35 Burst results for "Spacesuits"

NASA's Orion Space Suit Equipped to Expect the Unexpected on Artemis Missions

Innovation Now

01:12 min | Last month

NASA's Orion Space Suit Equipped to Expect the Unexpected on Artemis Missions

"Nasr's orion spacecraft takes off astronauts inside will be wearing new improved high tech spacesuits. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind ideas that shave our future at several points. During artemis missions astronauts will wear a bright orange spacesuit called the orion crew survival system suit the suits have been re engineered to improve safety and range of motion and will be custom fit to each crewmember. Here's dustin gohmert project. Manager for nasr's orion crew survival systems these updated spacesuits contain a fire resistant outer layer and stronger zippers and restraints that allow crew members to up quickly and stay at pressure longer. Well a lighter stronger helmet will improve comfort and communications updated. Gloves and boots will be provided. These suits can even keep astronauts alive for up to six days if orion was to lose cabin pressure. They're also equipped with a suite of survival gear. That could be used if necessary after the astronauts return to earth and splashed down in the ocean. astronauts will wear the suit on launch day in emergency situations during high risk parts of missions near the moon and during the high speed return

Dustin Gohmert Nasr
Eurovision Song Contest 2021

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

02:01 min | Last month

Eurovision Song Contest 2021

"Our two hundred episode julie and i basically we watched eurovision. And we're gonna talk to you about it. And i cannot wait. We are going to break down. This is like those. And i didn't realize this was a thing either. I mean. I don't know why i didn't think so. But like there are tons of youtube accounts where people are like reacting to lithuanians song in eurovision. Twenty twenty one. Yeah yeah like the goggle box. Basically you in england. And we're you know we were over there. We would be flipping through the channel. Yahtzee like we're gonna have folks celebrity goggle box and we'd be like why are we going to and then we would. We would watch them watching the tv and be like what are we doing here. And just yeah yeah. It's very popular. It's extremely popular to watch other people. React to a thing that you're both watching. I mean i'm one hundred percent on board with it. Yeah so we're gonna do kind of do that for you guys. Only two weeks later and three years. Yeah through an audio medium. Yeah it'll be great. Yeah because especially we had so many people episode eighty was called no eurovision. all about eurovision. We had so many people who are like either. They had been your vision devotees for decades. Yeah contact us or people who are like. I didn't even know this was any. Yeah exactly and i think before that you and i might have been somewhere in between we might have been like. Oh yeah your vision where they wear like crazy costumes each year right like we always know some scandinavian countries going to show up wearing a mask and for and horns and something somebody will be in a spacesuit. Yes hang on stage together. I think that's probably where we were on that spectrum by certainly was not aware of how and this is like i mean how like american centric like north american centric and this is but i guess i didn't realize how huge it was. How huge like the music olympics. Yeah absolutely

Julie Youtube England Olympics
Mars rover studying materials for potential spacesuit

Innovation Now

01:15 min | 4 months ago

Mars rover studying materials for potential spacesuit

"As perseverance searches for rock samples on mars. It will also be studying samples of a different kind. This is innovation now bringing you. Stories of revolutionary ideas emerging technologies and the people behind the concepts that shape the future. Nasa is preparing to send the first woman and next man to the moon part of larger strategy to send the first astronaut to the surface of mars. But what does a well dressed astronaut. Wear to the red planet to answer that question. Nasa sent some special cargo to mars on the mars. Twenty twenty mission while the perseverance rover explores jezero crater five small pieces of spacesuit materials will be studied by sherlock an instrument aboard the rover. The materials include a small piece of a helmet visor and a swatch veteran. The material used for the poems astronaut gloves just as sherlock can check the composition of rocks the instrument will use its chemical analyzers to periodically monitor the breakdown of the material samples overtime. The results will help. Spacesuit designers create a suit that protects astronauts from long-term radiation exposure wild explore the dusty surface of

Nasa Sherlock
"spacesuits" Discussed on Something Who

Something Who

03:19 min | 5 months ago

"spacesuits" Discussed on Something Who

"That's all new. I think maybe it's the high water mark of that now. Is that the start of. This is the single most complicated season that martha does. Yeah when i was making a couple comments and notes about things that happened at the start of the story. And i was throwing food in my mind. I'm getting frustrated knowing how they become resolved or not and it took me a while to remember that not anything from the end of day the moon. That's from the end of whatever it is after. Let's kill hitler if it's not the end of that one. I can't even remember where they come back to that beach to resolve that stories. The very end of the season is it is. It's not the story with a tesla testimony that once because let's go hit as well as. Yeah yeah but isn't that isn't that that resolve heavy paradox on the beach introduced in. Let's go hit and then these things i still. The reading of rebels was the one with the husband's with river song. Possibly i am. you're right. The conclusion came to. I asked myself kind review the story because i need to review it knowing how that wraps up on the beach or i will review it based on how i remember it on the day abroad because i was incredibly frustrated watching it again knowing how it ties up but that's not to say that it doesn't stand alone if you don't know how the story and it's a valid way of looking at. It doesn't for different than i would say. Don't watch the wedding river song again because thank you doing. That is the most frustrating forty five minutes imaginable often. At least this has of being early in that story arc so a lot of quite watchable. Do you think that it was all plotted. From the moment of writing. That scene on the beach did steven moffat. No very good question elector because the thing that frustrated me most with the foreknowledge that i'm not supposed to have i i'm watching this episode year when he dies and they have the dialogue. Amy says maybe he's a clone or a duplicate and that is the signal to the audience that he is not a clone or jupette because that would be a breaking the rules of television signposting. And then you've got cancer new turns up and says he's definitely real that so you've got you've got double the emphasis on this is not fake. Whatever you're seeing is going to blow your mind because Is the author not gonna lie to you about. This is not a fake. it's not a duplicate. What you're seeing is all real which then presents the problem is too big it. What can you do without obviously and it put me in mind. funnily enough in both ways at the same time of avengers endgame. When when thanos kills loki spoiler seeing the highest grossing movie of all time and he says no resurrections this time and its does then a trust with the audience that he's not gonna just bring back one of.

