18 Burst results for "Speech Impairment"

"speech impairment" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:55 min | 9 months ago

"speech impairment" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Shootings during protests in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Police are looking for someone with a rifle. This was the third night of protests the police shooting of Jacob Blake. His mother, Julia Jackson, says of her son knew what was going on violence and destruction beam very Unpleased. Dozens of businesses are damaged or destroyed. Mike Pompeo is the first sitting secretary of state to give a political speech during his party's convention. Secretary of State. Mike Pompeo is convention address from Israel. President Trump has put his America first vision into action. You may not have made him popular in every foreign capital, but it's worked. Democrats fumed at Pompeii pose appearance, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, accusing the secretary of discoloring bipartisanship, Fox's John Roberts. America is listening to Fox News. Good morning. I mean Gene Orville to students had to be hospitalized last night after fire broke out at merchants and haul men's dormitory on the campus of Miles college blaze was put out quickly. Those students are being treated for non life threatening injuries, and investigators are working to determine the cause of the fire. Authorities are looking for a 14 year old boy reported missing last night. Devon Wayne Copeland has hearing problems and a speech impairment hasn't been seen since Tuesday afternoon. He was near the end of a Marshall County line at that time, described this white 5 ft. 4 £120 brown hair, brown eyes wearing light colored blue jeans black shirt in a white New York Yankees ball cap. Contact authorities if you see him municipal elections held in over 100 cities and towns across Alabama Tuesday, some of the more notable races include the city food over where incumbent Mayor Frank Brocato easily won re election and in the city of Clanton, a new mayor Jeff Mimms, replacing former mayor Billy Joe driver who died from Cove in 19 last month. And incumbent mayors were defeated in Homewood, Iron Dale and Fulton Dale. Data released by the Alabama Department of Public Health shows there were just 185 new covert 19 cases reported Tuesday. Department says those numbers were incomplete. Doodle problem with connectivity from a reporting lab states positivity rate has dropped a 5.4% in the last two weeks. That's one of the lowest numbers recorded, and the Department of Public Health is a new addition on their dashboard, breaking down aged demographics into smaller chunks. Ages. 5 to 17, then 18 to 24 data for kindergarteners through high school juniors, representing just 7% of all code cases So far 18 to 24 represent 14% of the total cases in Alabama. We have to remember that schools have not been back in session nor have up College has been back in session for any length of time and again during the summer season. The students were not necessarily necessarily together in congregate settings. Alabama Department of Public Health Deputy Officer Dr.

Mike Pompeo Alabama Department of Public H Devon Wayne Copeland Alabama America President Trump Kenosha Jacob Blake Department of Public Health speech impairment Wisconsin Fox News secretary Julia Jackson New York Yankees Gene Orville Homewood House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Fulton Dale
"speech impairment" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"speech impairment" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"For the western part of the state and the only one there and I want to assure all of the citizens of the Commonwealth in the western part of the state that our priority is patient safety it always has been and it always will be safety of our patients comes first we have made necessary changes to ensure that safety and want all to know that should they should come to seek the needed care serious consequences of not getting care have been discussed by my colleagues and I want to share a little bit more specifics about what we have seen we have seen patients an eighty percent decline with stroke symptoms meaning speech impairment visual changes wait at home and not see care that was one month ago a total of an eighty percent decline those patients are starting to arrive at Baystate Medical Center they are seriously ill and many of them have lifelong debilitating consequences to waiting in our cardiac care areas we have not seen a great decrease in numbers however we've had patients that have described having severe symptoms for three days patients that walk two miles a day that are unable to walk up a flight of steps that are afraid to come to the hospital decrease in blood flow horns organs we want you to know that you can mitigate these consequences and like is described by my colleague we have seen more amputations as well due to the fact patients cannot have limb sparing procedures they have waited at home when we look at surgery across the Commonwealth we deliberately postponed needed elective surgery it is now six weeks later and some patients are saying they see a change in their condition and they think they stay on perpetual hold until we call them some patients have described that it and have been advised to come to our hospital in the fear doing so that they might get cold it even more than treating their serious illness so if your provider recommends that you come to the hospital please heed that warning we are safe and we are here for you we know that things that seem like a simple hernia or a call that Blatter with pancreatitis might be able to wait yep four or five weeks later there can be serious complications from surgery we are also seeing twenty percent fewer patients in our behavioral health emergency department and we know that patients suffer from anxiety and depression and we want them to know to call your primary care provider or their psychiatrist and if they are recommended you to come to the emergency department to please do so we want to care for you we are here for you the Baystate health hospitals have over one thousand deaths today we are caring for approximately a hundred and fifty Kobe patience and four hundred non Kobe patience so we have plenty of capacity we have space.

speech impairment Baystate Medical Center Blatter anxiety Baystate health hospitals depression Kobe
Family of man stabbed in Hanukkah attack says his condition is "dire"

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Family of man stabbed in Hanukkah attack says his condition is "dire"

"You Jeff the family of a seventy one year old victim who is in a coma following Saturday's Hanukkah tech near New York City says he may never wake up Joseph Newman remains in critical condition after being stabbed in the head with a machete his family is released a statement saying doctors aren't optimistic about this chance of regaining consciousness the knife penetrated Newman's brained if he does wake up the family says he'll likely have permanent brain damaged partial paralysis and speech impairment Newman is married has seven children plus grandkids and great grandkids they're asking for prayers and for people to share their experiences with antisemitism on social media using the hashtag me do fairly Kessler

