27 Burst results for "Spellman"

Toby Harnden Shares a Story From on the Ground in Afghanistan

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

04:24 min | 4 months ago

Toby Harnden Shares a Story From on the Ground in Afghanistan

"You mentioned this story, the prison uprising, Mike spann, a former marine CIA paramilitary. For those who know nothing, give us the story of that incredible event and what that man did. Yeah. It is incredible. And so November 25th, 2001. Two CIA officers walk into this fort called calla jangi, which means literally like fort of war outside mazar I Sharif. Now, backing up a little bit mazarin Sharif had fallen to northern alliance forces, aided by our allies. Our allies aided by the CIA green berets and air force combat controllers and the awesome might have U.S. air power overhead on November 10th. Now, less than a month earlier, Mike spann had been one of 8 CIA officers who landed in the Darius souf valley, aboard two Black Hawk helicopters that had flown in from Kashi Khan about K two, a former Soviet air base that Uzbekistan government had given over to the Americans for this post 9 11 mission. So October 17th, 2001, they land at dropped into the unknown. First Americans behind America. So we are barely barely a month out since 9 11. Yeah. First Americans behind them enemy lines. Now there had been a CIA team called jawbreaker that had landed in the pantry of Ali on September 26th, but that was, you know, relatively speaking safe territory controlled by the northern alliance. But this was enemy territory, Taliban controlled territory. So 8 of them, four of them were paramilitaries, one of those was Mike span. So when paramilitary is somebody who's been seconded, usually from the military and is working in the CIA using their skills for the CIA. Yeah, usually they actually in the CIA sometimes their contractors or people who've been seconded and on some of the other teams that were actually serving members of the Delta force and seals. But the four paramount trees on team alpha were serving CIOs special activities, division. Scott spellman, who was on the cover of the book, he was later became very senior, it was the senior CIA guy on the National Security Council during the Trump administration. He became station chief in Kabul, but then a young officer, but already battle hardened he had been wounded in the battle of Mogadishu in Somalia in 1993. It was a guy called Alex Hernandez, who was the deputy chief, who was a sergeant major, gone full career in special forces and then joined the agency and two case officers, JRC, who was the chief who'd worked with the CIA out of Islamabad in the 1980s against the Soviets for the supply and stinger missiles to the mujahideen and David Tyson who you mentioned at the beginning who was with Mike span on November 25th 2001. So they're in unfriendly territory. This is the Ford of war, walk us through that event. So David was a case officer based in Tashkent and spoke Uzbek almost fluently. And so he's the linguist and the main linguist on the team, although JR, seger also he spoke diary, which was the sort of lingua franca in Afghanistan. But on that day, the team split, there's a big fight, a hundred miles to the east. It expected in Kunduz so the bulk of American forces are there. But the night before 400 Al-Qaeda prisoners had arrived on the eastern edge of mazarin reef to surrender, and it was extremely murky why they were there. They should have been surrendering in Kunduz. And basically, I mean, what I was able to establish almost beyond doubt is that this was a Trojan horse operation. It was a deliberate trap. Yeah, it was a Taliban Al-Qaeda operation to put pretend that for these 400 fighters had surrendered, but in fact they were made up remained armed. They sort of exploited Afghan custom to keep their weapons with them and they were planning an uprising. Because you can have lots of people surrender at once if it's a regular army during the Gulf War, we had thousands of Iraqis surrender at once. When it's irregular fighters, you don't usually get hundreds of them surrendering at the same time. It's a little bit

CIA Mike Spann Mike Span Calla Jangi Mazarin Sharif Darius Souf Valley Kashi Khan Mazar Scott Spellman Trump Administration Sharif America Alex Hernandez Kunduz Northern Alliance Uzbekistan David Tyson Delta Force Taliban ALI
Toby Harnden Shares a Story From on the Ground in Afghanistan

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

04:22 min | 4 months ago

Toby Harnden Shares a Story From on the Ground in Afghanistan

"You mentioned this story, the prison uprising, Mike spann, a former marine CIA paramilitary. For those who know nothing, give us the story of that incredible event and what that man did. Yeah. It is incredible. And so November 25th, 2001. Two CIA officers walk into this fort called calla jangi, which means literally like fort of war outside mazar I Sharif. Now, backing up a little bit mazarin Sharif had fallen to northern alliance forces, aided by our allies. Our allies aided by the CIA green berets and air force combat controllers and the awesome might have U.S. air power overhead on November 10th. Now, less than a month earlier, Mike spann had been one of 8 CIA officers who landed in the Darius souf valley, aboard two Black Hawk helicopters that had flown in from Kashi Khan about K two, a former Soviet air base that Uzbekistan government had given over to the Americans for this post 9 11 mission. So October 17th, 2001, they land at dropped into the unknown. First Americans behind America. So we are barely barely a month out since 9 11. Yeah. First Americans behind them enemy lines. Now there had been a CIA team called jawbreaker that had landed in the pantry of Ali on September 26th, but that was, you know, relatively speaking safe territory controlled by the northern alliance. But this was enemy territory, Taliban controlled territory. So 8 of them, four of them were paramilitaries, one of those was Mike span. So when paramilitary is somebody who's been seconded, usually from the military and is working in the CIA using their skills for the CIA. Yeah, usually they actually in the CIA sometimes their contractors or people who've been seconded and on some of the other teams that were actually serving members of the Delta force and seals. But the four paramount trees on team alpha were serving CIOs special activities, division. Scott spellman, who was on the cover of the book, he was later became very senior, it was the senior CIA guy on the National Security Council during the Trump administration. He became station chief in Kabul, but then a young officer, but already battle hardened he had been wounded in the battle of Mogadishu in Somalia in 1993. It was a guy called Alex Hernandez, who was the deputy chief, who was a sergeant major, gone full career in special forces and then joined the agency and two case officers, JRC, who was the chief who'd worked with the CIA out of Islamabad in the 1980s against the Soviets for the supply and stinger missiles to the mujahideen and David Tyson who you mentioned at the beginning who was with Mike span on November 25th 2001. So they're in unfriendly territory. This is the Ford of war, walk us through that event. So David was a case officer based in Tashkent and spoke Uzbek almost fluently. And so he's the linguist and the main linguist on the team, although JR, seger also he spoke diary, which was the sort of lingua franca in Afghanistan. But on that day, the team split, there's a big fight, a hundred miles to the east. It expected in Kunduz so the bulk of American forces are there. But the night before 400 Al-Qaeda prisoners had arrived on the eastern edge of mazarin reef to surrender, and it was extremely murky why they were there. They should have been surrendering in Kunduz. And basically, I mean, what I was able to establish almost beyond doubt is that this was a Trojan horse operation. It was a deliberate trap. Yeah, it was a Taliban Al-Qaeda operation to put pretend that for these 400 fighters had surrendered, but in fact they were made up remained armed. They sort of exploited Afghan custom to keep their weapons with them and they were planning an uprising. Because you can have lots of people surrender at once if it's a regular army during the Gulf War, we had thousands of Iraqis surrender at once. When it's irregular fighters, you don't usually get hundreds of them surrendering at the same

CIA Mike Spann Mike Span Calla Jangi Mazarin Sharif Darius Souf Valley Kashi Khan Mazar Scott Spellman Trump Administration Sharif America Alex Hernandez Northern Alliance Kunduz Uzbekistan David Tyson Delta Force Taliban ALI
"spellman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"spellman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Myself the stress that people put on you because they They're so proud of you. They want you to go places like your You want to do it, But it feels like you're doing it for them more than you're doing it for yourself. Like I can't make beyond a room for the rest of the year like I have to make a honor. If I don't make on a road, because that's going to be a problem. I was expecting to be in school and get help with my college applications. No, I had to figure it out on my own. Pretty much like the colleges are gonna look at that and be like, Oh, she's not. She's not on top of the game, and my G pH. Already had a 3.57. That's a sap that is a solid G p A, though Because asking questions about college applications over the phone. Is so frustrating like it'll make you lose your mind and thus That's really good. I appreciate that. But it wasn't supposed when your standards are as high as they are. I get it. It's not good enough for you. But I'm saying that that's that is something to be proud of. Okay. Thank you. You're welcome. So what are your Where are you applying? Um Howard Clark in Spellman. Oh, man, Howard. Such a lost in school. Spellman also and what was the third one, Clark. All really, really great schools. So if you ever need anything or have any questions about that reach out, Okay. I'm definitely going to reach out. But thank you so much. You're so welcome, and I'll see you next week for sure. Parent ship. I'm on my okay, bye. Mm hmm. I hate School. Why did I did a.