Amy forty five minutes steven hitler single both ways martha loki double rebels couple comments river of
"spacesuits" Discussed on Something Who

Something Who

03:27 min | 5 months ago

"spacesuits" Discussed on Something Who

"The tone that he was the dialogue. He was coming up with soon to old-fashioned which is all because something's interesting about whitaker's he though he was there at the very beginning when dot who is very different very specific thing those first couple of years he did manage to keep up to date with the show. And listen till well this thing. You series five yeah. He moved forward different tone on power and again enemy the world the family of the world which is a similar mostly. Fm conspiracy mystery thriller. Might have made you think that some it wouldn't need something another stepping away from enemy to get to ambassadors. So i know exactly what he was doing wrong. And yes in between the done we win spurs which is about as well harder a harder edge. It's less jovial tone when he's writing it. Ironically i think terrance dicks. He writes her a lighter. More adventure based story and whitaker's tends to be these intricate mysteries. That don't always necessarily tie up at the end beautifully. I mean some oddities in an evil of the daleks have a similarly kind of convoluted that sort of hang together and partly unraveling you kind of move on. But his his work has that sort of stiffness that you'd think that was what they were pitching for especially in the season seven. Yeah yeah exactly so. It's strange i mean there's only a couple of things that i've seen about stuff that we know from whitaker's version and one of those was that reagan was the main villain throughout and sending the ambassadors out on bank robberies and raids was a heavier element towards the end of the story. That was more of that in episode six but from what let life seen broadly speaking. What makes it to screen was david. Whitaker's vision. I mean there's mine. Details like found out that he wrote in a space walk and in the end. It was to capsules doffing. You know. I mean if it's that kind of trivial stuff then then i don't understand also can't have been those details. That were the the issue. Personally it's interesting because it's malcolm hawk. It feels to me as going through two bit like a first draft of invasion of the dinosaurs. Yes you've got general. A politician amount scientists. You've even got that. Yeah i mean in the background. I was thinking that and then all kinds of head with the when doctor meets the three astronauts washing television. Who think they're on earth. But then you've been brainwashed. it's the same sort of gaga's in as the on. A spaceship and art is the inverse in the the set of invasion. So yeah and yet sort of lax. Totally lacks the lightness of touch. Even of a malcolm hulk. I think I'm going to get its own because you've got you've got the plot covered so i'm still trying to cover quite quite as show and moved on why they were sticking the hard edged thing when tear sticks his instinct and why it took him so long to turn the ship around and guess what we got in as night is the opposite of soft cuddly unit story from from later in the me. Run even the unit characters in the brigadiers. Certainly in this one..

Whitaker three astronauts five earth season seven one first couple of years terrance dicks first draft whitaker gaga dot two bit episode six david reagan things
"spacesuits" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:36 min | 8 months ago

"spacesuits" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"A Approachable by a lot of different engineering disciplines or or educational disciplines but for the design challenge specifically It is a software design challenge. And if you're building on Software for a specific augmented reality headset. Many of the popular ones are the microsoft tallin And the magically headset primarily students will develop their software in a game engine so when. You're developing augmented reality software. You're working in a engine and that game engine is called unity an- so honestly youtube has plenty of to to'real hs four Learning on how to develop in unity. it's pretty straightforward For the microsoft hololens microsoft has a suite of Helpful resources they have to oriels online. You can just google how to develop apps for the microsoft hollow lens and you'll just come across a huge user community We have some slack. Channels that we've Pointed with students towards That are just developed developer communities For the software design aspect of it. And there's also this other.

microsoft youtube google developer
"spacesuits" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

