35 Burst results for "Spacex"

SpaceX explains crash of  Starship prototype during landing attempt

Glenn Beck

00:37 sec | Last week

SpaceX explains crash of Starship prototype during landing attempt

"I'm Dave Williams. Cal. I have new space exes Prototype stainless steel rocket. The starship came apart or exploded yesterday while attempting to land following a test flight over Boca Chica in South Texas. This is how space X described it during the live webcast. Looks like we've had another exciting test of Starship number 11 Reminder again. This is a test series together data on Entry of the Starship Vehicle. Space X has sent four starships up on test flights. Each one has exploded or come apart while landing. The official Space X statement referred to the latest failure as a quote rapid,

Dave Williams Boca Chica CAL South Texas
Another SpaceX Starship explodes in test flight

Dailycast News

00:31 sec | Last week

Another SpaceX Starship explodes in test flight

"A fourth starship rocket prototype for elon. Musk's spacex launch company exploded after a test flight. On tuesday morning in south texas with previous test flights space x flu starship model s n eleven over six miles high above the city facility about one hundred and eighty miles south of corpus christi. The rocket then collided on wing flaps. Back to the launch pad. Heavy fog and problems with video feed made it unclear. Exactly what happened. But a spacex engineer confirmed the explosion.

Elon Musk South Texas FLU Christi Corpus Spacex
SpaceX test failure, Virgin Galatic new ship

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last week

SpaceX test failure, Virgin Galatic new ship

"Two private space companies take steps in opposite directions in South Texas Tuesday two point what a test launch of another SpaceX starship rotor type went well but the craft blew up as he was trying to land back at the launch site SpaceX launch commentator John instructor another exciting test as we say Ilan musk later tweeting at least the crater is in the right place virgin galactic owned by British billionaire Richard Branson rolled out its new spacecraft the first of a new class of vehicles the space ship three class and we need to V. S. S. imagine CEO Michael Cole gazer says it will likely be summer before that ship undergoes glide flight testing over southern New Mexico I'm timid wire

Spacex John Instructor Ilan Musk South Texas Virgin Galactic Richard Branson V. S. S. Imagine Ceo Michael C New Mexico
SpaceX Starship SN11 Rocket Explodes Amid Fog During Botched Landing Sequence In Texas

Sean Hannity

00:20 sec | Last week

SpaceX Starship SN11 Rocket Explodes Amid Fog During Botched Landing Sequence In Texas

"Space X engineers are investigating to try to see why it's basic starship Prototype rocket could not stick the landing in Texas that exploded just before touchdown. The company indicates all data from the vehicle was lost. The prototype was one in a serious for the heavy lift rocket being developed by Elon Musk space company to eventually carry people in cargo on missions to the moon and Mars.

Texas Elon Musk
SpaceX Starship prototype crashes during landing attempt after another clean, uncrewed launch

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | Last week

SpaceX Starship prototype crashes during landing attempt after another clean, uncrewed launch

"The launch went well, but the landing not so much. A space X Starship rocket was destroyed during a landing attempt after a successful launch earlier today, space ex founder Tesla's CEO Elon Musk tweeting after the test flight that something significant happened shortly after the landing burns start, he said engineers will try to figure out what went wrong when they examine the wreckage. Space X has successfully launched four starship prototypes on high altitude test flights, but the landings have all ended in a variety of

Elon Musk Tesla
SpaceX launches test rocket, breaks apart before landing

Closer Look

00:36 sec | Last week

SpaceX launches test rocket, breaks apart before landing

"Explosion during a test launch and landing of its new moon and Mars bound Rocket starship from facility in West Texas. Member station W. M. F E Brendan Byrne has details. Space X is testing the Rockets ability to launch and land and sent the vehicle to an altitude of about six miles before testing its landing capabilities. Space. Ex founder Elon Musk said something significant happened when the rocket relit its engines to land sending debris onto the launch facility. Musk says the team plans to sift through those rocket bits for answers. Another prototype heads the pad for launch in the coming days. Brendan Byrne with Orlando

W. M. F E Brendan Byrne West Texas Rockets Elon Musk Musk Brendan Byrne Orlando
Finding Your Compliment

Venturing Out

03:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Finding Your Compliment

"It's interesting beyond for four years right because you hear all these great ideas from people is that if they're execute upon change the world a very serious way. I always use the example of spacex rate. How many people before you on. Musk thought of reusable spaceship. Probably a lot. But how many actually get out there and execute upon it and build thing not that many and so you know patricia club. It's really a mindset shift. Right rather than sitting around and pontificating about ideas we really focus on. How do you put those ideas into action. You know even if it's something as small as bringing your product or your service to the farmers market and just selling it to people getting it in people's hands that's what we want to encourage this club so it part of getting started From our commerce conversation earlier. Excuse me you told me that Baylor entrepreneurship club engages in things like different focus groups that are skill specific. Is that right correct. Yes so what does that look like. Yeah what it really looks like. His peer to peer mentor ship. Where you have people building interpersonal relationships with others who have complementary skill sets to them. You one thing. I really believe in as being a specialist. Not a generalist You know it's been my experience that if you're a generalist you're not that competitive right and so as a special shoe is for people who Compliment your abilities and skills. That's what our mentor. Ship program is really about so it. It's more While it is developing different skills it's also networking opportunity correct absolutely. Yeah and i think that's important too because nicot said you're a specialist. I mean you are the the the leader of what you do. So i always think about mario and luigi do you remember. Playing mario mario was always good at a lot of different things but luigi was able to jump the highest. I often went with luigi for some tasks. Because i needed to jump higher than mario is able to know. And i mean it's it's purely fact like i love luigi because of that because he was able to differentiate himself and set himself apart. But if you can't jump that high that's no problem right around your self with people who can And i think they would entrepreneurship club. And wouldn't nick is doing is creating a great networking opportunity for students. Who may be good at one thing to find others who compliment them so for example In a previous episode. Talk with or talked with doria and i am a awful content creator. My social media is the worst But i would love to have somebody like doria on my team and we do. Have somebody like dairy honor team. Gray smith who is a killer content creator and so that's what nick's talking about and that's why it's important to have these types of clubs because he can find people who compliment yourself and It really helps take your business near venture the next

Luigi Baylor Entrepreneurship Club Nicot Mario Mario Patricia Mario Doria Nick Gray Smith
Mysterious Seattle Light Show Likely Debris From SpaceX Rocket

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:36 sec | 2 weeks ago

Mysterious Seattle Light Show Likely Debris From SpaceX Rocket

"24 7 News Center. Those guys were Clear last night, and that's why people could see that light show in the sky about nine p.m.. I saw something I I thought it was a coordinated But it was a trail behind it, so we kept looking at it. And it got farther, and it looked like it almost like exploded in the air. That teen and several others actually may have witnessed what was left of a space X Falcon nine rocket, according to Jim Todd, with the organ Museum of Science and Industry long it took to burn out. Because that classic or man made so far no

News Center Jim Todd Organ Museum Of Science And In
SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket debris creates stunning light show over Oregon

John Williams

00:35 sec | 2 weeks ago

SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket debris creates stunning light show over Oregon

"Residents of the Pacific Northwest saw a flash across the sky overnight. Video of the event shows several pieces of debris racing through the air. The National Weather Service in Seattle says the objects were debris from a Falcon nine rocket second stage that did not successfully have a de orbit burn. Jim Todd is with the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry Classic Man made object. That would mean you don't know overnight over the study of Portland and Seattle and band and you know the whole Pacific Northwest got to steer reports of injuries from that debris.

Pacific Northwest Jim Todd Oregon Museum Of Science And I National Weather Service Seattle Portland
SpaceX rocket successfully lands in test, then explodes

World News Tonight with David Muir

00:18 sec | Last month

SpaceX rocket successfully lands in test, then explodes

"Spacex which hopes to take americans into space and the test flight and landing followed by an explosion minutes after landing the space x starship rocket exploding on the pad a possible leak from a propellant tank. Maybe to blame the third explosion involving the rocket spacex hopes to use for crewed space missions beginning in two years

Spacex
SpaceX Starship prototype rocket explodes after successful landing in high-altitude flight test

The Bobby Bones Show

00:19 sec | Last month

SpaceX Starship prototype rocket explodes after successful landing in high-altitude flight test

"It was all good until it wasn't yesterday. Spacex is getting closer to successfully landing. Its starship space craft. The space company completed high altitude test the rocket and landed back on the launch pad in texas. It's soon after it exploded. Meanwhile spacex had a very successful falcon nine rocket launch. This

Spacex Texas
SpaceX Starship prototype sticks landing, then explodes

Dennis Prager

00:22 sec | Last month

SpaceX Starship prototype sticks landing, then explodes

"Ohio, near Cleveland, was one of the rich Thomason The third time was not a charm Space exes starship has exploded. After what looked to be a successful touchdown. The full scale prototype soared more than six miles Wednesday after lifting off from the southern tip of Texas. Previous test flights crash landed in fireballs. Space ex founder Elon Musk plans to

Cleveland Ohio Texas Elon Musk
SpaceX Starship prototype sticks landing, then explodes

WSJ What's News

00:37 sec | Last month

SpaceX Starship prototype sticks landing, then explodes

"That's the sound of spacex is starship prototype successfully touching down for the first time after a high altitude test flight in texas but then something went wrong. The rocket ship caught fire and exploded a few minutes later. Hurling it into the air space x said the rocket experienced a rapid unscheduled disassembly. After landing two previous trials have ended in explosive crash landings. The starship is part of space x founder elon. Musk plan to send people to the moon and

Spacex Texas Musk
SpaceX launches 60 more internet satellites

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:08 sec | Last month

SpaceX launches 60 more internet satellites

"Three previous delays. A Falcon nine rocket carrying another patch of StarLink Internet satellites lifted off from Kennedy Space Center. Early this

Kennedy Space Center
SpaceX Starship prototype sticks landing, then explodes

the NewsWorthy

00:36 sec | Last month

SpaceX Starship prototype sticks landing, then explodes

"Pulled off a successful test flight followed by another fiery explosion. It was testing a prototype of its starship rocket and this is big since spacex is hoping starship one day take astronauts and even civilians to the moon and beyond the launch and the flight went well and so did the landing. This is actually the first time i starship. Test flight ended with what seemed like a clean landing but then minutes later the spacecraft exploded. Good news no one was on the rocket and there were no reports that anyone got hurt so far. The company has not said exactly what went wrong but the company is already gearing up for. Its next

Spacex
SpaceX Starship lands upright, then explodes in latest test

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

SpaceX Starship lands upright, then explodes in latest test

"Hi third test of the lawn musk SpaceX starships seemed at first a success the full scale prototype a beeline must ship he hopes to one day travel to Mars lifted off from southern Texas three to four some six minutes later after going six miles into the air the bullet shape starship with horizontal and vertical as it used to send you the land back on the launch pad propping SpaceX commentator John instructor to declare third time's a charm as the saying goes before the webcast ended right after that the rocket exploded in a tweet musk was optimistic writing starship ten landed in one piece R. I. P. S. N. ten I'm timid wire

John Instructor Spacex Texas
SpaceX Starship prototype rocket explodes after successful landing in high-altitude flight test

Bloomberg Law

00:34 sec | Last month

SpaceX Starship prototype rocket explodes after successful landing in high-altitude flight test

"Back Covad mandates. Space X is getting closer to successfully landing it. Starship spacecraft, the space company, completed a high altitude test of the rocket and landed it back on the launch pad in Texas. Third time's a charm is the saying goes, We've had a successful soft touch down on the landing pad that's camping, a beautiful test flight. It looked like a totally successful landing. However, minutes after touching down, the rocket blew up. Two previous tests ended with a rocket exploding as it tried to land space X plans for the Starship spacecraft to conduct missions to

