36 Burst results for "Speaker Speaker Speaker Nancy Nancy Nancy Nancy Pelosi Pelosi Pelosi Pelosi"

Fresh update on "speaker " discussed on BTV Simulcast

BTV Simulcast

01:08 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "speaker " discussed on BTV Simulcast

"Markets are completely ignoring fed speakers right now. They don't want to hear it. Are they fighting the fed? I think they're fighting the fed, but I think you always need to bring the big guns out. We need Powell to come out and speak. So until he speaks, I think the market rally can keep going. Principle global ambassador is chief strategist save Michelle there on the recent rally in stocks. Meanwhile, the chief strategist over at JPMorgan asset management says he expects equities to rebind record highs. It might take three years. Stocks have seen a significant rally since hitting their low point in mid June, David Kelly says softer than expected U.S. CPI means the fed may slow the rate hike path. A lot to unpack. Who better than to do that with and Charles henrique Monsieur. CIO a bonk says. So sima was very, I think punchy, great line from semen. Bring out the guns, bring out power, the market is underestimating the risks I go. Do we need a clear message from Powell that this fed is not for turning to punch a hole in the risk on narrative for equities? Let's start there. Yeah, look, I think we got the first downside surprise inflation in 18 months. So I think it's quite normal that the market was happy with this number. That being said, we know that X energy, it was still a rise, plus 0.4%, months and months. And I think even though the fed might be a bit less, let's say, okay on the red eyed side, we need to keep in mind that in September, we're going to double the pace of tightening. $95 billion a month. That means that we have red ice plus tightening. And indeed, you know, that means that the military policy is still a headwind for equity markets. I think that's the reality that the investors are currently facing. Okay, so let's just build on that. Let's talk about the yield curve. There was a moment of steepening yesterday. I mean, we made it back from the deepest inversion since 1982. We've gone from negative 58 to negative 34. So we've had a small steepening in this curve. Given the road map you've just outlined for me, would it be an expectation to see a deeper inversion and a return to a deeper inversion on the tide of financials you've just laid out? Well, on the contrary, I think maybe there is some room for a bit of stiffening with the long end of the curve pricing in the fact that if there is a bit less red this year, that means that it will be less rate cuts, you know, as it is expected in 2023. And also there are two dimensions that we need to keep in mind. As mentioned, there is quite a typing so that means less demands for long handed U.S. treasuries and also, if you look at where the bone use currently stands, think about Japanese investors where a big buyers of your treasuries, they have less currently it's less appealing for them. So the curve is to start to be a bit more appealing on the wrong hands for that type of, let's say, investors and treasuries to come back. So I will not be surprised to see a bit of a sibling in the Woods to come. I'm going to struggle with that statement, so I'm going to challenge you a little bit. That's deepening is predicated on a view and I would say deeply misguided view that the fed will tolerate slightly higher inflation for slightly longer. That's what got us into this mess in the first place. But you know, it's a very thin path for the feds. We know that if they really want to cool down inflation meaningfully, that means that they put the economy at the risk of recession. But on the other hand, if they don't do enough, yes, the economy is a winning recession. That means that we have higher inflation for longer. So there is this very thin path and that means that bond market is going to stay volatile. So what's referred to before about the year curve is going to be steeper is going to get inverted. I think we probably would see back to back and forth for some time because the market is still very short where it can go. Maybe they just have to hop around at Goldilocks for a bit of a cooking lesson in terms of how to get a soft landing and good porridge. Right, equity risk. We've had this great rally which see michonne is skeptical of. She's neutral. Now you have upgraded your equity exposure from to attract from unattractive to cautious. So you know, it's a bit like you go into a dance, isn't it? They're the unattractive ones in your cautiously asking somebody to dance. Who are you going to dance with the most? The Americans, the Europeans, taught me through. Yeah, we grew up with America. I think because that's where you find it's probably the most robust balance sheets. And also we like the fact that gross style has been hammered so far this year. So it may be time to come back on some names. But regarding this statement, you know, as mentioned before in order, the military policy is a headwind. Liquidity conditions are still not there. Macroeconomic context is not good. But on the other hand, there is something that we need to keep in mind that positioning of the market is very defensive. Hedge funds are not short bonds are natural equities to an extent, which has been very seen. And you need to give the tape a bit the benefit of the doubt. It looks like a bear market rally. But birthmarks are relatively very brutal. And an average median bear market probably is around 15 to 16%. So we want to a bit cut let's say our defensive positioning. I don't think we're the only ones doing so. And this is probably bringing some fuel to the market at least we know for a couple of weeks. Okay, John Henry, thank you very much and interesting descriptive on how to on how to position for equity market exposure. His thoughts on the markets is Friday morning. We're waiting for the Michigan

FED Jpmorgan Asset Management Charles Henrique Monsieur Powell David Kelly Sima Bonk America CIO Michelle Michonne John Henry Michigan
Pelosi to March Democrats Off Cliff With Inflation Bill Vote

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:05 min | 1 d ago

Pelosi to March Democrats Off Cliff With Inflation Bill Vote

"If we go back and again, you're a PhD. So you may not know much about the Declaration of Independence. But in the Declaration of Independence, there's the glorious language we know, but then Jefferson laid out what is an actual indictment of George the third. One of the particulars is they have sent out armies of officials to eat up our wealth. And that I just think 87,000 IRS agent. So your friends who are Democrats. And I know you've got some friends who are Democrat. I was talking to one last night. My college roommate, a longtime democratic friend saying, you know, Democrats are bent on self destruct, Elaine luria can not win reelection. Having cut the defense budget by inflation alone and having 87,000 IRS agents, she got a vote for that this week. Every Democrat in a tough district is being forced to vote on the IRS expansion act. Will any of them defect well because they did this for Henry waxman ten years ago. They voted for his idiotic climate bill then and now they're going to vote for climate bill that helps people in our income bracket by EVs. Do you think they're actually going to do that 9 weeks before an election? Pelosi seems to be marching them off the cliff right now. And even the New York Democrats and the other salt state Democrats who drew a line in the sand and said, we're not going to vote. Would you explain that? Again, we got steelers fans listening and they're not on peyote. So you could explain salt. Salt states. The state and local income tax state and local tax deduction, something we capped or effectively got rid of depending on what state you live in in the tax cuts and job with the intent of stopping the subsidization of high tax progressive states. Obviously all the members from high tax progressive states objected to that. And so they said, well, we want to eliminate that provision, go back to the status quo pre-tax cuts and jobs act. But even the moderate members who drew that line in the sand have now caved a speaker Pelosi. So with the possible exception of maybe Jared golden, I think she's going to have all her members vote for this. Come Friday,

IRS Elaine Luria Jefferson Henry Waxman George Pelosi Steelers New York Jared Golden
Taiwan holds drills, says China seeks control of seas

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 d ago

Taiwan holds drills, says China seeks control of seas

"Taiwan has begun live fire military drills to test combat readiness Taiwan's foreign minister Joseph Wu says the drills are a rehearsal for an invasion of the island China has been conducting military exercises that have included launching missiles into waters near Taiwan's coast and it said those drills were prompted by last week's visit to Taiwan by U.S. House speaker Nancy Pelosi but Taiwan's foreign minister says China is just using Pelosi's visit as a pretext and that China aims to annex Taiwan which it claims has its own territory Wu says China has no right to interfere in or alter the Taiwanese people's democratic process or interaction with other nations I'm Donna water

China Joseph Wu U.S. House Nancy Pelosi Pelosi WU Donna
Rep. Troy Nehls Shares His Suggestions for After the Midterms

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:17 min | 5 d ago

Rep. Troy Nehls Shares His Suggestions for After the Midterms

"An idea before we came on air what we should do as conservatives after the midterms, what was your suggestion? My suggestion is that we have to make a big splash in the first two years. The American people are going to give us the gavel in the house. We are going to have the speaker. So we must take care of that gavel. Years previous. You know, we've had the gavel. We had both chambers. We had Donald Trump. And what did Paul Ryan do? Yes, we got the tax cuts and job deck, but we did nothing to secure the southern border. Now the American people are paying for it. So I think it's incumbent upon lunar McCarthy to make sure that we can rein in this out of control spending, take care of the gavel and make sure that we focus on 2024. This is about 2024 right now. How have we done enough to clean up what happened in 20 20 to make sure that 2024 is in stolen? Well, I think that a lot more attention, the states are given a lot more attention to this specifically the state of Texas. I think that the Democrats aren't going to have COVID and don't bring me this monkeypox story to all of a sudden declare another national emergency where you can see then these liberal mayors and governors and county clerks and stuff all of a sudden change the rules to the voting. And that's what you saw in 2020 all in the name of COVID. So I'm hoping that these individual states have tightened up the rules and made sure that we have voter integrity. Because without it, we don't have a country.

Paul Ryan Donald Trump Monkeypox Mccarthy Texas
Tom Tradup: Trending Events at CPAC

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:38 min | 6 d ago

Tom Tradup: Trending Events at CPAC

"Harry, what's your title? I suppose it'll be a vice president of news and talk programming, but here at cpac, I'm best known as the only person in the entire convention that does not have either pants or a shirt or both made out of an American flag. Well, come on, get one, get with the program. Where's your flag? No, I feel naked here. It's unbelievable. You told me. You texted me today. Two things that just cracked me up. First of all, you said, you don't want to miss Marjorie Taylor Greene's session. It's called I'll take my committee back, please. And then you said that there's a, I guess, a session called the invasion with both Myra Flores and Carrie Lake. Is that true? That's right. Yep, Carrie Lake is flying in right after her victory in Arizona yesterday. In the GOP primary and she and Myra Flores who you've had on the show before Mike and you know very well from the Rio Grande valley, they are going to have this place exploding today. But it doesn't take much. I mean, Mike lindell is making a speech, Rick Scott, the U.S. senator from Florida has got a plan to rescue America. He's going to reveal JD Vance is here from Ohio that he's going to be talking about the rise of the hillbilly, which would be him. And then tonight, our mutual friend Larry O'Connor is hosting the annual cattlemen's ball here in Dallas at cpac and the guest speaker is Steve Bannon.