Jeff New York City Joseph Newman Speech Impairment Kessler
"speech impairment" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"speech impairment" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"A. B. C. and W. ABC radio dot com revelers dance celebrated and shouted in Times Square for the new year's eve extravaganza it was extra special for ten year old Katrina dusk Alaska's who's a cancer survivor you can get so enjoy fun all the confetti come down so much fun the crowd more than a million came from across the globe including Australia and Germany the family of a seventy one year old victim was in a coma following last Saturday's Hanukkah attack in Muncie says he may never wake up WABC Saralee Kessler has the latest Joseph Newman remains in critical condition after being stabbed in the head with a machete his family is released a statement saying doctors aren't optimistic about this chance of regaining consciousness the knife penetrated Newman's brained if he does wake up the family says he'll likely have permanent brain damage partial paralysis and speech impairment Newman is married has seven children plus grandkids and great grandkids they're asking for prayers and for people to share their experiences with antisemitism on social media using the hashtag need you I'm Sara Lee counselor for seventy seven W. A. B. C. news a seventy three year old man walking home from synagogue on Long Island fatally struck by a car police say the thirty six year old driver what is with a twenty nineteen infinity SUV going southbound on financial Boulevard when she struck the victim at the intersection of Edward Avenue yesterday the man who has not been identified had just left the ever would Avenue fool in Woodmere US troops have fired tear gas and rubber bullets in hopes of dispersing pro Iranian protesters gathered outside the American embassy in Baghdad day after the storm the compound correspondent gold causal reports the group Hezbollah which is blamed for organizing the protest still has demands for the U. S. it was just the first step and that they're calling on the U. S. to withdraw from your rock and to shut down their embassy so the situation on the ground there for a second day now is quite Bala tile news reports say at least five people were injured some seriously after being shot inside a bar early new year's day in from police chief ray corn well of the Huntington West Virginia police department said the shooting happened of a culture hookah bar according to W. O. W. KTV more than a dozen shell casings were found outside the bar NYPD and FDNY members for waking up the T. in twenty nineteen police overtime amount led the way six hundred fifteen million dollars spending more than a hundred eleven million in the budget for the extra pay the New York Post learn W. ABC news time nine oh three traffic sports and this rabbi Joseph tastic of the New York board of rabbis and this is Renee are non from the Christian cultural center we are here to get in front of every day issues and we are not afraid to speak our minds we want to take a look.

A. B. C. ABC
"speech impairment" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"speech impairment" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"Sure sure hello thank you yeah there is no Canada button I think there's there we go if so it was a just an interesting morning going there being there from early on paying a ridiculous amount for parking and then not knowing what I was going to end some of the people that do performance dance over at Balboa park did very interesting dance from Hungary and left the way any Sir this was interesting but the I guess we need more people are coming from and the traditions they bring so go America thank you right I love it so yeah I wish I had some better sound there was like you're my boy red white and blue right that could work really nice I think so yeah and I live in and now it's more stuff hard work on that by prioritize right so has everybody else so is everybody doing well that's there the radio doesn't do well with clearance for doing good yeah good service is really relaxed and ready for this and Jason what was that I ate breakfast this morning I just want to announce that to the collective body and that's very exciting because I and I do intermittent fasting so I didn't what do you do it with an apology changed up all your diet and stuff all the time yeah so right now I'm doing what do the copy with the MCAT powder and then I'll do a plant based protein shake with athletic greens I put about six different supplements mushroom there's a mushroom plan that I put in there from tack this is exactly why us Paul what what he does for food because most most people would expect that no matter what well no better in your coffee I don't always do that now I find the MC two powers and I yeah there's a keto version of it that's really nice with the catia fiber and probiotic nice unless I'm a weirdo at that for all the knows he's got shelves of crazy wacky things verify have posed diet maybe I would we're gonna have a speech impediment well we don't know that so maybe we can try so on the next show about a month from now or a few weeks we'll we'll get Jason on some of your breakfast blend and we'll see what happens and if it transforms you then this was America will say right I mean in you know both of my oldest kids time speech delay speech impairment uhhuh so they're on a similar diet.

Balboa park Hungary Paul Jason America Canada catia speech delay speech impairment
"speech impairment" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

