynolds Alma Mater Of Baylor Universit Kevin Costner Debbie Fandango Ivan Baylor University Of Texas Steven Spielberg Yvonne Texas Vietnam
"spielberg" Discussed on Spider-Dan & The Secret Bores

Spider-Dan & The Secret Bores

03:25 min | 11 months ago

"spielberg" Discussed on Spider-Dan & The Secret Bores

"Which it infers that she because she's more overweight, or a larger lady, I don't want to offend any ladies out there that, you know, the larger frame. I've got a larger frame as well. So she's not your Hollywood starlet. No, exactly. And the other one is very much is like the joint in the USO show and stuff. And she's not your average Hollywood star, like you've said. But I think there's a gag there that's supposed to be some comedy there, but because she can fight too because she's brawny. Yeah, of course she knocks guys out. And she can throw him around, you know, so there's like, oh, he's not that masculine, but she is sort of, there's a gag there, and definitely is, yeah. To see the gags, but they're not the execution of them. Is it Billy? Is that the character that the daughter character? Yeah, I think Ned beat his daughter's character. Yeah, like again, she very much fits a kind of hitchcockian Spielberg mold, doesn't she? She's very kind of Willy from temple of doom. Yeah. Watching that documentary that you sent me. There was a lot of Spielberg with a camcorder talking to her and spending time around her I noticed. Oh, really? An object of his affection, I think, yeah. Well, you know, they're very similar blond, temple of doom, you know, similar character. He was like, absolutely. I love annoying women that scream they're the best. They're my favorite. That is my kink. I love characters. Annoying blond women from the 30s 40s that scream a lot. They're my favorite. But yeah, I'm stepping up. That is definitely true. We've solved that today, Tarantino feet. Annoying. Bombshells thing. So yeah, and we talked about Hitchcock and his lady as well in our last box. We did. It's all coming together. These bloody directors and their kinks. There's a character I've got to ask you about. Sure. When we're at the brigade to the oceanfront and they see you guys get put up on the Ferris wheel, which I know they want it to be, the honeymooner guys, was it Art Carney and other person school. Yeah, because our client was in the Star Wars holiday special, as you know. And what was his name? Forget it, right? But by this point they weren't talking with us. So we have the kind of the grumpy old man. And then we have the younger guy who put together and they're like on watch out there in a Ferris wheel over the seafront and it turns out the younger guys are ventriloquists. I don't want to talk to people and I think is the actor. You've heard you've heard that voice before avenue. If you've heard that voice from every annoying nerd you've ever heard in a film. And it usually is voiced by him, I think. I think he might have been on Dexter's lab as well. I think he played the villain in Dexter's lab. I think it's mandrake or something moon dark or whatever his name was. But he's also got the mayor from jaws up there, haven't you? Oh, is that who is that over there? Yeah, it's a Maurice that out. Yeah, that's him. He's got big glasses on and a hat, but that is him. Funnily enough. On the documentary we watch. They were like, well, we want Eddie D's and then the film, they're like, we need eddies and in the film for some reason. And Murray Hamilton went up to Spielberg and he went, you know what? I'm not going to have any problem with the playing this part..

Hollywood Art Carney Spielberg Ned Willy Billy Tarantino Hitchcock Dexter Eddie D Maurice Murray Hamilton
"spielberg" Discussed on Spider-Dan & The Secret Bores

Spider-Dan & The Secret Bores

04:20 min | 11 months ago

"spielberg" Discussed on Spider-Dan & The Secret Bores

"Simpkins is another thing to put out of this, I think, as well. Which tells you what he was going for, doesn't it? Because obviously the Doctor Strange love connection. Another comedy war movie. I'm not the biggest fan of that if I'm honest. I think I understand its merits, but again, I don't necessarily find it particularly funny. I find it. And it's got something to say. But I'm not sitting there riding with laughter, which I'm sure some people are. And I think we know Spielberg looks up to Kubrick. He talks about him as being the kind of Pinnacle filmmaker for him and we know he then obviously went on to make AI because Kubrick couldn't. Minority support as well. That was his. I agreed to his west films, which is interesting that Spielberg is and then of course The Shining sequence in ready player one as well..