Clark Howard Clark Howard next week third one Spellman 3.57
"spellman" Discussed on Influence

Influence

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"spellman" Discussed on Influence

"What would you wish for. Well i think one of the things that the gatekeepers need to look like what's on screen the world and the writers rooms because there's a level of frustration when you go to pitch a story and you have to give a cultural lesson i because the common denominator of different histories aren't they. Are you know it's not malicious but there's a level of ignorance in the basic misunderstandings about each other. If there's a story that you wanna do. But i you have to spend fifteen minutes. They know this is real this happened. This is the experience of these people. It's frustrating but i think that's cracking open. Quite frankly i can't imagine a show like atlanta being on the air ten years ago and that such a fantastic show what we have seen fleabag or insecure or i may destroy you the fact that all those shows are there now. Finding audiences people are talking about them. And you're seeing that there's more than one experience. I think the good work is being done in that area in a new company to fifty one. You're working with your husband and trying to address the persistent lack of representation marginalized groups. What are you hoping to influence. What are you hoping to get out of that production company that others on doing well malcolm. He's just coming off a falcon and winter soldier and hip hop uncovered two shows that he did this year and two years ago. We decided that we want to work together. As producers. they're only stories that we wanted to tell but as writers. We don't have the time and we don't have clones so we need to bring in other writers and bring in other people to work with so we decided to form the production company and then we signed a first look deal with hbo and we basically want to nurture new voices. There's a traditional track of college. Hollywood connections whatever else but what about all these other people who don't have that connection and maybe didn't go to college but they could be amazing storytellers or great directors or great filmmakers. So we've been working to establish a program where we tap into some of that and we could be mentors and an avenue for some of those underrepresented voices and people so we've worked with a couple of young people at our company who didn't go the traditional route to school but then have these great stories and one of them is. I can't talk about it yet. But one of them is turning into a pitch that we're going to take out which is pretty exciting. But you know he didn't go to college. Neither of us did the normal educational route were self taught writers so we know that there's value in those voices that you might not here. Can you give an example of the type of projects that you you're looking at on the type of work. You're aiming to produce. Well you know what was a perfect example of it is hip hop uncovered the documentary that he did for fx and hulu because that told the story of these characters in the hip hop world and in the music arena that the public hadn't heard about and they've been a massive influence on the music business and on so many musicians and they got to tell the story in their own words. It's five episodes. It's worth look it's a it's a wonderful show that's out now you can see it on hulu okay like you did with the truth. Vetoed and poppies dad. How do you think about incorporating stories. Not typically shed onscreen. Well i think that if you can find a character that is interesting to you so then that way it will be interesting to the audience. It's a way to tell that story with the shreve character who's played by ron sivas jones and he plays poppies father on the show growing up in the bay area. East bay dragons. That's the black motorcycle club. Were such a huge presence and outside of the bay area. People didn't know who they were and they were fascinating to me and they used to do this. This thing. this family picnic every year since all these bikers games and all these things going on in the park all these kids and i thought that was cool. I'm hoping sometime during the seasons we could get a shot of that because you think of these men in a certain way and even on the show. They're criminals but they're also family men. And so i just like the texture of a person and a character. Not just being one thing. Can you give us a sort of aha moment in your career where you thought to yourself. Okay i've done of of help change something. This is moved. The needle be felt like this is worth it l. My goodness this is going to seem obvious to everyone. But malcolm and i when we realize oh man. We could team up and do this together. Yeah we we were silos and we both had our separate individual careers. I started as a novelist and went to tv. And he's a feature guy before he moved into tv so it wasn't until he did that first year at empire went an exploded and it was this massive. Show that change. Tv ratings and everything else that we had the same language in common so him being in a writer's room for a year and it wasn't the novelist talking to the feature writer or the feature writer. Talking to the television writer. It was to television writers talking and we had this common denominator language and we understood each other and we'd always leaned on each other to help with story and everything else but once we did that and we worked on a project for amazon called a brief history of seven. Kelly's based on the marlon james novel about a marley. The project didn't go but the working experience was so wonderful that we got out of that. And we both said you know what. Let's do this so he came on and consulted season. One of truth be told and that was our other test balloon and once we survived that then we're dislike. Okay let's let's actually formalize this and do this together now you what they could hollywood power couple. Oh my god. Don't say that it's so boring if what we are most of the time. We're at home with our dog ruler. Her nowadays we're the most boring. Hollywood couple that you'll meet that's so fun but but also flattering. I suppose. so what's next. How you going to use your position to continue to influence. I think that continuing to foster new voices whether that's in the writer's room or behind the camera just like you know you go to set and you see. Oh onscreen this diverse onset. It should be just as diverse. It should look like what the world looks like. I don't think that is accomplished with. Let's get five black people. Five asians six women eight men. I think it's just looking at the world the way you see it when you walk out the door and especially growing up in the san francisco bay area which is such a melting pot. I want that representation everywhere. I don't wanna be a dictator about it because then it gets to what we talked about earlier where it's unnatural I think it should be organic in that way but mindful so when the writers come in i wanna hear about their experiences and how they're different for mind because then that enhances the show and i'm excited to tell different stories stories that may be the world hasn't seen before there was one i love that didn't sell but i thought it would have been a great story telling us what is it. What was interesting is that i saw it on. One episode of pbs. Show but another friend of mine and i. We went out years ago to pitch the story about sarah forbes. She was this african woman who was raised by queen victoria and she had such a great story and i thought what a beautiful costume drama. If sarah forbes is at the center of that story she's the lead and we're following her life and she's not a secondary character to someone else's that's a really beautiful different way to do a big sweeping costume drama so you should put you in the uk okay everything we produces period dramas all right. Let's bbc.

hulu malcolm ron sivas jones black motorcycle club bay area Hollywood hbo shreve atlanta marlon james East bay Kelly amazon sarah forbes hollywood san francisco bay pbs queen victoria uk bbc
"spellman" Discussed on Influence

Influence

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"spellman" Discussed on Influence

"And i had no idea among gary switchblades and her and our partners but it was so like it just said so much about her is just like on milady but i will cut you yes so then. She passed away in two thousand eight. And i've always wanted to use that. And it's the kind of history that matched this character because she grew up the daughter of biker and the capstone which is the bike club on. The show is based on a black motorcycle club that was established in oakland. One of the most powerful scenes in the show is when popey sister gets arrested in retaliation for poppies investigation into an old murder case and When she's being processed they take a hair and kipa for nails and take out eyelashes. I mean it's quite awful. It's filmed in you. You've written in the way that it. She's she's being raised. Why was that element important. We wanted the consequences of poppies actions to ripple through her. And they're all these things that you know. I'll read about all cr here about and they'll just live and my brain for years until i have the opportunity to use them and one of the things that was always just so disturbing to me was the sport of humiliation sometimes when people are arrested and it can be specific to race and gender and so for this black woman who is so tied up in our physicality and how she looks. She loves to be glamorous. She loves to be done up to the nines. The best way to break her down would be two stripper of all that artifice and so we talked about the scene in the room. I told the story of lax being notorious for years for doing that to women when they came through the airport. It was a little bit of a game that they played. I don't know why where if they saw someone and they suspected that they were wearing a. We've or a wig. There are security reasons. Sometimes but it didn't feel like that was the reason that they would strip these women of these things in the airport in a public arena. Just the idea of combining those two things in this environment of a police station. That's not physical violence but it is emotionally violent. What they did to her and we want it to have everyone in her family pay for her work in some way it was an interesting scene to pitch because then everybody starts sort of talking about different ways. They've been humiliated. Or you know where. Someone has used their authority to erase them. And i think it was one of the best things of the season and wind. Did you want other people to see that. Why why is that important. Because i don't think that people actually know or knew that that happened to that degree and it was just a parking ticket and she hasn't really done anything wrong so it was the perfect way to kind of show that now if she had been on a crime spree and she'd murdered nine people. You wouldn't care if that was done to her but this was done to someone to get back at our sister and this really horrific way that they break her down when she's processed would just hit with more of a punch to feel some responsibility when you're writing and when you're producing a show like this i do. I respect fillmore responsibility as characters though and so i know that writers have this discussion about that all the time but i feel like if i go in and the only thing i'm thinking about is responsibility. And what the ramifications are then. There's a way that the characters become a little bit of a soapbox and i'd just rather have it come out through the character interactions and their relationship so if there is something that i want to express then the goal is to try to find the way to do it in the most organic way possible and i think that that seen as an example of how we were able to accomplish that if you wanted to continue trying to build out characters manatee and enabled people to interpret them respond positively. Would it not be simply to just carry on writing novels. Yes but i probably wouldn't be able to pay my bills true. I did a two book series for random house. And i loved it and writing. Those novels was just truly a wonderful experience especially with book one. Because i hadn't sold it. It was just me in my little apartment with my dog right away and no idea what was going to happen at the end of it. It was so pure that i don't know that that could ever be duplicated again. Because by the time. I wrote the second book. I was under contract to random house. And so now was writing for an audience and i was writing for my editors but you know those royalty statements came in and it was like. I will always have to have another chuck up if i do this. So what is the play here and a friend of mine. One of my best friends said. I don't know anyone who watches more tv than you. Why haven't you thought of this before. And i don't know why. Evan thought of this before so i made the transition to tv in two thousand seven and obviously tv has has more influence depending on how many novels you can sell. How do you see the process in doing the work that you wanna do. You know working. Tv in general there are a lot of voices in. It's usually collaborative median so working on the novels. And then going to my first show are remember the experience of you know everybody's talking around the table pitching whatever else and are pitched an idea and a solution to something and it didn't land you know was just like no one picked up on it. It wasn't the solution that went up on the board. And i just remember thinking. Did you hear what i just said because previously. If i had that idea that was the idea. And that's what we're working on so learning to. Just say while i have this idea and i think that we could do this this year. And then the show run. The other writers like that doesn't work. And here's why and then it's gone. The ideas done. It doesn't work it. There was so much adjustment to that to the point that new riders will go back to the idea again and again. Because they're thinking. Well maybe. I just need to mention different. Or maybe they weren't listening and it's like no. The idea didn't work that's it. let's move on so when you're sitting there and you're determining everything in the entire world it's really different and now what's it like as the show run in that room. I have more control. So i'm the person when someone pitches and i'm like oh i don't think that works. That doesn't feel like something that poppy with do. Or that doesn't feel like something that the marcus character with think. And it's because they live in my head a little bit more than they do for the rest of the writers even though everybody's giving their all and then the thing here that's an added piece is. This is completely different from what the novelist imagined. It's a different title. It's not set in illinois and the lead is black and the lead is a podcast and in her novel. The story was based around the twins. That were played by lizzy caplan onscreen. So i just want to ask you about representation in hollywood. If you could wave your.