15:17 min | 2 years ago

"speech impairment" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"She founded the company back in twenty fourteen to provide voice procees for people that cannot speak in there. Own voices, and we're gonna talk a lot about that today was a mass challenge. Finalist, twenty fourteen where participated in the accelerator program, there Rupel's also been a professor or eastern university for the past sixteen years with joint appointments in the departments of health science and computer science shelter holds in Philip, faculty position, Harvard, MIT for the division of health science and technology early in her career while studying for a doctorate. Rupe? Also spent time as speech pathologists shared a PHD speech, language Valgy from university of Toronto in an undergraduate degree in neuro psychology from the university of Calgary Calgary. And she did her post doc, work at MIT Rupel Patel. Welcome to the voice podcast. Thank you very much bread him. Glad to be here. Well, I'm very happy to have you and it appears that you either are one point your life with Canadian, I've a lot of Canadian listeners, and they'll be thrilled that I have so many leased with a long period of time in Canada on the. Show again. Yeah, I am. Absolutely. Canadian in fact, leaving for Calgary for a trip after a longtime later today where you going in Calgary, we are going to trip to the rocky. So we're gonna go to Calgary. And then we're gonna go to bath Lake Louise. Jasper Columbia icefield kids haven't been there since my parents moved away while back. So it will be a really fun trip to go down memory lane. Again, sounds amazing. I wish I was going with you, but maybe maybe another trip. I love that part of the world in general. So the I understand though, that you, you arrived in Canada, when you are eight, but you grew up in Africa before that was correct. That's right. How did you know that? I think maybe you mentioned it, and one of her conversations, but I don't remember. Exactly, that's right. Yeah. I was born in Zambia and lived there till I was eight. And then moved to a very, very small town in northern Alberta, called swan hills of thousand people is just an outpost for, for SO. So. So those are rough transition got us. So the family worked in the energy business. Yes, my dad worked for an oil company and he worked for Esso for the first year, and then we moved to when we moved to Calgary was another oil company got it. Okay. So rural. Now, you live and decidedly urban area, very different experiences throughout life. I guess. Yes. Okay. So you're the founder is we said intro of vocal. I ID what does vocal ide- due to give a little context to their voice by audience? Yes. A vocal ID creates synthetic voices that have personalities so that brands and individuals can be heard themselves crew. And so, what are the locations for that? So as you mentioned in the intro, we started off with creating a unique voice so that somebody who was unable to speak and had to use a device to talk wouldn't all have to sound like the. What have to use the same voices Stephen hawking? Right. So you have a young girl who has cerebral palsy or gentlemen with a Alexa, later in life. There were very few voice options available. And as speech scientists what we were able to work. I was I was work on in my lab was to create a methodology for us to create unique voices for individuals. And so the first part of Oakland his journey was really trying to take that lab based technologies and turn that into a unique synthetic voice that was scalable in the last year. We're seeing what this whole synomyms of voice based devices that are coming out here that we can also apply similar technologies and similar applications, similar tack, four all the voice, I inner faces, well brands and we can talk about other properties, like games, they probably want to stink voices, just like humans divorces. That's right. There's a reason we all have unique voices that kinda helps us differentiate who's talk. Working at helps us form bonds, and social connections, and so on. So I think the, the value voice we often underestimated, when we are not when we don't have specific need for it, but it is such a huge social connector. Absolutely make sense to me. So you founded vocal idea twenty fourteen it, but you are professor for many years before that. So what was your focus before founding? The company was in this space was in the technology was more in the relational aspects of it. What were you doing? So I direct lab at Northeastern University called the communication analysis and design lab. And what the cod lab does is studies, speech behavior so speech communication, from the perspective of how do people produce speech, whether they have whether they're typically developing children, or individuals who have some kind of speech impairment due to neurological reasons and we, we specifically study in aspect of speech called property. So these changes in pitch changes in loudness, because that's relatively preserved in people with neurological disorders. So we do this basic science, and then we apply that basic science to. The development of new technologies. So other work. That happens in my live is very interdisciplinary. So I have students from communication sciences, but also from computer science, and from electrical engineering, and typically there were taking the basic findings that we have from the lob and applying them to develop a new methodology where the speech signal can be viewed visually, for example, to help kids learn how to, to read with more with more president more inflections so that they can understand what they've read when you just are learning to read, aloud, you often don't know what you're reading aloud because you're so focused on the motor act of rating. And so that's one of the technologies and then a lot of the stuff that we do on our lab was really focused on assistive technology. So if someone can't use speech, what other alternative methods of communication can they use, and that's really where vocal ID's project came about. So my lob was funded by the National Science Foundation and the national institutes of health is well on. A couple of different institutes both communication sciences and disorders, as well as they the visually impaired division as well. So we, we kind of have this interdisciplinary lob. So prior to vocal ID, the company vocal ID was a research project funded by the National Science Foundation within my lob, so and it's all interconnected because it really combines these two threads of research that we have the basic sciences and the applied assist of technology thread. So were you working on synthetic voices part of that original out grant before twenty fourteen? Absolutely. Yeah. So the first grant, we got for the vocal, Eddie project in the laboratory, and at that point, it was called locality, but no one knew how to spell it. And so when we turn it into the company or spun out the company, we now call it vocal ID, but the vocabulary project was around the basic science of if you have somebody who's non speaking. Thing, but they still make some sound can we utilize that sound can harvest that sound? And then find somebody who is similar to them in, you know, in age and gender and maybe even size 'cause vocal track length changes with height. And then create a unique voice for them so that early science began in the laboratory, and it was funded from two thousand seven all the way up to two thousand and thirteen. So when it turned it into the company there was it was really the science part was done. But we didn't know how to scale it really. You didn't know how to scale it, and in twenty fourteen so that you founded the company to figure out how to scale it. Well, so what happens is, you know, the basic science is not around. How do you make this cheaper faster? How do you make this technology available to everybody? So you really just, you know, focusing on is it possible to do this. Right. So now it's possible one of the interesting things is that m at the end of twenty thirteen I was given the opportunity to speak, it the Ted women conference, and one of the things that happened as a result of that is they asked me, well, what's your, you know, it's interesting this talk that you're going to get because you have to a preview of it before you actually go on stage. They said, yeah, we like the fact that you've you're talking about the science that's fascinating. But what will what can people do in order, when they leave this room, what will people be able to act on what's your call to action and even know what that was at that time? And I said, well, you know, when they can donate. The voice, you know. And they're like, yeah, go with that. So what we did is we set up a website to gather the names of people who might want to contribute, their voice, and at that time, it was seven hours of recording that we were requesting of them. So I figured, you know, the few people would sign up most of my studies prior to then were like ten to twenty people. I didn't think that too many people would sign up, but maybe one hundred people signed up or two hundred. I'd had the largest, you know, and study of my life. And what happened is lots of people signed up thousands of people signed up. And when a talk was finally released in February twenty fourteen there were close, I think three to four thousand people signed up, and then within the next few months, it got up to ten thousand individuals signing up to, you know, to contribute, their voice now at that point, I had no plan. Like what do we do? It can't bring them into the laboratory, and they were people from all over the world. And even if only ten percent of those people really completed the task. We were onto something. And so that's when that summer, I did, you know, a lot of thought processes of right? What are we, if people are willing to do this? Can we really, you know, create these voices for more than the handful of people that we were able to make synthetic voice for in the lab can really offer this to individuals who need it the most? Right. So that's when I entered actually the mass challenge competition, actually, finally mentioned that at the beginning, I'd gone to talk there that day that was given by someone from the National Science Foundation talking about these commercialization grants are called SPIC are small business innovation, Mirisch grants. And he said, you know, companies can or individuals and companies can apply for these grants to take research in laboratories and convert them into small best small business that kind of help generate new businesses in this in the country, and this was hosted at mass challenge and, and that was the deadline for apply. Thing. And so I got super psyched about this, and I thought, well, I know how to write a grant, and what is take, you know, to put us application. And so, with that, I mean, it was April first, there's no company formed at the time I filled out the -plication there. They actually gave me the passwords, and so on to complete the application right there. And then and created the first elevator pitch which was probably awful. And then went through the three rounds of, of the, the, the choices or the three rounds of the, the process, and we were selected as one of the one of the finalists that year and we that was our first sort of booster shot into this. And then since then we got later that you're actually twenty fifteen is when the company really started so that summer, I wrote the National Science Foundation grant, I also wrote another grant to the NIH, which was on a slightly different sub project, both for commercialization and the first one hit in January twenty fifteen and I took leave from the university and have. I've been on leave ever sits so. Okay. So you have been leave every sense, are you still? What are you doing with university anything at all? So what we're doing actually this year of my role, this year is very fragmentary of fractional and what we're doing is taking the work that we were doing with for people who if with speech disability and integrating, it back into the suspicion language clinic at the university. So we have voiced preservation clinic available at the at northeastern now for any individual who has who knows that they're going to lose their voice. They go to the to the university speech and language clinic, and they Bank their voice in a sound treated room so that the quality of their recordings is is really good. You can also do this just online, but better, the recordings of the quality of the voice, and that it can generate a voice prosthesis for them from that. So really full circle research started the lab, you know, incubated out and then. Bringing it back to the clinical services at the university term. I think for people who cannot speak, you call the speechless. That's right. I mean, they're not voiceless in the sense that they still have a voice preserved, but speechlessness is the inability to produce speech, clearly, and there was actually, an ABC. Sitcom that ran for two or three years now that was talking about this issue, which I thought was fascinating to kind of get it into the public awareness as well. There's actually a lot of people who have severe enough to speech and communication disabilities that they required advice to talk. So tell me about the origin of this. I think I want to say your earlier conversation. You were visiting a conference and they're like ball went off. That's right. So my maybe my research, in my PHD was all around, what is preserved in individuals who have very severe speech communication disorders. And what we're finding is that the property changes in pitch and loudness and melody was still preserved so they make vocalisations and those vocalisations can be distinctively understood as different speakers. So I gave this talk, and I was at that time a, a young professor at Columbia University. I got I gave this talk in Denmark, and right after giving my talk, I went to the exhibit hall, where I saw individuals who used a vices to talk 'cause it's a international conference where not only do researchers present, but also people come to see what new products are available. For them if they have these disabilities. And so what I saw was a young woman, and an older gentleman having a conversation with different assist of communication devices. Think, you know, a device like the one that Stephen hawking used, but there were using the same adult male voice, and the juxtaposition, with my talk, just few minutes ago, saying that individuals even when they had these disabilities had unique capabilities in their voice, that were distinguishable at least two familiar communication partners..