Simpkins Kubrick Spielberg AI
"spielberg" Discussed on Spider-Dan & The Secret Bores

Spider-Dan & The Secret Bores

05:51 min | 11 months ago

"spielberg" Discussed on Spider-Dan & The Secret Bores

"To the very first wrong direction where we look at a popular director's less successful work and try to determine what led them down that road. And we are going to start with a big one with a big name director, the biggest name director. It's a household name. And we're going to talk about not a household name film. We're going to talk about 1941, Spielberg's First World War II comedy epic. And we're going to decide whether his creative shift from his previous films was was it worth it? Was it not worth it? Did it feel good about it? Did it feel bad about it? How were the reviews? We'll find out, but I'm going to introduce the film guy as Tony likes to call him. We're going to introduce Jack is back. And as we know, loose lips sink ships. And I'm going to hand over to Jack. And we're just going to talk about Spielberg before we get into the film about this techniques, his style, the kind of films he's done, what he likes to look at in his films, what he gets right, what he gets, maybe he gets a little bit wrong, who knows. But Jack, take us to school. I mean, thanks for inviting me on again. It's great to see you. And this is a great way to start because as you said, you probably don't a lot of people are still thinking about don't know the name of directors. I think just Joe on the street, Jane on the street, namely ten directors. They might not be able to. But everybody knows Spielberg. So this is definitely the right place to start, I think, for this feature. This was definitely the wrong direction. We have to go in. When you look at that run that he's got going. I mean, we can take the sugarland express, which is his first official film, if you don't count duel. Then we take jaws and close encounters, and then we'll skip 1941 when we get to raiders. So without 1941, that is it. I mean, water run that is jaws Clayton counters and raiders. I mean, I'm not sure though to ever be another run of that could ever compete with that, really. But there's 1941. Which, for the film guy, as Tony likes to call me, I've never seen it until this. And part of me wishes I never had. Scathing review already already. I certainly don't feel like it's brought anything to my life that I was missing. Let's put it that way. It's not the diamond in the rough for you. Because this is quite a divisive film. There's a lot of people on either side of the wall. On my Facebook, I had two people that went, oh, I loved this when I was a kid. And I was like, and I was like, have you seen it now? And also I'm watching a two and a half hour version, the director's cook. And they both it was like they both did like the shocked emoji. And I was like, yeah, it is that long. And it's a comedy. And it feels twice as long, probably. Yeah. I mean, again, we're getting way out of ourselves. Let's write it in. We'll get to it. We'll get to it. But let's talk about Spielberg. What a season one for cinema, what's his legacy?.

Spielberg Jack Tony jaws Clayton raiders Jane Joe Facebook
Golden Globes winners announced at closed-door event

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 11 months ago

Golden Globes winners announced at closed-door event

"The the golden golden globe globe awards awards Hollywood Hollywood so so called called biggest biggest party party that that regularly regularly drew drew eighteen eighteen million million TV TV viewers viewers was was reduced reduced to to a a live live blog blog Sunday Sunday night night Steven Steven Spielberg's Spielberg's West West Side Side Story Story won won several several big big awards awards okay okay Best Best Picture Picture comedy comedy or or musical musical Best Best Actress Actress best best supporting supporting actress actress Netflix Netflix is is the the power power of of the the dog dog won won Best Best Picture Picture drama drama Best Best direction direction and and supporting supporting performance performance other other film film winners winners included included Will Will Smith Smith breaking breaking Richard Richard Nicole Nicole Kidman Kidman for for being being the the Ricardos Ricardos and and Andrew Andrew Garfield Garfield for for tick tick tick tick boom boom I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker the the golden golden globe globe awards awards Hollywood Hollywood so so called called biggest biggest party party that that regularly regularly drew drew eighteen eighteen million million TV TV viewers viewers was was reduced reduced to to a a live live blog blog Sunday Sunday night night Steven Steven Spielberg's Spielberg's West West Side Side Story Story won won several several big big awards awards okay okay

Golden Golden Globe Globe Awar Biggest Biggest Party Party Drew Drew Steven Steven Spielberg Hollywood Sunday Sunday Night Night Best Best Picture Picture Come Best Best Actress Actress Best Best Picture Picture Dram Netflix Smith Smith Nicole Nicole Kidman Kidman Ricardos Ricardos Andrew Andrew Garfield Garfiel Julie Julie Walker Walker Richard Richard Sunday Sunday Night
Spielberg's 'West Side Story' Embroiled in Controversy for Excluding English Subtitles

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

02:21 min | 1 year ago

Spielberg's 'West Side Story' Embroiled in Controversy for Excluding English Subtitles

"Called west side story. This is supposed to be the Spielberg epic. This was supposed to be his greatest film of all time. And it's turning out to be a dud. Have you heard about this? It's a crazy story. So a west side story, and if you know anything about Broadway, it's a wonderful Broadway show. The music absolutely phenomenal. Some of the most memorable songs in Broadway came from west side story. Many of which we can not share with you on the radio. But what was the one Puerto Rico? Your lovely island. I can't. Lyrics a little inappropriate. So anyway, there's some controversy surrounding west side story. Rachel ziegler is the lead. She plays Maria. And it turns out that there are no subtitles in the movie, and this is a big deal because most of the movie is in Spanish. So if you don't know Spanish, you're not going to have a clue what's going on. Much like grace baker when I went to go see Hamilton on Broadway and left at halftime. I love Hamilton, so. I didn't understand a word they were rapping. And it turns out the only white guy in the show was what king George the bad guy. So I didn't understand it. I love Hamilton, but that's a discussion for another day. I'm just sitting there, and I'm like, I paid good money for this? It is an expensive show. They should at least have subtitles or like the lyrics written out so you can understand. So you can understand what's going on. So now that now grace, they're saying, well, it's west side story, miss Ziggler, who is the lead actors there. She says the reason they eliminated subtitles is because they wanted to do it as an act of respect. For so what? For Spanish? Well, so just think about this. They're thinking, okay, well, most people in America are not Spanish speaking. No. So therefore it is disrespectful for them to put those subtitles up there. Okay. They say it's disrespectful for Spanish