07:21 min | 8 months ago

"spacesuits" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"What have you And then the third thing is is understanding the suit system steak or two telemetry And similarly for for the suits design challenge We asked the students to execute procedures execute suit telemetry and then this other piece that we really want to explore and have academia pursue navigation And that's why navigation is a really big focus this year for for the challenge. So i'm trying to go back to the to the wifi example. Fair made i love. I love there's one so all the things that you would want on just at least some of the considerations right you said you're still trying to figure it out but but for the wifi example right. You're you're talking to your parents. And i'm saying i'm thinking you're doing it like over like a video call right so so the procedures that you're talking about would be step by step instructions on. Okay i you gotta you know. Unplug it then plug it back in or press a button. Whatever so that would all be part of the display is step by step instructions. Those are your procedures then the visual system right that camera. I love that idea. That that that they don't really have an idea of where that cameras pointing. But if you were showing them something on your phone you have instant feedback because you're seeing the view from the cam from the camera itself that visual system and all of these components would be would be something that's put into a An spacesuit right. These are all things that you that help you to tell your parents how to reset the the wi fi router but we take them for granted. Now imagine that in a space. That's kind of what where my brain is going here. Exactly yeah that that hits it on. This is how i have to think. Pair meet on the engineering types. Oh so but i have helped. I have helped of some folks with some wisdom. Wi fi routers brandon. The the suits challenge in general. Tell me about the challenge that we have right now. We know a pyramid already hinted towards towards this idea of navigation. What what are the students that are participating suits right now. What are they doing so right now. We we actually just finished receiving proposals from teams. And so we're in the process review of reviewing those proposals but we expect the students are currently in planning to attack the tasks that we put forward to them which which do include navigation tasks that pyramid mentioned in getting from point a. to point b. Getting back to the lander From some locations away from the lander identifying joe geological points of interest but also They're preparing for Communicating with other devices outside the suit so System state tasks like the the lander suit a poor interaction where they would Ingress egress from the airlock. They're going to Be able to manipulate some switches that will allow them to to know what they're sup- consumable status is as well as Interact with another Direct control unit device that will allow them to see changes through Through their Software that they're developing in a suit consumables We we also ask them to tackle the science sampling task as a part of this challenge where they may have a system that's able to interact with science tools. Maybe it's tool recognition We leave this fairly open for them. we give them some some broad general goals but we try not to be too prescriptive in what we're we're asking them to do because we want them to be very open and creative This is also a very collaborative challenge and so We encourage them to collaborate with the other teams to get garner ideas from each other and also to work with subject matter. Experts at at nasa to to help guide their creativity and innovation. We will be assigning mentors. Nasa mentors two teams that will have some contact with them throughout the coming months after the selection process is complete and we hope that that gives us students some nasa perspective as they design toward their Solutions at present Later this year in april So right now. I hope that they are planning. They're putting together their Schedule of of work with milestones Which is very important for this challenge. It's a lot of planning involved in meeting milestones in meeting those deadlines that that Allow a successful project come together ahead of their software design review that they will have Coming up in march And at that point they need to be ready to present the the work that they're doing and so planning right now is essential to success for these teams so brandon. We're getting a little bit of a snapshot here on the expectations of of the students. Sounds like there's there's a lot of planning on the forward end and then there's there's a presentation on the back end. So what are the expectations through the whole duration of the of the of this this program. You know what what's happening in this timeframe that from the time that they apply in the end they submit their proposals to the time that they're presenting The students participating in typically open our recruiting and open our proposal process in late august. We asked them to ask student teams to submit a letter of intent to us It's not an Exclusive does not exclude teams from giving us a proposal But it does give us an idea of how many teams are interested in the challenge and Lets us know if we should ramp up our promotion to to reach more teams But then in october Usually mid to late. October we have our proposals do And so students. can attend Two to three virtual sessions information sessions that we will host a we broadcast those out for anyone to attend And we Typically we'll have pyramid or someone from the technical team Represented to give more answers to technical questions that they may have so we help. Prepare them along the way for what they're creating We select our teams in late november early december this year. Our selection is taking place for a live selection show which will be hosted on November the seventeenth And recorded so..

nasa wi
"spacesuits" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:17 min | 8 months ago

"spacesuits" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"So take us through some of the challenges. Okay you have a space sudan. What are the challenges that are presented by wearing a spacesuit some of the considerations just just in general and then the considerations of the moon itself what you know now challenges of walking on another celestial body absolutely so i think one of the interesting fund bax about nasa is that we have the em youth. And i think it's a fun fact to say that it's one of a massive current oldest spacecrafts that we've been buying continuously But at based for one person the m u Older space do tha- that's a microgravity suit is entirely gas gas pressurized. So you're working against this gas. Pressurized volume physically. You're being loaded by this. Gas pressure is volume. And you're working against that. And so that becomes physically cumbersome and easy in itself is technically typically like eight hours or so and so You're physically working in that gas pressurized environment. Doing dexterity tasked with some bulkier. Gloves that have to be gas. Pressurized and It's it's a little bit difficult to articulate your fingers as well Cumbersome i think would be the better word and so physically it's a little bit tasking. You're also let's think about Let's think back to the ams repairs the al alpha magnetic spectrometer those e v as. That happened i think it was a series of four of them are so that was one of the most complex engineering systems that An actor i ever had to Fix and so you're also cognitively loaded so you are being tasked cognitively by by Having to do complex Engineering tasks what have you And so with the hugh and in that sense you're physically and cognitively loaded. Now what the xm you we do have There's a lot of improvements that have been made to the m you suit primarily because this is a surface we really want to the The bearings and the hip and shoulder movements to be A lot more seamless There's a hard upper torso in axiom. You so you are Mobility in the axiom. You with a little bit. Easier than traditionally the gas pressurized X. apollo sued and. Emu's suits with axiom. You in general. Mobility is going to be improved immensely but It will still..

sudan nasa Emu hugh
"spacesuits" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