Calgary National Science Foundation professor Canada Stephen hawking speech impairment university of Calgary Calgary MIT Rupel Patel university of Toronto Lake Louise Northeastern University Zambia neurological disorders Rupel Alexa Africa Harvard
"speech impairment" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

15:17 min | 2 years ago

"speech impairment" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"She founded the company back in twenty fourteen to provide voice proceess for people that cannot speak in there. Own voices, and we're gonna talk a lot about that today was a mass challenge. Finalist in two thousand fourteen where participated in the accelerator program, there Rupel's also been a professor or eastern university for the past sixteen years with joint appointments in the departments of health science and computer science. She also holds in Philly at faculty position, Harvard MIT for the division of health science and technology early in her career while studying for a doctorate. Rupe? Also spent time as speech. Pathologists sheared, a PHD speech language Valgy from university of Toronto in an undergraduate degree in neuro psychology from the university of Calgary Calgary. And she did her post doc, work at MIT Rupel Patel. Welcome to the voice podcast. Thank you very much bread him. Glad to be here. Well, I'm very happy to have you and it appears that you either are one point your life with Canadian. I've a lot of Canadian listeners, and they'll be thrilled that I have so many leased with a long period of time in Canada on the. Show again. Yeah, I am. Absolutely. Canadian in fact, leaving for Calgary for trip after a longtime later today where are you going in Calgary? We are going to a trip to the rocky. So we're gonna go Calgary. And then we're gonna go to bath Lake Louise. Jasper Columbia ice fields like kids haven't been there since my parents moved away while back. So it will be a really fun trip to go down memory lane. Again, sounds amazing. I wish I was going with you, but maybe maybe another trip. I love that part of the world in general. So the I understand though, that you, you arrived in Canada, when you are eight, but you grew up in Africa before that was correct. That's right. How do you know that? I think maybe you mentioned it one of her conversations, but I don't remember. Exactly, that's right. Yeah, I was born in Zambia and lived there till I was eight. And then moved to very, very small town in northern Alberta called swan hills of thousand people is just an outpost for, for SO. So. So those are rough transition got us. So the family worked in the energy business. Yes, my dad worked for an oil company and he worked for Esso for the first year, and then we moved to when we moved to Calgary was another oil company got it. Okay. So. Rural. Now you live and in decidedly urban area, very different experiences throughout life. I guess. Yes. Okay. So you're the founder is we said, the intro of vocal ID, what does vocal ide- due to give a little context to their voice by audience? Yes. Vocally creates synthetic voices that have personalities so that brands and individuals can be heard themselves great. And so, what are the locations for that? So as you mentioned in the intro, we started off with creating a unique voice so that somebody who was unable to speak and had to use a device to talk wouldn't all have to sound like the what have to use the same voices Stephen hawking. Right. So you have a young girl who has cerebral palsy, or gentlemen with LS later in life. There were very few voice options available. And as speech scientists what we were able to work. Work on in my lab was to create a methodology for us to create unique voices for individuals. And so the first part of Oakland his journey was really trying to take that lab based technologies and turn that into a unique synthetic voice that was scalable in the last year. We're seeing what this whole synomyms of voice based devices that are coming out here that we can also apply similar technologies and similar applications, similar tack, four all the voice first interfaces, as well brands and we can talk about other properties, like games, they probably want to stink voices, just like humans distinctive voices. That's right. There's a reason we all have unique voices that kinda helps us differentiate who's talking at helps us form bonds and social connections, and so on. So I think the, the value voice we often underestimated, when we are not when we don't have a specific need for it, but it is such a huge social connector. Absolutely make sense to me. So you founded vocal idea twenty fourteen it, but you are professor for many years before that. So what was your focus before founding? The company was in this space was in the technology was more in the relational aspects of it. What were you doing? So I direct to lab at Northeastern University called the communication analysis and design lab. And what the cod lab does is studies, speech behavior so speech communication, from the perspective of how do people produce speech, whether they have whether they're typically developing children, or individuals who have some kind of speech impairment due to neurological reasons and we, we specifically study in aspect of speech called property. So these changes in pitch changes in loudness, because that's relatively preserved in people with neurological disorders. So we do this basic science, and then we apply that basic science to. The development of new technologies. So other work. That happens in my live is very interdisciplinary. So I have students from communication sciences, but also from computer science, and from electrical engineering, and typically there were taking the basic findings that we have from the lob and applying them to develop a new methodology where the speech signal can be viewed visually, for example, to help kids learn how to, to read with more with more property and more inflections so that they can understand what they've read when you just are learning to read, aloud, you often don't know what you're reading aloud because you're so focused on the motor act of rating. And so that's one of the technologies and then a lot of the stuff that we do on our lab was really focused on the system technology. So if someone can't use speech, what other alternative methods of communication can they use, and that's really where vocal ID's project came about. So my lab was funded by the National Science Foundation and the national institutes of health is well on. A couple of different institutes both communication sciences and disorders, as well as they the visually impaired division as well. So we, we kind of have this interdisciplinary lob. So prior to vocal ID, the company vocal ID was a research project funded by the National Science Foundation within my lob, so and it's all interconnected because it really combines these two threads of research that we have the basic sciences and the applied system technology thread, so were you working on synthetic voices part of that original out grant before twenty fourteen. Absolutely. Yeah. So the first grant, we got for the vocal, Eddie project in the laboratory, and at that point, it was called locality, but no one knew how to spell it. And so when we turn it into the company or spun out the company, we now call it vocal ID, but the vocabulary project was around the basic science of if you have somebody who's non speaking. Thing, but they still make some sound can we utilize that sound can harvest that sound? And then find somebody who is similar to them in, you know, in age and gender and maybe even size 'cause vocal track length changes with height. And then create a unique voice for them so that early science began in the laboratory, and it was funded from two thousand seven all the way up to two thousand and thirteen. So when it turned it into the company there was it was really the science part was done. But we didn't know how to scale it really. You didn't know how to scale it, and in twenty fourteen so that you founded the company to figure out how to scale it. Well, so what happens is, you know, the basic science is not around. How do you make this cheaper faster? How do you make this technology available to everybody? So you really just, you know, focusing on is it possible to do this. Right. So now it's possible one of the interesting things is that m at the end of twenty thirteen I was given the opportunity to speak, it the Ted women conference, and one of the things that happened as a result of that is they asked me, well, what's your, you know, it's interesting this talk that you're going to get because you have to do a preview of it before you actually go on stage. They said, yeah, we like the fact that you've you're talking about the science that's fascinating. But what will what can people do in order, when they leave this room, what will people be able to act on what's