Carrie Lake Myra Flores Marjorie Taylor Greene Cpac Harry Mike Lindell Rick Scott Rio Grande Valley Jd Vance GOP Arizona America Mike Larry O'connor Florida Ohio Dallas Steve Bannon
Pelosi: China cannot stop US officials from visiting Taiwan

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 6 d ago

Pelosi: China cannot stop US officials from visiting Taiwan

"House speaker Nancy Pelosi is defending her trip to Taiwan a trip some say has escalated tension in the region They may try to keep Taiwan from visiting or participating In other places but they will not isolate Taiwan by preventing us To travel there Pelosi made the comment in Tokyo the last stop on her Asia tour which included the stop in Taiwan China said today that its canceling or suspending dialog with the U.S. on issues from climate change to military relations and antidrug efforts in retaliation for Pelosi's visit China is also holding threatening military exercises in 6 zones of Taiwan's coasts I'm Donna water

Taiwan Nancy Pelosi Pelosi Tokyo China Asia U.S.
NBC's Hallie Jackson Makes Biased Remarks on CPAC News Report

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:50 min | Last week

NBC's Hallie Jackson Makes Biased Remarks on CPAC News Report

"Want you to hear Hallie Jackson from NBC. The Today Show this morning. This is very important. There's one thing she said. Now, this is a news reporter. She's not an opinion host. She's paid to be objective. Listen to how she covered the opening of cpac in Dallas. And we're going to stop it at the point where she calls out the speakers who are concerned about election integrity, just like Donald Trump. A couple of big names are not set to speak at the conservative conference starting today, including Florida governor Ron DeSantis, but plenty of others will be there. Like former president Trump, just days after a critical test of how much sway he still has in his party. In Texas, today, the world's biggest lineup of conservatives will descend on cpac featuring Republican lawmakers like Ted Cruz and Lauren boebert, media personalities, like Sean Hannity, and the man who's still dominates the party. Former president Donald Trump set to deliver the keynote address on Saturday. Against the backdrop of a key test of his grip on the GOP in this week's primaries. Multiple candidates he backed who have embraced his election fraud lies doing well, including former TV host Carrie Lake in a race too close to call even this morning with a narrow lead against Karen Taylor ropes in the Arizona governor's primary. Lakes also set to appear at cpac after claiming without evidence before election day that the primary was rigged until the votes came in showing her in the lead. I want to bring the Republican Party together. I mentioned that earlier were one big happy sometimes sometimes dysfunctional family, but we can come together. Another Trump ally set to speak at cpac today. There she was, the election lies. The election fraud lies

Hallie Jackson Ron Desantis President Trump Donald Trump Ted Cruz Lauren Boebert NBC Carrie Lake Dallas Sean Hannity Karen Taylor Florida Texas GOP Cpac Lakes Arizona Republican Party
China claims 'precision missile strikes' in Taiwan Strait

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last week

China claims 'precision missile strikes' in Taiwan Strait

"China has begun live fire military drills in the waters around Taiwan China says it has conducted precision missiles strikes in the Taiwan strait as part of military exercises by its navy air force and other departments in 6 zones surrounding the island the drills have been prompted by a visit to the island by House speaker Nancy Pelosi this week The intentions to advertise China's threat to attack the self governing island republic in response to moves to solidify its de facto independence from Chinese rule state media says the exercises are joint operations focused on blockade sea target assault strike on ground targets and airspace control I'm Charles De Ledesma

Taiwan House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Taiwan Strait Navy Chinese Rule State Media Charles De Ledesma
Pelosi Is in Taiwan Against the Administration's Wishes

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:15 min | Last week

Pelosi Is in Taiwan Against the Administration's Wishes

"According to The Washington Post, The White House worked urgently to deescalate tensions with China as House speaker Nancy Pelosi met Wednesday with Taiwanese president Tsai ing Wen and other officials during a high profile visit to the self governing island against the administration's wishes, hoping to head off a geopolitical crisis mid threats and military maneuvers by Beijing. White House officials warned that China is preparing itself for possible aggressive actions in response to Pelosi's visit beyond this week. They reiterated forcefully that the Chinese Communist Party should not use the visit as a pretext to increase military activity in and around the Taiwan strait. But of course, that's exactly what China is going to do. White House spokesman John Kirby, who is the National Security Council, spokesperson, he said, we've seen a number of announcements from the PRC in just the last several hours that are unfortunately right in line with what we had anticipated. China has positioned itself to take further steps. We expect they will continue to react over a longer term horizon. Pelosi said quote we will not abandon our commitment to Taiwan. We are proud of our enduring friendship. So I presented below you with a medal. The order of propitious clouds with special ground cordon for her work promoting U.S. Taiwan ties. Jake Sullivan, Biden's national security adviser spoke with his Chinese counterpart to defend Pelosi's right to visit, but even so, do not think the trip was a good idea, according to The White House, Sullivan expressed concerns about Pelosi's trip to multiple administration officials and asked for suggestions on how to dissuade her from traveling to Taiwan.

Taiwan House Speaker Nancy Pelosi White House Tsai Ing Wen Chinese Communist Party Pelosi John Kirby The Washington Post Taiwan Strait Beijing National Security Council PRC Jake Sullivan Biden U.S. Sullivan
Remember the Elián González Saga?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:27 min | Last week

Remember the Elián González Saga?

"Just reminds I love it when there are all these strange political bedfellows. It goes back to ilian Gonzalez in the Clinton administration. Remember the little boy in a little Havana in Miami? His mother drowned bringing him into the country and the father in Cuba wanted the little boy back and Janet Reno's Justice Department broke down the door and they swiped the kid from the arms of the relatives and delivered the boy back to communist Cuba. Remember that? And I remember at the time I was at a conference with a bunch of talk show hosts and all the big mouths on the radio gathered, which is rough. That's not a place I'm not real comfortable because I believe me, I'm mindful that I'm one of those big mouths and no one knew what position to take because it was, I mean, it was Clinton and we don't want to be pro Clinton, but on the other hand, family values, the kids being returned to daddy back in Cuba. Yeah, but it's communist Cuba. It's Phil de Fidel Castro. No one knew what to do. Well, the same thing's happening here. He got Tom Friedman from The New York Times lashing out at Pelosi. You've got Tucker Carlson from Fox News, condemning Pelosi. You've got, I guess, Pelosi supporters loving what she's doing. And you've got the Biden administration letting her go.

Ilian Gonzalez Cuba Clinton Administration Janet Reno Havana Justice Department Miami Clinton Phil De Fidel Castro Pelosi Tom Friedman Tucker Carlson The New York Times Fox News Biden Administration
John Kirby: Biden Admin Does Not Support Taiwan's Independence

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:50 sec | Last week

John Kirby: Biden Admin Does Not Support Taiwan's Independence

"Yesterday, spokesman John Kirby from the National Security Council told a reporter, we don't support Taiwan's independence. John Kirby cut four guys. She wants to say on this trip is really her prerogative. That's why it was so important for me in my opening comments, Kelly, to make clear what this administration's policy is with respect to the one China principle. When China policy, as well as not wanting to see cross street tensions resolved by any than other than peaceful means and the fact that we don't support Taiwan independence, it was important for me to lay that down right at the outset. That's our policy. That's this administration's approach.

John Kirby Taiwan National Security Council Kelly
Tom Friedman: Nancy Pelosi's Visit to Taiwan Is 'Utterly Reckless'

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:09 min | Last week

Tom Friedman: Nancy Pelosi's Visit to Taiwan Is 'Utterly Reckless'

"The airplane delivering House speaker Nancy Pelosi has landed on the island of Taiwan. Listen to what Tom Friedman from The New York Times wrote today about Pelosi's visit. He calls it utterly reckless. Friedman wrote yesterday, I have a lot of respect for House speaker Nancy Pelosi, but if she does go ahead with the visit to Taiwan this week, against President Biden's wishes, she will be doing something that is utterly reckless, dangerous and irresponsible, nothing good will come of it. The liberal columnist for The New York Times wrote, Taiwan will not be more secure or more prosperous as a result of this purely symbolic visit and a lot of bad things could happen. These include a Chinese military response that could result in the U.S. being plunged into direct conflicts with a nuclear armed Russia and a nuclear armed China at the same time. I wonder how Tom Friedman feels about being on the same side with Tucker Carlson. Over an issue of international global ideology and politics.