10:31 min | 8 months ago

"spacesuits" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"We're having this back and forth With academia and expanding the research and development for visual displays for the purposes of eda and and looking at human performance and looking at all of these cross disciplinary fields. And so. that's i think the biggest value and And y i. I love working with suits. In general yeah broaden the Not just keep it to just space suits in general but just broaden the interest and awareness of this this concept maybe maybe get some more some more research just all across the board that can be implemented for not just basically before for other things. I absolutely love it with that. I want to go into suits itself. You know what. What is this this program of course. It's an acronym stands i spacesuit. User interface technologies for students brandon at a high level. What is necessary so nasty suits again. to kind of put this into perspective at a high level is a mission driven challenge for students to design and create spacesuit information displays in augmented reality environments So we asked them to create the software user interface and we give them some some tools in a virtual community We asked them to use off the shelf to Display the software that they ended up from that And it's really meant to provide solutions for the technical community which in this case paramedic is the interface for that Those solutions that come in and so we We want to produce these solutions. That's technical community can use with the student work so that is A nice description of essentially what you know what it is that that the that you're doing but to kind of get some background On just you know some what what. It's like to participate in suits brand some of the things that you've gone through in the past because this is not the first year that you've done suits. This is not this is not a new things you got a couple of years on your about yes. So in in the first year This kind of started as a a a meeting. Between the ev manager and our our director in office of external relations there was a conversation that took place about the need for For for future forward development that wasn't necessarily Ready to be worked by the technical community at nasa and our eternal relations director who's now The associate administrator for the office system engagement At nasa mr Mike kincaid Suggested that why. Don't we have students help out with this and students can do the work to create these concepts. It's going to benefit them as they're looking to develop their careers. But it's also going to benefit the nasa technical community because you start to get some concepts For what future work could Could do and what it could look like and also to understand what some of the pitfalls might be And and what what to avoid and so this conversation Began and i came on board at that time Ready to to head up an activity and was told. Hey check this out. If there's something you can Develop with this. We think it would be very successful. Collaboration and partnership between the va community and office of stem engagement at the office of education. And so we had our first challenge using a task board that was designed to mimic an astronaut's tasks at a fixed location during an eva or spacewalk For international space station and that analog was successful for a first year pilot So the second year we moved onto an actual ev task that involved a mockup at our space vehicle mockup facility at johnson space center and the students designed their software interfaces to Be able to repair the bearing ring. Bearing role module the broom Bearing motoring role model there And we then had them work with a design evaluator when they came on site for the onsite testing to train that design evaluator to use their use their their software designs and complete the tasks It it worked out very well. We had Some great feedback from those evaluators to the teams And as i said last year we moved more toward a focus on artemis missions where we had students developing solutions for Planetary e. v. As for for the moon and so it's been a very successful challenged. So far in the last three years again tying the technical technical community their problems. identified by the technical community and solutions then developed by the students. So you know this is We're talking about solutions here for a for a first spacesuit and i think it kind of begs the question of okay so solutions is just And i'm thinking what. What are the challenges here. And i think what's unique about this is Some of these the the one that we're in now at least the challenge now and pyramid. Correct me if i'm wrong here is we're talking about solving challenges for an astronaut that is walking on the moon. Is that right correct. So take us through some of the challenges. Okay you have a space sudan. What are the challenges that are presented by wearing a spacesuit some of the considerations just just in general and then the considerations of the moon itself what you know now now the challenges of walking on another celestial body absolutely so i think one of the interesting fund bax about nasa is that we have the em youth. And i think it's a fun fact to say that it's one of a massive current oldest spacecrafts that we've been buying continuously But the based for one person the m u Older space do tha- that's microgravity suit is entirely gas gas pressurized. So you're working against this gas. Pressurized volume physically. You're being loaded by this. Gas pressure is volume. And you're working against that. And so that becomes physically cumbersome and easy in itself is technically typically like eight hours or so and so You're physically working in that gas pressurized environment. Doing dexterity tasked with some bulkier. Gloves that have to be gas. Pressurized and It's it's a little bit difficult to articulate your fingers as well Cumbersome i think would be the better word and so physically it's a little bit tasking. You're also let's think about Let's think back to the ams repairs. The l alpha magnetic spectrometer those e v as. That happened i think it was a series of four of them are so that was one of the most complex engineering systems that An actor i ever had to Fix and so you're also cognitively loaded so you are being tasked cognitively by by Having to do complex Engineering tasks what have you And so with the hugh an in that sense you're physically and cognitively loaded. Now what the xm you we do have There's a lot of improvements that have been made to the m you suit primarily because this is a surface we really want to the The bearings and the hip and shoulder movements to be More seamless There's a hard upper torso in axiom. You so you are Mobility in the axiom. You with a little bit. Easier than traditionally the gas pressurized X. apollo sued and. Emu's suits with axiom. You in general. Mobility is going to be improved immensely but It will still. You'll still be working against that. Gas pressurized environment so physically and cognitively crew members are are quite tasks on during va now on the moon itself. we're going to this completely New environment Today on earth We typically have landmarks which tell us which Like you can say. Hey turn laugh at that. Mcdonald's and you'll get to regions bank or whatever and so But on the moon we don't have landmarks like that. So navigating knowing how far you way far away you are from from objects or knowing how deep crater is There's a lot of uncertainty there so on top of the physical and cognitive loading your environment in itself. is is quite uncertain because you don't have landmarks or this is an unpopulated area. You're going to completely new Region and your primary task is to explore and be really efficient in in in in navigating the space If you go through If you look at a geologist what what. Their primary goal is in a while. They're doing field. Study is to understand geography of that region. Very well.

nasa director johnson space center va sudan geologist Mcdonald Emu mr Mike kincaid associate administrator hugh
"spacesuits" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

03:53 min | 8 months ago

"spacesuits" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"A a meeting. Between the ev manager and our our director in office of external relations there was a conversation that took place about the need for For for future forward development that wasn't necessarily Ready to be worked by the technical community at nasa and our eternal relations director who's now The associate administrator for the office system engagement At nasa mr Mike kincaid Suggested that why. Don't we have students help out with this and students can do the work to create these concepts. It's going to benefit them as they're looking to develop their careers. But it's also going to benefit the nasa technical community because you start to get some concepts For what future work could Could do and what it could look like. And all the understand what some of the pitfalls might be And and what what to avoid and so this conversation Began and i came on board at that time Ready to to head up an activity and was told. Hey check this out. If there's something you can Develop with this. We think it would be very successful. Collaboration and partnership between the va community and office of stem engagement at the office of education. And so we had our first challenge using a task board that was designed to mimic an astronaut's tasks at a fixed location during an eva or spacewalk For international space station and that analog was successful for a first year pilot So the second year we moved onto an actual ev task that involved a mockup at our space vehicle mockup facility at johnson space center and the students designed their software interfaces to Be able to repair the bearing ring. Bearing role module the broom Bearing motoring role model there And we then had them work with a design evaluator when they came on site for the onsite testing to train that design evaluator to use their use their their software designs and complete the tasks It it worked out very well. We had Some great feedback from those evaluators to the teams And as i said last year we moved more toward a focus on artemis missions where we had students developing solutions for Planetary e. v. As for for the moon and so it's been a very successful challenged. So far in the last three years again tying the technical technical community their problems. identified by the technical community and solutions then developed by the students. So you know this is We're talking about solutions here for a for a first spacesuit and i think it kind of begs the question of okay so solutions is just And i'm thinking what. What are the challenges here. And i think what's unique about this is Some of these the the one that we're in now at least the challenge now and pyramid. Correct me if i'm wrong here is we're talking about solving challenges for an astronaut that is walking on the moon. Is that right.