your call to action and uneven know at that was at that time, and I said, well, you know, when they can donate there. The voice, you know. And they're like, yeah, go with that. So what we did is we set up a website to gather the names of people who might want to contribute, their voice, and at that time, it was seven hours of recording that we were requesting of them. So I figured, you know, a few people would sign up most of my studies prior to then were like ten to twenty people. I didn't think that too many people sign up, but maybe one hundred people signed up, or two hundred ad had the largest, you know, and study of my life. And what happened is lots of people signed up thousands of people signed up, and when a talk was finally released in February twenty fourteen there were close to I think three to four thousand people signed up, and then within the next few months, it got up to ten thousand individuals signing up to, you know, to contribute, their voice now at that point, I had no plan. Like what do we do? It can't bring them into the laboratory, and they were people from all over the world. And even if only ten percent of those people really completed the task. We were onto something. And so that's when that summer, I did, you know, a lot of thought processes of right? What are we, if people are willing to do this? Can we really, you know, create these voices for more than the handful of people that we were able to make synthetic voice for in the lab can really offer this to individuals who need it the most? Right. So that's when I entered actually the mass challenge competition, actually funny. You mentioned that at the beginning, I'd gone to talk there that day that was given by someone from the National Science Foundation talking about these commercialization grants are called SPIC are small business innovation marriage grants, and he said, you know, companies can or individuals and companies can apply for these grants to take research in laboratories and convert them into small best small business that kind of help generate new businesses in this in the country, and this was hosted at mass challenge and, and that was the deadline for apply. Thing. And so I got super psyched about this, and I thought, well, I know how to write a grant, and what is take, you know, to put this application. And so with that. I mean it was April. First, there's no company formed at the time I filled out the app -plication there. They actually gave me the passwords and so on complete the application right there. And then and created the first elevator pitch which was probably awful. And then went through the three rounds of, of the, the, the choices or the three rounds of the, the process, and we were selected as one of the one of the finalists that year and we that was our first sort of booster shot into this. And then since then we got later that you're watching in twenty fifteen is when the company really started so that summer, I wrote the National Science Foundation grant, I also wrote another grant to the NIH, which was on a slightly different sub project, both for commercialization and the first one hit in January twenty fifteen and I took leave from the university and have. I've been on leave ever sits so. Okay. So you have been leave every sense, are you still? What are you doing with university anything at all? So what we're doing actually this year of my role, this year is very fragmentary of fractional and what we're doing is taking the work that we were doing with for people who if with speech disability and integrating, it back into the speech and language clinic at the university. So we have a voice preservation clinic available at the at northeastern now for any individual who has who knows that they're going to lose their voice. They go to the to the university speech and language clinic, and they Bank their voice in a sound treated room so that the quality of their recordings is is really good. You can also do this just online, but better, the recordings of better the quality of the voice, and that it can generate a voice prosthesis for them from that. So really full circle research started the lab, you know, incubated out and then. Bringing it back to the clinical services at the university term. I think for people who cannot speak, you call the speechless. That's right. I mean, they're not voiceless in the sense that they still have a voice preserved, but speechlessness is the inability to produce speech, clearly, and there was actually, an ABC. Sitcom that ran for two or three years now that was talking about this issue, which I thought was fascinating to kind of get it into the public awareness as well. There's actually a lot of people who have severe enough to speech and communication disabilities that they required advice to talk. So tell me about the origin of this. I think I want to say your earlier conversation. You were visiting a conference and they're like ball went off. That's right. So my maybe my research, in my PHD was all around, what is preserved in individuals who have very severe speech communication disorders, and what we're finding is that. The presidency changes in pitch and loudness and melody was still preserved so they make vocalisations and those vocalisations can be distinctively understood as different speakers. So I gave this talk, and I was at that time a, a young professor at Columbia University. I got I gave this talk in Denmark, and right after giving my talk, I went to the exhibit hall, where I saw individuals who used a vices to talk 'cause it's a international conference where not only do researchers present, but also people come to see what new products are available. For them if they have these disabilities. And so what I saw was a young woman, and an older gentleman having a conversation with different assist of communication devices. Think, you know, a device like the one that Stephen hawking used, but there were using the same adult male voice, and the juxtaposition, with my talk, just few minutes ago, saying that individuals even when they had these disabilities had unique capabilities in their voice, that were distinguishable at least two familiar communication partners..

National Science Foundation Calgary professor Canada Stephen hawking speech impairment university of Calgary Calgary MIT Rupel Patel university of Toronto Lake Louise Rupel Northeastern University Philly Zambia neurological disorders Africa
"speech impairment" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"speech impairment" Discussed on KOMO

"I want service is available to everyone. However, really, it's intended I Pacific communities. Those would be people who are deaf hard of hearing. Or may have speech impairment, people who can't talk such as an choking incident Brier says someone will respond to your text just as if it were a phone call, but he adds that it is important to include your address in the nature of the emergency. In that first message. Jeff pohjola. Komo news. Police union representatives are upset after she had lobster was investigated suspended and demoted in October. Former sergeant Frank publicity sat in a folding chair outside the workplace of a man he had ticketed. The man had hurled insults of the officer publicity told citizens was waiting for an apology police accountability reports Sipa block has escalated the incident. Now, the Seattle times reports the police officers guild says the officers behavior was only minor. This conduct and should not have been investigated treatment of migrant children held in US custody continues to alarm child advocates including psychologists call the detentions traumatic. Komo's Corwin Hake reports. Washington is one of the states from my grandkids are being held. We tend to think these kids are being held in the southwest border states, and the vast majority are, but Washington and Oregon are also among the seventeen states currently detaining fourteen thousand migrant children and teens in a program overseen by the office of refugee resettlement, they range in age from toddler to seventeen the death last week of a dehydrated seven-year-old girl detained in New Mexico made headlines, but less publicized is the general trauma of detention, Nina, k Thomas is a psychologist with the refugee mental health resource network. They're living in an environment. That it self structurally is a frightening to the point of terrifying. Quarters are often tight according to a new AP investigate. Nation fifty four hundred detained migrant children in the US are sleeping in shelters with more than a thousand other children. The investigation describes a phenomenon apart from the child separation crisis of earlier this year, the vast majority of children currently detained crossed the border without their parents to escape violence and corruption in Central America. Corwin Hake, KOMO news laws take effect in January that will affect child support in our.