Texas
Elon Musk - The Man Behind Tesla and SpaceX

Talk, Tales and Trivia

07:44 min | Last month

Elon Musk - The Man Behind Tesla and SpaceX

"Well who's elon. Musk well if you don't know you're gonna find out right now. There is so much news internet entertainment on ilan mosque. And i want to tell you that this is only the basics of aeon. Musk who he is. There is plenty to find out about him. I will leave some of the links and the show notes. So don't forget to look but who is elon. Musk and how does he lawns story began. Well he is a visionary entrepreneur and the co founder of paypal and tesla motors as well as the founder of the new space x program which is very popular to day his astounding success has given rise to comparisons to the uniqueness of howard hughes and the tenacity of a henry ford but he did have an often difficult childhood like most of us kids his own age made fun of him from his own descriptions the years were lonely and brutal alon is quoted as saying they got my best friend to lure me out of hiding so they could beat me up and that hurt. That's when i realized that they were going to go after me non stop. That's what made growing up difficult for a number of years. There was no respite. You get chased around by gangs. These gangs tried to beat the insert. Swearword here out of me. And then i'd come home and it would just be awful there as well but not all was wasted. This difficulty cultivated itself into a relentless work ethic a never ending tenacious vision of the future. You see enron was born and raised in south africa and he spent some time in canada before finally moving to the united states thin and the united states. He was educated at the university of pennsylvania. A very good school majoring in physics. That's when ilan started to excel and experiment to soon. Become a serial tech entrepreneur with early successes like zip to an x dot com. He took on two majors at the university of pennsylvania but his time there wasn't all work with a fellow student. He bought a tin bedroom fraternity house which they used as an ad hoc nightclub will. Musk graduated with a bachelor of science and physics at all as a bachelor of arts in economics from the wharton school for ilan. Physics made the deepest impression. He is again quoted as saying and somewhat giving directions to boiling things down to their fundamental truths and reason up from their. Musk was twenty four years old when he moved to california to pursue at phd in applied physics at stanford university with the internet. Exploding in silicon valley booming. Musk had entrepreneurial visions on his mind and dropped out of the physics program just after two days but in two thousand and four. Musk joined to engineers to help. Run tesla motors. You've all heard of tesla motors right. Well this is where. Musk was integral and designing the first electric car. There's no doubt the electric car is the car of the future. But his first car the he designed was the tesla roadster as we are all aware of the tesla has become one of the world's most popular and coveted car brands and is still growing in popularity in the united states and in many different countries tesla and the electric car are taking over but we must never forget about musk's early interest in reading philosophy science fiction and fantasy novels and how that played a big role. I mean a huge role in the inventor that he is today. It is reflected in his sense of idealism and concern with human progress. He aims to work in the areas he has identified as crucial to our future specifically the internet. The transition to renewable energy sources and space colonization and. Ilan has been all over the media. Making three podcast episodes on the joe rogan experience while the first one in which he smoked. Marijuana was pretty funny but in a maximum article. I found this elon. Musk's third appearance on the joe rogan. Experience podcast the genius. Tesla and spacex. Ceo did reveal intriguing plans for a floating tesla. Musk revealed that the long awaited second generation tesla roadster could have a space x package that would allow it to hover at a limited altitude above the ground. Something that we have never seen before with all these new inventions floating around. Is it any wonder why everyone is watching. And curious about ilan's next big thing. Well at tesla fans are awaiting the cyber truck which will make an appearance at the end of twenty twenty one and the exciting numbers are in for ilan's wealth elon. Musk started twenty twenty with a worth of about twenty seven billion dollars and was barely in the top fifty richest people then in july of twenty twenty. Musk past warren buffett. The great billionaire to become the seventh richest person in november. Musk raced past bill gates to become the second richest person. Musk has gained more wealth over the past twelve months then gates his entire net worth of one hundred and thirty two billion dollars and according to cnbc elon. Musk just became the richest person in the world. With a net worth of more than one hundred and eighty five billion dollars alone recently had a new marker for his wealth and that is so cool because of all his inventions and his time spent caring and wanting the united states and the world to move ahead has made a name for himself. There is no doubt an increase in tesla's share price pushed. Musk past jeff bezos of amazon. Who had been the richest person since two thousand seventeen. You see musk's wealth surge over. The past year marks the fastest rise to the top of the rich list and history but why because he is investing in the future. It marks a dramatic financial turnaround for the famed entrepreneur. Because he cares about what happens in our future so with all his wealth experimentation and knowledge elon. Musk is our future and for those. That are young enough to dream about being an elon. Musk it must start with your curiosity with reading and learning more and more about new and different things and that i want for you and your children now and in the future.

Musk Tesla Ilan Mosque University Of Pennsylvania Wharton School For Ilan United States Ilan Elon Howard Hughes Alon Joe Rogan Henry Ford Enron Paypal Stanford University South Africa Silicon Valley Roadster
"spacex" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

Main Engine Cut Off

02:37 min | 6 months ago

"spacex" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

"But. Yeah. This is just <Speech_Male> another business line here for <Speech_Male> SPACEX and they <Silence> need money. <Speech_Male> They <Speech_Male> are cash hungry <Speech_Male> right now. <Speech_Male> So if they can open up these <Speech_Male> different lines of business, that's <Speech_Male> a really good thing <Speech_Male> for the future of SPACEX. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Now. One last thing I wanted <Speech_Male> to mention that I just kind <Speech_Male> of find humorous I was thinking <Speech_Male> about this the other day <Speech_Male> when I saw this news <Speech_Male> <hes> whenever <Speech_Male> starship news. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> Traditionally this has <Speech_Male> happened around when SPACEX <Speech_Male> had incidents <Speech_Male> like the explosion <Speech_Male> on the dragon two <Speech_Male> capsule and the static <Speech_Male> fire. <Speech_Male> People. Look at starship <Speech_Male> stuff and say <Speech_Male> what a distraction <Speech_Male> from the things <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that NASA paying <Silence> <Advertisement> money for. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> We've heard that <Speech_Female> less and less recently. <Silence> <Speech_Male> But this <Speech_Male> is another example of <Speech_Male> the fact that space x <Speech_Male> is a huge company. <Speech_Male> They are a <Speech_Male> giant company with several <Speech_Male> different business lines <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> no one ever accuses. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Startling side <Speech_Male> of being a distraction <Silence> from the dragon <Speech_Male> line and <Speech_Male> I just wanted <Speech_Male> to mention this as <Speech_Male> a thing that it's a <Speech_Male> storyline that I was hoping <Speech_Male> would die <Speech_Male> and it seems to have <Speech_Male> died or maybe <Speech_Male> I'm just not reading the right <Speech_Male> or wrong spots. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But. This is a really good <Speech_Male> example again of <Speech_Male> how much space <Speech_Male> X is involved in their <Speech_Male> launch services there <Speech_Male> in satellite production <Speech_Male> satellite operation, <Speech_Male> they're doing crude <Speech_Male> flights up <Speech_Male> to the ice s <Speech_Male> doing cargo missions to <Speech_Male> the IRS cargo missions <Speech_Male> to the moon, <Speech_Male> and then there's everything <Speech_Male> that happens <Speech_Male> with starship <Speech_Male> including human <Speech_Male> lunar landing system. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That is in development <Speech_Male> right now <Speech_Male> they are doing so <Speech_Male> much. They are <Speech_Male> so expensive. <Speech_Male> That's a good thing. <Speech_Male> If they're able to keep <Speech_Male> all those plates spinning <Speech_Male> at the same time, <Speech_Male> it does introduce <Speech_Male> some risk. If one <Speech_Male> of those is <Speech_Male> significantly <Speech_Male> drawing <Speech_Male> more cash and attention <Speech_Male> than <Speech_Male> other and putting the <Speech_Male> others at risk <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> doesn't seem like <Silence> we're there yet. But. <Speech_Male> Certainly <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> when you get into this <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> many things <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> at once <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> it is something to be cognizant <Speech_Male> of. <Speech_Male> The other thing <Speech_Male> to consider as if <Speech_Male> they're making these satellite <Speech_Male> buses that are <Speech_Male> for uses that aren't Starlink, <Speech_Male> that's <Speech_Male> going to extend <Speech_Male> not only to the military, <Speech_Male> not only the commercial <Speech_Male> companies, not <Speech_Male> only to government agencies <Speech_Male> like NASA, that could <Speech_Male> extend all the way <Speech_Male> out to Mars <Speech_Male> and it's something we've talked <Speech_Male> often on about I <Speech_Male> remember talking about the <Speech_Male> original Falcon heavy. Launch. <Speech_Male> Hoping <Speech_Male> that spacex would shoot <Speech_Male> something to Mars on their <Speech_Male> own, right maybe <Speech_Male> some sort of relay <Speech_Male> satellite. <Speech_Male> This could be a <Speech_Male> thing that works <Speech_Male> all the way out at Mars as <Speech_Male> well. <hes> with <Speech_Male> those modifications necessary <Speech_Female> to operate in that <Speech_Male> different environment. <Speech_Male> If it is that big <Speech_Male> payload size, it would make <Speech_Male> a lot more sense while the <Speech_Male> pushing up into <Speech_Male> that <SpeakerChange> territory. <Speech_Male> So, <Speech_Male> let's see what <Speech_Male> else they do with the satellite <Speech_Male> bus <Speech_Male> in the future and <Speech_Male> really all of the things <Speech_Male> I can come up with a really exciting. <Speech_Male> So I'm hoping at <Speech_Male> least a fraction <Speech_Male> of those pan out <Speech_Music_Male> in the near <Speech_Music_Male> future, but that's <Speech_Male> about all I've got here <Speech_Male> today on manage <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement>

SPACEX NASA SPACEX. IRS
"spacex" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