nasa director mr Mike kincaid johnson space center associate administrator va
"spacesuits" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

07:41 min | 8 months ago

"spacesuits" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Brandon pyramid. Thanks so much for coming on. Houston we have a podcast today. Well thanks for having us. Yeah thanks for having us excited to be here. This is a really cool program. We have nasa suits. I'm excited to dive into it as a background. Really on what. This program is how you're contributing to the overall i guess spacesuit community Really cool stuff but like how. We have you both here because brandon. You're on the education side paramedic. You're the engineering side. I'm curious here about your backgrounds. And how this whole thing came together. How education and An engineering came in into this This one project here so brandon. And why don't we start with you. Tell us about yourself. And and what you do for nasa. So i'm a nasa education specialists in the office of engagement at johnson space center Manage suits challenge for students and it is a nationwide challenge that involves undergraduate and graduate students from institutions all over the united states and territories I have a bachelor's degree in middle grades education a master's degree in education administration and leadership. i'm also currently pursuing a phd and education learning design and technology at oklahoma state university. Which looking forward to completing in december of twenty two And i came to nasa in two thousand nine started at langley research center in. And i've been at johnson space center since two thousand fifteen Doing professional development workshops for educators and students programs and public engagement activities. And the last three going on four years. i've been A and p in That's an inter governmental personnel agreement And basically that just allows me to manage activities like nasa suits As an employee here at johnson space center. It's really excited about the activities that we're going to talk about. Today that that nasa suits is doing this year very cool brandon. And i love your whole background on education. You've really dedicated. A lot of your a lot of your academic life to to learning about educating students and And teaching them news things. I'm curious to hear your perspective on what you're passionate about. In terms of teaching them specifically about from the nasa perspective about stem science technology engineering math. And then even even human spaceflight some of the ways that those those two passions combined for you. Yeah what really started me on. This journey was i was teaching early on in nineteen ninety nine and early two thousands in middle grades. Science classrooms got involved with nasa professional development and and realizing that i can engage my students with nasa missions and that's a content in learning The subjects within the science classroom And at a much higher rate of engagement and the students were excited about it excited about learning And so then. When i came to nasa was basically sharing this this work with educators across the country and inspiring them to also consider using nasa content and missions in their in their lesson planning and unit planning and now with the suits activity being so focused on how we can have students contribute to technical solutions for nasa missions like arduous and going to the moon Starting in twenty twenty four the the idea is to one increase their Twenty first century skills Creativity communication collaboration And communiqu already say communication system We really want to increase those skills and give them all finnick experiences with technical problems. So this problem. Solving which is another first century skill In also integrating the knowledge that they're gaining from the courses they're taking it institutions and computer science but also human factors courses We've had students involved that are In kinesiology or involved were in more of Psychology backgrounds or marketing and so forth and graphics And and having all of these diverse backgrounds coming together to offer a solution that is Very diverse in nature but also provide some concepts that can help Our technical community as they're looking to the future of what they want The suits capabilities to be in. So all of that combined. I think provides a very rich experience for the students. It also gives them Material to produce new research and development a feel that is relatively new if we consider augmented reality head mounted displays. Only having been out for a few just a handful of years. Even though augmented reality may go back a couple of decades or so The work that they're doing is on the cutting edge. It's pushing the research and development in that field Not only to benefit our technical community at nasa and the work that we're doing but also the the stem community at large the Higher education academic institutions at large. They're creating new courses there Revising courses as a result of Suits content so we're just very excited about these opportunities that the suit students are having And being afforded as a as a result. I'm definitely looking forward to hearing more about this sues challenge because the augmented reality stuff i think is just so high tech and i'm trying to imagine myself as a student just being like what to do that. So that's going to be really cool to get into but your discussion on diverse background. I think that is a perfect way to lead into pyramid. pyramid on the technical side brandon. Just talked about his education background year. You're an engineer. Tell us about yourself and your work with nasa. Yeah so I have a background in aerospace engineering and undergrad and grad school I specifically I roll at johnston. I am in the avionics systems. Division Which is in the engineering directorate. And so with an avionics it's a lot of electrical engineers But also specifically. I'm in the human interface branch so my primary title. I'm a human interface engineer but i'm also a principal investigator The main project that i contribute to the extend you so as a lot of you may know Axiom you is the next generation that's going to the moon and my primary job on that suit is as the displays.

nasa Brandon pyramid brandon johnson space center Houston united states engineer oklahoma state university langley research center principal investigator
"spacesuits" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