Taiwan House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Tom Friedman President Biden The New York Times Nancy Pelosi Pelosi Friedman U.S. Russia China Tucker Carlson
Donate $1,000 to 'Food for the Poor' & Get a Signed Copy of NY Post

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:20 min | Last week

Donate $1,000 to 'Food for the Poor' & Get a Signed Copy of NY Post

"A $1000 will send 4000 meals to hungry people all over the world through our food for the poor partnership with this great Christian ministry. And I said, if you'll give me a $1000 for our campaign, I'll sign a personally sign the cover of this New York Post because it's going to be a collector's item. It should be right now. You could frame it. I'll sign it and I'll write, let's go Brandon on the cover and sign it to however you want me to sign it. Right now I'm going to sign a copy to dorota and Kevin, because giro and Kevin both made together a $1000 donation. All right. Well, a couple of other people wanted to get in on it. They said, hey, I'll give a tax deductible donation for a $1000. Well, let's have some fun. I've got a stack of several the New York posts that I will happily sign to you or your $1000 tax deductible contribution to food for the poor, a beautiful, Christian ministry, a relief organization that is doing God's work. So I'm asking you to go to Mike online dot com, click on the send food banner, but if you're interested in getting a personally signed copy of this classic New York Post cover, defining recession for Joe Biden's sake, call Tracy right now at 806 5 5 mic,

Dorota New York Post Kevin Giro Brandon Christian Ministry New York Mike Joe Biden Tracy
New York Post Defines 'Recession' for Joe Biden

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:30 min | Last week

New York Post Defines 'Recession' for Joe Biden

"Recession. Noun. Plural noun recessions, a period of temporary economic decline. During which trade and industrial activity are reduced generally identified by a fall in GDP in two successive quarters. The U.S. economy, as you know, shrank 0.9% in the second quarter, after a 1.8% drop in the first three months. Despite being the literal definition of the word, President Biden said we're not in a recession. Grandpa Joe stood there in the unselect recession to me. I have a stack of New York Post covers. This is the coolest thing we did. I'm pretty jazzed about this because we're taking time in August to feed the hungry. Through our food for the poor campaign, and many of you have already stepped up, I prayed on day one that your heart might be touched. Well, listen to how much fun we've been having. If you're watching me on the Salem news channel right now or you're watching us on rumble or you're watching this at Mike online dot com. You can see the show as well as listen to us on the radio. And the New York Post Friday had this banner cover showing the definition of recession. It is exquisite. It's the perfect SmackDown of Biden pretending that somehow he's rescuing the economy.

President Biden Grandpa Joe The New York Post U.S. Biden
Karine Jean-Pierre Celebrates the Slight Drop in Gas Prices

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:47 min | Last week

Karine Jean-Pierre Celebrates the Slight Drop in Gas Prices

"We went out of here talking about the recession, the state of the economy. Do you know now 61, according to the experts, 61% of Americans are living paycheck to paycheck. 61%. Talk about fiddling while Rome burns. Yesterday, Jean Pierre bragging karine Jean Pierre bragging about how Joe Biden is now rescuing the economy. Now, you got to hear this. This is astounding. Gas prices are coming down a little bit. Not a lot. A little bit. Check this out. An update on where we are currently with gas prices. We have now been falling for almost 7 straight weeks. As of this morning, gas prices have dropped 81 cents per gallon since their peak and June, as you'll see from the chart to my left here. That means American families who, with two cars, are saving $80 a month, a drivers can now find gas for three 9 $9 or less around half of all gas stations across the country and average gasoline prices have come below 3.99 in 19 states. Plumes war is still putting pressure on global oil supply, but President Biden is taking historic action to mitigate its impacts it's the same shell game they did with the job they're doing with the jobs numbers. You shut the country down and millions and millions of people don't work and when they rejoin the workforce because the country is finally opened again, you take credit for the job growth.

Karine Jean Pierre Jean Pierre Joe Biden Rome President Biden
Have a 'Healthy Awareness' of Pelosi's Flight With FlightAware

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:41 sec | Last week

Have a 'Healthy Awareness' of Pelosi's Flight With FlightAware

"And somebody else said there's a flight tracker app, right? Well, I don't have the app you get their website. It's flight aware dot com. Flight aware dot com. All right. You kids and your parents are on a flight. You can type in there and they'll shove exactly where they are and how fast you want them. Do you have a my pillow? I do not know. Well, now you do. I want to send you free my pillow for your professional flight tracking stalking Nancy Pelosi activity here on the Mike gallery. I wouldn't call it stock in Mike. I was just called a healthy awareness. That's right. That's what all stalkers say. Famous last words, your honor. It was just a healthy awareness. No, I appreciate it. And everybody's telling me that it's very, very prominent. And it's something I learned

Mike Gallery Nancy Pelosi Mike
Tracking Nancy Pelosi's Plane Using ADS-B

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:01 min | Last week

Tracking Nancy Pelosi's Plane Using ADS-B

"Ryan, you are tracking speaker Pelosi's plane as we speak, correct? That is correct. She's at 9600 feet, 346 knots heading northwest turned to approach to Taipei. So she is landing. This is interesting. I didn't realize there was this whole world out there where you can monitor and track prominent aircraft. Yeah, so it's called ADS-B. It's a satellite based transponder that you know their flight number flight information. Type it in and they'll track them anywhere in the world. She's 9000 feet and 330 knots. Now when about 5 minutes ago, ten minutes ago, you said she was at 30, 31,000 feet. So she's definitely descending. You know, I was poking fun at you 'cause I thought, well, 31 to 30 doesn't necessarily, but it's gotta be the only blip in that region of the world right now, right? I don't know, there's plenty of other aircraft around there, but now she was at 35 about 8 minutes ago. So she's got a nice little descent here. Got

Pelosi Taipei Ryan
US House Speaker Pelosi arrives in Taiwan, defying Beijing

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last week

US House Speaker Pelosi arrives in Taiwan, defying Beijing

"Despite threats from China House speaker Nancy Pelosi has arrived in Taiwan on the highest level U.S. visit in 25 years Shortly after stepping off an air force plane in Taipei Pelosi issued a statement saying her visit honors America's commitment to backing the self ruled island's vibrant democracy China claims Taiwan as its territory and sees visits by foreign officials as recognition of the island's sovereignty warning Pelosi against visiting Both she and the Biden administration say her arrival does not signal any shift in U.S. policy toward Taiwan but Beijing accusing Washington of a betrayal and says it will conduct targeted military operations to safeguard national sovereignty Sagar Meghani Washington

Taiwan Pelosi U.S. Nancy Pelosi Taipei Biden Administration Beijing Washington Sagar Meghani
US Speaker Pelosi arrives in Taiwan, raising China tensions

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last week

US Speaker Pelosi arrives in Taiwan, raising China tensions

"House speaker Nancy Pelosi has arrived in Taiwan on a visit that's raising tensions between the U.S. and China Pelosi is the highest ranking American official in 25 years to visit the self ruled island China claims as its own Beijing has been warning of strong measures if she showed up The Biden administration did not explicitly urge Pelosi to call off the trip but did try to assure China her visit would not signal a shift in U.S. policy toward Taiwan Nothing has changed There's no drama to talk to Still National Security Council spokesman John Kirby said yesterday U.S. officials worried China would retaliate with military exercises as a show of force We will not take the bait or engage in saber rattling Sagar Meghani Washington

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi China Pelosi Biden Administration Taiwan U.S. Still National Security Counci Beijing John Kirby Sagar Meghani Washington
"speaker  " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

The Speaker Station Podcast

04:40 min | 11 months ago

"speaker " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

"Jeff belanger jeff is an author podcast storyteller adventure and explorer of the unexplained. He's written more than a dozen books that have been published in six languages. You may have seen jeff on tv. Because he's the emmy nominated host writer and producer of the new england legends series on. Pbs an amazon prime. Jeff provides programs and lectures to audiences all over the world. And he's been the writer and researcher for every episode of ghost adventures on the travel channel. Jeff has made media appearances on hundreds of radio and television programs over his twentieth career. India has a passion for mysteries and legends. Hey jeff welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. Wow let's do it again. That already screwed up. No leave that in. It'll sound natural unreal. I just i was ready to be all polished and say thank you for having me peter. It's great to talk about public speaking with you. I think you should leave all that. In as a matter of fact. I would not edit that one bit all right just as is perfect. Hey jeff ralph walled say no no. Leave all this great. We're being real. This is the blueprint is authentic. Jeff ralph waldo. Emerson said all of the great speakers were bad speakers at first. Yes so tell us. When did you first start public speaking. And how bad where you back. Then it was two thousand five on a night just like this one and i was terrible. I had just published my first book. And what's cool when you write. A book is that People want you to speak about it and that's exciting because you're like. Hey all this work. I wrote a book. And i got up in front of an audience. I had all these notes. Because when you write books you you pore over every word you wanna make it just right you want it to land just the way you want it to land and i thought well public speaking the same thing so i wrote this whole speech and i read it to the says. It's so awful. I would never do that today. But i i read to them and i tried to like make eye contact. Then i lose my place. And i would try to keep reading because i thought i wrote it just right like what i wanted to say. I got better. I got better along the way but that was that was awful but ten thousand hours makes you an expert right so they say that was the first hour and that was a tough one. You don't i see that a lot. Where when someone writes a book people like you said. Ask them to speak. But one doesn't necessarily correlate to the other no it does not ovalles either way either way people get speak very well and they. They can't put a sentence down on paper and they are two different skills for sure. Would you agree that. Writing is wall solitary. Yeah writing is a lonely life..

Jeff belanger jeff emmy nominated host jeff ralph Jeff jeff Jeff ralph waldo Pbs new england amazon Emerson India peter
"speaker  " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

The Speaker Station Podcast

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"speaker " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

"You don't have to go behind the dais so when you look over your water you can see them. Get your little thing and turn back to your audience and they never know you looked and that's why you need fourteen point five or better. Do you believe the speakers. Merely having notes with them could increase the level of confidence a comfort. it does and i'm okay with having something there and one other tip is. I've sometimes doesn't big stages with thousands of people and what i would actually do because i like movement is i would have notes on one side of the stage on the floor. I'd have notes on the other side of the stage on the floor. And i'd have them on the lectern. That is somewhere in the middle. And so if i'm over here with the audience i can just kind of glance over at the floor for a moment. Come back up. And here's the key. You guys can't see me doing this. But what i'm telling you is if you look down at the floor first of all. Don't stand on top of it and look at it. Look at it from the side right. That's why you want that big font but always bring your eyes backup reconnect with some of the audience before you start talking if there are places that you can tape them where they're not on the floor and their higher up great but literally sometimes. I had them on the desk at in the front row. Because i came out to the audience i wanted notes there too. I don't do it as much anymore. I still usually have at least one thing of notes and typically. It's just my slides because visually i can see the image on the slide. I know what. I wanna talk about. And i'll do six slides per so it's one page. I can flip it over. There is my you know twelve or less slides for an hour. But it's all your comfort level and you know what people are. Okay if you go over the lecture and flip your notes around check him for a moment put him back down. Just put them back down before you come back out. Sometimes it seems like we don't want to check our notes because we believe it undermines our being the expert. What do you think yes. So you know. There's so many times that i have been in front of roman. I forgot what i was going to say. And i will say to the audience. What was i talking about. Oh glad you're listening. Oh yeah yeah and sometimes. I'm like yeah i can't find it. I'll let you know if it comes back. Let's move on sometimes. i never find it. And that's okay. It's about being comfortable in those moments and being you in those moments than comes back to what we started talking about which is why connection is so important as a speaker because it's not about that perfection right. We're not looking for that oratory. Experts were looking for somebody to make think or feel and remember at the end of connectors advantage. You write about the benefits of being an inclusive connector. How can being this kind of connector help us make our audiences feel included. I'm so glad you brought this up because it's really been interesting learning experience for me as a speaker. I like to diverse audiences all over the place and in the last few years. I definitely seen a shift in some of the audiences in use of language so for example i and i heard it when i said it but i i have tried to be more inclusive in the language i use so instead of saying husband i might say significant other instead of saying you know women who do their nails. I'll say people who do their nails. And i literally got called out by a guy who's like. Hey not only women do their nails..