Rachel Ziegler Hamilton Grace Baker Puerto Rico Maria King George Miss Ziggler America
"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

"It's a little film called ET. You guys ever heard of it? Joanna, you don't need to share your deepest personal history with the listeners, but this is a children of divorce podcast. And so obviously, you know, we're just really taking that subject head on here. I mean, I'm kind of like, I don't know why Steven Spielberg needs to make an autograph autobiographical film because he already made ET, you know? And then basically there's just like the weird intense very scary 30 minute medical military state drama in the middle of it, which I rewatched this movie last night, cried many times. I really love ET so much. And but it is so strange how scary this movie is, which, again, putting kids in peril, yes, Joanna. He loves to do that. And also, the 80s were just a different time, I guess, in terms of what we decided kids were ready for, including being in a medical tent with your alien friend who's just dying. And every single law enforcement officer coming to get you. But, you know, they save the day. In terms of iconic imagery, I guess you can't I mean, there's so many Spielberg movies, but just the bike and the moon and the kids flying and when the John Williams comes in. If you had to distill Spielberg down to 30 seconds, I like maybe this is what you pick, maybe not. There's some other movies. That's what's so hard about Spielberg and I felt it was a little obvious putting ET on my list, but at some point that is also like this Spielberg experience. Has made single handedly constructed. Mainstream American blockbuster movies himself. So this is a beautiful and pretty screwed up movie about about finding finding yourself and finding your finding your Friends, even if your dad isn't there, which he's not. I think your listeners would throw their phones in the ocean if none of us had each other. So thank you for saving us from that. Completely. And my friend mat patches did a great essay years ago about this concept of Spielberg face and Henry Thomas as Elliot is the number one Spielberg face when I think about that sort of stuff. Yeah, an incredible film. It deserves exactly what you're talking about. I love ET. I'm not going to be like ET is lesser or greater than previously. When he wakes up, oh my God. It's so beautiful. And baby drew. Yeah. Okay, number two, I'm having a battle with myself. I'm having a battle with old me and knew me. Old me is close encounters of the third kind. Okay. I'm Richard Dreyfuss. I want to see what's out there. I want to explore. I want to think of a world beyond my own. I'm obsessive. I'm compulsive. I'm hypnotized by building mashed potato structures out of your Blu-ray collection. Yeah. New me. Yeah. AI artificial intelligence. Oh, brother. Dad time. It's dad time. It's dad time. No brother. AI artificial intelligence. One of the most incredible films ever made. I rewatched this film. I was blown away all over again..

Spielberg Joanna Steven Spielberg John Williams Henry Thomas Elliot Richard Dreyfuss
"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

"And it moves and it has, it hits all the beats that I want from a caper movie, you know, with just great skill. The production and the 50s, 60s vibe, really anticipates a lot of what we all geeked out over geeked out on mad men. I'm losing my prepositions, but what made us all really be psyched about mad men. And just like peppered with great performances, Amy Adams shows up for like 20 minutes and braces along with Martin Sheen and a great Christopher Walken performance as the dad who can't quite deliver what he's supposed to, one of the great Spielberg not great dads. The universal dad. The universal dad, yeah, but just like a really well sharply done enjoyable movie. And this is post, should I talk about yesterday? Yeah, please. This is post Spielberg's reconciliation with his father, which he had, I think, of the late 90s, so honest trajectory of father son relationship through my art. This is a really interesting one. It's really interesting to think about I mean, I think this is, I think this is maybe Leonardo DiCaprio's best performance he gets to play all the notes that available to him. Got news for you. You've just set me up perfectly here. Next week we're doing Leo Hall of Fame. So we'll be deciding where this sits in the where this comparison don't look up. All right. And then I actually think it's one of the greatest walk in performances to walk and gets to be really funny and then really vulnerable. Emotionally, an incredible Hank's performance. This is my third most rewatched Spielberg, which is why it's number three on my list. I rewatch it all the time. I love this movie. It's like a Christmas movie for me. I think it's a really, really incredible. And I think to speak to like Spielberg putting his whole self into something, there is a bit of the con artist about Spielberg, and I don't mean that negatively..