Corwin Hake Komo US Brier Washington speech impairment police officers guild Jeff pohjola sergeant Frank Seattle times officer Central America Nina AP New Mexico Oregon k Thomas seven-year
"speech impairment" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"speech impairment" Discussed on KOMO

"I want service is available to everyone. However, really, it's intended I Pacific communities. Those would be people who are deaf hard of hearing. Or may have speech impairment, people who can't talk such as an choking incident Brier says someone will respond to your tax Justice, if it were a phone call, but he adds that it is important. To include your address in the nature of the emergency. In that first message. Jeff pohjola. Komo news county has a similar system of the program is not yet available in Pierce county. Police union representatives are upset after a Seattle officer was investigated suspended and demoted in October. Former sergeant Frank block he sat in a folding chair outside the workplace of a man he had ticketed the man head hurled insults at the officer. But Blackie told citizens he was waiting for an apology police accountability reports and publicity had escalated the incident. Now, the Seattle times reports that police officers guild says the officers behavior was only minor misconduct should not have been investigated treatment of migrant children held in US custody continues to alarm child advocates including psychologist who call the detention traumatic goes Corwin Hake reports. Washington is one of the states where migrant kids are being held. We tend to think these kids are being held in the southwest, border states, and the vast majority. But Washington and Oregon are also among the seventeen states currently detaining fourteen thousand migrant children and teens in a program overseen by the office of refugee resettlement, they range in age from toddler to seventeen the death last week of a dehydrated seven-year-old girl detained in New Mexico made headlines, but less publicized is the general trauma of detention, Nina, k Thomas is a psychologist with the refugee mental health resource network. They're living in an environment that itself, structurally, is frightening to the point of terrifying quarters are often tight according to a new AP investigation. Fifty four hundred detained migrant children in the US are sleeping in shelters with more than a thousand other children. The investigation describes a phenomenon apart from the child separation crisis of earlier this year, the vast majority of children currently detained crossed the border without their parents to escape violence and corruption in Central America. Corwin Hake, KOMO news. Briefing that was supposed to be about Seattle in regional transportation agencies plan for when the Alaska provide vita closes was really more about major changes to transportation over the next several years mayor Jenny durken calls it the new normal as we build a better Seattle. We know that how we get in and around Seattle is going to change significantly people have to understand that this new normal will last years not months because of the number of a construction projects coming online. The changes include all buses out of the downtown transit tunnel and on the streets in late March toiling in the new highway ninety nine tunnel in midsummer light rail from Northgate in two years and from the east side and four years. This is from this group leave your car behind and take transit into Seattle. Komo news time nine of forty and tonight's in husky women's basketball. Mississippi State BULLDOGS beat the Washington huskies one hundred and three to fifty six for the Harley exterior sports desk. The U dub wants husky basketball fans to throw teddy bears on the court in expo nation. Komo's Bill Swartz talking dogs. Both Washington round ball teams have home games tonight and Friday and dog fans can impact the lives of our neighbors in need, according to U dub men's coach Mike Hopkins were teaming up with the Salvation Army and at the teddy bear toss at halftime. So if you're coming to the game bring a teddy bear, listen to anything with the Salvation Army is big top club. Halftime people throw it on the floor of Shopian ESPN at some point break-up show show those fans and that.

Seattle Washington Corwin Hake US KOMO Komo Seattle times Salvation Army speech impairment officer basketball Frank block Jeff pohjola Blackie AP Mike Hopkins Brier New Mexico Pierce county
"speech impairment" Discussed on CXR Podcasts

CXR Podcasts

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"speech impairment" Discussed on CXR Podcasts

"Copy number eight sponsoring high school and community events to start reaching out to diverse population earlier in the candidate journey and education, number nine assigning. Specific recruiter to specific outreach, where they have an affinity don't have a recruiter with specific affinity looked to team up with employees number ten representing diversity in marketing and communication materials, both internal and external to the organization. Number eleven mandating diversity within the interview process on the company side by delivering a diverse slate of decision making interviewees to the candidates throughout the process, and finally number twelve ensuring that disability and inclusion efforts go beyond traditional metrics of gender or ethnicity, and actually focus on the diversity of education of thought and experience rather than just disabilities or veterans, for example, the best investments in the world are only good if they truly resonate with your target audience now over the last year, we challenged hundreds of our community talent acquisition leaders at top fortune companies to explore how they perceive, their employee values, and in turn, what their candidates feel are important. In this case, specifically candidates with varying disabilities during those exercises and the subsequent conversations it quickly became obvious every single time that one size fits all messaging is no longer acceptable, particularly if you were focusing on diversity initiatives, using research, inspired by Universum study, we I ask leaders to prioritize, what was important to their company from an extensive list of elements within the categories of corporate reputation people in culture job characteristics and rewards then unbeknownst to them. They were given or selected a specific persona and asked to do the same exercise as best they could through the eyes of that candidate not a persona of candidates with filing disabilities were considered speech impairment, hearing impairment vision impairment, dyslexia autism, multiple sclerosis and mobility challenges. Tripped up by knowledge, gaps teams participate. And quickly identified to digital challenges with the target market. I not all disabilities or easily identified and some must be disclosed something that is already often proving difficult to discover even collect also some disabilities require varying levels of accommodations, while others are work ready and choir little uptake, if any either way even the best messaging won't reach the right people. If you can't segment the audience and determine their needs the second challenge discussed was the challenge round learning more about a candidate's actual needs. Even the most senior leaders found themselves making a lot of sumptious while working through this exercise it became very clear that they simply don't know noth- about what they could be doing, or if what they are offering is even sufficient. We weren't expecting the exercise uncover these challenges initially, but over the course of repeating this with various leaders and leadership levels. We recognize that they are, certainly real. It's also important to note the realization that we all have biases and knowledge, gaps internal training. Particularly interview training is prime to be part of the solution at so many organizations looking to meet the needs.