"speaker  " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

The Speaker Station Podcast

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"speaker " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

"Can visualize big smiley face and at one side of your mouth is the start on the other side of your mouth is the end and so at the beginning. And you've got the highest attention curve and in the middle. It goes down now. Your job is a public speakers to make that smiley face look a little bit more like a wave so the attention curb will go up and down and up and down and up and down but the beginning and the end are always the high points so if you're going to memorize memorize opening and memorizer closing one to no more than three sentences of memorization on either side because then you will lose it. The only other time i will say memorize or refer to notes because i'm also not big on notes is if it's a quote or statistic anyone make sure you get it right. Would you agree that memorizing the openings help speakers become when beginning talks. That's a really great point. I'll never forget my first international speech in two thousand fifteen in hong kong the largest audience ever had of a thousand people at that point and it was you know english as their second language. My husband my children were in the audience. I mean i. My heart must've been racing outside of my chest. I felt like they could all see it. And i got up on that stage. I'm like oh my god. That's not really what i was thinking. But i'll keep it clean and i took a breath and i'm like i have to do this and i ended up saying hello to everybody in mandarin because i was talking about before and i got this huge applause and i calmed down and it was unplanned but it gave me that moment of. Oh okay they want to support me and a lot of times that i five minutes is so scary. And that's when your heart's racing the most and so to have something to lean on to give yourself time to come down and to be welcomed and to recognize typically. Your audience is there to support. You want you to succeed. They're not out to get you right. And it's your job to make them as comfortable as it is for them to make you comfortable so that is really a great point for your listeners. And what about endings. Why do you believe memorizing. These are so important because it's the last thing that they heard and you can ruin everything with a want wall ending like thank you for your time. Good night you know. It's just what it just ended. You wanna make sure that you have the last word that you deliver that last word that makes them feel something that makes them actually wanna stand up. You mentioned notes in that. You're not necessarily in favor of them. Why is.

hong kong
"speaker  " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

The Speaker Station Podcast

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"speaker " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

"And often with a better result when you are connected a lot michelle. I've heard you say that connection is the key to public speaking as an expert in both connecting and communicating. Can you share. Why it's so important. You know it's funny. I teach a lot of public speaking classes as you do. And we will tell people what to do with their hands and how to stand and how to use their voice more effectively and all that stuff. In at the end of the day. I always say. Now forget all of that because it doesn't really matter what really matters is your connection to your message and your connection to your audience because if you can make them feel if you can make them listen if you can make them remember if you believe in buy into your own message that's when it becomes memorable that's when it lands i actually will say connected to your message is equal if not even maybe a little bit more important than the audience because even connect your audience. But if your message isn't a connection to you the may might love you as a person. I think you're funny but your message won't land just like the word connecting. We hear the word. Authenticity used a lot. Why do you believe authenticity is so valuable when speaking in public because people can't buy into somebody who they don't feel as being real right if we feel like somebody's up there on that stage talking to us and they have a mask honor they're putting on a show or an act and it's not who they really are. We tend to turn them off or we tend to start to look at them through that lens of. I'm not sure i buy them and authenticity is the foundation of trust. And what you're really talking about. Or some of the mindsets of a connector right so in order to allow yourself connection. Trust is fundamental. And if you're not willing to be vulnerable right which is another aspect of trust right another aspect of authenticity if we are not putting ourselves out there and being real and being authentic then people aren't going to trust us if they don't trust us. They're not going to buy anything that we're selling. And when i say buying what you're selling it could be an idea. It could be thought it could be something actually tangible that you want to sell. But it's just they're not. They're not eating what you.

michelle foundation of trust
"speaker  " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

The Speaker Station Podcast

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"speaker " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

"And who better to discuss this with you. Buy a veteran speaker. Who's also an expert on connecting. Listen as michelle tillis. Letterman shares insights. That'll help you use the concept of connecting so you can be even more effective when presenting to others one of forbes top twenty five networking experts. Michelle is the author of four books including the internationally known the eleven laws of likeability and her latest the connectors advantage. She is a connection. Creator and ceo of executive essentials which provides customized communications and leadership programs for fortune. Five hundred nonprofit university and government clients a former finance executive in nyu professor. Michelle is a regular in the media appearing on nbc. Cbs fox npr. The wall street journal new york times. Cnbc and others. Here's my talk with michelle tillis letterman. Hi michelle welcome to the show. Thanks for having me on first. Congratulations on your latest book. The connectors advantage. What inspired you to write this one. It's actually a follow up to my first ever book. Which was the eleven laws likeability. And i i was like. Oh this is this is it. This is what people need to know and to understand that connection whether it is connected to your message as the speaker and connecting to your audience or is it connecting your team as a leader connection. Is everything end. The connectors advantage is basically faster. Easier better results would ever it is. You're working on whether to the job. The promotion the client referral to sail the health happiness. I got stats for that stuff too. You're going to get there faster easier.

"speaker  " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

The Speaker Station Podcast

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"speaker " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

"What's happening. i don't wanna do this. I would like tomac. Frustrated felt sick. You know what i mean. I just didn't want to do it. And then everybody else felt that we to all of my classmates felt that way once. I kind of realized that it was like okay. You know for all feeling this way. It's going to be okay in old. Look tiffany you're not going to be perfect but you're not going to causing of the world with your speech. So do your best. And i was like. That's that's really good advice. I'm not going to be perfect. But it's also not going to be the end of the world. Know someone. I interviewed on another podcast. Another episode said that. She's still looking for the that certificate out there where someone died from public speaking. Yeah we something that people bring up. As while i have the butterflies in my stomach and i my heart's racing and unlike but can people see the butterflies near sonic. They can't. They can't mush her. You know like on the extreme side in your peaking guts out. They're not gonna know that you felt queasy or the butterflies. Same with a heart racing. People can't see your heart racing now if you have a heart attack again on the extreme side in fate in front of everyone then they're going to say maybe needed feel so great but even they're not gonna know those from your heart racing something that i like to tell people is you might be nervous but a lot of the things that happened when you are nervous transitions or translates into energy to your audience. So if you speak up a little bit louder or if you talk a little faster if you move around a little bit. More people can receive that energy not as nervousness so to breath. You'll do great tiffany. Thank you so much for joining us. And shedding some insight and some light on millennials and public speaking in working with them and how they view things. It's going to help a lot of people who were from millennials up to people of my generation. I'm sure how can listeners. Learn more about you in the services you provide. They can actually go to fearless presentations dot com slash. The fearless millennial there. They can see more. About what i do for one on one coaching. The classes that i teach in how i can help them individually and in groups. That's great thanks once again. Thank you for having me. That was fine those good conversation. That's a wrap of another episode of public. Speaking with pita.

tomac heart attack tiffany
"speaker  " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

The Speaker Station Podcast

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"speaker " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

"Like we're really settling in to our jobs. Our careers and things like that and so that's my first instinct is if i'm going to market this to somebody who might need help public speaking. I wanna work into somebody like me. You know somebody who's like okay. I need to get grounded in my career. I wanna move forward in my career. So what can i do to be better. Well we can get better at speaking professionally in ways that the older are this. Narrations prior to us are used to. Do you want to advance your career. You have to be able to do both. you can't just do one. You have to be able to play both worlds now. How do you encourage a millennials who might not be used to speaking in that manner to get up and give presentations. Yeah i would say if you are. Like i have an office full of millennials. None of the one of your presentations. What can i do to get them to your presentation. I would have picked something that they're really passionate about or that. They really like about what they're currently doing. We will talk for hours about what we're passionate about. Money does love a good cause. I don't know if you've ever noticed that but we we love. We love a good cause. And i like to think that we're not snowflakes. What we are a little bit more sympathetic..