Spielberg Amy Adams Martin Sheen Christopher Walken Leo Hall Leonardo DiCaprio Hank
"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

"But I do think they manage a very nice balance of making nods to it, bringing enough in, that if you know, you know, and you're like, oh, okay, there it is. While I agree also thematically that it would have stood out. There it kind of wouldn't match the updates that Joanna mentioned in terms of just kind of being a more brutal energy. Let's talk about why this exists because we've noted that Spielberg of course is a huge fan and the original is this acclaimed legendary film, but the original is not without flaw. Probably primary among the flaws is the casting of Natalie Wood as Maria who of course is not Latina in any way, shape or form and also does not sing the songs in the film. So I'm a huge fan of Natalie Wood, but it is a glaring awkwardness, even when you watch the film today that she just kind of doesn't fit in the rest of the production in a way. I think there's also I think maybe Joanna or maybe you Amanda noted like Richard bemer is Tony is also pretty bland in the film and it's odd to have a film in which the two leads are so miscast and kind of wrong and it's still be this kind of iconic piece of work. I couldn't really think of a comparison point here for something where it's like, what's at the center doesn't work and everything around it. You know, specifically Rita Moreno and George Harris, but everything around it is kind of operating at the ten out of ten level. It's so unusual. Well, we should say that George sheriff is also Greek, not, you know. And I think I don't want to be smarter, but I'm pretty sure even reader Moreno was wearing like bronzer. Makeup. Yeah. And so yeah, there's a lot of stuff in there that's awkward. I feel bad for not only wood because she was told that she was going to be able to sing, and she trained and they let her sing all the while knowing that they were going to dub her with Marty Nixon who dubbed Audrey Hepburn. But other people famously. But yes, there's things about Natalie Wood that I think really nails the ending, but she's doing a thick accent that you're just sort of like, feels tough to watch, you know? In her defense, the Maria character. I think throughout doesn't have that much going for her besides the songs and you're like investment in this Romeo and Juliet love story. And this show really does depend upon you understanding that it's Romeo and Juliet and these kids just really need to love each other instantly. And that's like a thing that happens. If you can't buy into that, there is this kind of hole at the center of the show. She does a little comfortable. She just doesn't. Like Natalie Natalie Wood's a wonderful actress and many other ways. This is not the one. Well, and the same with Tony, I would say these are kind of bland characters. And I think they did a lot in this updated book to flesh out Maria. I think really successfully Tony may be less so. And to your point, Sean, the casting in this film is a lot closer to the mark here..

Natalie Wood Joanna Richard bemer George sheriff Maria Spielberg Rita Moreno George Harris Marty Nixon Tony Amanda Moreno Romeo Audrey Hepburn Natalie Natalie Wood Juliet Sean
"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"spielberg" Discussed on The Big Picture

"I'm Shawn fantasy. I'm Amanda Robbins. And this is the big picture, a conversation show about Steven Spielberg, perhaps you've heard of him. This week marks the release of west side story Spielberg's first musical, a remake and modest reimagining of the show that was originally conceived by Jerome Robbins with music by Leonard Bernstein and lyrics by the late great Stephen Sondheim, the original 1961 film, is legendary in Hollywood history at one best picture at the Academy Awards, along with 9 more Oscars and it remains one of the most gorgeously photographed and choreographed movies ever made. So I think Amanda, and I both had our doubts about the necessity of this remake and how foolish we were. Joining us to talk about ws S two and the work of Spielberg is a ringer senior staff writer, ringer versus co host, my partner in succession podcasting, a Spielberg fan as well. Joanna Robinson hello. Hello. I'm a silver fan, but I'm even more a musicals fan. So I'm so excited to be here for this. So excited to meet Amanda. Likewise, and join you all here. So thanks for having me. Joanna, before we get started, just because I want to share this great shame. Were you at all nervous about west side story, the remake? Oh, hugely. I was like, okay. Don't want it. Sean. Okay. I was again, I was against it. Would you say we were profoundly wrong, deeply wrong? Foolishly wrong? How wrong were we to have doubted Spielberg Tony Kushner and the aligned forces of this remake? I think I'll say I love the movie. So that's true. But I think there are some people who still have their doubts and I think that's worth addressing. But I love this movie. I was very surprised very surprised. Amanda, what do you make of it? Yeah. I mean, I put it on my top 5 movies of the year on our podcast started to spoil that for you guys. That was a great podcast..