speech impairment noth
"speech impairment" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"speech impairment" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Up to ten years to see the full effects of what they're going to suffer with my kids suffer from hand eye coordination issues in speech impairments one of my children has bone density issues now and the one with the compromised immune system hasn't grown properly since all this has happened so we we have some struggles ahead of us but my kids are survivors and and who pays for the extra medical bills well we do i mean there is up system in place but it's a lotta hoops the jump they cover children m zero to five and then anybody over the five up to twenty one it's a lot of red tape to get coverage and they still aren't covering any of the adults in our city for this now you live in virginia but i take it you're still very much fighting for the rights of of the people of flint michigan still well i don't live in virginia oh you don't know i still live in flint my husband is stationed in virginia so i drive back and forth with my kids every two weeks we go and visit my and then we're back in flint and we've actually utilized that because if something comes up and i need to go to dc or only three hours away in virginia so we're just using all the assets that we have with the situation we're in tell me a little bit about the advocacy you're doing in dc because this has become so much bigger than flint michigan what one of the things that we're doing is i've made it my personal mission to get the lead and copper rule changed so that what happened in our community doesn't happen anywhere else no child ever needs to be poisoned by their water again in so that's one of the things we're going to be hitting on women are in dc is we're still we're still fighting for that we have been actively crusading on that for the last three years so we're really going to be hitting hard on that when we're up there because what needs to happen with what's changed in terms of the way people are responding to you washington dc now that the administration has changed from the obama administration to the trump administration well we were given certain promises by the under the obama administration that the.

virginia michigan flint dc obama administration washington three hours three years ten years two weeks
"speech impairment" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"speech impairment" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The underlying disease course may be i know one study that took aids patients who uh were below two hundred in their tcell counts and gave them elsa training and at the end of that they were all over one thousand in there he fell counts the opportunistic infections start showing up in the tea self count are below two hundred so we know also that things that stress people have reduced their alpha reduce the functioning of the seattle the salivary you manuka i'll be on a aspect of the immune system and so you know there's some very hopeful things there and with nonspecific dimensions which are usually underlain by insufficient blood flow to the brain there is a part of learning alfi increases that involves learning how to tie late the blood vessel from the brain just like doing can temperature warming temperature about feedback teaches you how to dilate the blood vessels to lead to your fingers and your toes which can essentially eliminate ranoj disease is to be the medical doctors didn't know any way to treat that accept amputating the fingers or the toes not necessary with the temperature bio feedback and so when you learn alpha training part of that is learning how to dilate the blood vessels that feed the brain which is one of the reasons that shows some benefit in stroke patients when somebody has a stroke uh blood vessels a break or a block and brain cells in that region some of them die because they don't get enough glucosinolate teacher not enough blood others simply go dormant and they can't do their neurons thing and win with the alpha training you learn how to die late your cerebrovascular structure some of those dormant blood vessel uh some of those dormant neurons suddenly are getting enough glucose in june they switchback on and i've seen you know people with motor impairments speech impairment so benefiting from uh the alpha training all right thank you very much for.

seattle immune system blood vessels brain cells speech impairment aids
"speech impairment" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"speech impairment" Discussed on KKAT

"Ought to opt radio with a polls defeat 60 cheese mm bloomberg known no no applied to moscow go home thursday abbas was not good no relatives go dirt goes wrote about much larger role over the fox news benzene fox business network off depends who you ask if it's good or not gonnell about adventure insane while ira mr regard tom dolan so lightening strike down zone without where did a news ourselves lahser recall how that go short fun good saw should be fine but aaron everett no though orchard bridge were demon betterment line that you don't really nit cannot go home early today or dollar goodell or just hang out maybe not a big deal so you guys got it no big deal but the but it's not you're doing the news marin your benefit was not that oh at italia other stuff i do other stuff all the stuff is say throughout to show us you look nice it always the best rest guy in the show i am then you're you're you're you're one of the more talented people i've ever worked with ocean wa nicest accidentally thanks i'ma so by thirty three after the alpha irishman program now try try time for a bernie briefing macau over that manama good deployments more great corners rivasseau the nj diet dotcoms duties i told you that the president friday night in pensacola florida did not dare he didn't suffer any year's speech impairment apparently anyway tony is going to like this cut three this is one of the things he said i love these guys under these guys blacks for trump i love you by the way black hole ownership just got highest level it's ever been in the history of our country.

abbas tom dolan orchard bridge president florida speech impairment moscow ira aaron everett manama nj pensacola tony black hole
"speech impairment" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"speech impairment" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Frock john lewis i'll i'll always remember him and what little impersonation i do of him as from when i was on in atlanta at the wbap of atlanta about ten years or so ago and um i know he's got a speech impediment is from him getting hit in the head with a brick during the civil rights protests which there's nothing to make fun of but not the speech impairment just this is congressman john lewis who was a commercial that he did running saying that the that that they sick dogs and hold water hoses arsoned dogs are going to do it again if you vote for republicans it was ten years ago sick teacher nuts europe flippant leftist nutbag and today he he wished a happy birthday to madam president hillary clinton madam president what do you think after john mccain hello my friends after john mccain lost to barack hussein obama if ten months after barack hussein obama was the president they could miss first nobel peace prize for what what are they given the nobel peace prize for afterwards for creating isis but um what if we were to said a happy birthday mr president to john mccain ten months and do you have was a birthday ten months into uh hussein obama's uh first year presidency although it said you raise shares rape oh gosh yeah cuba says that how we didn't do anything on these sonic attacks remember how we've like evacuated the embassy now is kind of stuff cuba's ana wasn't us it's cicadas cicadas now they do make some scary noise don't there some wicked noises like knowing all antonioni alan yeo right did you ever you don't you know what my friend did we have back when that i do not from downtown just be funny i'll be sitting there and people will be looking at me and i'll lose my my my my mouth to like for the wheel wing only o'neill like as if i'm making the noise and people look at you and they start laughing usually or they look at you like you got a screw loose of they don't know what you're doing yeah cuba says it was the securities that meter everybody sick yeah right the economy is seeing its second quarter with three percent growth that is huge and guess what that's after.