"spellman" Discussed on Influence

Influence

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"spellman" Discussed on Influence

"And i had no idea among gary switchblades and her and our partners but it was so like it just said so much about her is just like on milady but i will cut you yes so then. She passed away in two thousand eight. And i've always wanted to use that. And it's the kind of history that matched this character because she grew up the daughter of biker and the capstone which is the bike club on. The show is based on a black motorcycle club that was established in oakland. One of the most powerful scenes in the show is when popey sister gets arrested in retaliation for poppies investigation into an old murder case and When she's being processed they take a hair and kipa for nails and take out eyelashes. I mean it's quite awful. It's filmed in you. You've written in the way that it. She's she's being raised. Why was that element important. We wanted the consequences of poppies actions to ripple through her. And they're all these things that you know. I'll read about all cr here about and they'll just live and my brain for years until i have the opportunity to use them and one of the things that was always just so disturbing to me was the sport of humiliation sometimes when people are arrested and it can be specific to race and gender and so for this black woman who is so tied up in our physicality and how she looks. She loves to be glamorous. She loves to be done up to the nines. The best way to break her down would be two stripper of all that artifice and so we talked about the scene in the room. I told the story of lax being notorious for years for doing that to women when they came through the airport. It was a little bit of a game that they played. I don't know why where if they saw someone and they suspected that they were wearing a. We've or a wig. There are security reasons. Sometimes but it didn't feel like that was the reason that they would strip these women of these things in the airport in a public arena. Just the idea of combining those two things in this environment of a police station. That's not physical violence but it is emotionally violent. What they did to her and we want it to have everyone in her family pay for her work in some way it was an interesting scene to pitch because then everybody starts sort of talking about different ways. They've been humiliated. Or you know where. Someone has used their authority to erase them. And i think it was one of the best things of the season and wind. Did you want other people to see that. Why why is that important. Because i don't think that people actually know or knew that that happened to that degree and it was just a parking ticket and she hasn't really done anything wrong so it was the perfect way to kind of show that now if she had been on a crime spree and she'd murdered nine people. You wouldn't care if that was done to her but this was done to someone to get back at our sister and this really horrific way that they break her down when she's processed would just hit with more of a punch to feel some responsibility when you're writing and when you're producing a show like this i do. I respect fillmore responsibility as characters though and so i know that writers have this discussion about that all the time but i feel like if i go in and the only thing i'm thinking about is responsibility. And what the ramifications are then. There's a way that the characters become a little bit of a soapbox and i'd just rather have it come out through the character interactions and their relationship so if there is something that i want to express then the goal is to try to find the way to do it in the most organic way possible and i think that that seen as an example of how we were able to accomplish that if you wanted to continue trying to build out characters manatee and enabled people to interpret them respond positively. Would it not be simply to just carry on writing novels. Yes but i probably wouldn't be able to pay my bills true. I did a two book series for random house. And i loved it and writing. Those novels was just truly a wonderful experience especially with book one. Because i hadn't sold it. It was just me in my little apartment with my dog right away and no idea what was going to happen at the end of it. It was so pure that i don't know that that could ever be duplicated again. Because by the time. I wrote the second book. I was under contract to random house. And so now was writing for an audience and i was writing for my editors but you know those royalty statements came in and it was like. I will always have to have another chuck up if i do this. So what is the play here and a friend of mine. One of my best friends said. I don't know anyone who watches more tv than you. Why haven't you thought of this before. And i don't know why. Evan thought of this before so i made the transition to tv in two thousand seven and obviously tv has has more influence depending on how many novels you can sell. How do you see the process in doing the work that you wanna do. You know working. Tv in general there are a lot of voices in. It's usually collaborative median so working on the novels. And then going to my first show are remember the experience of you know everybody's talking around the table pitching whatever else and are pitched an idea and a solution to something and it didn't land you know was just like no one picked up on it. It wasn't the solution that went up on the board. And i just remember thinking. Did you hear what i just said because previously. If i had that idea that was the idea. And that's what we're working on so learning to. Just say while i have this idea and i think that we could do this this year. And then the show run. The other writers like that doesn't work. And here's why and then it's gone. The ideas done. It doesn't work it. There was so much adjustment to that to the point that new riders will go back to the idea again and again. Because they're thinking. Well maybe. I just need to mention different. Or maybe they weren't listening and it's like no. The idea didn't work that's it. let's move on so when you're sitting there and you're determining everything in the entire world it's really different and now what's it like as the show run in that room. I have more control. So i'm the person when someone pitches and i'm like oh i don't think that works. That doesn't feel like something that poppy with do. Or that doesn't feel like something that the marcus character with think. And it's because they live in my head a little bit more than they do for the rest of the writers even though everybody's giving their all and then the thing here that's an added piece is. This is completely different from what the novelist imagined. It's a different title. It's not set in illinois and the lead is black and the lead is a podcast and in her novel. The story was based around the twins. That were played by lizzy caplan onscreen. So i just want to ask you about representation in hollywood. If you could wave your.

gary switchblades oakland fillmore Evan chuck marcus illinois lizzy caplan hollywood
"spellman" Discussed on Influence

Influence

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"spellman" Discussed on Influence

"Nichelle. Very nice to meet you. Thanks for making the time. Thank you so much. Maybe you could help us understand. What a show runner is to the people. Have a bit of an idea as to what it is that you do well. It's the person who's in charge of both the creative and the production. It's a big title for one person. You sit in writers rooms for years with different show runners and you sit there and you think yeah. I wouldn't do that that way. And then you get into that seat and you understand the reasons why some choices were made because it can be very overwhelming job. Usually as a writer. You're focused on the rioting focused on pending deadlines writing something that people respond to but now you're bombarded with questions about the construction of the sets casting the budget props you know whether this paint color looks good on the ceiling of this one room that they might not show on camera and i came home after the first week and i said to my husband. I didn't know that. So many questions existed in one day. So it's kind of like you're the general you're in charge of all the troops. Would it be fair to say the sort of the for that project. yes yes. So you're the series. Could truth be told if those you listening having watched it you should do. And it's about a journalist turned. Podcast played by incredible octavia spencer who revisits a murder case. And there's a medication that she covered as a young journalist. I just wanna ask octavia spencer. She everything that you'd hoped she'd be. She's amazing she's she's the best. She's the best actress and she's a wonderful human being. So i got so lucky with my first. Show that number one on the call. She is just a diamond and season to kate. Hudson joins us and she was perfection. So i just you know almost want to end the show. Because i don't want to risk it now. The character played by otavio. Spencer as podcast. Obviously that's relevant for us. As of this project you went out and raise the money. You pitched it to apple an apple board. So why podcasting. What's the unique power of this medium. A couple of things. This is based on a book called. Are you sleeping. And i went to a meeting with a producer who had worked with in the past as i was getting ready to leave. She said oh yeah. We got the spoken that hasn't been published yet. But i think there's something there do you wanna take a look at it and maybe read it over the holiday. This was maybe three christmases ago. And so i took it home. Read it over the christmas break and in january when she and i talked i said you know. I think there's something really interesting here. But the podcast is a very very minor character in the story. So my idea for this adaptation would be to make the podcast at the center of the story and that way we could have somewhat of an anthology series where we investigate a different story every season. It gave us the possibility of refreshing the cast. You know not getting bored with the same old story and then delving into different questions and it was really just opened up the world and it was also to kind of explore the wild wild west of modern day journalism. There's a way in which anybody can start a twitter account throw a podcast in their journalists not with the same level of training that we saw in the past or the same responsibility to anyone whether it's a corporation or person so it was interesting to me to have this woman who came from very traditional background all of a sudden being a medium where she could just run on her own opinion for good and bad and what we explore and season two is the consequences of that. No hold bar level of journalism. So it's a bit of an ongoing story. But what was appealing to me was allowing her opinion to be a part of the story and then her opinion taken over the story whether she was right or wrong. You said it's based on a book that you read three christmases ago. Yeah to re read something three christmases ago to have pitched it sold it and produced it executed it and have already in season. Two seems pretty quick. Oh my god. It was remarkably quick. I read it that. Christmas spoke to the producer in january and we went out to pitch it in september so two weeks. We pitched all over town. We were lucky enough to have multiple offers. And i was really excited about the idea of working with apple on this new venture. We started the writer's room in february and we started shooting in june so it was like boom. Let's go and one of the reasons was because they were getting ready to launch the platform and there needed to be content and it happened very very quickly and we just robbed season two two weeks ago. Your background is rising right. So you written books. You've also been a writer oversee on other shows and in particular the good wife and justified. The writer's room i can imagine it ego playing a huge role and people's inability to listen and i can say it's going to everyone. So what are the key ingredients making it successful. You know every room. I've been in has had a different personality at it comes from the top. So you know. There are some jobs that i've been offered and i knew that they had terrible. Ceo's you know that the environment there was abusive or negative or twisted. or whatever. and so i'd pass on those jobs. The best kept secret is everybody knows where the bad shows are. But it can be a place where you leave. At the end of the day. Demoralized and i had zero interest in that. My point of view is is one of the best jobs in my opinion in the world. Why make it awful. And i didn't want people that had reputations for being political or that they maneuvered or they had nasty personalities or they didn't play well with others. None of that. The key ingredient for me was smart creative people that knew how to operate in a respectful environment. You want the room to be open so there could be a fair exchange of ideas. you know. we're dealing with grief and an episode. We're dealing with generational trauma over the whole series. Like what role has violence play generation. Lii in a family so that will lead to people telling stories about their own family history. So if there's judgments sitting across the table you're not going to get into the specificity and the nitty gritty of the story. That's interesting and will make for good tv so it's really up to the show runner to set the tone set the environment that is going to be the individual writer room. Could you perhaps give some examples of of where it's been personal where you can see that people have been able to refund some of your suggestions or others. So the podcast who was in the original novel. The story was set in a small town in illinois. Which i know very little about and so when we made the podcast her the center of the story i then had to build her character builder. Backstory build her family history out from scratch. Because we didn't know a lot of it. In addition the casting of octavia spencer and octavia being an ep on the show. I had to build a back story that matched this black woman because the character was not black in the novel so we moved into the bay area which is something that i know growing up there. I had four writers in the room who were also from the bay area but there were small things that were pieces of family history that we threw in their octavius characters. Name poppy cornell. There's a scene where poppy is getting dressed. She goes in her closet and she opens a drawer and they're all these switchblades. Beautifully kept in this jewelry box and they have engravings on them and they say her mother's name on the show and our grandmother's name so when my mother passed away one of the beautiful things that we found was a box of beaded crystal bags. All these really pretty evening bags and every single one of them had a switchblade inside and my sisters..