Shawn fantasy Amanda Robbins Spielberg ringer versus Jerome Robbins Joanna Robinson Steven Spielberg Leonard Bernstein Amanda Stephen Sondheim Academy Awards Oscars Hollywood Spielberg Tony Kushner Joanna Sean
The Poltergeist Curse

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:29 min | 1 year ago

The Poltergeist Curse

"Movies. Obviously in poltergeist, we know, directed by tobe hooper produced by Spielberg and instant hit, consider a masterpiece of American horror film, right? And it's about the freeling family. That middle class family, but the nice dashing Craig T. Nelson as the dad. And the life gets turned into shit when a bunch of paranormal and vicious events occur in their California home. Remember the beginning of seeing that area they lived in that beautiful new development. Didn't look so sweet and peaceful, oh boy. Obviously they find out that the daughter Carol Ann is abducted through a bedroom closet by a group of ghosts who are under the control of the monster demon called the beast. And then they learn that their house sits atop a Native American burial ground, so they spend their time trying to retrieve Carol Ann while they try to stay sane. They get smacked around and terrorized, and it's one of those movies you never forget watching. With that success came very creepy, mystique that the film is shrouded in real life tragedies. And some people call it a curse. Forecast members died during and soon after the film filming of this movie. How these movies. But the majority of the fuel for the alleged curse, it comes from the deaths of a bunch of cast members. Four people died during and soon after the filming. Two of them were tragic where highly unexpected and very puzzling. So a lot of fans began to think, um, this trilogy has some eerie

Tobe Hooper Carol Ann Craig T. Nelson Spielberg California
The Magic of Screenwriter and Director John Milius

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:51 min | 1 year ago

The Magic of Screenwriter and Director John Milius

"You think of the top ten most memorable lines in movies. He's written like five of them. It's crazy so i don't know how way with But it's not just the lines. It's not just thing because the reason the lines are memorable is because the moments or memorable which is because the characters are memorable rights and that's the difference between a lot a lot of other directors and writers would do great things but they don't get that that that it's it's hard to put your finger on exactly what it is. It's almost like this. You really know the character right. But you're selling him short and it's easy for you to do because you're so close to the fire and what comes to me is look. They're great directors. Okay spielberg i get it There are great scriptwriters. Mike yovich and others. But there's nobody who's a great script writer. Incredible great director incredible and producer. And then the guy who's like the l. surgeon for everybody else when they that film is tanking his garbage in the rushes are coming in and nobody wants to see it released and he comes in and he gets the paddles and he fixes it with a little. Bit of a rewrite. That robert shaw delivers and makes the movie. So it's at it's poverty for you to analyze. But how does he have that that that circumference of talent. I mean i think if i obviously can't say from his perspective but from knowing his career path i think it was Forged out of the fact that he was forced to do anything. They didn't want him to direct for the first half of his career. And that's very common get pigeonholed as a writer director in hollywood and he was getting these incredible fees the rate that he was getting to write scripts at his you when he was right on radioed fee was at the beginning right and that was for Judge roy being weirdly was like an broker record for a screenwriter so he was like the top earning screenwriter in hollywood at that point and for him to be like no. I want a direct. And i'm not going to release. I'm not going to give you my next script unless i get to direct it. Which was well. I think he got the record breaking rate because they he wanted to direct that and he kept bargaining back and forth and they were just like no rather than direct which is weird. Because that's the thing is unless you come out of film school directing no one trusts you to direct you. It's very hard to transition into directing producing or writing or anything yourself it can take decades and arm twisting and you won't get any money and that's what happened is he didn't take a fee but for he he wrote a script everyone was gonna want. Which was dillinger. And then he. And then he insisted on directing it himself and that's how he finally was able to start

Mike Yovich Robert Shaw Spielberg Hollywood Judge Roy Dillinger
Richard Donner, Director of Superman and Goonies, Dies Aged 91

BBC Newsday

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Richard Donner, Director of Superman and Goonies, Dies Aged 91

"The American film director Richard Donner, whose box office hits included Superman and the Woman has died. He was 91. The Warner Brothers studio described him as a pioneer of the modern superhero horror and action genres. The BBC's Adam Porter looks back at his life. Richard Donna began his career as an actor before becoming a TV director. After directing the Omen in 1976. He found international acclaim for his work on Superman. With Christopher Reeve, often regarded as the first modern superhero film. His hits in the 19 eighties included the Goonies and the Lethal Weapon series starring Mel Gibson and Danny Glover. Gibson said. Richard Donner had a huge chunk of humility, referring to himself as merely a traffic cop, while Steven Spielberg said Donna was like a favorite coach, smartest professor and

Richard Donner Adam Porter Richard Donna Warner Brothers Christopher Reeve BBC Danny Glover Mel Gibson Gibson Steven Spielberg Donna
Spielberg's Amblin to Make Several Films a Year for Netflix