"speaker  " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

The Speaker Station Podcast

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"speaker " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

"You want to become confident incredible. Every time you speak in public well you can be. And it doesn't matter whether you're speaking on stage presenting in meetings or selling to prospects by being a more compelling public speaker you can increase your impact influence in income. I'm peter george public speaking coach international speaker and author and this is public speaking with peter. George every generation has characteristics associated with it. Accurate or not and millennials are no exception course some traits of the same in every generation in some different due to circumstances trends and their environment so when it comes to speaking to audiences made up of millennials or even more so having millennials present we have to adjust our thinking to help us with that is today's guest tiffany foot known as the field. This millennial tiffany helps. People communicate effectively overcome public speaking fair and not let fear. Hold them back. Her passion is meeting people where they are and helping them get to where they need to be so they can live life fearlessly. Hi tiffany welcome to the show. And it's a real pleasure to have you here with us. Hi peter yes thanks for having me. I am very excited to be part of your show today. Tiffany's speakers we always want to be able to communicate with into resonate with our audience. What is it that we need to know about the millennial generation in how they communicate differently. Well and he also communicate differently because communication drastically changed our generation. I remember being a child and having the phone plugged into the wall and now i watched my friends go live on my phone. That is not plugged into a wall. daily we have things like talk and instagram lives. Facebook lives and the way that we grew up in communicating changed drastically because the social media and because of the advancements in technology we grew up you know using short shortened words protects. Like i remember saying you know what's up but it was like w..

peter george Hi tiffany peter George Tiffany Facebook
"speaker  " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

The Speaker Station Podcast

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"speaker " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

"Higher <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> power <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> under no <Speech_Male> circumstance. <Speech_Male> This be a waste <Speech_Male> of my time. Please <Speech_Male> please please <Speech_Male> let me find at least <Speech_Male> one. Decent human <Speech_Male> being will take my <Speech_Male> car and accept my <Speech_Male> services in a way that <Speech_Male> i need and please <Speech_Male> don't let me be inundated <Speech_Male> by thousand <Speech_Male> sales pitches of things <Silence> that i don't need. <Speech_Male> We've all <Speech_Male> made that <Speech_Male> that talk to ourselves <Speech_Male> in a car <Speech_Male> now. Love what <Speech_Male> you need to do <Speech_Male> is adopt <Speech_Male> the mindset. When you <Speech_Male> go into a networking <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> let me. Find at <Speech_Male> least ten people <Speech_Male> in this room. <Speech_Male> Who will be <Silence> valuable <Speech_Male> and aligned <Speech_Male> partners. <Speech_Male> That i can <Silence> strategically <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> powerfully align myself <Speech_Male> with so <Speech_Male> that we can grow <Speech_Male> our businesses <Speech_Male> together <Speech_Male> because that is the <Speech_Male> point of networking strategic <Speech_Male> alliances. <Speech_Male> And if <Speech_Male> you go into a networking <Speech_Male> event <Speech_Male> with the understanding <Speech_Male> that you are looking for strategic <Speech_Male> partners <Speech_Male> in your <Speech_Male> in the growth of your <Silence> business <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> then you start to look <Speech_Male> at that networking events <Silence> a little bit differently <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> instead <Speech_Male> of pitching. <Speech_Male> This is <Speech_Male> what i do. Hey my name <Speech_Male> is sean tyler fully. I'm speaker <Speech_Male> coach. You need to get on <Speech_Male> stage is hey. My name is sean <Speech_Male> todd. Fully speaker <Speech_Male> coach can. Do you wanna get on <Speech_Male> stages. I can go <Silence> <Speech_Male> pierre. My <Speech_Male> name's sean tyler. Fully <Speech_Male> speaker coach. <Speech_Male> How can i be <Silence> service to you <Speech_Male> and you <Speech_Male> can say well. I don't need to <Speech_Male> be her coach coaches on speaker <Speech_Male> myself. I <SpeakerChange> do it all the <Speech_Male> time. So great so <Speech_Male> what do you need <Speech_Male> what. What <Speech_Male> would be the one. If <Speech_Male> i could wave a magic wand <Speech_Male> eight now what's the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> one thing you need to <Speech_Male> propel your business forward <Speech_Male> and then <Speech_Male> you tell me <Speech_Male> now. I may <Speech_Male> have that service <Speech_Male> in my toolbox. <Speech_Male> I can <Speech_Male> say well funny <Speech_Male> that you mentioned that <Speech_Male> i do this <Speech_Male> but if you <Speech_Male> don't i can say <Silence> great. <Speech_Male> I have a very <Silence> large network. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Can i get your card. <Speech_Male> And if i know <Speech_Male> anybody who <Speech_Male> does that thing <Silence> <Advertisement> that <SpeakerChange> you need <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> i will put <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you in touch with them. 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I was <Speech_Male> the one that solved <Silence> the problem. <Speech_Male> And it wasn't <Speech_Male> with my service. <Speech_Male> It was just <Speech_Male> by opening up my network <Speech_Male> and that <Speech_Male> is truly <Speech_Male> when everybody <Speech_Male> says you know your <Speech_Male> net worth is <Silence> your network. <Speech_Male> They don't <Speech_Male> mean to constantly <Speech_Male> spam on <Speech_Male> link din and <Speech_Male> try to sell your <Speech_Male> product to them. <Speech_Male> What they mean <Speech_Male> is that <Speech_Male> your network <Speech_Male> is who <Speech_Male> will directly refer <Speech_Male> to you <Speech_Male> but <SpeakerChange> you need <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> give <Silence> to receive <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> more <Speech_Male>

"speaker  " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

The Speaker Station Podcast

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"speaker " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

"Who is seeking me. What advice can i give to the. Those are the two quickest ways to figure out who your audiences. I've never heard that before about speaking to yourself five years ago and that being one of your audiences to better serve our audience. We need to engage them. How can a speaker deliver more engaging presentation while so we've touched on a couple of points already. But to reiterate one of them is reiterate. Always bring back to mind some of the things that you discussed so summing up things bringing up key themes or points throughout always triggers audience to remain to be reminded that that is important information. Things like write this down there. You know their subtle plays words that you can use phrases I call them transition phrases. So write this down. Or and now we're going to cover or to recap all of these. Things are phrases that you can use to trigger your audience's mind to know that important information was just said so now they have to think back to or important. Information is coming or both so. That's one way you can do it. Another way is again tell story. Did people engaged through the story and always start off the story with not always but if you want to get them to really embody the story imagined this or picture this or think of a time when those are real trigger words for people to know that they you want them to get inside their head and then you're going to guide that story in walk them through that so that they can personalize it A really really quick way to if you see your audience is starting to drift and you need to bring him back and engage them again with that. Seventy to ninety two percents engagement difference between a monologue and dialogue. it's not always appropriate to ask the audience questions or solicit input directly from the audience but use a speaker may need a break or you may need to reset the tone of the room so anyone at any time..

Seventy five years ago two both one ninety two percents one way points
"speaker  " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

The Speaker Station Podcast

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"speaker " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

"And this is why. When i've talked to people in the past even taught a class on it or two. Is i say start small. It's really difficult to build momentum out of nowhere and it's really probably not the best idea to just start throwing money at facebook or google ads just to build awareness about this. I would probably start small. And i might even partner with some other speakers in the area where you're all working together to bring in an audience There's a lot of different tactics and things you can do and certainly mentioned like facebook. Ads are good wine. If you know your audience google ads sometimes could be appropriate as well. Maybe putting on a free webinar. That kind of promotes. The event is another way to get some people aware of it partnering with a local organization. That's looking to get a word out. You know very often. What i've done in the past is for fast forward may want at one of our brands we have. We wanted to get a bigger audience..

facebook two one google
"speaker  " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

The Speaker Station Podcast

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"speaker " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

"I'm putting on an event on social media or public speaking or accounting tips. That you need to know whatever it might be your area of expertise that you're not talking to nobody. You're talking to somebody you posted to social. You posted your marketing. You put on your website you get people to register either for free or for a paid amount and you start feeling those rooms. I always feel anytime. I put on an event and i don't put him on his lodges. You're talking about. But i always feel that for the greatest amount of time. I have to channel p.t. Barnum and that. I have to promote. I'm no longer speaker. Our trainer at least not in that sense till that day but during that other time i'm promoting it and getting people in the seats and getting butts in the seats especially in larger events not necessarily an easy thing to do. You have to be consistent. Yeah there's gotta be a marketing and advertising behind it. There's a lot of. I mean we can spend weeks talking about all the things you could be doing to fill seats. But you know there are you. If you do have other speakers it might be that the other speakers also wanna help you promote the event If you have sponsor sometimes you can right into some sponsorships that they will promoted on their social channels or through their email And there's other ways of getting some presses well and getting some free or inexpensive advertising just so people do know about the admit. What are some of the pros and cons. People gonna run across if they decide to do this The pro is the pros. We've kind of talked about. I mean obviously you're setting yourselves up in authority. Whenever you take the stage you are already have a certain level authority. People almost often physically have to look up to you When you deliver your content so assuming that you've got good quality content everything that your voice is going to carry a lot more weight just by getting up there even if you rented the room yourself even if you've done everything yourself. There's a certain authority that comes with that position and that can really lead to more business or whatever you're looking to accomplish it might doesn't have to be business. It could just be about a cause that you're very passionate about or you want to change the way people are thinking. Certainly it can generate revenue for you either directly through ticket sales and sponsorships indirectly through business and very often at flight. You know when we're talking to a new prospect or client. We say well. How did you hear about us..

p.t. Barnum
"speaker  " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

The Speaker Station Podcast

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"speaker " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

"He's also the tech guru of the evening news. Show to seven which ears on the nbc affiliates in maine joining from one of my favorite places. Portland maine is rich brooks rich. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me. I really appreciate the opportunity back in two thousand twelve..

seven nbc two thousand twelve one maine Portland maine
"speaker  " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