octavia spencer otavio Nichelle apple Spencer Hudson kate twitter octavia illinois
"spellman" Discussed on Influence

Influence

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"spellman" Discussed on Influence

"Nichelle. Very nice to meet you. Thanks for making the time. Thank you so much. Maybe you could help us understand. What a show runner is to the people. Have a bit of an idea as to what it is that you do well. It's the person who's in charge of both the creative and the production. It's a big title for one person. You sit in writers rooms for years with different show runners and you sit there and you think yeah. I wouldn't do that that way. And then you get into that seat and you understand the reasons why some choices were made because it can be very overwhelming job. Usually as a writer. You're focused on the rioting focused on pending deadlines writing something that people respond to but now you're bombarded with questions about the construction of the sets casting the budget props you know whether this paint color looks good on the ceiling of this one room that they might not show on camera and i came home after the first week and i said to my husband. I didn't know that. So many questions existed in one day. So it's kind of like you're the general you're in charge of all the troops. Would it be fair to say the sort of the for that project. yes yes. So you're the series. Could truth be told if those you listening having watched it you should do. And it's about a journalist turned. Podcast played by incredible octavia spencer who revisits a murder case. And there's a medication that she covered as a young journalist. I just wanna ask octavia spencer. She everything that you'd hoped she'd be. She's amazing she's she's the best. She's the best actress and she's a wonderful human being. So i got so lucky with my first. Show that number one on the call. She is just a diamond and season to kate. Hudson joins us and she was perfection. So i just you know almost want to end the show. Because i don't want to risk it now. The character played by otavio. Spencer as podcast. Obviously that's relevant for us. As of this project you went out and raise the money. You pitched it to apple an apple board. So why podcasting. What's the unique power of this medium. A couple of things. This is based on a book called. Are you sleeping. And i went to a meeting with a producer who had worked with in the past as i was getting ready to leave. She said oh yeah. We got the spoken that hasn't been published yet. But i think there's something there do you wanna take a look at it and maybe read it over the holiday. This was maybe three christmases ago. And so i took it home. Read it over the christmas break and in january when she and i talked i said you know. I think there's something really interesting here. But the podcast is a very very minor character in the story. So my idea for this adaptation would be to make the podcast at the center of the story and that way we could have somewhat of an anthology series where we investigate a different story every season. It gave us the possibility of refreshing the cast. You know not getting bored with the same old story and then delving into different questions and it was really just opened up the world and it was also to kind of explore the wild wild west of modern day journalism. There's a way in which anybody can start a twitter account throw a podcast in their journalists not with the same level of training that we saw in the past or the same responsibility to anyone whether it's a corporation or person so it was interesting to me to have this woman who came from very traditional background all of a sudden being a medium where she could just run on her own opinion for good and bad and what we explore and season two is the consequences of that. No hold bar level of journalism. So it's a bit of an ongoing story. But what was appealing to me was allowing her opinion to be a part of the story and then her opinion taken over the story whether she was right or wrong. You said it's based on a book that you read three christmases ago. Yeah to re read something three christmases ago to have pitched it sold it and produced it executed it and have already in season. Two seems pretty quick. Oh my god. It was remarkably quick. I read it that. Christmas spoke to the producer in january and we went out to pitch it in september so two weeks. We pitched all over town. We were lucky enough to have multiple offers. And i was really excited about the idea of working with apple on this new venture. We started the writer's room in february and we started shooting in june so it was like boom. Let's go and one of the reasons was because they were getting ready to launch the platform and there needed to be content and it happened very very quickly and we just robbed season two two weeks ago. Your background is rising right. So you written books. You've also been a writer oversee on other shows and in particular the good wife and justified. The writer's room i can imagine it ego playing a huge role and people's inability to listen and i can say it's going to everyone. So what are the key ingredients making it successful. You know every room. I've been in has had a different personality at it comes from the top. So you know. There are some jobs that i've been offered and i knew that they had terrible. Ceo's you know that the environment there was abusive or negative or twisted. or whatever. and so i'd pass on those jobs. The best kept secret is everybody knows where the bad shows are. But it can be a place where you leave. At the end of the day. Demoralized and i had zero interest in that. My point of view is is one of the best jobs in my opinion in the world. Why make it awful. And i didn't want people that had reputations for being political or that they maneuvered or they had nasty personalities or they didn't play well with others. None of that. The key ingredient for me was smart creative people that knew how to operate in a respectful environment. You want the room to be open so there could be a fair exchange of ideas. you know. we're dealing with grief and an episode. We're dealing with generational trauma over the whole series. Like what role has violence play generation. Lii in a family so that will lead to people telling stories about their own family history. So if there's judgments sitting across the table you're not going to get into the specificity and the nitty gritty of the story. That's interesting and will make for good tv so it's really up to the show runner to set the tone set the environment that is going to be the individual writer room. Could you perhaps give some examples of of where it's been personal where you can see that people have been able to refund some of your suggestions or others. So the podcast who was in the original novel. The story was set in a small town in illinois. Which i know very little about and so when we made the podcast her the center of the story i then had to build her character builder. Backstory build her family history out from scratch. Because we didn't know a lot of it. In addition the casting of octavia spencer and octavia being an ep on the show. I had to build a back story that matched this black woman because the character was not black in the novel so we moved into the bay area which is something that i know growing up there. I had four writers in the room who were also from the bay area but there were small things that were pieces of family history that we threw in their octavius characters. Name poppy cornell. There's a scene where poppy is getting dressed. She goes in her closet and she opens a drawer and they're all these switchblades. Beautifully kept in this jewelry box and they have engravings on them and they say her mother's name on the show and our grandmother's name so when my mother passed away one of the beautiful things that we found was a box of beaded crystal bags. All these really pretty evening bags and every single one of them had a switchblade inside and my sisters..

"spellman" Discussed on Influence

Influence

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"spellman" Discussed on Influence

"Nichelle. Very nice to meet you. Thanks for making the time. Thank you so much. Maybe you could help us understand. What a show runner is to the people. Have a bit of an idea as to what it is that you do well. It's the person who's in charge of both the creative and the production. It's a big title for one person. You sit in writers rooms for years with different show runners and you sit there and you think yeah. I wouldn't do that that way. And then you get into that seat and you understand the reasons why some choices were made because it can be very overwhelming job. Usually as a writer. You're focused on the rioting focused on pending deadlines writing something that people respond to but now you're bombarded with questions about the construction of the sets casting the budget props you know whether this paint color looks good on the ceiling of this one room that they might not show on camera and i came home after the first week and i said to my husband. I didn't know that. So many questions existed in one day. So it's kind of like you're the general you're in charge of all the troops. Would it be fair to say the sort of the for that project. yes yes. So you're the series. Could truth be told if those you listening having watched it you should do. And it's about a journalist turned. Podcast played by incredible octavia spencer who revisits a murder case. And there's a medication that she covered as a young journalist. I just wanna ask octavia spencer. She everything that you'd hoped she'd be. She's amazing she's she's the best. She's the best actress and she's a wonderful human being. So i got so lucky with my first. Show that number one on the call. She is just a diamond and season to kate. Hudson joins us and she was perfection. So i just you know almost want to end the show. Because i don't want to risk it now. The character played by otavio. Spencer as podcast. Obviously that's relevant for us. As of this project you went out and raise the money. You pitched it to apple an apple board. So why podcasting. What's the unique power of this medium. A couple of things. This is based on a book called. Are you sleeping. And i went to a meeting with a producer who had worked with in the past as i was getting ready to leave. She said oh yeah. We got the spoken that hasn't been published yet. But i think there's something there do you wanna take a look at it and maybe read it over the holiday. This was maybe three christmases