07:46 min | 11 months ago

"spacex" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Brian resnick senior science reporter at. Vox Are these dots. What are they? They're satellites? And these government satellites. Who's behind him? Now they're from SPACEX. They're called Starlink satellites. Their little satellites are small and they orbit the earth at a relatively low altitude compared to other satellites and they're meant to eventually one day beamed down Internet access to remote areas of the planet. Is that the only way some places can get Internet access like. Are there a lot of places that can't get online without satellites? Well there is a really large need to expand Internet access to rural places like even in the United States Rural Broadband. Access is a huge issue. Really crucial point of inequities that there are a lot of places that big cable companies. They just don't build out the infrastructure for good Internet in rural places. And this is a problem that you know. The government has tried to address. A lot of people are concerned about because of your cut off from the Internet. You're cut off from the economy. That's just not just the United States around the world to there's a lot of places that are just cut off from Internet. How do we way this good of bringing Internet to more remote places against these concerns from astronomers so astronomers get the value of connectivity? But they're really afraid like a not enough thought has been put into protecting their view of the sky. Spacex has the clearance to launch twelve thousand of the satellites and SPACEX wants to send even more potentially tens of thousands and. They're not the only company that is seeking descend up. These small satellites in low earth orbit. Perhaps not very long from now. The number of visible satellites in the sky might outnumber the number of stars distracting see. This is like the tip of the iceberg. What exists right now is not gonNA destroy astronomy. They're worried about this regulation less future where anyone can send any type of bright object into space and really face no consequences for that. And they don't have to think about a the research impact that these objects are having and also like what does it mean that we might be permanently changing our view onto the cosmos. So let's let's talk about the cost here. Is it just an aesthetic one that we are sort of going to be looking up at a sky? That is a bit brighter. A bit fuller than we're used to or is there something worse there and say that like a sky. Full of lights is fine. But what's the worst scenario here? The problem is that observatories just like giant cameras. So they're opening up their apertures or they're collecting light and they're making images so if you have these bright things that ruins the image literally looks like someone took like chalk like an eraser and our race part of the image every like bit you're race and an astronomy is an enormity and increasingly so much of astronomy now is about like taking this big picture and looking for little tiny things that are changing. So they're not looking at one star they're looking at all of them are as much as they can at one time and in these very wide view astronomical images like if you have satellites everywhere that ruins the image the fear is like this is just the beginning so the fear is not allowed must versus astronomy the fear this will continue unregulated and there are no protections for the night sky beyond the clutter beyond harming say images. Are there other problems that come from having more and more satellites in the sky? There's already been some examples of things that have been sent up. That are have been intentionally bright there. Is this group. Some years ago that sent up a satellite called the Humanity Star Zealand's first satellite in space is a huge disco ball but the glittering satellite put into orbit by rocket. Lab is not an invitation to party more of prompt to a little deeper about the role of humans on planet earth. Astronomers were not happy about it cooling the satellite an active environmental vandalism and New Zealand light pollution project. Astronomers wow if you can send something up. That's intentionally bright into space. Like what else could happen and like there's no international ban on space advertising so you can imagine a scenario where some company sends up satellites into space has them spell out like a favorite brand of Cola or something horrible. Could YOU IMAGINE GOING TO UTAH? Going to like one of the darkest places in the world. You go out there you do your trip you'd start stargazing and then you see like overhead flash by like by Coca Cola and there's nothing internationally at least to stop that from happening plus. There's this whole other problem of space debris where if we just keep launching more and more things into space. We have the potential to create space. John where satellites can go off line they can break they can just float before they deorbit and crash back into our atmosphere and they can potentially create problems when they bump into other things so it seems like a pretty serious issue both from a research perspective from an aesthetic perspective from safety perspective in space. I mean what are astronomers or other stakeholders doing about it? You know. We're at the part of the movie where the scientists are like. This is a problem we should be thinking about it. And they're really just asking for international communities for companies like spacex to like think a little bit harder to their credit spacex is working with astronomy. Community they're working with specific observatories. They're trying some experimental coatings on their satellites to darken them. But at the same time they keep sending up more and more of the satellites that are unaltered. And they're gonNA keep doing it so that's a part of the problem too. Scientists are like. Hey can we just slow down a sack and like figure this out before it's too late before like Oh you know. There's just too many up there. Yeah you know it sort of reminds me of. I guess you know I think about the ocean like forever people thought about it has just this infinite expanse you could dump things into it would go on forever and now we look up and there's you know islands the size of Texas of plastic floating around everywhere and there were people decades ago saying. Don't dump plastic in the ocean and only now are people taking it really really seriously and. I wonder if what you're talking about this tip of the iceberg sort of demonstrating that space or at least the space close to Earth is maybe less infinite than we think. Yeah I mean it's it's definitely finite there's there's only so much space around the earth and our eyes are really sensitive and so are these observatories. They can see the faintest light from light years and light years away like light that predates all of human civilization for sure and like pre dates like a lot of life on planet earth. That light traveled here from the deepest reaches of the Cosmos to be blocked by some little. Play thing that some humans built you know. It seems so deeply tragic to race this light that has come to us over millions of years of tens of thousands of years over billions of years however long that light traveled to return telescopes and to dislike erase..

SPACEX Spacex United States Brian resnick Coca Cola reporter government Access Humanity Star Zealand vandalism Texas UTAH John New Zealand
"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

05:07 min | 11 months ago

"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

"Mine is I think there's some chance that this may have already been a carve out. 'cause I've recommended this Sony time different people but as a five year old talk by Michael Malpass This one at Google For his book tour or at least discussing the book untangling skill and luck this success equation and it is one of the best hours you could spend with your time where he lays out games of skill and games of luck and every or most things are both and understanding where a lot of the different sports that you love or games that you love are on that continuum and also thinking about competitions in your life of what's more skill based in what's more luck based and doing this really analytical theoretical analysis of it that is just a privilege to watch because he uncovers weird paradoxes. Like this one. The more skill and activity requires the more luck will play a role in the the the paradox skill right. It's and it's so interesting and like I if you're interested in if you're a sports fan Or if you're an investor or if you compete at anything of the highest level It is wildly clarifying to watch this and And understand sort of what game you're in and I I can't recommend it enough so good and You read a book about Same title and with the same title and Yeah I think I should go back and read that or at least we watch the video. I remember it being fantastic. It's awesome it's awesome Well before before our usual sort of wrap up here We have one more Kind of fun announcement And that is that David and I are going to be speaking at an aerospace industry conference in November called and That's something that You know obviously based on both of US getting to go deep on the research here I'd call ourselves Aerospace Novices but But curious and and love diving into this stuff. and And we were fortunate enough to to get to attend And do some talks at ascend. And so if you're like us where this stuff is interesting to you or you think space may be the future or you're interested in getting Getting into a space adjacent industry ascend should be a great event Hopefully we'll get to do it in person but folks should check it out and We'll put a link in the show notes if that Tickles your fancy. Wait for a really hope. It'll be imprisoned. That'd be great You in many ways. I think this time has for us acquired US personally and for many of our listeners to forced to grow and obviously adapt. But you know folks may know we. We used to do all of our episodes with guests in person. We would fly to go see. I guess obviously remember doing that. Now but which is on the one hand been great but on the million I miss it and it just speaker. Great to to hope that happens in person. Be there together and And have our community together. Yeah for sure. Well one talk. I'm really excited for his. Jim Britton Stein who's NASA's administrator? Who was sort of overseeing everything about? What's what's GonNa be happening this week Speaking there and it's a lot of You know it's it's as high up as the the sort of folks go in their space industry and you know one one other person who I'm sure will be a fascinating to hear is the the president and CEO of Eua is is going to be there and so for all the shade I just through. I think it'll be really interesting to hear how they're they're sort of navigating spacex and other competitor so all right that's ascend check it out. Send DOT events if you aren't subscribed and you're new to the show and you like what you hear you totally should you can subscribe to us in any Any podcast client or we are now sending out new episodes via email. And so you can subscribe to that on our website at acquired dot. Fm either in the footer. Or in the top right hand corner there and And that way we can. We can shoot a note and we post something new If you WANNA become a limited partner subscribing gets you access to our bonus show and as mentioned the L. P. Calls where we get to interact with all of you which will be Super Fun and To listen you can click the link in the show notes or go to glow DOT FM SLASH ACQUIRED. And all new listeners. Get a seven day free trial if you WANNA hang out and And Chat. You should join the slack. We've got or four thousand people in they're talking about Different topics of company building news of the day acquisitions in discussing previous episodes. So I'm sure we'll be a Jatin in there After we dropped this episode with that. Thank you to celebrate Valley Bank and Wilson's Houdini and we will see you next time. We'll see you next time..

US Michael Malpass president and CEO Google Sony spacex dot Jim Britton Stein NASA Valley Bank David Eua administrator partner
"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

08:55 min | 11 months ago

"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

"Was interesting because in some ways I'm trying to think if the analogy holds in the other direction like apple has has apple vertically integrated the IPHONE. They've it's whereas extended vertically integrated an boy. I think there's actually a great contemporary post on the fact that this is not vertically integrated that they they do make they make the things that they've you as too tightly couple so like us the Oh ass and actually interesting. They don't make them. They design them at true. Then they outsource thousands of race right they have in a Lotta ways really out. I mean if anything apple is kind of like the Detroit on your manufacturer model Wailing. They design it. They make the core engine and then have a ton of suppliers for all the other parts yet but they have so much power over those suppliers that they're able to squeeze margins on those Yup whereas there was nobody squeezing margins in aerospace. Everybody was happy to let their downstream partners have fat margins. Yup Yup Yup because again from the Lockheed's Boeing's perspectives the higher the total price. The better the more money they made they were just a straight percentage. Yeah so interesting. It's funny I. I didn't articulate it quite the same way you had but I tried to write out. Like the bullet points of the Business Model. Which was like one get paid exorbitant fees but not as exorb- exorbitant as everyone else for every launch. Nasa is willing to pay this because the old world competitors had crazy high cross structures and importantly no reusability hasn't been important yet but will be and so what I th I think. They're gross margin positive on every launch. Now on the first try even without re I'm not totally sure but that's what what Some estimates suggest that to is take those profits to fund the development of more usability and more lower cost systems. Three make even more margin from doing that and getting paid for those contract launches of Satellites Etcetera Four. Enjoy these fat margins. Well everyone else is trying to catch up to reusability and trying to vertically integrate or squeeze all their suppliers and as a data point here. You know space x charges less than their competitors but obviously well above their their cost basis. If they're actually able to harvest all this margin there they would have been giving away by vertically integrating The data point is that Falcon nine missions even to the US government with with the additional thirty million in Costco for under one hundred million dollars and you L. contract that was I can't remember which one. But basically has all of the launches at four hundred million guns so like there's just so much margin in there so then then component five use the funds from these fat margins to fund their own owned and operated businesses like Starlink. Or like the the Mar- Steph that. I think we'll talk about here. We're basically SPACEX themselves will be able to charge for those owned assets on an indefinite basis. Like they're able to like bootstrap the production of rockets using NASA and then bootstrap their their owned and operated business with all this margin that everyone let them play with. It's like this to step bootstrap debts pretty awesome Couple they quick ones. I WanNa hit on One We've alluded blue origin. A little bit on this and that's probably another episode for another day but I you know with different strategies different approaches but strikes me as interesting back to the whole you know Funding Money Mo problems like basis is putting a billion dollars a year into blue origin. Visas is selling a billion dollars Amazon. Stock that could be used for Lord but certainly a lot more than one hundred million dollars has gone in in terms of equity funding into blue origin. It's interesting though. Lake SPACEX in terms of equity funding has received so much less money and Ilan from the beginning was focused on this is going to be revenue generating profitable business and so on the one hand you'd think naively like oh they have so much fewer resources but I think it's in many ways precisely because of their resource constraint and having to build this profitable business that they've figured out how to disrupt the industry and accomplished so much and this is like the like we see all the time in on this show and in startups rate is lake. Sometimes you think when you're out of the gate lake you see these companies raise tons of money and like think they're gonNA know clear out the industry and have all the success but it ends up hurting them because like they're not forced to not forced to build a real business. Yeah I hadn't really thought about it in those terms. And then the last one is related to that man is Alon Across Cross spacex and Tesla is he dislike the living embodiment of you know the skin in the game. You know Axiom like this guy like absolutely put his money where his mouth is. And you can say many things about John But you know he's been quoted on so many occasions saying like if either. Tesla goes bankrupt. I will personally go bankrupt. And that is has it should be and the number of near death moments. They've had and pulled through like if that were the case if he really you know I'll be fine. I'll still have my McLaren. If this goes bankrupt like would they have had the fortitude and he had the fortitude to to pull through. I don't know I do think so. I think you're reversing the chicken and the egg button. That's why it's a chicken or the egg thing the way that I would think about. This is like He launches drive to make this thing. Success is the reason like it's not any monetary skin in the game. He I mean he cares if he goes bankrupt but not really like if he really cared about not going bankrupt than he wouldn't have doubly leveraged himself across two companies so like clearly the thing he cares about is succeeding in this mission and that is what drove him to put all of his money in. It's not like he's like logged into succeeding now because of the fact that he's so invested but he definitely burned. The bridge is behind him. Yes yes there is no way for him to I mean now there's a way out because there is just he he still owns probably forty something percent of space x and there's so much equity value there that you know. Yeah he he. There's there's a way out for Tesla purely by by getting OUTTA SPACEX Yup but this point and it's such a good business truly like making making one hundred hundred million bucks a pop if you can do that twice a month. I yeah especially if you can reuse those rockets yeah sorry go go for your themes. Ya Now. I've got a couple of fun ones so I WanNa talk about a different type of vertical integration which is Spacex assembles their rocket horizontally and most other companies assemble their rockets vertically and As you can imagine when you lay them on the ground and you build them that way you don't have to take really expensive crazy hydraulic machines and move around. You know you don't have to construct a skyscraper around your rocket and this is a. I'm using this as an example. But it's super illustrative of House. Space X problem solved every single component of building their company in cash constrained environment into finding a more innovative more inexpensive way of doing something and like. I think Ilan has this interesting is yeah actually the Russians. I don't know fizzy Lonner Gwen but the Russians actually manufacture them on the ground. Most of these companies actually manufacture them vertically. But the the number. That gwen sites is that She says Spacex rocket factory is fifty cents a square foot. And if you've vertically integrate your rocket no pun intended Stand up and and assemble at that way Space Ends up effectively costing you twelve to eighteen dollars a square foot. Because you're you're moving people up and down to build these rockets way the heck up in space and it's just like it's just a great l. Association of the incredible constraints that SPACEX was under that no other player that's ever reached the scale that they're at has been under.