The Speaker Station Podcast

06:27 min | 2 years ago

"speaker " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

"Welcome to the Speaker Station where we generally discuss how you can be more effective when speaking stage presenting in meetings or selling to prospects. I'm your host Peter George in this episode. You GonNa several tips that you can implement immediately. That'll help you more effectively use video conference call platforms such as Zoom in doing so. You'll demonstrate your level of professionalism just as you would in person to person meeting before we get into it however I wanna bring it to your attention that if you're feeling a little burnt out from zoom or self conscious or feel that you're under pressure because you're always on while attending one of these meetings. You're not alone. I've heard from many business associates that they feel under pressure this particular burnout. It actually is receiving a few different names. One is zoo midas another is zoom. Burn so if you two are experiencing this you're not alone. These ideas hopefully will alleviate some of that first one arrive early. Many of us are figuring. Well my meetings at one. Pm I can pop on at twelve fifty nine and I'm still early. Well maybe ninety nine percent of the time that's fine but what about that one time? When you have to reboot computer while there's just a little snafu in the platform at that moment and it takes longer than expected. Your credibility is at stake whether it's in person or virtual be there early once you're there sooner or later you're probably going to have to speak and when you speak you want to be clear so people can understand you without straining now most of us. Maybe we have to rely on the microphone and not computers. Unfortunately they're not all that good so if you have the capability use an external microphone. It might be with a headset with the boom mic. It might be the air pods. That came with your phone. They work on some computers not on others. But if you can devise away to use a different external mic abetter Mike. The others will appreciate if you must rely on the built into your computer. Speak clearly end slower than you might normally and when it comes to sound whether wanted sound or unwanted sound the mute button as your friend keep yourself muted. You never know when the dog's to bark kids are going to come up to you and if that happens engine not muted. It's not a big deal but it does interrupt the flow of the person speaking. Get in the habit of muting yourself from the moment. You're on there. If you're not repre- muted on Mute. Yourself a second or two before you're going to speak and then as soon as you're done speaking yourself again the others will appreciate of course it's not just what people can hear. It's they can see so you have to be very aware of what's behind you. Is it a plane wall? Fine a wall with mementos and photographs in the like perfect. Your Library in your office. Excellent a sink full of dirty dishes. Oh maybe not so much someone getting out of the shower and running across the bedroom now definitely not but it has happened. Keep in mind what others are seeing. Now let's talk about how you appear onscreen in the meeting. First of all we know how important I contact is when communicating with others the first step in achieving. This is making sure that the camera on your computer is it. I level if you're working on a desktop raise a lower your chair to get to the point where your eyes are in line with the camera. If you're using a laptop the same but of course now you can either raise lower the laptop itself. One of the things you don't want to do with the laptop is what many of us are doing. Just plopping it down on a desk or a table. Tilting the screen back and have it shooting up at us. Get that camera. I level now once you have it at eye level. How far away from the camera you going to be? Some people are too close so their head fills the frame top to bottom other cities so far back that the head is just oh. I don't know ten percent of the entire screen. What you WANNA do is get a comfortable distance but comfortable. Visually to others think of broadcast news broadcast on. You often see a bus. Chatan the chest shoulders and head. That's what you WANNA do once you've accomplished all this. It's back to a peculiar thing when it comes to video conferencing when I talked about I contact many of us. Look at the person with speaking to right. We're looking into their eyes makes sense doesn't it? Unfortunately no when you're looking at the screen you're not visually looking into their eyes. You have to be looking at the camera. So here's a few ideas when it comes to this when someone else's speaking in general speaking to an entire group you can look at them so the most comfortable thing to do when someone else's speaking to you directly look at your camera on their end they will see you looking at them making eye contact. If you're looking down at the screen at them your head will be tilted down. Your eyes will be tilted down and it won't look like making contact anytime you were speaking. Look into the camera again. It's not the easiest thing to do but you have to get used to it because making eye contact is key in person and.

Speaker Station Peter George Mike
"speaker  " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

The Speaker Station Podcast

12:18 min | 3 years ago

"speaker " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

"Expert? Are you an author. There are so many things that can differentiate. She ate you and I think the three categories are educational. Are you an engaging speaker and then do you have some form of entertainment and that's aside from being a celebrity speaker. If you are <hes> you know an an actor or a famous person or famous athlete. We call that you are celebrity speaker where people they wanna hear who you are. They want to hear about you. They want to hear your story. They wanted 'cause you're the celebrity. You're the one that fills seats but for most people it bowl and <hes> a lot of professional speakers they have learned to create that engaging experience on stage and I'm speaking to you don't the keynote speaker not awesome <unk> necessarily goes in and does for five hours of a workshop or is a consultant. If you're a keynoter if you're the person that sets the tone if you're the person that opens a meeting and closes a meeting opens a conference closes the conference and you need to be compelling. You need to have that entertainment factor. More and more corporations are looking for people that are diverse <hes> they're looking for females and that's one thing that we get. Asked as we refer speakers in our business they asked for females and then they asked for someone of culture they're asking for people and speakers that are young and so in relation to your question me being young is is a is is a big reason why we are getting booked me being professional drummer week we do. I have a drum set on stage and I have a story that correlates with that and then we involve the audience and everybody buddy has buckets and everybody has drumsticks and I think the old adage of being a speaker on stage that just delivers a speech is not quite as competitive as a speaker that creates experience <unk> spirits. Everything's about an experience now it is it you have to you have to create some sort of compelling experience and you can do that some storytelling you can do that through great craftmanship on onstage but really it is a mixture of entertainment engagement a getting people to be a part of the story be a part of the message and there's lots of ways to do that but we have done that through music. They've done that through drumming and and then also I we started. It's called the undercover millennial program and five years ago I started interviewing millennials millennials in the workplace as a millennial and I would get hired by corporations to go in and kind of do like an undercover boss type of situation if you've ever watched that T._v.. Show and I would go in as the undercover millennial and <hes> we worked with one hundred eighty organizations and we've interviewed over ten thousand millennials undercover and so that Kinda it's it's different it's unique and we offer up perspective that most people they don't get through a survey. They don't get through their one on one management. It's a different unique twist into something that gets them results that can help better their business and then we do it in a compelling exciting experiential experiential learning type of of a keynote that just sets us in a place in the market to to deliver a wonderful experience for their people and you don't just come in deliver a speech each in leave you wrap it in the program correct. Oh yes one hundred percents. Every keynote is tailored every key notice customize. We have postino implementation. We have workshops that we deliver we also I do all the all the pre-consultation were and then the undercover work. If a company chooses to do the undercover program then we're partnering with that Company for three to six months just to compile the research that specific to the organization I would say more now. We're getting books to come and just deliver that research. We have a book. That's coming out in the fall at it's called. I love it here. How great leaders create an organization there are people never wanNA leave and so a lot of corporations nations are now booking us to come in and just talk about that research and what we found and how great leaders created organizations that people loved themselves when they were there they loved the experience they loved with the manager did and we talked about what those things are and how they can do that themselves and these are more ways that you differentiate yourself from others who might just come in do a presentation and the company never hear from them again wrecked? That's exactly correct we look at it as a partnership we look at it as a relationship and we've got a second additional keynote as well so that yeah we had clint last year. We could bring him in again next year or we could bring him in. You know in a in a few years just again staying diverse. We even do emceeing. I we got a new MC a demo reel that comes out and again. You have to be careful because you don't WanNa be the guy that does everything you need to be specific. You need to be very focused but also I do believe that versatility and being innocence being the Costco being the Walmart being that one stop shop that man he can Keno but he can also mc well he can also do a workshop <hes> ah we've worked really really hard to get to that point but but for us it's about value you have to scream value because you're competing in an industry where they're looking at ten other speakers that are doing the same thing and if you aren't more valuable if you don't scream more opportunity a better experienced a better R._O._I.. THAN THEY'RE GONNA book the next Guy they're gonNA book the other woman. They'RE GONNA book the other speaker and so you have to. I'm thinking how can I bring as much value to the table while still being authentic and true to yourself your your area of expertise and still being focused and we've tried really hard. To do that in a balanced and still stable manner I've got to imagine it's paying off. It is extremely yes. It'd been very lucky very blessed and yet we're not homeless yet. uh-huh of cheer you marry a you have a tremendous amount of energy on stage. I haven't had the opportunity to see you in person. I hope to someday but I've watched you on your website and anybody who goes to your website is going to see see that energy immediately. How difficult is it to be that up if you will for every presentation it's a marathon after every KENO I a lot of speakers <hes> I'd like to go out and have drinks people in my life to go like I go to my my hotel room and I pass out and I I go to bed or I? It's it's exhausting. It really is <hes> on a sweaty mess S.. It's I'm all over the place and you're up onstage in your under the lights and just doing the seven minute drum solo in a suit <hes> it's hot and and then you're trying to create an experience friends for you know five hundred to three thousand four thousand people and you got to create that energy you gotta bring people in you got to capture their mind. You've gotTA capture their heart and it takes a lot of energy energy. Can I really hard to to to pace myself. I worked really hard on tiny. I've worked on where I now on stage. You have worked on pacing into to control that win to go. Hi Indigo Low. I've worked on voice control is there's Times now where I'm speaking symptoms four times five times a week amend doing workshops in between there so I have to preserve my voice is all the physical and emotional side of things <hes> to just keep your health up and to to be able to do that again and again and again <hes> in each show with any talent sometimes of creeps over into your lifestyle and that's what you're saying that you have to stay fit it. You have to eat the right things. Take care of your voice. It's not just the craft of getting up on stage and speaking. It's all encompassing view as loosely. I think every speaker should have a code of health. Every speaker needs it's too. I think there's a level of fitness I mean the privilege of the platform you're up there as speaker telling people how to live their lives you're recommending at talking about ideas and to be looked <unk> as a thought leader and a <hes> you know as a performer as an entertainer there is that level of of help emotionally physically spiritually meditation getting enough rest. What are your what are your rituals? What are your habits? What are the things that you do when you're home and what are the things that you do on the road to make sure that every speeches the super bowl it doesn't matter if there's five people in the audience or there's five thousand actually every speech as a super bowl and I have to maintain that level of mental and physical <hes> just focus to be able to do my job and it just helps me to be better speaker? It helps me to have that confidence in myself to be able to perform at the best ability that I can onstage. Hey knowing what you know now and you'll learning on this journey of yours. What suggestions do you have speakers who are trying to transition from their current jobs yet? Two things two things I would recommend I is is if you're trying to craft your client trying to cal craft your message and figure out what I what are you going to speak on. What are you going to talk about the best thing in my opinion and what has worked for us and for me in our business is I went out on my ask? The potential buyers my future buyers the future clients. I ask them first off early in my career. What would you pay a speaker three thousand four thousand dollars to talk about and at the time this was in the youth market and as I transitioned into the corporate market I I went and asked the same thing to the C._e._o.'s and to the event planners and the H._r.? Directors and just simply doing that taking taking the time to go and ask the people that will eventually book you what they would actually book you for. What are they looking for? What do they want? I think sometimes speakers Wego into this career saying I know what you you want. I know what message Jimmy here on on the leadership guy on the <unk> well. Maybe they're having budget problems or maybe they struggling with not dismiss leadership. Maybe it's it's management issues or its retention issues Komo or maybe there's this struggling with the margining efforts or they they had no idea how to create a social media strategy. Whatever I mean listen listen to what they want? I've seen so many speakers that jump. Into this career and they put thousands of dollars into a website into a demo video into a strategy plan and then three years into it they go. I'm not getting booked. Nobody's booking me and I always I always ask ask the question. Did you ever think to ask the people that would book you what they would actually book you for a little bit of marketing research can go a long way huge and so so that would be my first recommendation is going..