Popey Poppy
Nichelle Tramble Spellman on the Writers Responsibility and Representation in Hollywood

Influence

02:33 min | 1 year ago

Nichelle Tramble Spellman on the Writers Responsibility and Representation in Hollywood

"Nichelle. Very nice to meet you. Thanks for making the time. Thank you so much. Maybe you could help us understand. What a show runner is to the people. Have a bit of an idea as to what it is that you do well. It's the person who's in charge of both the creative and the production. It's a big title for one person. You sit in writers rooms for years with different show runners and you sit there and you think yeah. I wouldn't do that that way. And then you get into that seat and you understand the reasons why some choices were made because it can be very overwhelming job. Usually as a writer. You're focused on the rioting focused on pending deadlines writing something that people respond to but now you're bombarded with questions about the construction of the sets casting the budget props you know whether this paint color looks good on the ceiling of this one room that they might not show on camera and i came home after the first week and i said to my husband. I didn't know that. So many questions existed in one day. So it's kind of like you're the general you're in charge of all the troops. Would it be fair to say the sort of the for that project. yes yes. So you're the series. Could truth be told if those you listening having watched it you should do. And it's about a journalist turned. Podcast played by incredible octavia spencer who revisits a murder case. And there's a medication that she covered as a young journalist. I just wanna ask octavia spencer. She everything that you'd hoped she'd be. She's amazing she's she's the best. She's the best actress and she's a wonderful human being. So i got so lucky with my first. Show that number one on the call. She is just a diamond and season to kate. Hudson joins us and she was perfection. So i just you know almost want to end the show. Because i don't want to risk it now. The character played by otavio. Spencer as podcast. Obviously that's relevant for us. As of this project you went out and raise the money. You pitched it to apple an apple board. So why podcasting. What's the unique power of this medium. A couple of things. This is based on a book called. Are you sleeping. And i went to a meeting with a producer who had worked with in the past as i was getting ready to leave. She said oh yeah. We got the spoken that hasn't been published yet. But i think there's something there do you wanna take a look at it and maybe read it over the holiday. This was maybe three christmases

Nichelle Octavia Spencer Otavio Hudson Kate Apple Spencer
"spellman" Discussed on Influence

Influence

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"spellman" Discussed on Influence

"I can eliminate a week on the vineyard which is not mother. Poppy is a journalist and a well-known one of that. She cut her teeth on a case that sent a young man to prison for life. A reporting help game tried as an adult and it cemented his fate but recently she started to worry the in her quest to further her career and use this murder case to do it she might have missed some crucial pieces of evidence so almost two decades after her initial coverage. She begins digging into the details a second time round and she does she shares those findings on her podcast. Popey is walking in her neighborhood with her husband. When the police chief rolls up in his cruiser and literally cuts them off go speak to for a moment poppies gays hardens and probably husbands steps in front of l. I'm asking father not as a uniform. Stop them right. What if you did make a mistake. My son deserves to imprison. And you're gonna come to the same conclusion because it's the truth. When the police chief drives away puppy and her husband look around their white neighbors have emerged from. The houses just turned us from the new people in the neighborhood to the black people that poppy.

Popey Poppy
"spellman" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"spellman" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"We continue our conversation with Tom Spellman. Every time we have come on, it invokes a lot of questions and comments. Fruit seems to be very popular. You know how to keep your trees trimmed. How do you harvest all those things and we continue our discussion. With those very same topics, Tiger? Yeah, And before the break I had mentioned about you know you're at the nursery and you picked out your stone fruit. You're ready to take it home and plant it. Um, you know, maybe it's Tom. If you have some tips if you haven't covered on on on it already, But what people need to do and specifically, do you? Do you think that people need to consider any pruning? Or any kind of like horticultural oil spray when they get that fruit tree home into their own garden Tiger. That's a great question. And absolutely, you know, the philosophy on fruit trees, from my opinion is The first cuts that you make the day that you plant the tree. Those first cut should be made. Those are the cuts that are going to determine what the eventual structure of that tree is going to be. And I was just talking to somebody the other day on the phone, and they said, Well, we planted a few trees last year, and we thought we'd let him grow for a year before we did our initial pruning. So you you just wasted a year wasted a whole year, so you don't want to wait to do that initial pruning. You want to make sure that you're looking for those low heading cut so that you can get a nice low structure and you can regrow a structure that's gonna be manageable for you. You don't want that big, long, lanky, tall plum tree to start growing out at 6 ft. And grow above that you wanted to start scaffolding at 3 Ft so that you can manage that structure and be able to work with that lower canopy to produce a good easily manage crop of fruit for you. So, yes, the first day that you buy that tree and plant that tree Those first pruning cuts are important, and it's even more important when you're considering a bare root tree because you know we can grow a two year plum tree or a two year peach tree or two year apricot tree That is 8 ft. Tall, But when we did those trees out of the ground, it's the same piece of equipment. That digs an 8 ft tree that also digs than 18 industry, So they're all going to have AH root system that is basically the same. So that little root system whether it's 14, or 16, or 18 inches in diameter does not have the ability to effectively push out an 8 FT. Top. So what you want to do is you want to consider the lowest structure on the tree? You want to take the big, long, Winky top out of it, And you want to make sure that you're when you look at that tree. That your your structure that you're growing off of is balanced out to the root system that you're planting if you've got a balance or reasonable balance between cop and roof. They know more than about 1.5. Times scaffolding branches as you have root system. Then now that root system can effectively push nutrients and carbohydrates up into that structure and put out a very, very vigorous aggressive Growth pattern through the first season. So you're reestablishing fruiting structure in that first season, not waiting for a year or two years to make those decisions, And in the meantime, growing a tree that's where the system is weak. Because that little root system didn't have the ability to supply all the carbohydrates and nutrients needed to really effectively push out that top So, yes, prune early and, you know, look for a balance of no more than 1.5 times. Scaffolding structure to the root system that you're planting. And now how about disease and pest control? Because you know one of the things with fruit trees. Is that in order protect them in the growing time of your fruiting, come here. You have to take those considerations while it's dormant, right? Absolutely. And you know, with the whether that we're having right now. I mean in the Southwest,.

Fruit Tom Spellman Southwest Winky
"spellman" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"spellman" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Contagious new strain of the coronavirus that spreading in Britain is showing up here in Florida. The state Department of Health says the patient is in Martin County on the Treasure Coast. He's a man in his twenties with no history of travel. D O. H is working with the CDC to investigate. Say experts anticipate the new strain will have little to no impact on the effectiveness of the covert 19 vaccine. The announcement came after reports that the strain has been detected in Colorado and California. I mean, I'll inspector. Some people in Florida are finding out they don't necessarily need an appointment to get a coronavirus shot. Health officials in ST John's County say their phone system crashed And people started lining up early this morning to receive of vaccination without an appointment. Sarasota County is another example or seniors and been able to walk up to the local health department and get vaccinated. The New year's onto a violent stored in ST Petersburg and for three people were shot early this morning and for a large crowd gathered in an argument broke out. Police say officers on the scene at the time heard the gunfire and we're able to quickly help the victims whose injuries appear to be non life threatening. The pandemic hit Florida and its terms of based economy particularly hard, but Tony Carvajal and Florida tanks watched sends. Recovery is well underway. We've had actually a better year that we expected to they just up the tax collection estimates from this past year by a billion dollars. He's cautiously optimistic about the state's recovery in 21. Believing at all l pace all other states. Among the new laws taking effect today in Florida finds for passing a stopped school bus or now doubled. You're looking at paying between 204 100 box with Florida's news. I'm Larry Spellman. Several Pembroke Pines is Florida's number one volume Subaru store where you can Always expect extraordinary services. Subaru Pembroke Pines come in for an amazing automotive experience. What do you reckon? That's what homeowners Roman public here Lori Finkelstein read a real state L C with a December update. I haven't seen a shortage of waterfront homes like this since 2006. If you're getting 7 to 10% above market value for your home sounds good, then this is the time right now to do it. Not all areas will get it. So gotta 888 97 roman dot com and into your address, and I will personally contact you or go to my Facebook page Roman public real estate and see the properties. I've personally just sold above market value and how I could do the same for you..