Radio From Hell

01:16 min | 1 year ago

Spielberg's Amblin to Make Several Films a Year for Netflix

The Little Things Movie Review

Little Gold Men

01:45 min | 2 years ago

The Little Things Movie Review

"Okay one less title. That's out this week. This went on in theaters and on. Hbo max i believe It's the little things which is a detective thriller. It is both set in the early nineties and feels a little bit like a time. Capsule from early nineties It starts in washington with rami. Malik and jared leto. Three best actor oscar winners. That's kind of a rare sight There it. I enjoyed the throwback quality of it while also thinking it was yet another of the stone cold boomers. We're talking about this week Richard i think you might have enjoyed it. Listen i did even. I didn't like it at all. I really wanted it to be something specific that of that was written in the early nineties. Steven spielberg directed. Imagine so strange are and then. I think clint eastwood was looking at it and deigned veto and finally john lee hancock wrote it decided to make himself twenty seven years later. I wanted it to be kind of one of those nineties. Post silence of the lambs. Serial killer studio thrillers. You know a little grimy kind of silly but like engaging good detective work kind of stuff and it has those trappings but at the center is kind of a weird void at the center. I think it's kind of trying to be about something bigger and fails at that. And so everything else kind of doesn't get its proper do denzel washington's always good rummy. Malik is fine. Jared leto. People people's tolerance level of him certainly varies. And he's really doing a thing you know and i found it engaging for like the first scene and then i was like okay i get it. I don't even more so for me. It was just like it had all these interesting component parts. But the whole didn't really didn't do it for me.

Jared Leto John Lee Hancock Malik Rami HBO Oscar Steven Spielberg Clint Eastwood Washington Richard Denzel Washington
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo To Receive International Emmy For Daily Coronavirus Briefings

NPR News Now

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo To Receive International Emmy For Daily Coronavirus Briefings

"York governor andrew cuomo getting an international emmy. Npr's colin dwyer reports have always had a soft spot for politicians granted. They usually reserve honors for the actors playing bake leaders on tv but not this time the international academy of television arts and sciences said andrew cuomo receive its founders award for his daily coronavirus press conferences earlier this year. The briefings made the governor one of the most figures in the struggle to contain the coronavirus in the us. The academy explained it's unusual choice by saying quote he effectively created television shows with characters plotlines and stories of success and failure that asked him to of past winners include oprah winfrey and steven spielberg

Andrew Cuomo Colin Dwyer International Academy Of Telev Emmy NPR York United States Oprah Winfrey Steven Spielberg
Andrew Cuomo to receive International Emmy for COVID-19 briefings

NPR News Now

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

Andrew Cuomo to receive International Emmy for COVID-19 briefings

"Governor. Andrew cuomo is getting an international emmy dwyer reports. He will be recognized on monday for his televised. Cova nineteen briefings. The have always had a soft spot for politicians granted. They usually reserve for the actors playing bake leaders on tv but not this time. The international academy of television arts and sciences said andrew cuomo will receive its founders award for his daily corona virus. Press conferences earlier this year. The briefings made the governor one of the most busy figures in the struggle to contain the corona virus in the us the academy explained. It's unusual choice by saying quote. He effectively created television. Shows with characters plotlines and stories of success and failure that adds to a list of past winners that include oprah winfrey and steven spielberg

Andrew Cuomo International Academy Of Telev United States Oprah Winfrey Steven Spielberg
George Clooney reveals how and why he gifted 14 friends $1 million cash