atlanta speech impairment congressman john lewis john mccain barack hussein obama president cuba civil rights madam president hillary clinto rape alan yeo o'neill ten months ten years three percent
"speech impairment" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"speech impairment" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"And in looking perfectly normal that's really what kind of stands a lot of the confusion and disbelief and unless we have speech impairment like myself i it at that point and and i had one for two years it it just it's hard to convince anyone and having the ability to talk to somebody and here i good prognosis in good diagnosis and and just the kind of calm astound because you're kinda creatures when hedge we hurt and we are heads pound and we're confused and we have a hard time reading have a hard time adjusting and it's it's basically were fighting in in a cell and we do not have the key to get out and it's it's a lonely place and a lot of the people that we love or confused and scared as well as office and my gosh yes that i'm so glad you mentioned the trade the toll on family members on a spouse who's standing loyally by but confused and terrified and not knowing how to help and then you've got the children children's seeing their parents who of course any mother or father is like god to their child and all of a sudden it's like god fell how god fell and collapsed and is not able to do what he or she used to do and might go through a personality change because as we heard from one of our quotas this sometimes a frontal lobes syndrome or just your iran to bowl trey has vehemently described the sensitivity all of which stems from that inflammatory process in the brain when the brain of swelled up and inflamed the neurons are racing so they're running at much much foster speed than they normally do and any incoming stimuli take it just over the top and it becomes unbearable so you're irritable you don't have the patients for your children mike you used to have it's it's a it's a spiral turning twisting downloads constantly so so let's onset georgia's questioned the first thing that we did we decided that you needed a dramatic intervention having arrived at the.

speech impairment personality change iran trey georgia two years
"speech impairment" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:32 min | 4 years ago

"speech impairment" Discussed on KOIL

"Bring it up a little mesa was speaking during this segment on the report is show visit like somebody who crossed the red light beam compared to a murderer the great jackie mason my father used to laugh at them hysterically when he was on member he came on the edge seligman show years ago jackie mason came on the television show and he hit a whole thing gave he gave a certain sign with his hand and this is for you and the became a controversy was he was one of the first controversial guys like bad but it it propelled him at the national consciousness and his he has been icl sense of humor jackie may said the when i see rabbinical sense of humor because he's a shocker bush book is the name for family as i said in the beginning of the show the amelia mitchell and we're all mitch bookies i always felt that the judaism and christianity have a symbiotic relationship but jackie mason went on to say that and he says it with you like this folks like this very funny you could say anything like ivory boga jackie amazing say this she came in she said down the delo what do you want to give me some multiple soup i took some isis this is meatballs would not multiple his wisdom with them up the anywhere jackie mentioned listen to like bogota so you're right now bill clinton had those women the hillary took care of what you see we've got to concentrate on donald trump is he because sometimes you don't want to say things exactly especially back that we weren't so speech in impaired we have speech impairment we can't say things or think things because withdrawal and i'm all for respect leaping i respect your lawn my whole life court on the call remember laura he was eighteen or nineteen when i married 21 forget anyway as she was showa humphrey bogart could say anything imagine him talking about politics right now yes bernie sanders let's talk about bernie sanders her second medal lucien versus a revolution bernie so bernie sanders on jake tapper show ice guy bernie says.

jackie mason amelia mitchell bogota bill clinton hillary donald trump laura bernie sanders lucien seligman speech impairment showa humphrey bogart jake tapper
"speech impairment" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:16 min | 4 years ago

"speech impairment" Discussed on KOIL

"Them named after he rip them any we got them broderick wound up with a with a cut lip advisor to please go see the dog was very compassionate about sending about this but it wasn't the concern about beating them up in the first place it was so busy punching them around the nobody knows we love to them or he just wanted to beat them up a little bit whose jackie mesa great comedian bring it up a little mason was speaking during this segment gonna report is the show busy like somebody who crossed the red light be compared to a murderer the great jackie mason my father used to laugh at them hysterically when he was on member he came on the ad celebrate show years ago jackie mason came on the edge sullivan show and he hit a whole thing gave he gave a certain signed with his hand and this is where you and the became a controversy it was he was one of the first controversial guys like that but it it it compelled him at the national consciousness at his here's the rabbinical sense of humor jackie may should the when i see rabbinical sense of humor because these for her bush book is the name for family as i said in the beginning of the show lava mitchell and we're almost bookies i always felt that the judaism and christianity have a symbiotic relationship but jackie mason went on to say that and he says it will humor like this folks like this very funny you could say anything like ivory boga jackie amazing say this she came in she said she said give me some multiple soup ibooks from isis this is through not multiple is wisdom wisdom is the anywhere jackie makes anything you listen to like bogart so you're right now bill clinton had goes women that hillary took care of what you see we've got to concentrate on donald trump is see because sometimes you don't want to say things exactly especially back that we weren't so speech in impaired we have speech impairment now we can't say things or think things because withdrawal and.

broderick advisor jackie mason jackie bogart bill clinton donald trump speech impairment jackie mesa sullivan bush hillary
"speech impairment" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"speech impairment" Discussed on KOIL

"Bring it up a little the mesa was speaking during this segment on a report is the show busy like somebody who course the red light beam compared to a murderer the great jackie mason for these to laugh at them hysterically when he was on member he came on the edge celibate show years ago yeah jackie makes you came on the show and he hit a whole thing gave he gave a certain sign with his hand and this is where you and the became a controversy it was he was one of the first controversial guys like bad but it it compelled him at the national consciousness at his here's a rip biblical sense of humor jackie mason when i see rabbinical sense of humor because he's a for her bush book is the name for family as i said in the beginning of the show left the mitchell and we're all mixed booker i always felt that the judaism and christianity have a symbiotic relationship but jackie nation went on to say that and he says it with humour like this looks like this very funny you could say anything like ivory bogart jackie amazing say this she came in she said down the delo what do you want to give me some multiple soup by book some isis this is meatballs not lots of bullies wisdom with them on the anywhere jackie makes it if anything it listen you like bogart so you're right now bill clinton had those women the hillary took care of what you see we've got to concentrate on donald trump you see because some time you don't want to say things exactly especially back that we weren't so speech in impaired we have speech impairment down we can't say things or think things because it's wrong and i'm all for risk louie i respected lawn my whole life course on the call remember laura not eighteen or nineteen when i married twentyone forget but.

jackie mason mitchell bogart bill clinton hillary donald trump speech impairment louie laura bush jackie nation