6 Burst results for "Spencer Bailey"

"spencer bailey" Discussed on Lakers Nation Podcast

Lakers Nation Podcast

02:44 min | 8 months ago

"spencer bailey" Discussed on Lakers Nation Podcast

"I mean, if he can do that , he's got the physical profile. Can you get the mental side of it down? It's asking a lot of a 20 year old, but if he can do that, wow, he could be really, really, really good. So yes, I am more than anybody else excited to watch Taylor Horton Tucker on Sunday and see where has his game grown. What's changed about his game? Does his demeanor change? Now that he's the guy, right? He's no longer making second round pick money. Now he's the fourth highest paid player on the team. It's the three stars and then him and then another gap and you get to Kendrick nun and then everybody else is a better minimum. He's being paid now to produce. What does that look like? I can't wait to see, because again, his trajectory is going straight up and don't forget man did he look good and preseason last year. Obviously, cooled off when some of the regular guys started playing again and things like that. But he really showed that when the ball is in his hands, when he's in control of the game, he could be something special. So I am really excited to see Taylor Horton Tucker on Sunday. Let's see what else we've got here. Spencer Bailey said from YouTube with a super chat. Thank you. If rolls were versed with state guidelines, were the same with COVID and LeBron took the stance that Kyrie is what would happen. Fan reaction, everything. So just if I'm understanding you correctly, just flip the script and say that LeBron is the one refusing to get vaccinated and Kyrie was vaccinated if we were to put LeBron into that spot. The reaction. I mean, I think that it would be fairly similar. I think it would be louder because LeBron draws more of a spotlight than Kyrie does nationally internationally. So I think it would be a bigger story, but I think Kyrie has a lot of detractors just like LeBron does. If you look around the NBA, a lot of non Lakers fans are anti LeBron James because it's what happens when you lose to a guy for a while. Kyrie's had some controversial statements in the past and there's some fans, particularly non nets fans, right? Because fandom can kind of blur these things. Who have, well, kind of jumped on Kyrie Irving and said some not so kind things about him and had some criticism. Some of the justified, maybe it depends on your point of view, but yeah, I think if you were to flip it and you were to have LeBron be the guy that was taking that stance, it would just make the story louder, but I think the criticism would be largely the same or similar. Just you'd be.

Taylor Horton Tucker LeBron Kyrie Spencer Bailey COVID Kendrick YouTube LeBron James Lakers NBA Kyrie Irving
"spencer bailey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"spencer bailey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Nelson Stewart coming up. We'll speak with author Brian Washington about his highly anticipated debut novel Memorial, which tells the intertwined love stories of parents, Children and partners separated by cultures. Then it looks for the art and design of memorials around the world with Spencer Bailey. He's the author of a new book called In Memory of Designing Contemporary Memorials. And Later We Have a list of movies to watch if you are celebrating Halloween at home this year from cult classics to psychological thrillers. Gothamist editor Ben Yaakov joins us with some of his favorites. We will get to all of it. I'm Alison Stewart and I will meet you on the other side of the news. Live from NPR News. I'm Shea Stevens Judge Amy Cockney. Barrett is set to take the judicial oath in a private ceremony on Tuesday to become an associate justice to the U. S. Supreme Court. NPR's Claudia Chrysalis reports that it's one of two else required before Barrett can begin her work on the high court. Before a socially distanced and largely masked crowd at the White House. Barrett thank the Senate for confirming her to the court, and I pledge to you And to the American people that I will discharge my duties to the very best of my ability. Moments Earlier, Justice Clarence Thomas administered the constitutional oath with President Trump and guests looking on during the outdoor event. It quickly followed a Senate confirmation vote of 52 to 48 confirming Barrett, largely along partisan lines on Ly Republicans voted for Barrett in one GOP member, Susan Collins of Maine. Joined Democrats to vote against the confirmation. Claudie Salis. NPR NEWS Washington The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says people in nursing related jobs make up the largest number of severe covert 19 cases among health care providers. Remember Station W A. B E. Sam Whitehead reports that frequent close contact with patients puts those workers at higher risk of exposure to the disease. CDC researchers looked at close to 29,000 people hospitalized for Kobe 19 from March to May. Of the nearly 6% who were health care workers, more than one third worked in nursing related jobs. Underlying conditions were also found in nearly 90%. Of all the health care workers Hospitalized. Obesity was the most common Researchers say the findings highlight the need for all healthcare providers to take infection prevention measures, especially those working closely with patients. They say failure to do so could decrease the workforce capacity of the health care system. For NPR News. I'm Sam Whitehead in Atlanta. A fast moving wildfire has forced nearly 70,000 people to evacuate their homes in southern California. At least two firefighters have been injured. Mike Richfield is captain of the Orange County Fire Authority. He tells KNBC that powerful winds are making it harder to battle the flames with most is fire is that the wind is the biggest problem so Mother nature controls.