05:55 min | 8 months ago

"spacesuits" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Brandon pyramid. Thanks so much for coming on. Houston we have a podcast today. Well thanks for having us. Yeah thanks for having us excited to be here. This is a really cool program. We have nasa suits. I'm excited to dive into it as a background. Really on what. This program is how you're contributing to the overall i guess spacesuit community Really cool stuff but like how. We have you both here because brandon. You're on the education side paramedic. You're on the engineering side. I'm curious here about your backgrounds. And how this whole thing came together. How education and An engineering came in into this This one project here so brandon. And why don't we start with you. Tell us about yourself. And and what you do for nasa. So i'm a nasa education specialists in the office of engagement at johnson space center Manage suits challenge for students and it is a nationwide challenge that involves undergraduate and graduate students from institutions all over the united states and territories I have a bachelor's degree in middle grades education a master's degree in education administration and leadership. i'm also currently pursuing a phd and education learning design and technology at oklahoma state university. Which looking forward to completing in december of twenty two And i came to nasa in two thousand nine started at langley research center in. And i've been at johnson space center since two thousand fifteen Started out doing professional development workshops for educators and students programs and public engagement activities. And the last three going on four years. I've been A and p in That's an inter governmental personnel agreement And basically that just allows me to manage activities like nasa suits As an employee here at johnson space center. It's really excited about the activities that we're going to talk about. Today that that nasa suits is doing this year very cool brandon. And i love your whole background on education. You've really dedicated. A lot of your a lot of your academic life.

nasa johnson space center Brandon pyramid brandon Houston langley research center oklahoma state university united states
NASA To Send A New Toilet To International Space Station

All Things Considered

03:34 min | 10 months ago

NASA To Send A New Toilet To International Space Station

"Be challenging. Even simple tasks here on Earth are much more difficult in orbit like going to the bathroom. But that's about to get a little easier, especially for the growing number of women. Astronauts from member station W. M. Fi, Brendan Byrne reports. NASA is sending a new toilet to the S. When it comes to building NASA's next toilet. Jim Fuller takes pride in his work. You know, when the astronauts have to go, we want to allow them to boldly go. Fuller is a project manager at Collins Aerospace, working on the $23 million contract with NASA on the agency's next generation, potty or a NASA speak the Universal Waste Management system. A new cosmic ca mod is smaller, lighter, more efficient and built with three d printed parts. So it can be fixed easily in space because the agency plans to send this toilet not only to the international space station but to the moon. And one day maybe Mars. To do that Engineers have to shrink down the system, says NASA's Melissa McKinlay. The space capsules are very small and use of the toilet area takes up a lot of space on a spacecraft and we want to get this is usable is possible, but minimize it where we can going to the bathroom in space is not easy and space toilets are complex Number two right here, show you, but you see, it's pretty small astronauts, Sonny Williams demonstrated how to use one when she Is on the in 2012 in space. You can't rely on gravity to move things where they need to go. Instead, a zero G toilet relies on fans and vacuums to pull material away from the astronauts and preferably from the rest of the crew to Williams says solids are directed into bags or been for disposal. So you have to have a pretty good aim. Can you be ready to make sure things get? Let go the right direction, and it smells a little bit so I'm closing it up. Liquid waste astronauts use a hose with a funnel attached to it well, that poses a challenge when female astronauts need to use the toilet for both functions, McKinley says. Due to the differences in male and female anatomy, women have issues aligning the urine collection funnel while also using the solid waste portion of the toilet. A new NASA designed better accommodates the female anatomy, which is important as more women. Astronauts travel to space. Well, it's that time retired astronaut Nicole Stott spent more than 100 days in orbit. I really like that they're going on with this way, because I think there's just in general, you know, understanding that there have been some challenges with. You know the toilets with their current design, but also that it says, Hey, we acknowledge that this demographic is part of the astronaut corps. Now it's kind of sad. The toilet to do that, right? NASA's issues with equipment for women is no secret. A historic all female spacewalk was delayed last year when the agency didn't have the correct sized space suits. NASA will take the toilet design changes and apply them to the development of other new tack like spacesuits to focus on anatomical differences. I think it's telling that that's just becoming As part of the initial design for what we want to do, and you know if we go further and further from a planet that would want to consider all of our crew mates in the way we design things, If all goes as planned. The new toilet will be installed later this month, and NASA is asking the astronauts to give it all they've got to stress test the system. For NPR News. I'm Brendan Byrne in Orlando.

Nasa Brendan Byrne Jim Fuller Melissa Mckinlay Sonny Williams Nicole Stott Npr News W. M. Fi Astronaut Corps Collins Aerospace Mckinley Project Manager Orlando
How will we fix climate change?

Tai Asks Why

06:26 min | 11 months ago

How will we fix climate change?