SPACEX Tesla apple Nasa Ilan Boeing US Costco Detroit gate lake Starlink Amazon Lord Alon John
"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

09:43 min | 11 months ago

"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

"And this is actually I think a big point related to We didn't really talk about Starlink at all in this episode thus far but I think one of the reasons besides Starlink and providing satellite Internet access being big market and attractive in and of its own that space x decided to launch this division internally was to stimulate the small set market demand for lake. They now they are going to be their own. First and best customer for small sets and the The rideshare program that they launched where when they're sending up stuff having having space available for for little sets as well. Yeah I want to give a little bit of detail on both of those things that you just described now that we've sort of We've tipped our hand a little bit so for people who don't know what. Starlink is which me probably two months ago and mostly me even a week ago. spacex going to put twelve hundred satellites in low earth orbit. Twelve thousand round the earth. I'm sorry twelve. Thousand Satellites Low-earth orbit so way way way closer than the direct TV satellite that needs to be out in geosynchronous which is twenty two thousand miles away like these things are on the order of Two hundred mile miles away. So you know takes a rocket to get it up there but you know it's It's IT'S NOT. It's not as far away as As the old stuff is whereas a lot of the fixed geosynchronous staff so space was going to launch these these Twelve thousand satellites and They are all going to have line of sight to each other and they are all going to be able to provide broadband internet anywhere on earth at anytime to anyone in a cost effective way and the way that it works is is kind of a miracle the fact that of them have this line of sight to each other and communicate in high bandwidth between one another. It means that the latency can be way less so since their way. Closer right the problem with using satellite Internet is it has to round trip all the way out twenty two thousand miles and back and even at the speed of light. That's still time and so you're getting you know dog crap. Slow speeds on On Satellite Internet. And if you have a whole bunch of pretty close here and they can only all communicate with each other. It's kind of okay if there's not a single same one above you all the time as long as there's something above you all the time and they can communicate with each other you can. This is the The WIFI Mesh Network of satellite broadband. Totally it's genius. And so you might think my gosh. That's so many satellite that must be really far in the future. Will they launch sixty at a? And they've done this. I think three times now like they literally stack real tight. They jam sixty of them in a fairing in a nose cone of a of a Falcon nine. They shoot them up and they all sort of make a little string in the sky and they they go right behind each other and it works like Elon. Musk has sent a tweet from from Starlink Internet. Oh I haven't seen that he has. He tweeted something. Like I'm tweeting. This from starlink and then he replied to himself a minute later it was like got it and you know it's these publicity stunts but like that you can see turning into this very interesting owned and operated business where they can be a huge fixed cost sent him up there it's You know to them. The cost it would cost me. Sixty two million dollars to send something up on a Falcon nine but and it would cost the government something like ninety million because they have additional regulatory stuff. But for SPACEX. I don't know what their costs are. Call it forty million. So it's that sort of big fixed cost investment to get them up there but they can run a profitable business and we can all a lot of people get their Internet from Starlink and that can be a cash machine that then can bankroll future endeavors. So they're not just getting paid every launch but they can get paid in perpetuity for subscription to something. That's already in the sky so I know dipping all over the place here and analysis and business model but When you dip into sky Starlink there. I think it's important to sort of like what the heck that is. And how real? It could be how soon it could be. You know two three four years before that starts to be meaningful. Yeah I mean it's like the satellites are already up there. Yeah totally and they've got competitors there to Amazon Scott Project typer and Softbank funded. A company called one web. That's that's That's doing it but yeah. It's it's futuristic stuff that's has the back to the vertical integration like. They have the advantage of you know there. It benefits all sides of the business. Either building this business internally be they're giving more Stimulating more demand for launches of which they are the primary provider can lead to more launches more vertical integration cost comes down farther and then the the fly wheels can keep spinning hundred percent hundred percent and you mentioned rideshare too which is a funny word to use in space. What is the thing that they put on their website? La In the last year or so where by the way you can put in a credit card to for them to take a deposit on this and they will charge your credit card but you can basically pay as little as a million dollars to hitch a ride. So it's exactly what you said. David you're sending a big satellite up. Take my little one up to. You can go to the website and you can say I want I want to send up something. That's one hundred kilograms by twenty twenty four and Like quote me and it is crazy. Realize they take said this is like the equivalent of an apple pay down payment on a tesla on the website. Absolutely do you know if a gift shop powers like that would be as in question? The design is pretty similar between the Tesla website and the space x website. Chappel yeah just because I don't WanNa talk about this twice I'm going to pull forward my my My playbook thing now about about the pricing there it is a massive disruption to the entire aerospace ecosystem that space x has a pricing page like. It is the craziest thing you can go to to. There's the rideshare thing but then there's also like literally just a pdf that you can click and pull up and it's like. Do you want a Falcon nine? It's sixty two million dollars. Do you want a Falcon heavy? It's more expensive and I don't know what it is but the this has never been an industry with price transparency and by bringing that it is just like you know freaks everyone in the industry out to for them to be that transparent plus the Uberpool. Right okay so that was what would have been otherwise. I dipped us into playbook Let's go over if someone wanted to do something like this. What is the playbook? They should run. And what are some of the themes that we noticed here? Who Well Okay. I'll run to you some of the ones. I jotted down quickly when I started thinking doing the research about lake. What would what would Hamilton? Helmer say about lake. What is SPACEX is does space x have power? If so what is it and I think the right one. I think this is basically what we've been banging the drum. On episode is they came out with counter positioning lake the the vertical integration and the whole approach that they've taken With price transparency and everything to the industry you A. L. and other competitors matched at it would destroy their whole organizational structure and business model totally. So there's no way they can but I think there's another interesting thing here. I'm not quite sure I'm not quite sure. If this is a PA- or or many other like industries this is applicable to but I started thinking about vertical integration and in so many industries. You see going from the disruption happened when you go from vertical to horizontal like this is what happened in the PC mystery. You know and I start thinking about why. And I think it's often when if you think about Lake. When computing was vertically integrated and the deck days it was when he had mainframes and you had pretty few units shipped lake at a very high praise for each of them. That's like when it makes sense vertically integrate and then is volumes grow and you get a lot. More unit shipped and GOES UP AND PRICE GOES DOWN THAN HORIZONTAL INTEGRATION. Makes more sense because you can be more nimble you can define layers of the stack where there's more power versus another and you can have more profitability and outsource commodity parts. What's interesting here is that you had this industry structure where you had and extremely small number of units shipped like number of rocket launches around the world was extremely small and it. You had these. Because of the way most of it being government business you had these horizontally integrated players that were competing with SPACEX. Came in and said like actually like an anti-scale economy here we should be vertically integrated and I can't think of any other markets that exist like that where you have like a really small number. But you have this. Bizarrely horizontal is industry but to distract me. They'll like this was like a major key. To how SPACEX was able to disrupt..

SPACEX Starlink sky Starlink Starlink Internet lake Softbank Musk Chappel Amazon apple David Uberpool PA Helmer Hamilton A. L.
"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

10:34 min | 11 months ago

"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

"Less than forty eight hours now. The plan is One of these Falcon Nines. It's going to have a man crew capsule dragon on it and we're going to be sending astronauts up to the International Space Station. It's a funny. I'm saying we like it's like it's US right. The company yeah a little bit of A. Us centric show but like my gosh for a US company to fly you know U. S. astronauts up the ISS is is You know it's compelling it's cool Yup it It is so this goes back to September twenty fourteen NASA BIT. Outta two point six billion dollar contract to to do this. This was the point of all of Griffin's work to re architect how NASA operated with with their suppliers for a private company to fly humans to the ISS and and spacex wins it so the last year in twenty nineteen a big key step in this. Is They completed? The first autonomous ISS docking with a drag dragon capsule so it was a crew capsule. Did there were no people on it. It was just cargo. There was like a little stuffed animal. I think that then. The s astronauts went in there and showed and wave to the camera and held up the stuffed animal. That's globe I think and on Wednesday may twenty seven scheduled to bring us astronauts. Bob Bankin and Colonel Doug Hurley. Up to the yeah. It's it's it's it's astoundingly cool. I mean it's just what time to be alive. So the items that people may think about space x that we haven't dove into here because We might talk about a little bit. But there's so much to talk about. Obviously Are Obviously Starlink their own small satellite Communications Broadband Communications Internet? Network that they're developing the starship. Which is the future Benue alluded to this? They're going to be retiring the Falcon Program and the Dragon Program and Merging everything into one giant. Spacecraft the starship which will eventually go to Mars thing. Sort the spaceship the starship. The which I wish was still called the far. I know so cool. They had a successful engine test for that so that it work as well underway on that and and then there's a little thing called the boring company. Yeah which I think is something like it ended up spinning out and space XS minority investor along with Alon Yup so inland owns about ninety percent of the company. I believe maybe a little less space x six percent And then there's the or the other. Yeah wow there. We have it SPACEX as of May Twenty Fifth Two thousand twenty. Yup well I I do think before. Moving out of history and facts here because we're sort of ending history and facts with the the events that are happening. Wednesday it is worth talking about this particular contract. Because you a skeptic could say something like this there's lots of interesting skeptics of of space x one skepticism could be. Why is it so impressive? What they're doing like other countries have been flying people up to the ISS forever like you know get get get off your high arcing. Get less excited. So what is a private company instead of government? So what they may be spent a little bit less money like not that this easy to do. But there's plenty of other people that could do it well. Nasa doesn't sole source crap like NASA always awards multiple contracts because like this stuff is super hard and the second person. The second company that that got this. Same contract was Boeing and Boeing has built a thing To produce you know this. Their version of the dragon called the star liner but in December of last year it launched attested dock with the ISS. I'm veering off course. And they did manage to get at home but basically scrub the mission in order to do it. And And Boeing to four hundred ten million dollar writedown on earnings last quarter as they prepare for NASA to potentially ask them to run another full test. Do another full launch the exact same thing you know which is actually quite telling that for Boeing. That's a four hundred million dollar expense because for for space that would be somewhere between sixty and a hundred million dollar expense but well. Maybe that's not fair because there's more reusability anyway. The the point that I wanna make there is like this could be Boeing later this week. But it's not it's SPACEX and they managed to do it. You know better faster. Cheaper faster safer more reliable. Yeah and so fingers crossed. Everything goes well but It's you know you can throw shade at Ilan. In whatever way that you want or at this company in whatever way that you want. But YOU CAN'T ARGUE WITH RESULTS. We talk about narratives. Yeah Yeah let's do it well I think there's at least three vectors that I can think of around Bull and bear here one is around. Alon himself by people. You know the you could call him the savior you can call him an ego maniacal sort of work you to the bone words. We can't say on this show so David any sort of like color that you want to add to narratives on Ilan I mean what else could we add It is interesting though like again until really until doing recording this episode now obviously thought SPACEX and Tesla right very different situations but But I think the yuan factor the Alon randomness factor in space. X is just so much less than in Tesla. Probably one because he has gwen but then also to because the company at Least Tesla. I think isn't a very good place now but six months ago. Tesla was not in a very good place bases so there's just kind of less Even though SPACEX is in many ways in a more politically sensitive position Then then Tesla like there's less for one person to mess up right now. Yeah Yeah I mean. It's also a private company which is also preface. If you if you could tune out all noise around Tesla's stock and only focus on the more intrinsic stuff like I think there'd be a lot less narratives period a ninety percent less narrative around Tesla and You know SPACEX has that and they also have the benefit of You know long long term commitments with agencies and governments that can always come through on that cash and so to the extent that they can deliver You know they have guaranteed stable predictable revenue. The only thing that's predictable as you know when you're GONNA crash ABS stage one into a drone ship and have to take a you know multi dozen if not hundred million dollar right off but you know. That's that's the hard part that comes with. The guaranteed contractual revenue The other narrative that I think is important to highlight. So that one that you one is one that everyone outside of airspace? Talks about the one. That's more internally. Debated is around reusability and so a lot of the SPACEX. Bears will tell you that's total. Bs that those things are reusable. It's total BS that even if they are reusable that cost efficient in fact. Some of these people include. Ceo's of competing companies who when someone flags the point well spacex is able to do this cheaper. Because they've done. This performed this miracle of engineering of reusing the rockets. They'll say things like well. You don't know their cost structure. You don't know that it's actually cheaper and The examples exist in the past of the solid rocket boosters for example on the The space shuttle those white ones on either side of the Big Red Tank. Those would fall back down to the Ocean. And then they would they would be refurbished and then those would launch again so this sort of thing theoretically has happened but the differences with things like that the order of magnitude. It's probably an order of magnitude more expensive where they basically cycle out every part scrubbed clean and then send it back up and space. X is iterating toward you know. This is the bulk as on reusability Being able to just give a one or a two day inspection On the rockets and then And then send them back without replacing anything and only need to replace things maybe every ten times or so that you ended up and right now I think the maximum they've they've sent a rocket back opera stage. One at backup has been three times. But you know There are very very real. Cost savings that that That you have here from you know not having to produce A. I don't know what the cost of goods sold are on a Falcon nine but twenty thirty million dollar rocket every single time. And you know I think. In the coming years we'll see a SPACEX actually able to get to the milestone of You just need to give it a once-over and forty eight hours you can fly again. But there's there's massive debate over whether the reusability actually provides the type of savings that spacex claims. We move on to you. What would happen to otherwise? Yeah let's do. Where do you even start here? There's like there's so many moments where this could have gone off the rails. Biggest one is what if what if NASA hadn't sort of change their their tune on how we bid stuff out I mean I think without at the small set market. Just you know I think it probably will literally said will materialize in the future and is materializing now but during the time period that spacex needed to just wasn't going to yeah.