Ringer Dish

05:33 min | 2 years ago

George Clooney reveals how and why he gifted 14 friends $1 million cash

"Shall we talk about george clooney. I'd love to. I mean it's great stuff. What a joy to wake up on a tuesday morning and just find a profile of george clooney and cheeky magazine. I mean i can't ask for much more in this life First of all this is the man of the year man of the year issue. An annual occurrence for gpo usually accompanied by a party or parties. there's some kind of fun. Dj set online slash than doesn't sound fun. at all. i mean george clooney is just like the de facto celebrity to me. It's just like you've for for me. Just because i love him so much more so than brad pitt. Who is you know. One of our animating figures. Of course their friends part of both their charm. George clooney has always been lovable because of playing doug on er those politics both of which are part of this piece. But i just feel like this was like best case scenario for a celebrity profile. What stood out about it to you. This is slightly awkward as we noted. Your husband wrote this but you know. Just talk about his work. Yeah let me see. I was not involved in this process and just reading it. You know differently than i feel like i know the man who wrote this you sleep. You wanna say through this these interviews were done over. Zoom as the as the peace explains for a number of reasons but for the health and safety of everyone in this time so like they were done in my house on and afterwards i was thinking about the fact that george has such a distinctive voice that i should have just stood outside the door and listened to george clooney talking like through the door. Because i don't think i think act just uses the zoom without headphones for these interviews. I don't think he wants to bring bluetooth into this experience. And screw it up even more. So i i regret not standing outside the door like a creep and listening to george. Clooney talk and i didn't do that so i really. I have no behind the scenes information. I just absolutely charming. And that's why you want from george clooney right you want him to be a like cary grant but for now and i just like a hugely charming informed person that you want to spend time with. I honestly want that more. From george clooney than i want like a movie directed by george clooney at this point or movie starring george clooney. You know there are many movies starring. George clooney that. I really enjoy but i just. I'm happy for him as like capital g capital. See george clooney. And what's nice about. The profile is that he seems to know that too and he's just like let me give you some more george clooney stuff and let me just tell you about how much i love my wife for awhile and let me just tell you how acting works. I thought that stuff was so fascinating. I love it when really talented people just like switch into their genius mode and like i'm gonna tell you this and i'm going to tell you this and he tells a story about e. r. n. Any tells another story and he's just like annotating the scene and it's like talking to someone who knows a ton of stuff. I thought that was fascinating. He shares an anecdote from steven spielberg students. Billboard tells them to stop moving his head so much. And i loved that because doug ross did move his head a lot especially when talking to carol. You assert like trying to like burrow into the moment. And it's like dude. You don't need to your doug fucking rossier water. Attrition your renegade pediatrician. He also so happy that zach got him to talk about the time he gave his fourteen friends. Each one million dollars in cash on honestly the details are so much better than you ever could have hoped for. This story came out. I think like almost two years ago. We talked about it at the time. I think randy gerber shared the information. Right yes and then. I think we talked about it on jam session and zack knew about it. And then zach wanted to ask you about it. So i'm gonna credit usually with that particular. Thank you thank you so much. Thank you so much zach. So george clooney like basically impersonated danny ocean one day. Although i think the other takeaways like owed any ocean it's probably a lot like george clooney and he got a florist ban that he rented for the day and drove to an unnamed location. Downtown los angeles richardson. huge vaults. Like just stacks of cash literally. It's kind of like the way they portrayed the vault in die hard three. you know. there's like all that cash. What i guess the vault i was imagining i skipped ahead. Because there's an ocean's eleven here too but keep telling this story you're doing great. I won't interrupt. He goes down like multiple levels below ground and just gets tons of cash and then puts a a million dollars in two fourteen different to me. Suitcases he says that it's much lighter than you would think. And then he loads it into the van and he drives away then. He gives his friends the money. And yeah the reference. The correlation to ocean eleven is shocking. It's stunning right right. There is like i can see the duffle bags of money notions eleven being carried out of the blasio and it is absolutely that and they also commandeered a swat car that like it's very similarly ban also underground the whole thing is like it's hard to believe it's real george clooney. Actually i made that up. It's not how i did it. And he just was like. This is the antidote. I'm gonna tell. I also surprised because it's like so close to the movie.

George Clooney Brad Pitt George Zach Doug Clooney Randy Gerber Cary Doug Ross Steven Spielberg Billboard Danny Ocean Carol Zack Richardson Los Angeles Blasio
The Mandalorian Season 2 Episode 2 Released