"Now. When we were born climate change is already kind of a big thing and that's because our parents and just people of the previous generation started building the factories in releasing these greenhouse gas into the like that Kinda take you off that they're just. GonNa leave you this like dying planet. Does that like annoy at all? I think it does these are my friends are just wanted to ask them if they're also super terrified about climate change I mean it's up to us for some reason to fix our planet in just to fix what all our ancestors have wrought upon us. Okay. So yeah, we're on the same page. It just feels like we're all just kinda like stock on this. Sinking boat is the planet's heating up with no way to stop it maybe we need to dislike travel to Mars or something. There are no planets in our solar system where human being could just get off the ship and walk around and live. This is Tony Del Genio and I am a scientist for NASA. BREAKING NASA I do research on Earth's climate and how the Earth's climate is changing because of the stuff that people are putting into the atmosphere and do research on other planets in the solar system I've been involved in a few NASA. Space missions to other planets. Awesome. People on Earth may decide to try to colonize Mars, but it's going to be a big challenge to do it because there are a lot of roadblocks to actually making it a place where people could live. Moore's is an extremely cold planet much colder than human beings can tolerate and it's air is very thin. It's less than one percent as thick as our atmosphere is and it's not made of nitrogen oxygen. The things that we breathe it's made mostly of carbon dioxide and so human beings couldn't breathe it. If you walked around without a spacesuit, you'd immediately died. Seems like impending doom. So I. Guess we're kind of stuck on earth. But you know Tony says a might actually not be the worst. Global warming is not going to kill off everyone. It's going to make it harder to grow crops. It's going to create more heatwaves it's going to. Make it hard for people to live near the coast because of rising sea levels and so you have to find ways to adapt to climate change. I had this idea since I was really little like six about my way to fix global warming and it's ridiculous but like when I was six. I want to share this with. NASA have to see my idea. It's basically like a giant, a C units like the AC unit in my home, but it gets power off collecting the heat in the atmosphere and then use that to create steam the turns things we create like a sustainable environment with just like a whole bunch of these massive AC unit just littered around the globe because the hotter it got the more power, get new return on faster than would stabilize, and then the A. C. would slow down. And I know it's ridiculous. It was just this funny idea of wanted to talk to someone at NASA for for years. So while the trick is you'd have to find a way to make these massive AC's without creating even more heat right because what an AC does is it takes heat out of one place but. Pushes it someplace else? So around so that's always the problem with you can move it, but it's hard to get rid of it entirely. But just for good record I was six. But yet like you know that's good idea for six maybe we could like grab the coldness from space we can just be like. He'd outlets. Let's just throw it out. Yeah. Well, you know there are a lot of people who have. About how to offset the heating that we're already causing one of the problems with any idea for Geo engineering is that the earth is pretty complicated place and something that you do in one place has an effect someplace else. We're not smart enough yet to think five steps ahead and understand what all of the unintended consequences of one idea or another might be. Still what most people would say is you're better off not putting so much carbon dioxide into the atmosphere in the first place. But like. Are you hopeful about the future? I am hopeful about the future you know we're not going to kill off all the life on earth. All we have to do is some time in the relatively near future. We just have to make decisions to limit the amount of greenhouse gases that we put into the atmosphere, and there's still time for us to do that. I believe that as people start to see in their own lives, the evidence of climate change that some point we'll reach a tipping point in public opinion where people will say you know what? We really do have to do something about this. You can't afford to be pessimistic. We can't believe that we're doomed. If we all feel that we're doomed than we've lost already. I think especially, if you're young, you are the most important people really because. You're the ones that will be running the countries in the world, and you have to maintain optimism than not believe in you have to believe that the problems are serious but you have to also believe that there are solutions to the problems and it's just a matter of getting people to believe that it's time to start doing the right thing.

Nasa Tony Del Genio Moore Geo Engineering Scientist
How will we fix climate change?

Tai Asks Why

05:45 min | 11 months ago

How will we fix climate change?

"Now. When we were born climate change is already kind of a big thing and that's because our parents and just people of the previous generation started building the factories in releasing these greenhouse gas into the like that Kinda take you off that they're just. GonNa leave you this like dying planet. Does that like annoy at all? I think it does these are my friends are just wanted to ask them if they're also super terrified about climate change I mean it's up to us for some reason to fix our planet in just to fix what all our ancestors have wrought upon us. Okay. So yeah, we're on the same page. It just feels like we're all just kinda like stock on this. Sinking boat is the planet's heating up with no way to stop it maybe we need to dislike travel to Mars or something. There are no planets in our solar system where human being could just get off the ship and walk around and live. This is Tony Del Genio and I am a scientist for NASA. BREAKING NASA I do research on Earth's climate and how the Earth's climate is changing because of the stuff that people are putting into the atmosphere and do research on other planets in the solar system I've been involved in a few NASA. Space missions to other planets. Awesome. People on Earth may decide to try to colonize Mars, but it's going to be a big challenge to do it because there are a lot of roadblocks to actually making it a place where people could live. Moore's is an extremely cold planet much colder than human beings can tolerate and it's air is very thin. It's less than one percent as thick as our atmosphere is and it's not made of nitrogen oxygen. The things that we breathe it's made mostly of carbon dioxide and so human beings couldn't breathe it. If you walked around without a spacesuit, you'd immediately died. Seems like impending doom. So I. Guess we're kind of stuck on earth. But you know Tony says a might actually not be the worst. Global warming is not going to kill off everyone. It's going to make it harder to grow crops. It's going to create more heatwaves it's going to. Make it hard for people to live near the coast because of rising sea levels and so you have to find ways to adapt to climate change. I had this idea since I was really little like six about my way to fix global warming and it's ridiculous but like when I was six. I want to share this with. NASA have to see my idea. It's basically like a giant, a C units like the AC unit in my home, but it gets power off collecting the heat in the atmosphere and then use that to create steam the turns things we create like a sustainable environment with just like a whole bunch of these massive AC unit just littered around the globe because the hotter it got the more power, get new return on faster than would stabilize, and then the A. C. would slow down. And I know it's ridiculous. It was just this funny idea of wanted to talk to someone at NASA for for years. So while the trick is you'd have to find a way to make these massive AC's without creating even more heat right because what an AC does is it takes heat out of one place but. Pushes it someplace else? So around so that's always the problem with you can move it, but it's hard to get rid of it entirely. But just for good record I was six. But yet like you know that's good idea for six maybe we could like grab the coldness from space we can just be like. He'd outlets. Let's just throw it out. Yeah. Well, you know there are a lot of people who have. About how to offset the heating that we're already causing one of the problems with any idea for Geo engineering is that the earth is pretty complicated place and something that you do in one place has an effect someplace else. We're not smart enough yet to think five steps ahead and understand what all of the unintended consequences of one idea or another might be. Still what most people would say is you're better off not putting so much carbon dioxide into the atmosphere in the first place. But like. Are you hopeful about the future? I am hopeful about the future you know we're not going to kill off all the life on earth. All we have to do is some time in the relatively near future. We just have to make decisions to limit the amount of greenhouse gases that we put into the atmosphere, and there's still time for us to do that. I believe that as people start to see in their own lives, the evidence of climate change that some point we'll reach a tipping point in public opinion where people will say you know what? We really do have to do something about this.