Florida Subaru Pembroke Pines Department of Health Martin County Sarasota County Pembroke Pines Britain Subaru Treasure Coast Larry Spellman Lori Finkelstein ST Petersburg Tony Carvajal CDC O. H Colorado California
"spellman" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"spellman" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Lago resort in Palm Beach. A tank the agreement earlier this week and insisted on $2000 direct payments to Americans. Ah White Christmas isn't in the forecast for Floridians. But the coldest weather of the season, perhaps in years in the Sunshine State is arriving just in time for the big day, says meteorologist Dave Help in the Florida Weather Center. One of the coldest nights we've seen in some time. Temperatures are going to be into the twenties for low temperatures Friday night into early Saturday morning with widespread freezes across Florida. By the time you get down to Brooksville, we're talking about temperatures in the twenties on your education in Florida is changing and the corona virus pandemic is fueling it. Across Florida Community colleges are competing for students like never before, Thanks in part to Cove it what happens by going overnight digitally is that you now as a student have a choice. You can pick the best online college anywhere, not the one in your backyard. Miami Dade College President Madeline Puma Riga believes community colleges will fuel the state's economic recovery as they provide affordable programs for a changing workforce. I'm Rory Oniy, the number of Floridians filing for first time jobless benefit. Last week was down by 1900. Still, 24,000 found claims The Magic came out on top over the heat last night in Orlando 1 13 to 107 is Florida's to MBA teams kicked off, then you season with Florida's news. I'm Larry Spellman. Straight. Scattered storms will hit the low to mid eighties. Tonight. Showers and storms early overnight. Low to around 55 sunshine for Christmas and colder up to around 60 wins making up close to 30 MPH with update trying o'clock in South Florida Severe weather station on the weather Channel Steffy know on these radio six time Wi OD. This report is sponsored by better help dot com There's something interfering with your happiness, visit better help dot com slash feel happy for 15% off your first month join over one million people who have taken charge of their mental health with the help of an experienced professional. That's better. H e l p dot com slash feel happy. As a marketer. You want to reach everyone Adults teams millennials, but it's not like these groups all hang out together, right? Actually wrong. They're all listening to radio commercials. Just like this one radio ads connect with 93% of Americans every week. That's more than Google more than Facebook. More than TV reach your customers, all in one place. Visit I hard media dot com or dial Pound 2 50 say Advertise with I Heart that pound to 50 say, Advertise with I Heart and Let us help Grow your business. Hey, it's Brian. My Joining.

Florida Florida Weather Center Dave Help Miami Dade College South Florida Palm Beach Madeline Puma Riga Rory Oniy Larry Spellman Brooksville Orlando Google Facebook President Wi
Married to the Movement

Committed

06:28 min | 1 year ago

Married to the Movement

"I was fifteen. And sean you. You're seventeen right when we first met. And we were both in church in lexington kentucky and we met just so you. I asked me for my number at the watch night service and those who long before that though. Yeah but watch night services a tradition in the back this church maybe other churches actually not just baptist but is it a particularly black thing. I don't know watch night services where you just you watch the new year. Come in you're at church at midnight and there's like a church service and then afterwards there's normally a dinner or breakfast being served. It's a really awesome time. That was the first time you actually from my number. But you're right. We have met before then. Just seen each at church and out. I'll let you tell the story of how you became immediately smitten with. I didn't notice what s where you were going. But and i saw this girl who seemed like she was running things she really was the sunday school secretary but not just for children like for the whole sunday school at the church and i remember just thinking to myself. Who is this young girl. That is running everything. She was super spunky and she always warlike creative hats and had a lot of style. So you just pique my interest. But at that time she and i both always kept a boyfriend and girlfriend and so she was dating. Somebody and i was dating somebody. But i i was pretty interested in her. It took me almost six months to kind of build up the nerve to to get her number and then even very slow moving. I was interested in you for really from the first moment that we started talking to each other and john would show up at choir rehearsals and stuff for no good reason. He didn't sing. He wasn't in the choir. I was but i guess they didn't have anything better to do it. His time on a thursday night and so he would come and we were like chitchat. And even after you asked for my number. And i gave it to you like it took forever to to ask me out. I think you were shy. I was slow. Maybe i was a bit shy. But i think some of it was. I had just grown to be like a super private person at that point in time. And so i'd have to even go back in time and reimagined what i was thinking but once we got started we were super committed to each other in super into each other. After that we went on our first date. I was a sophomore in high school. John was a senior and then he left to go to morehouse college in atlanta. And i was still stuck in kentucky waiting to graduate high school and then i would go to atlanta to attend spellman. We dated long distance for two years and it will never not amaze me that we maintained long distance relationship s. sixteen and eighteen year old and he was in atlanta the city of lag. Black excellent surrounded by all these beautiful women and still somehow interested in little me backing kentucky. But he was and we made it and about two years into college. Actually we got married because the baby came. I actually our oldest birch out candy. She was born my sophomore year. Now she was born junior year at spelman and we got married before she was born. Just to be sure we weren't total heathen we have been raised in church and so that was like a requirement before that baby gets here. You better be married so we did get married and had kendy and so we were super young parents. I tell everybody. I had a husband and a baby and i couldn't even drink yet. I wasn't even twenty one years old kids really and when you're in college in this kind of in between stage of childhood and adulthood and we hardly knew how to provide for ourselves sauce doing airport security and we were still going to school fulltime which was a struggle. We both struggled to finish college. We did when we knew in part. Not just that we wanted to do it but we knew act to to make a life in a living for ourselves that we were going to have to finish school but it was brutally difficult to do that with a young family. And when we were doing this in two thousand and one it was particularly in the college environment where we were more house than spelman are super traditional and it was kind of frowned upon in a way to be a young parent. Mba student for sure. Nobody was saying anything overtly necessarily but we were aware now you see videos and things go viral of professors holding babies while they're trying to concentrate in class and that was not our experience like me walking around bully nine months pregnant. I don't remember anybody else who was doing that. Yeah it was really difficult. It was alienating in some ways our lives completely changed pretty much at every stage of life. Man not tell people now. I really can't separate my whole adulthood from being a father and rain. I've been parents literally almost every year of our adult life and so our entire journey of even self-discovery in our twenties of trying to understand what either one of us grew up in a household where we saw healthy marriages and healthy relationships kind of had to struggle and sometimes flounder and figure those things out on our own and one of the things they ran. I've always tried to tell people is when you grow up in a lot of ways when you grow up in a marriage. We were together as teenagers together in our twenties in our thirties. Now i'm forty. You are with somebody through several phases of life and we've had to learn some really hard lessons than heart's skills on how to support in love your spouse through all the different natural phases that a lot of people just by the time you marry somebody. They've already gone through some of those phases. We've learned a lot of lessons. Have been with each other for now. Almost twenty five years even though whereas young as we are. We've we're nearing twenty five year point of being together

Kentucky Atlanta Lexington Sean Morehouse College Spellman Spelman John
"spellman" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"spellman" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Licenses have a chance to get their privileges back at a discount that begins today. The people have to take advantage of those who have outstanding five beef or they have not paid any traffic citation. This is the time for them to meet those obligations. They still have to pay what they owe. But Orange County clerk of court Tiffany more, Russell says they won't have to pay collection costs if they sign up during Operation. Green Light Dates vary from county to county. Some county clerks aren't participating because the pandemic Tickle advisory for Orange County schools is leading a statewide push to extend distance learning through the end of the school year under the Department of Education School Reopening plans. Distance learning is set to expire at the end of December. Based on recent increases in the number of corona virus cases, the committee is calling distance learning a medical and academic necessity. They're also concerned that if all students are required to return to the classroom Social distancing would essentially be impossible. I'm Larry Spellman Governor, Rhonda Santa's has signaled his support for having all students return to school in January, parts of a Florida highway being dedicated in honor of July, Perry, a victim of the echoey massacre, who was hanged for exercising his right to vote, representative Geraldine Thompson and Senator Randolph Bracy, sponsored the bill to rename a portion of Silver Star Road in Perry's memory. This week marks 100 years since the massacre, an event that is considered the most violent in the history of U. S elections. And this weekend, the first four person crew to launch aboard a Falcon nine rocket arrives at Cape Canaveral. The astronauts are flying into the Kennedy Space Center ahead of their launch. The four are going to be in the first operational crude a launch in a crude dragon capsule by space six Mission is now set to launch November 14th with Florida's news. I'm trade Johnson. Like Friday. Savings all month of Miami Leak, so tamal represent interest.

Orange County Department of Education School Perry Florida Kennedy Space Center Cape Canaveral Senator Randolph Bracy Geraldine Thompson Larry Spellman Miami Johnson Russell representative Rhonda Santa
Grand jury proceedings in Breonna Taylor case will be released, Kentucky AG says

AP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Grand jury proceedings in Breonna Taylor case will be released, Kentucky AG says

"Attorney General Daniel Cameron says he will release recordings tomorrow of grand jury proceedings in the Briana Taylor case. Cameron acknowledges he never asked the grand jury to consider homicide charges against police officers involved in Taylor's death. At a rally in New York Reverend Kaji Spellman Dusa prayed for the attorney general, May he find a way back to his blackness. May he turn and repents from all that He should have done that he has not yet done. New

Daniel Cameron Reverend Kaji Spellman Dusa Briana Taylor Attorney New York
the 6:00 hour

Houston's Morning News

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

the 6:00 hour

"As As I I said, said, chairs chairs on on vacation vacation and and again again today, today, Here's Here's Dona Dona Spellman, Spellman, and and it's it's 50 50 What What on on NewsRadio NewsRadio 7 7 40 40 K K T. T. R. R. H H our our top top story story this this hour hour President President Trump Trump campaign's campaign's in in Michigan, Michigan, talking about the military might Of the U. S. Something he also did with the reporter Bob Woodward before opponents claimed he gave away military top secret information. We have systems and missiles and rockets and Military and take. We have systems that you've never even seen before. President XI has nothing like it. Putin has nothing like it. Nobody has anything like what we have on DH, I said. Is he giving away military information? No,

Dona Dona Spellman President President Trump Trum President Xi Newsradio Bob Woodward Michigan Putin Reporter T. T. R. R. H
Atlanta-based Spelman cancels in-person instruction, shifts to digital learning for fall semester

The Frame

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Atlanta-based Spelman cancels in-person instruction, shifts to digital learning for fall semester