spacex NASA Tesla ISS Boeing Falcon Nines International Space Station US A. Us Griffin Alon U. S. Benue Ilan Doug Hurley Bob Bankin Ceo Ocean gwen
"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:47 min | 11 months ago

"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

"Miles per hour zero zero meters per second right as its setting down. And so. It's this like magic trick. Every time they they they pull it off of unbelievable sensors and unbelievable precision over when they're firing that that engine at minimum thrust incredible so now of course. The point of all of this is that you're going to reuse the rockets so in twenty seventeen they have the first successful Falcon nine reuse in March of two thousand. Seventeen and twenty seventeen was just a banner year for space. X Eighteen successful launches. No failures and they landed every single one of them except the few that they were the end of the useful life of the rocket weather. A planning not to them coming out coming out of two thousand fifteen. This is a company that is firing on all cylinders. Like perfect product market fit on the business side iterating superfast launching all there are indeed stuff actually into production super fast. Like they're they're they're flying out their backlog at remarkable pace like it is. It's just impressive totally The next year in two thousand eighteen. They hit their fiftieth successful. Falcon nine launch. They have twenty one total launches in two thousand eighteen including the Falcon heavy which is an adapted folks of Prevalje in this and watch videos but like it is amazing. So this is the re Falcon Nine rockets wired together for twenty seven total engines burning That can bring up an incredible amount of payload and these guys and what they do is all three go up and then they all end and honestly like watching a magic trick like it's like a anyone that watched the spacex fly Tesla's You Lonzo Tesla roadster up with Starman in it like this was on a falcon heavy and then exactly that ballet of the to come down simultaneously land next to each other on pads on land. The third sort of main booster then goes and lands on the drone ship which Actually that one ended up tipping a lot harder to do because that one's especially reinforced to be able to hold onto the other two brewster's right. Yeah which apparently in the block five which is the most recent and I think final version of Falcon nine. Yeah they've actually figured out a way to to of fix that problem and they're going to be able to. I suppose catch them much more easily out in the drone ship but yeah so that brings us to now. There are a couple things. We're not talking about here. We might mention At the end of the episode but.

spacex Prevalje Starman brewster
"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

08:40 min | 11 months ago

"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

"For the US. We don't WANNA keep supplying you those. So they've stopped like there's only something like there. There are some number in the single digits or teens of of those engines in country in the US that like that You L. A. Can Use and so like. I think it's called the RDA. One Eighty is the if the atlas five is the is the rocket like you. La is in this position where the world is closing in on them from every direction. They're running out of the engines that they can use for these launches Spacex is massively undercutting them on price. Which we'll talk about here in a moment and like the clock is just ticking with their basically they're one customer looking to them and going wait. I'm sorry in. What ways are you better? And so they're going to try and run out of the house before it burns down with the new Volkan program in partnering with Blue But You know there're powerhouse and we'll continue when contracts for awhile. But they are certainly spacex is number one enemy indeed well you know it's disruptive innovation coming to launch bracket the space shipping mortgage so it was twenty two thousand eight when spacex gets the The contract from NASA for the ISS resupply pretty quickly within eighteen months. They have a successful test. Flight of the Falcon Nine. Which again they've already been working on. And then Subs June two thousand ten. And then only six months after that. In December twenty ten they have a successful test flight of the Falcon nine. Plus the Dragon Capsule which they've engineered from scratch in house at SPACEX and it takes a little while longer after that but on May Twenty second two thousand twelve. The first real dragon mission reaches the. Is Do the first of the twelve resupply missions and this is just incredible. I mean I remember this happening. Lake a private company has made a not just a racket but an entire spacecraft an operator it and sent it to the ISS again like you said with the first With the first successful Falcon one launch. Like this is the stuff that countries do not company said. Here spacex doing is just crazy and delay on the reason it's called. Dragon is alon named it. After the Pierre Paul and Mary Song Puff the magic correct. We're basically it was to to give the finger everyone who said he could never do it. And you know you're you're sort of chasing the dragon and saying look here it is. I did it. I think the I think the ISS as they were they were pulling in. Dragon said something like Houston. We've got ourselves a dragon here. Something like that. Got a dragon by the tail. Then the next year in twenty thirteen to what we were talking about about using these all the technology they built for the government in the commercial sector in September twenty. Thirteen the first commercial falcon nine launch. Takes place they launched several Canadian satellites. up into orbit in just about a year later and in then in twenty fourteen. Say COMPLETE SIX FALCON nine launches in two thousand fourteen in twenty fifteen. They complete seven. Falcon nine launches including the first successful test of a new program with NASA for the Crew Dragon. Which is what's going to happen on Wednesday. The first step towards what's going to happen here. takes place in two thousand fifteen and then at the very end twenty fifteen. This is the other big big thing. We WanNa talk about the one more thing. They Landa rocket. Do you remember when this happened. Just Holy Holy God moment I just I. It is so unnatural. I remember thinking that when it was happening is like this moment of sci-fi yeah I was I was traveling because over the holidays it was like late. December was was of two thousand fifteen. The was right after we started acquired. Yeah and it was. It was on the ship and so I it was. I was only and The drone ship and land. I was on land. Yup Yup so they had to do the boost back burn to they were. They had done time several attempt. So here's here's how it goes down so all the way back in twenty eleven. Yulon in the team. It started thinking about this and it was the an algae. We talked about earlier. Like it's crazy that you would build these massively expensive things and then every time you fly a seven forty seven from New York to London. Just throw it away afterwards man. How expensive airline tickets would be if that were the case? So they started working on the technology and twenty eleven to land rockets. People think this is impossible like the laws of physics people think won't allow it and they call the program grasshopper and then in March two thousand thirteen grasshopper. They're just sending these building. These short rockets shooting 'em up not into space or anywhere near space and the just trying to land them. They've land their first grasshopper in two thousand thirteen. And then what you might be thinking of in twenty fourteen in one of those falcon nine launches. They're like they're pretty quickly. Getting this tech into production they try and land in April. Twenty t fourteen a Falcon nine rocket on on a drone ship and it falls over Allen blew up bushes close though got really close then. The Second Attempt January Twenty fifteen fails the third attempt fails. It's dislike the first game that I Falcon one up. And then finally. The fourth attempt was was on land. Because it's much easier to do it only on on the ocean like you know it's on the ocean. Is Bob up down and moving around? They successfully land the first the first time on on land in December Twenty fifteen than they have to more fails in the ocean and then in April Twenty Sixteen Day successfully on the twenty-third Falcon nine launch on the drone ship followed by a second successful landing. The precise still love you. Yup Yeah this is. That's right was on land. It's it's interesting thinking about this because the way that space x lands these looks really unnatural. Like if you I remember a lot. watching The first blue origin rocket that went to space in came down and successfully landed back on earth which they actually beat spacex to so spacex was doing the grasshopper stuff. I but blue origin flu a rocket not to orbit but above one hundred kilometers above the earth. I mean that's A. It's the formal definition of space. So I think it's the Karman Line I dunno excellency up but yeah And you know space x sort of was the first then to beat them to that big milestone of of getting to orbit and then landing back down but if you watch like blue origins rocket do this it's Sorta seems more natural decelerate and then it lands kind of gently and the way that it works for spacex in the industry the way they are referred to it as as the hover slam or in a much less delicate way of referring to it people call it a suicide burn where basically what they do is they put just one of the nine engines that you know they turn one of those nine engines on an even at the minimum thrust from one of those nine. If you just leave it burning it will decelerate the rocket and then it will go back the other direction like these are. Wow just those raptors are so crazy powerful the I should to the raptors are flying today have twice the thrust of the raptors. They started with in the original Falcon nine. So like the their Interational Merlin's the raptors engines for the starship. Oh you're right okay. Cool I was referring to the wrong thing. Yes the Marlins have gotten twice as as performance so anyway they they turn just one of the Merlin engines on as it sort of decelerating and the reason they call it the harvest lamb as it comes in so fast and then just the exact right time like they have unbelievable sensors on this rocket. They can Fire it at minimum the minimum amount of thrust just in time for it to decelerate and hit. Basically you know zero.

Spacex spacex Dragon ISS raptors US NASA La Marlins L. A. Pierre Paul Allen Houston Bob alon New York London
"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