Barrett NPR News Spencer Bailey E. Sam Whitehead U. S. Supreme Court Claudia Chrysalis Senate Nelson Stewart NPR Brian Washington Alison Stewart Mike Richfield Justice Clarence Thomas Disease Control and Prevention Claudie Salis Obesity Ben Yaakov editor
"spencer bailey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"spencer bailey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"My guest, Spencer Bailey. The name of the book is in memory of designing contemporary memorials. Of course, you know, we have to talk about Maya Lin's Vietnam Memorial. What you know. Traditionally, what were War memorials like before my legs work. And how much of a game changer was that? It's impossible to understate how much of a game changer I mean and and also the fact that my was ah, a Yale University student who was taking a funerary architecture course and submitted her Proposal. Ah, you know, anonymously to this competition and one s O. You know, she was a new generation a new mindset coming at how? How to think about how we remember. But this was also coming, You know, In the wake of World War, two were architects and artists were increasingly exploring non figured of forms. You know, following World War one and two, You had the rise of the counter culture In the sixties and seventies. You had the Evolution of abstract art and minimalism. There was a greater sophistication happening in psychology, yet terms like post traumatic stress disorder becoming a part of the mainstream, you know. Add to that shifts in religion and spirituality. How we mourn the rise of victim culture, especially in the U. S. You know, all of this created this sort of perfect storm for memorialization. And I think you know to answer your first question. The idea of the monument? Ah stems back very far. You could argue that the pyramids and you know so so much of What our national mall is based on our European ideas or ideas stolen from other cultures. You know the obelisk. So you know, thinking about monuments, a cz something that was definitely more of related to war and politics and was about victory and valor. It was the man on the horse with the sword and, you know, sort of I think that that that day is is numbered. Um, you know, I don't think it's going to disappear. But I do think that memorials, especially as I'm sort of defining them post Vietnam. Veterans Memorial are these spatial and abstract places and spaces that allow us to recognize collective hardship to understand trauma and tragedy and survival and violent death and You know, in the case of 9 11 terrorism things that you know, I think before we're kind of Ah, shunned or ignored at the sacrifice of You know, politics, really? I mean, it was it was about trying to the monument was really built as as a show of power, whereas I think memorials air really built as a show of collectivity of of of All of us being interconnected as a species. Name of the book is in memory of designing contemporary memorials. Spencer Bailey has been my guest. Spain's there. Thank you so much for being with us. Thank you so much. It was really great to be here, Alison. This is all of it. WNYC supporters include the Rubin Museum of Art now reopened on 17th Street in Chelsea, featuring Himalayan art and ideas across six floors..