"Spelman College and elite. Historically Black College in Atlanta is among a growing number of colleges that are reversing their decisions to bring some students back to campus. With cases rising in Georgia and the politicising of that state's response, Spellman President Mary Schmitt, Campbell says it would be irresponsible to bring students back. We felt very comfortable about what the protocols and practices we were putting into place on our campuses. The one star students walked outside of those gates. Once they went into the city of Atlanta. They were an environment that we felt was Virtually unregulated because classes will be entirely online. Spellman has announced a tuition

Spellman President Mary Schmit Atlanta Spelman College Black College Georgia Campbell
Spelman College Announces Virtual Instruction for the Fall

Fresh Air

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Spelman College Announces Virtual Instruction for the Fall

"College and elite. Historically Black College in Atlanta is among a growing number of colleges that are reversing their decisions to bring some students back to campus, with cases rising in Georgia and the politicising of that state's response. Spellman President Mary Schmitt. Campbell says it would be irresponsible to bring students back. We felt very comfortable about what the protocols and practices we were putting into place on our campuses. The one science students walked outside of those gates. Once they went into the city of Atlanta. They were an environment that we felt was Virtually unregulated because classes will be entirely online. Spellman has announced a tuition discount,

Spellman President Mary Schmit Atlanta Black College Campbell Georgia
New Atlanta Public Schools superintendent sworn in

Atlanta's Evening News and Rick Erickson

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

New Atlanta Public Schools superintendent sworn in

"Georgia native and Spellman Alarm has sworn in is Atlanta's new school superintendent. She says she's ready to do what's right for the district's Children. I'm both honored and excited about the opportunity that is ahead of us. Dr. Lisa Herring says she's motivated by the board and the embrace she's already received from public officials as she steps into the role of Atlanta public schools superintendent Although no one can never predict the future, I can speak to what my focus is and my greatest concern. Turn that is tied to the wellness of Children and being able to make those most serious decisions. Collectively, Doctor Herring's already considering options for students and staff to reenter school this fall Post pandemic Veronica

Superintendent Dr. Lisa Herring Atlanta Spellman Alarm
"spellman" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"spellman" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"The Kennedys go is shown. In spite of his jokes about television, the medium appealed to his show business blood and he couldn't stay away from it. Mr, weaver tell it like Fred's was needed by television. And if it had not been for his health, he would have I'm sure. Lightened up his formula and the town hall tonight, or it's television version would have become one of the great classics, of TV, all his life read wanted to be a writer, and it was a source of great happiness to him that his treadmill to oblivion became a bestseller. When he died on march seventeen to this year. You left behind an unfinished autobiography, which he wrote in a small dusty office. You rented for more green enjoyed foster. One of the most touching was. Coming back to this office, the Tuesday after Fred had died. He'd been there on Saturday. We hadn't been in the office for six or seven days. And we never quite were sure when fed been in the office. We knew he was there every day and yet you never buy. There was never any sign that fed had occupied this place. Except, if you knew friend, everything was neat as a pin. The dust was still need. He disturbed so little and yet disturbed so much with his tremendous talent. But personally he was the most methodical in the finer sense of what methodical means rather than against the drudgery sense of it. we walked in the following Tuesday open the refrigerator and there with the two bottles of apple juice. In the four or five pieces of fruit and the little container of cottage cheese. And in the bottom of the wastebasket. which was quite clean, were a few little shadings from the pencils he had shot him the last penalty job and But my open, the secretary drawer, and in it were twelve brown paper bags neatly folded. These with the bags, with which he had brought to work the fruit, the apple, juice and so. He never threw them away. In case we might possibly meet them and the big show. Theme Song Imagine Loosen that we always ending the show with. and. I would like to end this tribute by putting the last line on the big show. made the good. Lord bless and keep you until we meet again. Good night. Ladies and gentlemen. Is Eminence Francis Cardinal Spellman. Archbishop of New York. But, I always admired about Fred. Allen. Was the same quality that will rogers possession. As a great interpreter of American life, the cloudy was essential an unassuming charity. He loved him so to God and country well. He was kind and helpful to his neighbor. And his neighbor was every human being. Ever in help those in need. And especially loyal and.

Fred Kennedys Francis Cardinal Spellman weaver apple writer secretary Archbishop of New York Allen
"spellman" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"spellman" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Finding difficulties any Spellman with the national federation of independent business says that creates more stress that roll out hit and they were calling their banks and they were being turned away that panic set in the program has three hundred fifty billion dollars the president and congressional leaders say they will add money if needed governor Abbott says we're doing OK on hospital beds but using more ventilators across the state the governor says last week there were eight thousand eight hundred fifty seven ventilators available today there are six thousand and eighty ventilators and available that is not including seven thousand three hundred fifty anesthesia machines with events that could be used if needed he says we do have enough hospital beds to meet the need at least for now but he expects the number of cases of code nineteen to keep growing he says were a couple weeks behind states like New York and California could reach their peak this week Robert wood news radio que L. B. J. Williamson County says it's ready to help nursing home patients county judge bill Gravelle says even though to his knowledge no Wilco's nursing home patient has come down with code nineteen he'd rather have the centers set up in case that changes in the near future but as I remember the story in the Bible and forgive me for being biblical no we didn't build the ark when it was raining Noah built the ark when it was dry Revell says he wants to make sure the county has all options on the table during the outbreak John Cooley newsradio kale B. J. U. T. Austin president Gregory finviz is leaving the Texas Tribune reports he is leaving for Emory University in Atlanta finviz has served as UT's president since twenty fifteen seven oh four eight K. Austin's on time traffic with Melinda Brandt we're looking at a live conditions out there on the freeways and at this time out on any of the mainly there's no reported racks or stalls your next reports at seven fifteen I know indifferent with Austin's on time traffic this fall get visor in effect.

Texas Tribune newsradio kale B. J. U. T. Aus John Cooley bill Gravelle county judge Robert wood Melinda Brandt K. Austin UT Atlanta Emory University Spellman Gregory finviz Revell Noah Wilco L. B. J. Williamson County California New York governor Abbott
"spellman" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"spellman" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"To Spellman who is our guest from Dave Wilson nursery welcome Tom thank you Bob one of the big things is pruning on trees and you know I've we've had friends from many others thoughts on summertime pruning and I'm a devotee of well okay if you want to but I I like to go pruning in January of all the deciduous trees because is that a plea for me and what you want to do that tree the best time for me is January now what is your thoughts on that well I am I'm an advocate of of summer pruning and and summer pruning is strictly done for one reason it's it's size control only so once you've chosen designated size for your trees now you have the opportunity to do the majority of that rough worker or you know over burdened work in the summertime so I'm gonna grow my Peachtree St eight feet tall so that I can recall let fruit from the ground so yeah so is the the theory there is anything that ever grows over eight feet is never going to be fruiting what on the tree because I'm not gonna leave it there long enough so why not get that off earlier in the season would so you can allow the tree to put out one more slash and and you know fill in some of those areas where you've taken off that that excessive growth that you don't need so you're actually adding to the gross down in the lower canopy and not having to supply nutrients and carbohydrates to that growth that is never going to free for you anyway and then you can come back in in the fall or in in the winter January if you like and do your detailed running only collaborations look for dead water disease water broken branches or cross with crisscrossing branches open up the center a little bit that way you have that that a bare bones skeletal structure of that tree now exposed and you can do all that detail work of effectively we're in the summertime I'm not looking to detail at all if I see a broken branch or something I'm going to cut it out but in general all I'm doing is is looking at limiting the size of the tree so that it's manageable for me so the the the two procedures are are completely different from each other there for two completely different purposes and I think the the two complement each other very well the old commercial standards were they would bring their trees strictly and judge January or early February but that's pretty much over I mean most of the guys that are growing commercial fruit trees.

Spellman Bob Dave Wilson Tom
America’s Got Talent: Gabrielle Union’s NBC Meeting Reportedly Put All Eyes on Simon Cowell

TV's Top 5

01:35 min | 2 years ago

America’s Got Talent: Gabrielle Union’s NBC Meeting Reportedly Put All Eyes on Simon Cowell

"NBC NBC has now launched a formal investigation into what happened behind the scenes. On America's got talent that's on Judge Gabrielle Union. After a one season run on the top rated competition show following reports of a toxic culture. Union had what she described as a lengthy five hour. Is there any other kind and and productive meeting on Tuesday during which she expressed her hope for real change at the network union and fellow freshman. Judge Julian huff dismissed November. Twenty second second since then claims of off color jokes from guests Jay Leno and concerns over unions hair and wardrobe choices as being described as quote unquote to black have emerged urged shows workplace. Culture prepares to go under the microscope. In the meantime union has received support from former. Gt judges including Sharon Osborne and Howard Stern with the the ladder calling the Simon callow produce talent show a quote unquote boys club and if anyone would know to recognize a so called boys club it would be Howard stern yeah. Stern spent four seasons as a judge on talent. And here's a quote. He says quote he sets it up that the men stay no matter how ugly they are no matter how old they are no matter or how fat they are no matter how talentless they are and that's of course Howard Stern talking about Simon Cowles selection of the judge's panel he went on to say quote he replaces the hot chicks with hotter chicks and younger. Chicks Howie Mandel is doing a fine serviceable job. Why don't they change him? And why don't they change Simon. This is the ultimate example of a boys club. Time's up and other. Prominent actresses and show runners have voiced their support for