consultant Costco clint Jimmy Komo Walmart C._e._o. three thousand four thousand d seven minute three years five hours five years six months
"speaker  " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

The Speaker Station Podcast

11:49 min | 3 years ago

"speaker " Discussed on The Speaker Station Podcast

"They wanna hear in that moment, but have it all tied together into an overall song or performance or symphony that leaves people saying, wow, I was just part of something. Special. Well, your presentation styles been described as I've seen it as warm funny and inviting what advice do you have for our listeners when it comes to their presentation style. Oh, I think presentation style is is very important. And the most important piece of it is you have to present in a way that's an alignment with who you are. If you wanna be really successful. Let me explain what I mean by that. There are many speakers that are really warm, and inviting and entertaining on stage and the second step off stage. They're anything but and in my experience, those folks don't really develop long-term careers. Those folks are maybe able to deliver a performance or show at an event or for a period of time, but doing it day in and day out year after year with that type of misalignment is very difficult. I think at the end of the day, the best speakers are the ones who craft their own style. You know, it's kind of, like when we see an actor and actress on the silver, screen, or on the TV or on the stage. I don't wanna be able to tell where. Are they studied acting by their performance? In fact, I don't even wanna be able to tell that they're acting my uncle's a Shakespearean actor and director. And he shared with me years ago. You know, when someone is on stage sleeping, there's two types of performers. There's the one that you look at him on stage and you say, oh that person sleeping. There's the other one that you look at the person on stage and you say that person sleeping and I can tell that they're having a dream right now while I strive to be the ladder. I tried to have people look at it and say, God, this guy loves what he does, and I'm loving being in his presence learning because these are things I can apply to my life tomorrow. I'm so glad that I gave him my time energy and attention to be part of this experience with him today. So that's the standard I always tried to bring to the table. And as I mentioned, it keeps it really interesting and exciting for me as well. That's great advice. I hope the people who listening, take that into consider-. Ration-. So many of us try to be either something we're not or even worse. Someone were not very true. Very true. And I and I will tell you and we've all of your listeners, we've all probably had this experience or a similar experience in our lives. We need someone and who they're pretending to be just isn't an alignment with reality. Sometimes we figure that out very quickly. Sometimes it takes a little bit longer in my experience, when that person is on stage, the time in which it takes us to figure out that they're out of a lineman, if compressed and augmented what I mean by that. Is it takes less time? And the consequences greater, we've all probably have that experience of being in the audience, and seeing someone come on stage where it's just like, EM not feeling it. They don't seem to be excited. They don't seem to be engaged. They don't seem to care or they care more about themselves than the audience. They're not paying attention to the nonverbal. And verbal cues they're getting from the audience. And, and this. Magical moment of time together with one person in the front of the room on stage, performing or presenting quickly goes away, when we feel that, that person isn't showing up in their best true self. And I think that's you know, if there was one thing, I think speakers could focus on is not losing sight of, who they are when they're on stage and who they're trying to be in what they're trying to project. I always equate it to the rock band, or any banned, the singer, whomever. It may be who. Yeah. This might be your eighty ninth performance this year. But for this audience, it's the only one Peter so true. So true. In fact, if I may if you'll indulge me a brief little story when I was in college, I had the opportunity to sing with the Notre Dame glee club. And we traveled to Europe the summer after my sophomore year of college. This was my first time going to Europe. I was thrilled. This was going to be amazing. We were touring around. And singing and some of the most impressive cathedrals into silica 's on the European continent. And our first stop was in Rome, and the conductor came to me the day of the big performance, our first show in Europe and he said, Joey, I want you to sing the solo in the Ave Maria. Now this was unbelievable. I felt so honored and so- privilege to be able to have this opportunity. I'd never sung a solo with the group before this was the best main stage, one could ever hope for. I mean we're in Rome for Pete's sakes. This was amazing. And we got to the venue. We did our warm up. We're backstage, we're watching the crowd filter in, and it's about five minutes before we go, and I sneak a look out to see this audience, this audience that I'm gonna get the chance to do a solo for. And there are seven people in the basilica seven total, Peter. I was crestfallen. I couldn't. Believe it my big debut, and here it was we had fifty guys on the tour and there were seven people in the audience, we outnumbered them seven to one, right? This was ridiculous. And I went back and the guy there was a guy in the in the group who's a few years older than me, and he got the group together, and he said, guys, I hear the murmuring I know some of you have looked out and you've seen that, you're, we are on the first stop on our European tour. And it's almost non existent audience. But here's the deal for those seven people. This is likely the only time they will ever get the chance to hear the Notre Dame glee club. Let's make sure that we honor the almost hundred years of history before us, and surely the hundred years of history that will come after us by giving these folks, the most memorable evening of music they've ever experienced in their lives. Well, let me tell you that changed my focus entirely, and I think of that often. When I step out onto the stage now as a professional speaker. It doesn't matter how many people are in the room. This is my moment of time with them for many of them. This is the only time we will ever be in the same room on the planet in our lives. I want this moment to be magical. I want it to be remarkable, and I wanted to be memorable, and that gives me all the juice, I need to take the stage and deliver. That's a great story. You know, it's not their fault that they were the only seven to show up. They shouldn't get a discounted performance because they showed up and others didn't exactly if anything they were our customers. Right. They're the ones who deserve even more of our performance because they are the ones who did show up. You're absolutely right. Speaking of great stories. Throw your book you use relatable stories. What do you see is the power of storytelling? Oh, the only power. I see behind storytelling Peter. Is that it is the oldest form of communication? You know, when the caveman used to huddle around the fire and tell stories this is millennials old. This is the essence of the human condition. Our ability to create and tell stories that captivate that intrigued that entertain that strikes fear that bring joy, all the different things we can do around the power of story for creating a moment for creating an experience. I think it is an intrinsic part, and in of any presentation and a huge opportunity for us to shape the experience and some of the big student of story. I'm a big fan of story, I feel like it's the best way to teach. I feel like it's the easiest and fastest way to learn. And so, in my presentations, and in my book, telling stories and giving examples something that's really important to me because. I think it's a great way to not only translate the message and transfer the message into something that's understandable for the listener for the reader. But it's also a way to make the points portable, what I mean by that is if I were to say here, the, you know, the six steps of this process, or the ten steps that this process and asked you to memorize them. That's one thing if I were to tell you a series of stories that lets you retell the story and find those six steps, or those ten steps in the story, every time, you tell it now I've given you a piece of knowledge in a piece of content piece of information that you can continue to use long after I've left the stage. So I'm a big fan of using story to shape, the overall experience and the key takeaways. It's one of the big lessons I learned many years ago, was the power of storytelling, as opposed to just giving people the nuts and bolts, we can't digest nuts and bolts. Stories we condi- jus-. We can internalize we can remember. I love that about your book where you gave the concept. And then you gave an example. And that helped me format in my mind how I could use that concept in my business. Well, I'm glad to hear that Peter. Yeah. And, you know it's interesting. That's how the concepts came out it came into the book, right? I would find the stories and then I would reverse engineer dissect, the stories to create the points I was gonna make and vice versa. So it wasn't just all always. Hey, wanna make this point go find a story sometimes it was, here's an amazing story. What point could I make with it? And as you know, going through the writing in the developmental process that made it interesting for me because it allowed me to, to go from nuts and bolts up into the story or go from the story down into the nuts and bolts, and being able to move in both directions. You know, was definitely a fun piece of the writing and development process, getting people to move. We talked about that. A couple of times implementing what they've learned their speakers who that's what they do. They speak and then there are speakers who make a difference in people's lives and dichotomies obvious of cost. But what does it take to move a speaker from being just a speaker tournament a difference? And I know that in your presentations, you actually have an action plan, right ideal. I tried to get my audiences to take action in the room and afterwards. So depending on where I'm speaking an advance kind of where my speech falls into the overall structure. Sometimes I'll give homework assignments in the speech often, I'll have downloads that they can get all have them do worksheets. I'll have them come up with an idea and share it with somebody sitting next to them as an accountability partner. So there's a lot of different techniques that one can adopt, as speaker to get the audience more engaged in the action. But I think the, the distinction to me. Between somebody who give speeches and somebody who makes an impact is fairly they're multiple pieces to the puzzle. So a couple of things come to mind. Number one, it goes back to what we were talking about of acknowledging different types of audience personas in the room, certain things are going to be more compelling to one audience member, then the next and so how do you navigate the structure in the development of the content second of all?.