Spencer Bailey Maya Lin Vietnam Memorial Rubin Museum of Art Veterans Memorial WNYC Yale University memorialization Vietnam Alison Spain Chelsea
"spencer bailey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"spencer bailey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"W and I say, Suspensive open this book with such a personal story about There's a statue that depicts you as a child. It became part of Memorial because you survived this devastating playing crash. It's a photo from 99, a man carrying three year old three year old you Away from the wreckage of United Airlines flight to 32 this this photo circulated widely, you in one of your brothers survived the crash. Sadly, your mother was among the 112 people killed. And staff. She looks remarkably like like the photo. What do you see? When you look at that memorial I don't see myself, which which I sort of note in the book and I don't see myself because in a way, it's been hard. She even removed, you know myself from from, uh, well, it's hot. Been hard to remove myself from that image. It's been quite a fascinating sort of Journey to understand that image in the greater context, which is really what this book was about, and the only reason I don't see myself in and I should clarified. I don't see myself in the statue, even though it's very clearly that it's me and the image through the statue has come to represent something. Far different something you know, I understand its power to represent something far greater than myself and that I also you know the image of me being carried kind of serves as AH, image of hope. Um, but it's not clear cut in its message, and it's really I think that fact that there is there's a new idea. Underlying the figurative statue. That is just totally Mr represented and what it's trying to say It's almost like the image becomes biblical. Almost in a way it becomes. Something that is about a hero story. It's reflective of something that is not ah, about the multitude of experiences that happened that day. It's really just about one story or a hero story. It should and that, And that's sort of what the book goes into is that there is a power and understanding the multitude of stories, and that figure figured of statues tend to often dictate they tend to I have one definition or maybe a handful of definitions, as opposed to dozens, and that's the point. These these monuments Are trying to weave a specific definition of something. Ah! By the creators of them as opposed to allow us to bring our own human. Wait our own human baggage to something I liked with on Brian Washington was saying on the segment before about why he decided to name his novel Memorial and It's this idea of flexibility. Memorials of their best can offer flexible and sort of metaphorical understanding something that's much broader than Uh, you know, something that's figurative and saying, Well, look at this. This is important. Okay, So with all of that in our brain, what's what's an example of you think is a an effective Modern memorial. And why just for you to give a baseline for audience before we go into details, Of course. I mean, I think the one that immediately comes to mind for me, which was incredibly affecting when I visited about a year ago is the Memorial for Peace and justice. It's in Montgomery, Alabama, designed by mass design group. And it's part of Brian Stevenson's equal Justice Initiative. Um, the reason I bring this memorial up is because, well, for one thing, I think every single American should Go visit it and be required to visit it. Frankly, um, but also because it it shows the power of abstraction in a way that I think is Um, you know, Something that all of us can really understand. Ah, like it would be hard. I'd be hard pressed to find an American who goes and visits that memorial and isn't somehow affected. I guess I should describe it. It's hard to describe physical things and in an audio format, but I'll give my best shot. Basically when you arrive at this memorial You follow this procession upwards toward a Central pavilion and the Central pavilion is all of these pillars there. They're quite compressed and as you walk down this procession Um the pillars begin to raise and so you're walking downwards and it's sort of down toward this water. Teacher and you notice all of a sudden you're your neck Is crane ing up? And it's creating up in a way that isn't necessarily comfortable. And that's exactly the point. Um, I think the subject matter is not comfortable. It's it's about America's lynching history and the history of slavery, really, and understanding that in an intimate way, each pillar is meant to represent a county. And marking marked on each Piller are the names of those who were lynched in those counties. Ah, And it's something that I think that combination of abstraction with specificity, so there's this. There's the names. There's the lists. There's the county's You've got to really understand. The magnitude and the weight of this thing, while also Experiencing it in physical space, and I think that that's a really important thing to mention is, um there's this sort of idea of commemorative justice happening through this very thing. I actually, you know, think it's worth mentioning that Wa Sou in The New Yorker recently wrote this beautiful piece on the idea of commemorative justice, and he's basically what he's basically talking about. Is this notion that we all need to really look at thes things? Not as um, you know? Ah. You know when talking about memorialization? It's not about Oh, do we need another statue instead of a monument or a figurative statue? We should really be thinking about these sorts of environments or spaces as portals. I kind of love. This idea is like You know, it's basically what my book is about. The memorials in the book are is portals. It's It's offering us a place to interact with an environment but also turned inward toward ourselves and to understand our own. Place in this grand scheme of things. My guest is Spencer Bailey. The name of the book is in memory of designing contemporary memorials and reminder. If you go to our instagram page at all of it up in my sea, you can see the memorial that is at the E. J. I institute as well as the one we were discussing. Regarding Spencer's Spencer's memorialization memorization, thie Statue of the picture in case You want a visual for yourself. Can we talk about who gets a say in memorial design Spencer because this is something that is a little bit sticky and could be a little bit tricky. You. There's a case in the book, You talk about the Juden Platz Holocaust Memorial Vienna,.

Spencer Bailey Juden Platz Holocaust Memorial Modern memorial United Airlines Brian Washington Central pavilion Brian Stevenson Montgomery Justice Initiative Alabama America E. J. I institute Wa The New Yorker
"spencer bailey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"spencer bailey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This's all of it. I'm Alison Stewart coming up. We'll speak with author Brian Washington about his highly anticipated debut novel Memorial. Which tells the intertwined love stories of parents, Children and partners, separated by cultures, then looks for the art and design of memorials around the world. With Spencer Bailey, he's the author of a new book called in Memory of Designing Contemporary Memorials. And later we have a list of movies to watch. If you are celebrating Halloween at home this year from cult classics to psychological thrillers, Gothamist editor Ben Yakis joins us with some of his favorites. We will get to all of it. I'm Alison Stewart and I will meet you on the other side of the news. Live from NPR news. I'm Laxmi saying growing market fears, especially over the spike in new Corona virus cases air, triggering a major sell off on Wall Street. The Dow Jones industrial average has fallen more than 800 points or 2.8%. So far, the S and P 500 NASDAQ are also down sharply. The White House and its Republican allies in Congress have yet to reach an agreement with congressional Democrats over Corona virus relief for millions of Americans battling through the ravages of a global pandemic that shows no sign of abating, especially in the United States. Campaigning in Allentown, Pennsylvania. Today, President Trump insists the health crisis is turning a corner. Groundbreaking therapies and safe vaccines that quickly.