/Film Daily

09:02 min | 2 years ago

The Mandalorian Season 2 Episode 2 Released

"Young. Hey thanks for having me. I really like talking about. Star Wars. Yeah, and if you haven't seen Brian every week on the site has has like A. I WANNA call it a recap because I feel he gets much more than a recap. Would you call your your column about the mandatory in every Friday? You know I, kind of call it a review in that it does what I think or it it aims to do what I hope. Good criticism does is just shine lights on aspects of the. The show that people wouldn't have noticed whether that's in the filmmaking or the cinematic references or the mythological references and star wars. So I don't know, I, just call it a review but. Maybe. It's a little bit more depth than that to in this morning's one is like what two thousand words yeah just kept coming and I feel like I still in hit everything. And it's crazy to this year or at least for the first episode. Disney is not providing screeners for press. So you know all of us are actually did you stay up till midnight or did you watch it this morning? No I definitely watch this morning because it didn't come online until midnight Pacific Time which is two am my time and I'm getting too old to do that. I was up at midnight and I watched the thing and I was like I'll just go to bed after I couldn't sleep. I was up till three am just. Checking twitter reading up on things I. I was just like amped up. So bright you saw last right? No. I mean, in my time zone, it's one am in like Brad I'm getting too old for that sort of thing. So I got up at five actually to watch it and well, and I knew if I watched it last night, I was going to sit down in half to write my my review then. Go and I knew I wouldn't sleep. So I got up early in and got it done. Got It over to. To you all as fast as I possibly could. ANYWAYS, we're all on an even keel here. No one gets information ahead of time twenty twenty has sucked. But at least we have new season of the member Orien- right Maybe. It's over lining. I feel like it's the most excited I've been in a long time last night watching that episode Okay. Before you into the heavy spoilers I mean I wouldn't listen to this podcast if you haven't seen the episode so I'd go watch that on Disney right now but before we get to that, let's give our. Thoughts brief reactions and I'll start off by. Saying. This is how you do fan service. Right like Vincent gets bad rap I think that word is kind of used as a derogatory word in in certain ways but it was cool you know to. I feel like a lot of the stuff that was being done in this episode was not references for references sake it was the further story and then like when their work like interesting fan nods and reference it, you kind of have to connect the dots wasn't like. Oh look at that Blah Blah Blah. It wasn't like very obvious about it The production budget felt much bigger than season one for me. I I I. Love that. This was fifty four minutes where most of the season one episode where much shorter I think like most of them are closer to the thirty minutes. I. Guess. So. It was just it was so epic. So Good I. Guess My only negative that I want to say is I th I. Wish I had more of a role in this. Upset he was kind of like. The site I I mean I guess he's always sidekick, but he really didn't have much to do. So but I was really impressed with Jon favreau in what he was able to accomplish here. This is the first time you know he's obviously the creator of the show. He's a writer of the show, but this is the producer, but this is the first time he directed an episode. So Brian, what what are your brief thoughts? So I really loved the cinematic feel of it and it felt very George Lucas Very Spielberg and I'm sure we'll talk about that. Later. But I I'll be honest like I. Sort of as excited I was for what I saw at the ending I was also dismayed And it Kinda left me with like a bittersweet feeling because I've really enjoyed. BOBA FETT being dead. And getting. It's kind of like the feeling that a lot of people had with thinking ray was a nobody and then. J. j.j Abrams comes along. Well I don't I mean like I there was easier for me to swallow like I. Really. You only had years of that right? Like only two years of like thinking about that was the reality. Yeah, we've had a lot longer to to feel that Boba Fett was dead, but I really am appreciative of the fact that they worked in all of the stuff that Chuck Wendy get created around the armor and Cobb Vance to meet the elephants character that really. The that that has been the story for a long time and if they are incorporating that, I'm still not I. Don't know maybe maybe people know other things that I, don't but I'm still holding hope that it's not actually Boba Fett and it's some other random clone but I know that that's a long shot. Yeah. We'll get to that later. Do you have anything else to say in your brief thoughts? Just, it was fun. It was really fun and I haven't had that fun sitting. Had that much fun sitting down and watching something like this in a long time probably since last season well, Nelson's clone wars. Yeah Brad what are your thoughts on the by the way? Are we call this like to exit one or is this chapter nine like they're calling a chapter nine? I mean we'd be calling it both. Okay. Okay. What did you think of Chapter Nine? I realized I ought to fund with I'm I feel like I, wish that maybe it wasn't quite as long because even though it was a good episode I I felt a lot better when the episodes were between like thirty in forty minutes it just makes it feel a little bit breezy. especially since you know even though this season premiere did have some interesting new details to reveal. It felt more like an episode that was from like the middle of a season as opposed to season Premiere only because I didn't feel like that. There was much advancement as far as like the over. Arching plot you know it's like it's it's just a basic. It's like. Well, guess I'm taking this kid back to where you know to his people and you know, and here's another adventure of the week scenario and granted that's. The. Like I said there are big reveals I i. always like. I feel like season premieres should have you know something a little bit bigger and granted you know the whole idea of trying to take down a crate dragon is a big thing. I mean that's that's a big impressive effect that you're not likely to get in an average middle episode even a man to Laura and you know so that was a big deal but I don't know I don't want to say that disappointed because I never bored I still have a lot of fun with it but I guess I was just expecting a little bit more of an advancement with the the serial aspect of the story. That was my main complaint about season one was it was a lot of like. You know mission adventure of the week and it wasn't a lot of like there isn't really much of a overall like cereal plot of the show yet but I'm hoping that kicks into gear the season. What are you guys yet because I don't I don't mind the adventure of the week format necessarily but I just wish that the progress on the overarching stereo part of it was a little bit more media gas in each episode especially since these are very short seasons. You know it's interesting that it kind of depends on the scale you're looking at it from to right like in terms of the mandatory and in his story with seeking out man delorean's to return the asset to its people whether those are Djeddai or other creatures of its kind. It doesn't. It doesn't move the ball forward very much at all but when you pull back and look at the star. Wars universe. What it does with Craig Dragons in Tuscan raiders tattooing and Boba Fett absolutely does move that ball forward. So it's interesting to watch them balance between both those masters that they have to. Work for. I think that's fair. But I but I also think the progress of those balls in question is like I mean, how much? How much deeper are we into star wars lower by spending some extra time with Tuscan raiders in a crate dragon like it's not necessarily hugely revealing stuff that like provides a lot more depth into the Star Wars universe. It's more interesting details of stuff that we were already familiar with. Okay guys we we've got nine minutes which serve ref- reactions. Get into this.

Boba Fett Brian Brad Twitter Disney J. J.J Abrams Jon Favreau Vincent Twenty Twenty Craig Dragons RAY Writer Nelson George Lucas Laura Delorean Cobb Vance Producer Chuck Wendy