08:44 min | 11 months ago

"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

"And SPACEX being like these arm chips especially early on in having this you know sort of toy rocket with the The Falcon one worked under a very different set of requirements and ended up building a completely different system one that was cheaper and they could hit rate on it very quickly shipping up at different rocket every single time especially because they controlled the whole stack right exactly but initially. It didn't seem very useful for anything I I. I don't know for sure that this feels like it could be a case of of disruptive innovation here. Yeah looking like the Falcon definitely looks like a toy. Do a lot of people in the industry right. Absolutely you don't look at the Falcon one and say well. They're just a few years away from resupplying the the ISS and probably sending people up to it to like. That's just not. It's not your natural inclination there but David as you were mentioning like the design requirements around a lot of the other stuff that they sent up in. The meantime was totally changed with these small satellites. Cubesats I'M COMMERCIAL SPACE. Sort of developing so Getting back to United Launch Alliance who I mentioned there and I think they're important to understand in the context of the story. So Lockheed Martin and Boeing had both been longtime government contractors. They built Amazing things to their credit still build amazing things And a few examples you know Lockheed made that big orange tank on the space shuttle though we all know and as iconic and I still one of the most elegant when you see the space shuttle launch videos that's still to me. Is this romantic version of space. That in some ways. The the the spacex rockets art as beautiful. And don't just sing space to me the way that that shuttle designed did they also made the Hubble telescope and the the Mars Lander so you know the the Phoenix said lots of Really storied stuff. That they manufactured Boeing on the other hand made everything from the Lunar Rover back in nineteen seventy one to the actual space shuttle orbiter itself so longtime space companies. So here we are in two thousand and six Boeing and Lockheed and I think it's important understand their motivations because then you really get the context for what people thought. The space industry was Boeing and Lockheed had decided that the one real customer that they were both doing work for Was the US government. But the government didn't have enough business for both of them to justify their massive size by combining the manufacturing and research work of the two companies. This would be cheaper and safer way to get the same stuff out the door. Boeing already had the the Delta at Lockheed had the atlas existing rocket programs. It kind of. Sounds like a good idea. Unless you've heard this story before Or a story much like it. The first thing I want to tell you is you. You don't need to look any further than the U. A. Logo to discover that everything was basically designed by committee Something where you? La had a massive advantage with all the existing contracts that the two companies had they actively continued to work on the space shuttle program for another five years after this. They had years of knowing how the industry worked but what they didn't see was that the industry was undergoing this massive change you know for one with other potential non. Us government customers. There could be. There's real commercial industry and that was something that the US has basically lost two nations who could launch stuff cheaper like Russia China. Yeah Janet throughout the we haven't talked about China China. Was You know I think Vance wrote the Elon? Musk book and wanted to come out. Like two thousand fourteen fifteen. Maybe some no sixteen at that point in time you knows the Russians were still predominant in space. But China was making Bush now China like China and their Long March rocket like like space today. A Ben correct me if I'm wrong. But his is a two horse race between SPACEX and China and It's crazy yeah in a lot of ways and I think he launch. It looks at it that way. Another thing that I didn't really realize what is that There's this great talk linked in the show notes. It's a relatively under viewed video on Youtube of Gwen shot well. Giving up a small fireside chat to some industry insiders in twenty fourteen and she points out that the US was competitive in commercial space sort of in the up till the eighties or in the eighties but has basically lost it since then and that was the case. Really until you know until this reignition of Of of Commercial Space Industry here so long story short you L. A. was completely unsuccessful in capturing commercial market the. Us You know if you if you think about it. It's it's actually a huge failing on their part because there were tons of commercial satellites. Starting to go up you have direct. Tv who sort of owns and operates tons of satellites in order to Provide their service. You have intelligence satellites. You have surveillance you've researched concept you've startup companies. David you mentioned these cubesats you. La Managed to capture basically zero of this because they were focused on winning contracts from the US government. And you know there's more to blame than you you. La Themselves International traffic in arms regulations in the ninety s sort of built up barriers. But the biggest problem was Boeing and Lockheed Martin just feet anymore and so everything got so bloated and expensive when they just combined into one one big behemoth and so you know you might see the opportunity here and You know if you do then you are similar to Alon and Gwen and everyone else. Who Sort of saw this gap and then decided. Hey we're GONNA go build a fricken cash cow of a business in the Falcon nine and we're going to go shoot that gap really been. You mentioned a minute ago that I think over the life space x thus far they receive just under eight billion dollars from the government Now by our calculation spacex is obviously a private company. But you can tell by their you know. Put launches and launch manifest public We think based on sticker price for Falcon nine launches of which now over eighty Ray That they've done. Yeah I think eighty six launches and somewhere around fifty five on the future manifest. Yup and something like twenty two of those issues for government and the Dragon Program The restaurant they've probably made just about that same amount. Another eight billion dollars. Give or take in commercial revenue from be no other governments wanting satellites from commercial satellites from all sorts of stuff. Yeah I don't. I don't think it's quite that much. I think it's probably about half that but If the revenue mix will definitely start to skew toward commercial as we see them fly out their backlog. You know there's all these committed launches they have they haven't launched yet that you know you're right. I I definitely don't think it's more than the. Us government right now by the way private company. So who knows but if you just sort of add up the sticker price of You know sixty million times. The number of of commercial launches that. They've sent up which are probably I. Don't know forty fifty sixty somewhere in there. Yeah you're right. You're in the the single digit billions. Yeah so So yeah it will move quickly. It's funny to move quickly through all the amazing technical engineering feats that SPACEX has accomplished. Since then I think you hit the nail on the head like getting this contract. This was the moment that lake made the company getting that initial NASA. Iss contract real quick before we move on. Because I know I just through a bunch of shade and I wanted. I always want to make sure I like do right by someone rather than just blasting him on the show you L. A. has since replaced their. Ceo They're actually working with blue origin. Now and designing a new rocket called the Vulcan and hoping to use or I think are going to use blue origin Engines on there and so blue is actually commercially. Selling those engines to To You L. A. Which is is kind of amazing. What one more digression on You la? Here I can't help it do this. They the supplier that they have for the engines on. I think it's the atlas five I'll correct myself later if I'm wrong. But their their main basically their competitor to the Falcon Falcon nine or Falcon. Nine heavy it uses Russian engines interesting and the the main. Us government contractor for sending up things like intelligence satellites and the current iteration of that uses Russian engines of which the Russians have decided.

US Boeing SPACEX Of of Commercial Space Industr China David Lockheed United Launch Alliance Falcon Lockheed Martin L. A. Gwen La China China Mars Lander government contractor Youtube
"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

08:34 min | 11 months ago

"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

"Because listeners. As you know David an either of us are in the aerospace but I'd say Know enough to be dangerous here. So it's worth just articulating some of the terminology. We're using and what are these rockets? So the things that that's the big main body of the rocket. I'M GONNA WORK. My way up from the bottom is called the first stage and this is where all that liquid-fuel is. That gets it up. Not all the way to orbit maybe all the way to orbit It basically gets it off the ground it gets through the thick atmosphere of the the Close to the earth and it sets it off on. It's sort of More horizontal journey to to Start orbiting and of course the Are Sort of the attached to that. Or in this case in the Falcon One Just the one Merlin engine so that goes up and David. You mentioned the stage separation. So the first stage of falls back toward Earth Nowadays it can land couldn't and splashdown casually dropped the nowadays it can do. It doesn't feel barbaric like okay. I was thinking about this. The other day Some SPACEX is competitor is have rockets that the first stage when they come down. They splashed down into the ocean and they're useless. Does nephew barbaric like it was mirrored a few years ago where it was the most amazing thing in the world that? Oh my God we vertically oriented a rocket and the we can sort of like clean it up and then we can use it again and now you're like wait. I'm sorry it's just wasted. It's just like you can never it just trash like it feels like like you just threw at the bottom of the ocean. Yeah it feels like I just finished a Lacroix and then threw it directly in a trash can. And it's the new that scene in in Madman. I think it's in. The first season may be where the draper family out on picnic in a park. Yes and they just don't all the trash all they pick up the blanket and just kind of shake it and then they just walk off like happy family. I take it back. This is like finishing your algae and water bottle and then throwing it in the trash. It's like it's amazing. How your perspective changes? But anyway I digress so we got through that I then you've got the second stage of the rocket or You know the the this is the part that does something out in space. This has another engine on it. David you mentioned the Kestrel engine. That's the smaller engine. That's sort of better for little maneuverability out in space because these Merlin and then later the What's the current? Remind me the raptor the raptor. These are powerful Freakin engines. Like if you're GONNA go try docket against something. That's going to create a problem because in so you big frequent baseball bat. Yeah Yeah it's the Falcon Punch and so you've got this smaller stage. That has a single. You know smaller engine on it. So that's the second stage that we're going to talk about. It does stuff in space then. There's one more thing on top and that can be one of two different things. One is a payload that is contained within. I think the right way to say it is within a fairing ferrings but basically the fairing splits into two those things fall back toward earth and then it's got something in there it's got for example satellite or a bunch of satellites in there. The other configuration is that it could have a capsule on there and that would be a spacecraft that you know humans could operate one day who knows and so that's sort of the the structure of the rocket and the terminology that for a long time when people talked about the multiple stages of Iraq it or I is would sorta glaze over. But it's at least spacex his case because it's a relatively straightforward design It's it's good to just sort of keep in mind so you can go okay and follow along Yup Yup so they were so close. They were so close to actually doing this. Being the first private company ever to launch a satellite into orbit. And then right at the last minute hit it failed. So they're Terry Classic Yulon fashion. He says not only. Are we go for number three? Were go for. So this is the Falcon one which was both the first and one engine one mellon engine. They had been Tom. Muller's genius He and he'll on had been thinking about. This isn't just wanted. This is a modular system. And you could. You can have multiple of these engines put together and build bigger rockets with the same engines. And so the idea initially was they're gonna the Falcon One and the Falcon Five. Which was going to have five. Roland. Engines and then Falcon nine with nine Merlin. Engines says not only are. We undeterred by the second failure. We're GONNA go full steam ahead with trial number. Three number three with the Falcon one. I'm great I'm killing the Falcon five to light the Falcon Nine all-systems-go Development Anak while we haven't even launched the Falcon down. There was a big reason. Why did that? Which we've we've the kneeling went to the whole episode. We add eight more an octo web around that engine. It will really work. It will really work fare. The first stage did work so the the that second launch was a success by some measure although they never could delivered whatever payload was on the second stage and going into space yup so with the third try again takes them a year to the summer of two thousand eight when they are finally ready to to give the third try at the Falcon one launch from the island ago the first attempt on August second thousand they have to abort the launch team zero seconds. But they've got a. They've got a launch window. The weather's cooperating and they're going to try and get on the same day they go later on that same day it all starts working well again and then there's another failure Before the first stage is even finished and Eli only has so much money. I know I know it's just like it's crazy. So Yulon is what put a so. We said total of one hundred million in two hundred million into space X. I think he said at some point that that was enough for three or four and I'm putting the weight but why or four urban here which is great which has three or four launches right. But that's cool because you know. Hey likely he's deep into this. He said they're going to do this. Hell or high water. He's put one hundred million in but he made like close to two hundred from pay pal right so like he's good for it right. No He's not because this is two thousand eight and two things that just happened this summer. Two thousand one. Ilan has now summer. Two thousand eighty takes over a CEO of and he's pumped almost all of the rest of his money into Tesla seventy million seventy million And to Leeman brothers is about to collapse and the world is about the financial world is about to go nuts so good luck raising money so internally like he keeps a cool head to the company and externally but internally he is like freaking out so what does he do. He calls up his old friends from pay pal who are now at founders fund. Remember that time we were in a McLaren you calls Peter and Peter. Peter's Partners Founders Fund and says. Yeah I didn't WanNa race gap outside capital but I guess. I'm going to do it from anybody I'll do it from you guys Replace me a CEO. Once there's no way you would do it again right. I don't think that was peters choice to replace Don I don't think it was And so founders fund in the summer of two thousand eight invest twenty million dollars into the company that is enough to very quickly turnaround for a fourth and what would be final attempt to. I do the first successful launch of a Falcon one the very next month in September. Two thousand eight the same month. That Lehman Brothers went under. They finally succeed in a launch. And it's crazy. They don't even the only dummy payload at this point in time the only customer that That Trust Them. They Gwen has been able to to rustle up. Is I believe the Malaysian government. I think to launch communication satellite delusion. God's tell the next one yes well. The believes in government didn't trust them enough that it wasn't gonNA blow up so they said all right we'll like we'll let you take us up but on this one. You put.