Howard Stern Gabrielle Union Union Judge Julian Huff NBC Howie Mandel Simon Callow Jay Leno Simon Cowles Simon Sharon Osborne America Twenty Second Five Hour
"spellman" Discussed on Signs From The Other Side with Fern Ronay

Signs From The Other Side with Fern Ronay

10:54 min | 3 years ago

"spellman" Discussed on Signs From The Other Side with Fern Ronay

"Forget that what a gift for you and them. Amazing exactly exactly. It's it some of these hard ticket over. It takes time to get over it because it again. It's it's excel extraordinarily humbling to have been blessed to be a part of that and then you have ones that go completely the opposite direction. I have a woman who came in her husband had passed away and he is the funniest spirit. Do I love. She comes back in a regular basis. And she's your daughter back in a regular basis but he is hilarious. Key literally was putting on Superhero Costumes. And he was so entertaining turns out he was an entertainer. He was on stage all the time he brought through his personality so much and he was like that he would get serious but people love to make people laugh especially her any always brings through specific details of what's going on in her life since her last reading but he just has this energy. I am smiling talking about it. Because you know those people that you get around them and you can't not smile He is that person and whenever I get to do a reading with him. It's amazing he's just and yeah. It was amazing and I have never laughed so hard and reading. I was laughing so hard. I was crying until she. And she's like I did not expect things to go this west meter but it was exactly what she needed. Yeah and it's validation that he's still him? Yes yes and I. I have the phrase that I use my website called one more moment with the ones you love. Because they do come through their personalities and I've had so many clients tell me I feel like I just spent time with my mom or with my husband or with my brother because they do come through what their personalities intact And I would say one of my other favorite stories is I have so many of them. I get so excited talking about this. Because it's what people changed sitting across from you or on the phone carrying them There was one woman who came in and she's late twenties. Maybe early thirties sometimes spirits. They will give my client something to watch out for to know that it's them And just be a sign that there with them. So this This woman her sister actually came through and she was giving me a sign of hot air balloons like when she sees hard airplanes to know that that's her and I thought well that's really random off on air balloons and I thought really want me to say how they're balloons and she was like okay and they always say it's not just an actual hot air ballooning picture on the side of a black server but often you see how our land back and so her sister was. My client was like okay. I don't know today she saying and I just I always pass along with. They say whether it makes any sense or not well. She emailed me like thirty minutes later. She says they've just got home and I don't know why didn't think of it but I have exactly two pictures in my bedroom. And this is one of them for ever bear in a hot air balloon. I was like Oh my gosh. Oh that's incredible doesn't have to be an actual harder like. She doesn't have to walk outside and honorably exactly like a Carter a memoir. And they'll you know it could be like that. That's that's a sign that's incredible. It's all of these things because it means something specific it is something that again. I couldn't possibly know Yeah but it. It means something to them and it stays with them to jail personnel. Do you receive any signs from loved ones. I don't and I don't try to Because I don't think that's why I have this gift I think I have it to help others. But one is the things that I've learned is to be okay with not being in control And that was the hardest lesson for me. The Taipei Person Do just to be a psychic medium. In general the first thing I have to do is stop trying when you type a person to stop trying like Laura. Oh I'm wondering about working on on releasing which is so hard I feel like I'm constantly gripping like it's incredibly freeing. Yeah I think about it as a person who's also always been very hard on herself. One of the things for me is when I was like what if I don't do it right. What if I don't do it right? Well I'm not doing anything. I can't take credit for this. Someone who's really hard on herself. Which I am. I going to do it right. What if I don't do it right But then I realized doing anything I can't take credit for this. I personally I believe in God. I believe God gave me this gift in order to help people And he opened up at the right time in order for me to help people and by knowing that. It's not my gift. I kind of tell people I am the volume button on the radio. I just turn. The metric is up so you can hear them Irene to stop blaming myself. I'm doing it so if a message doesn't come that they're looking for war Twice in all the readings that John had twice. Where couldn't get anybody? It was the same person like you said. Come back later in the back. Yeah Yeah and I just getting nothing And the old me would have beat myself up about that. Yeah but the news like I. I don't know if it's just not the right time in her life Or maybe something else needs to happen before she gets disinformation or maybe she's supposed to meet someone else who the reader so. I could get anything. She'll go to them. Yeah so I gave her money back and and I don't. I don't know the wise but the thing is now I don't need to. Yeah how freeing. And you find your nose and there's no you can put a y. And you spend so much time doing that but what does it really get you? Yeah and there's no shame type. A personality would be like I can't tell this story because it should be perfect but you can tell the story. Is You know it's not you exactly. Yeah actually and She this happened with her and then one other time. I couldn't get anything but I mean I've done so many readings. Yeah Yeah and then again I I don't know why and but I don't need to make it right for the client and that's all I can do. Yeah his I learned that. I don't know nearly as much as they do. Yeah what's happening in life? Yeah you're amazing couple of books right now. So I'm hoping is a book. I'm I'm working on a couple At some point I do WANNA write a book about my my story and then get into more details about my childhood about Kind of how this whole thing happened and it's interesting but I also WanNa right. I'm looking to write a book about The kind of learned from heaven And they really kind of amazing perspective on certain illnesses on things that people don't know for instance the fact that these people are spending time on the other side they're going back and forth so there with family on the other side. They're not alone just hanging out to cover I mean there's there. Are Things like that that I've learned. That can be really really helpful for people here. Who have families in those situations? Yeah you have to write. These books. Came into yeah. And where can everyone find you come to my website is www dot light of the PHOENIX DOT COM And I also have instagram. Which is light underscore of underscore the underscore Phoenix And facebook is light if the Phoenix one. Okay basically what? My facebook and instagram are as I realize that when they started doing these readings that was come through for my clients. They say some really beautiful things So I started taking quotes so if you know comes through and says something for his daughter his son I will take a quote and I call the messages from beyond me and my basically almost my entire experiment I spoke is really just those quotes manhood. Everyone go from being fired by Right because I think there's a lot of broken people in this world. That could just use them kind words. Yeah and I know that I can't say some of these things and some of them very simple But they can still be very helpful and there are very few that I put out there. That at least one person doesn't say I needed to see this today. Yeah one person says that Ben. I'm happy yes and I love the name of all of these in the in the show notes but I love the name. The light of the Phoenix. It's so meaningful yes. Her knee was basically. I was the Phoenix because my life as I knew it turned around me. I didn't have my job. I didn't have my family. I didn't have my home and I didn't know what my future was going to be. And I was able to rise from the ashes and I'm trying to be like so that point named it light at the Phoenix. It's perfect. It's perfect happy when inhalable. Thank you yes. What are the chances that that would be available on? I know it's it's great. It's perfect but thank you so much. I appreciate it so much in your inspiring and helping so many people and thank you for sharing your story here for having me on. I was honored to be here. Honored to have you and we have to keep in touch. Definitely I would love that. Thank you so much for listening to science on other side. You can find me firm Rene on all social media at Fern Rene R. O. N. A. Y. A. Love hearing from you and I love hearing your stories of signs and if you would like to hear more episodes of this show please be sure to subscribe in Apple podcasts. Thank you again and sweet dreams..

Phoenix facebook Fern Rene R. O. N. A. Y. A. Taipei Carter Laura Irene John instagram Apple
"spellman" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

03:09 min | 3 years ago

"spellman" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"There really was going to other choice. The only other large stadium in the ima city was husky stadium, and husky stadium was just it wasn't a real possibility for for baseball. Yeah. Because it was a football Centric construction. Yeah. I mean, I mean the Coliseum was sort of work ward for. The dodgers, but husky stadium wasn't wasn't the Coliseum. It wasn't as large a a place. So there is no place to go. The the argument the discussion as the pilots were beginning to leave was a discussion over who's going to pay for further innovations to make six stadium. Let's say equivalent to seal stadium in San Francisco where the or the giants played for at least a year, maybe two years before they they went to candlestick. Here's the last question on that one. That's so so, and this is sort of little forwarding the story. But like after the team has has left were a bunch of reasons we'll get into a second. Was there any what was the thinking than once the team had left? Was there anything that that then caused certain people in the mixture to pause thought about the stadium? I mean, they had lost the team. Right. And yet the stadium had been voted in prior to the team's arrival or during the team's arrival. And now the team was gone. So I'm wondering if people sort of had some remorse about following through with the stadium now that the team had left or do they redouble their efforts and go, you know, what if we don't build the stadium? We're never gonna have a shot at anything professional baseball or otherwise and misses the real flip-flop in Seattle political landscape. A city that was like I said just a little bit beyond lukewarm for stadium for for team. It really changed around. And and I think it was it owed to just one individual John spellman became the county executive that sort of like being the mayor of the county and the stadium was was a county undertaking. So it was his responsibility and amazingly enough. He didn't blink an eye. He said, yeah, we're going to build this building. Even without a team. We're going to be searching for team as we build it. But he didn't hesitate at all to continue the building process, and I could him a lot of credit 'cause I'm a baseball fan. And I think that building the stadium was a good thing to do. I give him a lot of credit for for forging ahead when almost the rent while the rest of. Seattle city political landscape. Probably what is just thrown up their hands and put the money in the Bank for some later day. It's all it's all very interesting. So let's get into and we'd have to go through you know, sort of the on field stuff..

husky stadium seal stadium Coliseum baseball Seattle John spellman dodgers football ima San Francisco executive two years