Peter Europe Notre Dame glee club Rome director partner Ave Maria condi Pete engineer Joey hundred years five minutes
"speaker  " Discussed on KC Secular AA Speaker Meeting

KC Secular AA Speaker Meeting

15:56 min | 3 years ago

"speaker " Discussed on KC Secular AA Speaker Meeting

"Welcome to the secular speaker, meaning I'm Qena, and I'm an alcoholic. I have asked, Emily to read, our preamble. Hello. I'm emily. And I'm an colic. A is a fellowship of people who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover. We have no dues or fees for membership. We are self supporting through our own contributions. A is not allied with any sect denomination politics organization, or institution, does not wish chain Gaijin any controversy. Neither endorses nor opposes any causes our primary purpose is to stay sober and help others to achieve sobriety. Thanks. Ali, our secular group maintains two attempts to maintain a tradition of free expression, and to conduct a meeting where all may feel free to express any doubts, or disbelief that they may have into share their own personal form of spiritual experience their search for it or their objection of it in keeping with a tradition. We neither endorsed, nor pose any form of religion or atheist him are only wishes to help those who want recovery without having to accept anyone else's beliefs or having to deny their own. During the meeting, we will pass around. I forgot to be pass your on anything tonight, but I don't have any money. Yeah. Yeah. We don't have to worry about that, and I and believe it or not, there's no one here, who's who like to introduce themselves. And I don't believe any of us have extended periods of sobriety that we would like to celebrate. But every day we are celebrating so to speak. The meeting is this is actually it is not a speaker meeting. It is, as regular meetings, so to speak, ROY will have a topic and everyone will discuss it. So I in less one of you would like to introduce a topic, I've, I've come up with one, my, the topic, I came up with is I was wondering, how people how people's ideas of what L Kahal ISM and mental illness, and those things how that how Hauer ideas have shaped our recovery. How we kind of think about these things, and how that affects how we kind of. Recall. I mean, it's kind of like there's a lot of stigma, that's kind of attributed to, you know, addiction also mental illness that I know that some people deal with, but it I, I realize that, you know, I have a certain amount of shame or self loathing, when it comes to these things, and I when I really think about it. I realize, you know, there's no reason for that in, if anyone else was still like express any of those feelings, billable, of course, you shouldn't feel that way because, you know. It. It's an illness. It's, it's something that is serious and it's not a defect or you know, this shameful thing. But, you know I don't I mean. I'll let one of you talk about if you want. I mean, this doesn't have to be real formal, obviously, but. I'll open up. I can say if you things I guess, just starting start off. Talking about stigma about mental illness or addiction. I it was the stigma of mental illness, in particular was something that shaped me very early on in my life. Because my mother back in the nineteen seventies was being treated for depression, real serious depression. And it was something that nobody in my family talked about, and, you know, I knew that she was seeing a psychiatrist. And every once in a while, she'd get taken away and put in a the middle ward of a hospital and so forth, but we just never talked about it. So it was something that I was deeply ashamed of and, you know, there was no reason for is just the way things were, then I guess nobody my family ever discussed it, you know, it was kind of weird. So, you know, then back, you know many years later. So now this is the nineteen eighties, she committed suicide. And that was stigmatized, you know, it was like, you know, I was only twenty one years old. Old and it was kind of unusual for someone that age to have their parent pass away. So, you know, people would ask me how my mother died, and it was like I didn't even wanna wanna tell them, you know, so, and there was no reason for that, either. So I'm sure that all of that, you know, and, and everything else that had gone on. But I'm sure that plate apart and my calls until certain extent, because, you know, the thing I liked about alcohol is it gave me the ability to numb any pain that was going on in my life. It, it kept me from feeling that pain or actually growing from it. So, so that was it, you know. And I am so I got into to a and one of the first things I saw when I was sitting down and my first meeting on those looking at these steps they had on the wall, and they had that word insanity. And the steps so that kind of triggered me to, you know, feel like okay, there's something wrong with me, and so immediately, I was ashamed of my alcoholism at didn't want anybody to know and it was just, you know, that's just the way I was about everything, you know, I was not the type of person that would ever ask for help, because I saw shamed of the stuff that I was dealing with. So now I've grown a lot from that. I don't I don't feel the stigma anymore something that, that I think has helped me other than just being around a lot of recovery for a lot of years. And I think our society has advanced to but just learning a lot about the science behind mental illness and addiction. I have a brother who has schizo affective disorder, and he's not on medication. So he is he psychotic. And he is, as a result of that, you know, he's homeless and so forth and. You know, it it's and it's kinda, you know, it's, it's because his something, he's got a physical physiological. Problem with his brain, that's causing him to act different than other people. And what's unfortunate about it is, you know, if someone has cancer or something or some kind of a disease with some other part of their body? It doesn't really affect their behaviors. So people don't attach feeling or you know, a stigma, I guess to, to those diseases because they're not affecting a person's behavior. But because it's affecting has behaviors United Site something that we all you know, but I understand, is a physiological mental physiological thing with the brain addiction as the very same way that, you know what I believe, from what I've learned from what I've read is that anybody can become addicted, because we pretty much every human being has a gene, that is triggered by a substance and for some for different people to different substance. And for different people. All it takes different amount of substances before that gene, is triggered. But once triggered the person becomes addicted to that substance at any other substance, that is doing because it's doing the same thing to the brain is triggering the same chemicals that are that's causing that addiction. So Guinness physiological thing as I understand that now. And I and that helps me I guess. That's how I view my everything that idea what I deal with depression, I treated for that. And I and I'm watching my I'm very engaged with my recovery from from alcoholism, addiction to, because I just, I guess, I understand the to kind of go together. And you know it's not my fault. It's just the way things are swayed weight is it's, it's my responsibility to take care of it. And I try my best to do that. So I guess I'll start with that. Thank you, John. Hi, I'm Emily. And I'm an alcoholic and I feel a lot of pressure to make this good. So I am pretty open about the fact that I am mentally ill. And that's not really a new thing for me have been open about it for a while. I used to be very active on social media, and I'm not on it at all now. But when I was on it, I would post about things I was going through, and people would privately told me that they found that helpful that I would talk about things openly normalized, my experiences because a lot of those people could identify with those experiences. So I didn't. I'm just a much more private person than it used to be like, I don't I don't not want to talk about it. I just don't share information with as many people as used to. But I have no problem talking about my, my issues in a with a people because I think there's a pretty high come more biddy rate between mental illness, and alcoholism and drug drug abuse. And I think a lot of people can identify with it. So I know I've taught. Many people in our groups who also have depression, anxiety among other things. So I think I think people really get it. And it's a it's a good place to talk about it. I just always feel like maybe I'm talking about it too much at the risk of focusing on it more than than my alcoholism. But. The two are really intertwined for me. They're not really separate. Although I think like they kind of came together in a in a I don't know. I don't even know how to say this, like they work kind of separate issues that kinda crashed into each other just created a big mess of a person. So. When I was in college. I really liked college, and I had a pretty good. Collegiate experience and I started drinking occasionally my freshman year, I had an older boyfriend, who would buy alcohol for me. And he was in a fraternity, and we would go to parties at his fraternity house in, like it wasn't excessive or anything, but, like from the get-go I was binge drinking. I was not drinking in moderation like it was already illegal for me to be doing this. So I just thought you know, just go for it and drink as much as I could in short amount of time because, you know, who knew where my next drink was coming from because I couldn't buy it for myself. And I was I felt like I. Like a lot of women in college, don't have the experience, but, like because I had a boyfriend because of the nature of our relationship I was extremely safe in those circumstances. And not everyone has that reassurance. And like it didn't even like factor in to the what I how I felt about it at the time. This is only looking back that I realized like how very lucky I was to be able to, to drink excessively in that environment in not. I don't know. I guess not worry about mice eighth d. As much as, as other people do I don't know. That's a whole nother conversation though. Talk more year. I really kinda step back from that and really focused on my studies in the junior year, I studied abroad, and I mean I wasn't quite twenty one I was almost twenty one when I went to England and I mean, it was already legal for people eighteen enough to drink over there. So we could immediately go out to pubs and bars and drink, and it wasn't a big deal. We still celebrated my twenty first birthday, which was one of the best nights of my life. It was just it was just a lot of fun lake. I don't even think I didn't get sick or anything like I tried to climb offense on a medieval university wall. But I think that was pretty much lower stub it. So, yeah, I was friends with a lot of other American students from other universities while I was in England, and we all kind of went a little overboard with the drinking the drugs and everything and. I don't know. We were all, you know, away from home for the first time we were really living on her own we weren't on a college campus. We were in lake townhouses are apartments and no one was looking out for us silly. I think you know, you just I it's totally understandable, that we just went a little crazy. And I'm not going to say it wasn't fun because it definitely at the time it was a lot of fun. It was not healthy. It was not safe. But it was. It was really just it was a very special time. And I'm glad I had that experience even if it lead to problems later on, because when I came back to United States ice that was when my mental health started to deteriorate. I know I've never experienced psychosis. But I started to believe things were happening that weren't actually happening in, I think it was because of my lake. I remember one of my sorority sisters had mono and I think I had like eaten something that she had like already bit into, like girls who lived together a gross, I don't have any other explaination for that. And so I immediately thought I had mono I developed the symptoms of mono and I got a blood test, and the test came back negative for mono. I did not have mono, but I definitely felt like I had mono and I went around telling everyone that I had it and people were a little freaked out by it. But I don't know. It didn't I didn't really think about it. And then the summer between my junior and senior years, I became absolutely convinced that the brakes on my car were working. And I would have other people drive my car to see if they could feel it. And they had no idea what I was talking about. So, like I would be on the highway audit like my, my body would just sees up in what I later understood to be a panic attack because I thought my brakes, going to fail, and I was going to crash in die, and Ivan took it like my dad humored me and helped me take it to a dealership in there were like there's nothing wrong with this car..

depression Emily Ali England United States cancer Hauer ROY United Site psychosis Ivan John twenty one years