David spacex CEO Lehman Brothers Peter baseball splashdown Malaysian government Lacroix Iraq draper Gwen Don I Muller Partners Founders Fund Yulon Roland Eli Ilan McLaren
"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

08:58 min | 11 months ago

"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

"Throughout all of this should be where. Why is this expensive like obviously this expensive? It's almost unfathomably expensive when you hear about anything in this industry contracts awarded cost of Emission Nastase budget which by the way in the last twenty years has gone from about one percent of our federal budget down to about half a percent it was as high as five percent in nineteen sixty nine hundred of the space race so interesting about that that the the question of the US government budget by the way document entire federal government. Yes so but so. It's immensely expensive almost to the point. Where it's you you can't even discern between the millions and the billions and I'm I'm I'm trying to sort of paint a picture here where you really should just try and figure out every single time you hear a high number. Why is it expensive? And where does the money go? And of course you can't make rocket just by throwing commodities wall so You'RE NOT GONNA get all the way down to two percent of what that rocket costs but two percent Being sort of like the hard materials. I I'm not someone who's in a industrials job but I have to imagine that. In most manufacturing businesses the actual hard materials are much more than two percent of the final sticker price of the line. You have a bomb versus the MS RPM totally. Well and this is you know. Alon Alon studied physics in Undergrad. In addition to business he is a physicist. And this is the question you ask themselves today. These are atoms and like you know it's a bunch of gas in a tube right like that. That's what Iraq it is. And so this is what he's putting together in spreadsheet so the touchdown back in the US and basically the same time. Pale finally goes public and right after so even though they were the first we talked about this with with rule oftener adapting episode with with with real of it. It's clear who was at the time the CFO. Pay Pal the broke. You know they were the one bright spot in the in the DOT com the Russia Russian like dot com winter the stock pops fifty five percent right after the IPO. So on sees this. He's got this spreadshee- and something clicks in his mind and he says you know what this isn't just a gesture. This isn't just a inspirational thing. I WANNA do. I actually disrupt this industry. I want to build a company I can take. You know all of this cost blow. That's happened in this industry Use My spreadsheet connections and do this for real so he gathers up they they walk up the plane he gets Cantrell he gets Griffin. He gets smaller the rockets the literally racket scientists and again him Chris. Thompson. Who has an aerospace engineer at? Boeing? And he says let's do this. We'll start a company. Nonprofit is dead. I'm going to start this. I'm going to fund this all myself. Paper liquid public urgency. The lockup will be over soon. I can get exit my stock and I'm willing to go all in on this so all in almost in Hindi greater than half in greater than half. Now he hasn't yet met J struggle and got introduced to the electric car seat. And so at this point. He's He's thinking all in the one person who everybody's in except for for Mike Griffin. He lives on the East Coast former Yankee guy he says lick is. I'm a little farther on in my career. I'm a little more senior. You know. This is all great adventure best of luck. I'm rooting for you. But I'm not going to move out to California and and do this and then ends up being a very good thing for space X. That did not do that as we will see. I'm like learning in real time for you on this episode. I had a very good thing for first. Basics that very thing spacex and the world that he did not do that Everyone else though is in Cantrell in for up leaving a few months later but in June two thousand and two they officially incorporate space exploration technologies and then the very next month in July two thousand to Ebay buys pay pal for one and a half billion dollars and alon now doesn't just have liquid public stock currency. He has one hundred and eighty million dollars plus in straight up cash that that he gets out of paypal and at this point time he says remember. He's been ousted three or four times from the two companies. He started in the past. This is going to be his. Life's work is next company. He says I don't want any any chance that anyone could kick me out here ever again. I'm not taking any outside investors. I'm putting my entire fortune. Do Uh will fund it all myself. It's mine and the super interesting thing is. We were talking about this texting about this. All told over the life of space x I think Yulon is only put in about one hundred million dollars into the company versus Bezos at blue origin puts in a billion dollars a year and so other people that have entered into the space industry. Just pets. That's a good. Let's let's plant that seed. Because yes SPACEX is very revenue funded instead of Equity Fund. And of course it's very quick funded to this is a company that has a what thirty five billion dollar valuation today and has over three billion dollars invested in it from not much of which is second. Oh interesting good point. Yeah I think much of a secondary okay. Well the the point I want to drive home here is space. X was founded. And there's two there's one thing that's known about the company at this point and one thing that's not super solidified. At least as far as I can tell the thing that is known is we're we're going to frigging Mars like we're figuring the smartest thing out and we're gonNA start by lighting a one engine candle on fire and like we'RE GONNA. We're going to figure out how to take baby steps here so that part is figured out the part. That's not figured out is what you'll find in the very first paragraph of the wikipedia entry SPACEX. Which is this sentence. They are an American aerospace manufacturer and Space Transportation Services Company. It is very very important to understand. Space x today is both of those things and they are different. They are a company that make stuff for aerospace and may well one day run a business on that and then they also have this business where they're basically a logistics company to ship stuff up to space and that latter business funds the former business and I think the the missing puzzle piece. That sort of comes along that Lobbies for space x to do that is is not yet in place yet. Well so the business plan for this new company again. Very very insistent. This is now a company is that he's seen all this cost bloat in the industry. He thinks they can do much better and he realizes really. The hard part about launching things into space is the engine of the rocket and he has the best rocket engine engineer in the world. Toppmoller working for him. They're going to build their engine completely in house. And then the idea. Is that the initial initial idea. Is they're going to go to third party suppliers in commodity folks and get all the all the rest of the stuff together and work with contractors. Kind of like you can imagine. The business plan. Ironically is sort of like the traditional Detroit automotive companies where they make the engines and they make the finished products but everything in between the engine and the final car comes from a whole network of Suppliers Yahoo Horizontally Integrated Company. Yeah exactly exactly so the plan is. This is what they're going to do. They're going to build the engine and They'RE GOING TO START LAUNCHING IN SEPTEMBER. Two Thousand and three it is now. July two thousand one. Yeah that's that was wishful thinking collapsing. Last may have been the first the beginning of the longtime line. 'cause in software. You can ship that fast. Larder in hardware should also say like. There's a there this I think is from from the Ashley Book as well like the way that Ilan calculates these deadlines as like he thinks about it about literally. How long would sort of like build a Gantt chart in his head and then he tries to compress all the minutes together and then he also tries to apply a speed acceleration there where he says look like. I would work on this really fast all the time so anybody that I hire would also do that. And so he basically creates this. Like Ultra Ultra compressed. Gantt.

US Cantrell engineer Mike Griffin Alon Alon Space Transportation Services alon Boeing paypal Equity Fund physicist CFO Iraq Russia Thompson
"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

08:24 min | 11 months ago

"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

"Griffin. Been Raymond. We'll come back to my griffin later in the episode Mike Griffin listeners. In my notes I won't tell you where or what his title was. But Wow it's the same Mike Griffin been talking before the show and I was like there's going to be a thing like does we just wait listeners. There's GonNa be a thing about Mike wait. So what makes role this so he comes over to just be part of this? What's the right word like emissary entourage maybe to kind of make introductions and meet with people? We'll see how one would go about buying an ICBM from Russia. We could call it an ICBM. You could call it a rocket to get the space which is what the intention here is so Mike. He worked at NASA earlier in his career. And then he'd run inky tell which is the it is part of the government is that it's kind of venture arm for investing in Commercial Ventures. That are going to be helpful to the government so you know who knows why. Mike was coming with them. You know he's coming from the government is coming from inky tell. Maybe he's keeping tabs on everything that's going on here So he comes along and basically goes as you would expect listeners. They meet with much Russians Cantrell and maybe maybe Mike Set. Set up some beatings and kind of go like Seo. Vance describes a bunch of them in the book. You Walk in. They sit down. There's a Lotta. The first thing that happens of course is vodka shots and talks about one meeting where a everybody in the room does vodka shots and the Russians are toasting to America and that that probably should set some some red flags off the get go there and then you know the chap for a while. They're not really talking about anything. Related to buying a missile lunches served a couple of hours. Go by and then finally they get around to lake so the purpose of your visit For anyone who's ever met with any of Ilan's companies let alone. Ilan himself like this is not how you get to have a meeting. With someone at SPACEX. It's quick it's to the point. It's how fast give me really good reasons for everything and let's move on and like Alan is the personification of that type of meeting Yup so he starts getting really frustrated by all these meetings and finally you know by the end. He's he's had enough of this kind of Russian way of doing things and he just starts coming out like right after the vodka shots like I want to buy. I want to buy rockets. You know. Here's my offer. And he's he's calculated he's willing to offer the meaning with one group. This is the last group me with. I think as either two or three brackets. He offers them eight million for For the two of them. How about eight million each they Needless to say they don't come to a deal so everybody leaves meeting by the way they're there in the middle of Moscow and Russian winter which is awful pretty interesting. I've been in Moscow in February and it is like it is like freeze your face off cold so it is. It is literally February. Two thousand two when this is happening. Wow Yeah let's let's recap dollars real quick just as a 'cause 'cause dollars are going to be an important thread through this through this whole story. Not just because this is an expensive endeavor but because the the scale of dollars to other dollars is important to think about. How would you go about solving this problem? So eons basically got hundred and seventy million from pay pal post tax dollars once the acquisition happens which is now for another and yet so he's got twenty million total now but you know he'll he'll eventually have one hundred and seventy million and so the that number that I quoted buying a A A rocket like this from a US company that manufacturers? It's like sixty five million dollars so you know he's trying to buy for eight million for for for two of them in Russia so that keep those sort of relative dollar amounts in your head. Of course the deal blows up. He doesn't actually end up buying them but that would have been what it cost him and he couldn't you know you if you're willing to put all his money into this. He couldn't do the sixty five million dollars launch. Because that's the launch. Then you gotta like get the stuff there you've got to build the robot you gotta set up all the stuff like I'm sorry. Is that sixty five million that I'm quoting. You is literally to buy a rocket from. Oh interesting yes. I didn't realize that you couldn't even. I guess you couldn't at that point in time. Just walk up and like reserve a wants spot on Iraq actually. Yeah who who? Who can you just go and say? Hey I wanNA yeah imagine if there are a company that did that and I take that back. I think such a concept did exist but I think it would have cost you one hundred fifty million to five hundred million quoting my numbers we're GonNa bust out later and our future cost comparisons. Well well okay so back to February. Two thousand two in Moscow. The leave the meeting this This motley crue. They get on the airplane and they head back to to the US on the plane and Cantrell talks about this. He says Whenever you get on a plane in Moscow particularly and in February hitting back for the for the states he says you always feel particularly good when the wheels lift off in Moscow. It's like Oh my God I made it so. He incriminated their veterans here. The over the drink and they start celebrating getting out. Meanwhile Ilan sitting in front of him and he's just like furiously typing away on laptops silent and they can't figure out what's going on and I felt halfway through the lady turns them any says. Hey guys I think we can build this rocket ourselves. And then he hands them the laptop and they look at it and they're like dumbfounded. Ilan has this spreadsheet on his laptop. This is supposed to be an excel. A Google seats in existence pointed out. This Excel Doc. And it's like hyper detailed SPEC sheet with costs and all the materials needed to build a rocket not necessarily rocket that would get them to Mars. But it's like you know it's real and and so they're they're stunned and they say. How did you build this well? It turns out alone had been reading a lot of Soviet rocket manuals and he had also met as part of this kind of group of advisors. He'd been putting together. He met this guy named Tom. Muller and Tom had worked at Hugh's aviation he. Of course being Howard Hughes back in the day setting of of billionaires he started rocket companies indeed. And then we've done to TRW SPACE. And he was kind of known in the industry as a real savant about engines like probably the best Most impressive rocket engine engineer in the world and Musk had had gotten in touch with him and And met him and started asking him all these questions about how rocket engines work and what needs to go into building a rocket and he'd helped him put together a spreadsheet so it was it was pretty damn good so they get back to the US and then basically halting of events gets kicked off that ends up in space x and tomorrow on American company launching people into space. Yeah another just to keep the dollars thread going. I think it was. I can't remember exactly which the sources it is. We David and I have twenty or thirty different sources that are in the show notes where you can go and read. Read more about this. I want to say this was originally from a SPACEX engineer but Pointed out if you calculate the cost of goods sold for Aerospace Grade. Aluminum allies plus some titanium copper and carbon on the open commodities market. It's about two percent of what rockets cost and I want to plant that seed because the question in your mind.