Alison Stewart Spencer Bailey Brian Washington NPR Allentown Ben Yakis Pennsylvania Trump President Congress White House United States editor
"spencer bailey" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

04:34 min | 3 years ago

"spencer bailey" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Services magazine offers so perhaps there's a new a new clarity. Certainly in the mind of the folks at clove magazine, you talk a little bit in the briefing notes about clove being a welcome look away from the US and a welcome back away from Europe, we can focus on journeys again, though for you next magazine pick, which is cool to migrant micro Odysseys, and I have to admit this is an extremely extremely intriguing choice. Not one I've come across before slightly smaller than a four format with a lot of use of kind of Flora's text heavy in some places, but then amazing expressive photography full bleed images. An illustration who are enough is this magazine about holy. Well, I'm quite late to the party on this as well. So it's a six part magazine, which is interesting that it sets lifespan. It's kind of what it says. So it's devoted to looking at my Gration. I think what it's trying to do is open up the ways we think of migration so it looking at migrations of peoples all of infrastructure data flows. Flora and fauna. So each issue has lightly different theme. The most recent one which is number five is looking at the world of micro and flow of very small things. It's still very new to me as well. But I just find it very intriguing magazine, it's taking a very serious topic. And I think it topic that could do with a little bit more nuance and could do with some more depth to other time when debates about migration at become very polarized. And I think quite shallow and superficial and aggressive. So I quit my what they're doing looking through. It's kind of serious. Highly researched writing it's academic. But I think has that nice trick of wearing it's not mere quite lightly as he says for beautiful they're already pops of this sort of flora coral running through, and then this kind of metallic goal to has this very well defined color. Palette? That's quite poppy and fun and brings you in. So I think it's clever design job of taking something that could be very of putting in heavy and just giving it that level of injury to make you want to dive in and make you want to engage with that topic. We do have enough time to delve into another title, which is the London review of books. Now. Can I give you a compassion herald? I've never read the London review of books, the New York review books older sibling on which this is based while they're both great cities. Yeah. Both great public relations. But won't draws you to the the unabashed text, heavy newspaper esque stylings under review of books. I think London review of books everyone at Tucson you on their to'real stuff is subscribed to it. It's just the most fantastic research results. So it's extremely long form journalism book reviews. So it takes a topic, and then just delve into essays about that book and engaging with its content, and it kind of shows what you can do if you support long form journalism, and if writers at the time to research, a topic and really get to grips with it. So you get these huge often, very stylishly written all the time. So some quite drawing, but that's kind of what I admire about it. But it's unafraid to take on topics which on the surface could be very dry. They're often quite nation often quite historical. But through the strength of the writing in just the kind of classical journalism that has gone into it really draws you in becomes very gripping. And you you get into topics sort of like about seventeenth century diarist working in. I don't know Dr just writing endlessly about wool prices. But because. The way it's being dealt with it becomes fascinating and my sincere. Thanks to all these travel only. We'll be back to join us in April for the next issue is then you suddenly hype side. Thank you very much. And sadly, that's always have time for today. Next week. We sit down with Spencer Bailey. The charismatic new editor in chief a book publisher fighting and don't forget if you need a little more design minded inspiration. You can subscribe to this show or our sister podcast Monaco on design Xtra which is available. Each thursday. You could also pick up leaf through a copy of Monaco magazine at your leisure or peruse on library books or travel goods for bit of inspiration monocle on design was produced by definitely Condie's an edited by the ever patient Christie Evans on Josh Harnett, underplay us out its craft work with computer.

clove magazine London review of books services magazine Flora Monaco magazine US Europe Gration Spencer Bailey New York review editor in chief Josh Harnett Condie Tucson Christie Evans publisher