Ilan Moscow Mike Mike Griffin US Russia Cantrell SPACEX emissary NASA Griffin. Howard Hughes engineer Mike Set America Iraq Commercial Ventures Vance
"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

08:36 min | 11 months ago

"spacex" Discussed on Acquired

"There's nothing there and so he gets really disillusioned. He's like I Kinda WanNa make like I've got some resources I WANNA make. A grand gesture is not thinking about a company. He's not thinking about a business. He's thinking about something to inspire people to get back into space exploration so the Mars Society. This is their charter. So he makes a hundred thousand dollar donation to To the Mars Society he joins the board and he starts meeting all of these aerospace people in La and And not just in a way of course backup in Silicon Valley. There's NASA's Jet Post Propulsion lab in mountain view and so Elon. He's he's mostly down L. going back and forth and he starts organizing these Saturday salons. He calls them where he's just getting together. Industry leaders in aerospace and at JPL both in La in Palo Alto. And he's just kind of like there's no agenda but he he kinda lets it. Be known to all of them that like. He's got some resources. He's dot com rich guy and he wants to make a gesture and like what could be done on the order of kind of ten to twenty million dollars so they start to coalesce the group on this idea of building a quote Unquote Mars. Osas and the idea behind a Mars. Oasis is that they're going to buy a rocket and they're gonNA put a plant on it and they're also gonNA put a robot on it and they're gonNA shoot this rocket to Mars and when it lands on Mars. I can't remember if the Mars Lope rover ahead landed at this point I I think so was the lander. That was the one that I remember was a really big deal that I think found ice. I remember the the the the Mars Phoenix Lander was somewhere. Like two thousand eight and so that hadn't happened yet But I think the rover had I think the river was there anyway wasn't like I mean it was kinda crazy. Obviously everything about this is crazy but you know you could sort a piece together how you could string along somebody that this could happen. We're GONNA put this there. And then the idea was that the robot was going to create a greenhouse and then was going to put the plant in the greenhouse and let the plant grow on Mars and then the robot would have camera and a video feed and kind of Lake. The you know the whole picture that the first Apollo astronauts took of Of the Earth and moon that this would be a live video feed of a plant growing on Mars now beaming back over the internet onto dot com site and spire the people of the world to explore space with this love. It love. It sounds great. So so the purpose being sort of like inspiration. A little bit of like philanthropy stunt. Maybe even like a Some kind of performance art project not foreshadow. What's going on in Lonzo today? But but yeah that's kind of that's kind of the idea. There's one problem though and nobody in the group and the Salon Group is really willing to tell he. Lon He's thinking he's got you know. Probably tennis million leftover from The sale that he made he me about twenty. I think twenty two million from the sale of ZIP TO I. Companies got about ten million leftover. He thinks he can probably scrape together. Maybe twenty million maybe take some loans out against US pay PAL equity. That's that's his budget for this and and David earlier you had said that number two hundred million that obviously would come later when you get on those shares. Now he's only got sort of this ten to twenty million from their first company right. He's you know he could. He will end up being a with two hundred million dollars in liquidity. But at this moment It's all tied up in paypal so the thing that none of these space experts wanna tell him stat like he's off by an order of magnitude on the cost of this thing and Ten twenty million isn't GonNa cut it. You need more hundred two hundred million three hundred million to ours so musk the lake. He's very You know. He singular in his focus and so he keeps pushing forward on this and he comes up with this idea. I think this was his idea that the way he's going to make this happen was he was getting a good deal on a racket. By instead of using a purpose built a space launching rocket he was going to go over to Russia and the member. This point we're not that far removed from the Dissolution of the Soviet Union like. It's kind of the wild west right at this point. Two two thousand and one like yeah. We're we're now in two thousand one and musk's ideas he's GonNa go over there and he's GonNa buy an intercontinental ballistic missile because the Soviet Union has disintegrated. You can kind of do that in Russia. These apparently there's an open market where you can go and buy well. Maybe it's not open but it's you know it's gray it's right and he has some sort of like shady not shady but a connection like sort of like help him figure about to get into this we we should also contextualized here I think to be able to actually buy one of these in the US through more appropriate channels. Like if you could actually get your hands on one. I think it's something like sixty five million dollars like the the reason to sort of look elsewhere is. There's no way you're one here for any reasonable amount. Yup He thinks he's going to get a deal by buying missile and converting it into Iraq. This is like q the q the James Bond Villain thing. So he goes over there. He he he. Here's what he hears from his network that there a guy who can make this happen and that guy's name is Jim Cantrell and so Jim Lived in Utah. He's an American and worked for NASA and also the French Space Agency and ended up doing a lot of actually super classified collaborative missile defense projects with the Russians. I don't know if this was during the Cold War just after where they were actually working together on missile defense so he knows the Russians pretty well so he tells the story one day. He's he's in he's in you'd is driving. He gets a call on his cell phone and he says this is an advance his book. This guy in a funny accent said I really need to talk to you. I am a billionaire. This Zealand by the way is not a billionaire. At this point I am going to start a space program. And Musk fairly refuses to give cantrell his cell phone number and musk made the call from his fax machine. And he's like starting to get paranoid about what this is going to entail to go. Try and Ryan missile. So must ask Cantrell to if there's an airport near where he is and if he could meet the next day and cal says my red flag started going off and then he's he's fearful that one of his enemies is trying to set him up he says okay. I can meet you at the Salt Lake City Airport but only behind security because he wants to make sure that these actually really smart. I mean these used to dealing with the Russians here just like it's a good if I ever won a super high security meeting like now I know how to do it. Don't go to an airport. It's probably pretty empty. These current ivars very private meeting so cantrell rinse out of conference room and the Delta Lounge at the Salt Lake City Airport. And they end up hitting off cancels. Like Oh okay. I'm in this guy's something but he's totally crazy and so he says he agrees he says. Okay I'll go back to Russia with you and I can. I think I can help you buy a rocket so at this point. Ilan's friends all basically try and stage intervention. They create like a compilation video of rockets blowing up. Peter they come up with all stories. Ben You're mentioning everybody. Who's lost all their money doing this. He goes forward but one of his best friends from college a day. Oh Resi who started the funded? Dot Com and Founder Institute is not great entrepreneurs in his own way. He says I'm GonNa come with you like he's like the friends must league nominated him to can keep tabs on your lawn so the of them cantrill. Ilan RESI and one other guy end up going to Russia and making a pilgrimage to try and do this the other guy who goes with them as Gandhi Mike Griffin who they get introduced to Mike.

Jim Cantrell Russia Mars Society musk NASA US Mars Lope La Salt Lake City Airport Soviet Union Ilan RESI Gandhi Mike Griffin JPL Jet Post Propulsion Ryan missile paypal Elon Silicon Valley Osas
"spacex" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"spacex" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Up a SpaceX falcon nine rocket is set to launch tonight carrying a communications satellite for Asia and the Pacific on Friday United launch alliance atlas five is scheduled for a test flight to take an unmanned capsule to the international space station George Amir as news ninety six point five W. D. BO although dense impeachment document came out a little after midnight the six hundred fifty eight page report from Jerry Nadler reports that president trump is a threat to the constitution and should be removed from office course president accused in the first article of abusing his presidential power by asking you crane to investigators twenty twenty rival Joe Biden while holding military aid as leverage and the second of obstructing congressional efforts to probe his actions more than thirty women accuse Harvey Weinstein of sexual assault or rape but white scene is defending himself in a new interview Harvey Weinstein says the notoriety brought by his supposed crimes shouldn't overshadow the work he's done for women in the industry in a new interview he tells the New York Post quote I feel like the forgotten man saying he made more movies directed by women and about women than other filmmakers and quote it all got a Vista rated because of what happened my work has been forgotten hallmark channel backtracks after pulling ads featuring a same sex couple kissing reporter Rachel sconces the channel reconsiders despite complaints from conservative groups you had people like Ellen DeGeneres tweeting that isn't an almost twenty twenty what do you think it company says he got it wrong apologize is reaching out to the wedding planning site solo to reinstate the ads all three of Florida's NFL teams were on the road Sunday James Winston put up four hundred and fifty eight yards and four touchdowns in the box thirty eight to seventeen win over the lions in Detroit the Jackson the raiders out of Oakland with the twenty sixteen lost the waiters moving on the Las Vegas next season meanwhile the dolphins continue their commitment to excellence losing thirty six to twenty Sunday in New York and what will likely be Eli manning's final game is a giant Doral movie news ninety six point five W. D. B. L. six forty nine eleven minutes away from seven o'clock now on our land does morning news the five day forecast brought to you by U. S. heating and air conditioning join up I meteorologist Brian shield Hey Brian good morning Joe we've got some warm weather to start the work week but cooler weather will be sliding in mid to late week so we have another front on the way lots of changes again for the week ahead sunny skies today gorgeous day highs around eighty two tonight we're down in the mid sixties with some patchy fog tomorrow we're still on the warm side of the front the work day eighty three on Tuesday late in the day tomorrow about a forty percent chance of scattered showers and storms tomorrow night the front moves by and then cooler on Wednesday highs in the mid sixties with a couple leftover showers Thursday were at sixty eight degrees Friday seventy three will be in the upper sixties in low seventies for the upcoming weekend from channel nine Eyewitness News I need all just Brian shield right now it is partly cloudy and cool fifty six Sattar Landau severe weather station six such Gerrity triple team traffic.

SpaceX
"spacex" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"spacex" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"Hello and welcome back to the Space News Pot the daily podcast about space science and tech. I'm your host will Walden on this episode mottaki about SPACEX now. You don't really really need to be a scientist or an engineer or have years and years and years of training in engineering field to get a job at spacex okay so spacex also has a lot of jobs interior to the company that help out other employees now one of these jobs what are these careers is a Barista. That's right a Barista. They want you to be able to whip up a mean. Cappuccino Chino in SPACEX headquarters also like to make a bunch of these are they want to make a bunch of mini restaurants little it'll cafes within SPACEX that can help the employees get through their day and if you're good at that kind of stuff you can apply spacex his website now here is the description of the Barista job so Brita space exploration technologies analogies is looking for experienced passionate driven team members to launch and grow world-class coffee bars inside our corporate facilities. We are searching thing for candidates who have superior experience working with Coffee Espresso and t the current positions are best suited for those with several years a Barista experience who who pose a WHO poses hands on knowledge of Espresso drink preparation coffee tasting in general coffee bar operations okay so I worked in a pretty big tech company back in the day a couple of years ago and I can tell you from firsthand experience agreeance that these many coffee bars and little restaurants and little cafes within the company are in Amazing Perk Doc for employees there also the workers in these spots got paid very well really really great benefits benefits and also it was just a great work environment so if you're a Barista or if you want to work in food service at SPACEX checkout third job listings and here's some of the responsibilities that you'd have as.

spacex SPACEX Walden Chino scientist engineer
"spacex" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"spacex" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"Hello and welcome back to the space news pod a daily podcast about space science and tech. I'm your host will walden ended in this episode. We're going to be talking about spacex his starlink said lake constellation in if you're not familiar with startling i talked about it a lot on this podcast before but i'm going to go over real quick starlink is spacex is satellite constellation that will be bringing being a high bandwidth low latency internet capabilities to rural areas in space x has already launched one small constellation of satellites that they were kind of doing a test it was the point nine tests version zero point nine test of all these satellites and lights to workout bugs and kind of fix all the problems that they need to fix in order to <hes> to move onto the next phase now <hes> <hes> now according to a suite of eight f._c._c. special temporary authority licenses that spacex has filed on august thirtieth they plan for as many as four additional starlink launches this year so they have four more launches planned for this year now they ran into a little bit of <hes> an issue with e satellite recently where the constellation and what are the satellites in the constellation was in the orbit of an isa.

spacex walden
"spacex" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

Main Engine Cut Off

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"spacex" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

"Debatable interesting and in that regard you know the the two big players that people think over spacex in one web knowing the way so that space i think x there typically was a wall street runs journal which article is let's that make everything name ourselves drop somebody is spacex there any who's do working we have any ideas with of on their if they're a going to go with their on own a units nanto ten or a if they're going but to i don't use recall you who know it was other people's off the flat top panels of my head or white that label is a them signature somehow space do we have any x idea thing they what they're do planning as much in as that they regard can in house this is a really complicated side of it so i i don't know how they would go about doing that you know not that it's impossible for them but this is something that you know even he's even as i start to say the statement i realized that you could save the same for rockets my first thought is like we'll people been trying to bill better rockets for decades and you know that was so difficult than space sixgame along so maybe the same thing we'll happen here where it'll be lennick oh people who've been trying for decades to create this breaks of you ground unit and then spacex will come along be like figured it out.

spacex