Nasa Tony Del Genio Moore Scientist Geo Engineering
Unpacking Everything Samsung! (With TK Bay)

Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

03:20 min | 1 year ago

Unpacking Everything Samsung! (With TK Bay)

"Little bit of time that you did have with the no twenty five when we were at Arboretum. Thoughts. Did you have like how do you feel about this phone in general and then I want to ask you about the no twenty ultra then go regular. Tell me what? Would the alter the first thing? So why it my first thing when when I when I held it in in my hand, I have to say that I was surprised that it's actually physically bigger than actually bigger Dan the s twenty altered because my understanding is that the same that boasts six point nine inches they're not different in size, but the dimensions of physical dimensions on the device. They're a little bit bigger the the touch response. The the handling is pretty good once you put a case on at the hunt little thing on the back that was a little bit not. Not as much of an issue. It's a nice inker though I say. We have the same problem on the s twenty alter the ultra has as its. Literally leaning on my finger right now like this. You can hang it's like an angle there. You I seem pretty good the the SPN functionally I found that was really cool that the fact that they decided to take out the gestures although not not everything worked in the way that we think about it You know cameras seems pretty good and I, and I listened to some of the footage that was able to get back from the from the phone. The microphones are actually pretty good like for yours and me talking to the you know the talking head on the on the camera Oh has actually had and listened to those clips yet. Okay Yay no I. Was surprised on the microphone site because I I typically like I think they made a point of mentioning the microphones. Samson's always had this feature where they have microphones zoom function built into their camera where if you zoom in with the camera zooms the microphone Alongside that. So it's basically focusing the audio So initial aggressive, it actually is pretty good I I have to say. The one thing that sold me though. which was something you did. was that focus pull. The when when you did that focusing level and how fast that that camera was focusing with a one hundred and eight megapixel sensor that's I. Mean we don't have the time time flight space spacesuit that's just separate. I'm just talking just focusing issues that I think the twenty ultra had ever since the beginning they've been trying to fix it. That sold me. That's what saved me on on the idea love that and it's It's it's crazy and I think I made the I think I made the point while we were like messing around with the focus like this is like cannon level dual pixel stuff like it's really nice. It's crazy. It's crazy and is sharp and it does it's so quick and but that's the that's the level of professionalism. That you want. This is what we expect it out of the s twenty and I think it's like I use this as a daily. This is my main device that I have my own personal stuff on and I switched around my secondary line to all of my devices that I when I'm reviewing them because you know it just goes to the headache of reconfiguring banking, APPs and all of that stuff those. So at the end of the day when I saw that. Yes I can see that device becoming my main phone. This is this is something that works for me the Espen functionalities I love because of the documents signing like. I not obviously not everybody does but if you ever have to have signed contracts ever have to sign documents statements or anything like that on a phone. the ESPN just does it right? It has at Bilton its native into it. You can open it sign and send signed PDF's right away

Samson
Astronauts work through practice countdown

World News Tonight with David Muir

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Astronauts work through practice countdown

"Tonight. America's closer to making space history NASA completing dress rehearsal for the launch of the SPACEX Falcon on Wednesday but because of the corona virus pandemic. There were a few extra steps added to the astronauts countdown checklist tonight. The first steps in launch America astronauts Bob Bankin and Doug early in those new spacesuits symbolic of the new era in space travel the partnership between NASA and Elon Musk's spacex on full display as the astronauts were transported in Tesla's for this final dress rehearsal before Wednesday's launch the

Spacex Nasa America Elon Musk Tesla Bob Bankin Doug
Could We Be Entering an Era of Commercialized Space Exploration?

BrainStuff

05:16 min | 1 year ago

Could We Be Entering an Era of Commercialized Space Exploration?

"I S A great deal to Nasr's defunct Space Shuttle Program Green Lit by then president Richard M Nixon in nineteen seventy two. This initiative gave the world its first reusable spacecraft from nineteen eighty one to two thousand eleven NASA astronauts into orbit on American made shuttles. These were often used to transport portions of the ISS during its construction on July Twenty first twenty eleven. The space shuttle. Eric came to an end. As the Atlanta's orbiter returned from its final mission with the program just continued. I S bound astronauts grew dependent on Russian Soyuz rockets. Then the law of Supply and demand took over for nearly a decade. No other rockets were capable of sending people to the ISS. All astronauts bound for that station had to be launched out of Kazakhstan Baikonour cosmodrome which is spaceport least to the Russian government and by April of two thousand twenty. The Russians were charging eighty six million dollars to include foreign astronauts in their Soyuz missions. Another Soyuz rocket launch is scheduled for October. And Breitenstein says NASA is currently negotiations to book a seat. Nevertheless it's hoped that the SPACEX x crew dragon will end the spaceflight monopoly. Rydin Stein explained. We want the russian-american relationship in space exploration to remain strong. We see a day. When Russian cosmonauts can launch on American rockets American astronauts can launch on Russian rockets by now space x the International Space Station? Have a fair bit of history. Using unmanned crafts the company has delivered supplies to the orbiting laboratory since two thousand twelve. The crew dragon aced dress rehearsal and March of two thousand nineteen when it left. Merritt island on the nose of a spacex Falcon nine rocket and autonomously docked with the International Space Station. Five days after its departure the crew track and returned to Earth splashing down in the Atlantic Ocean. Some one hundred and forty three miles or two hundred thirty kilometers a Florida's eastern coastline. But that trip only passengers were in earth shaped plush toy and a dummy named Ripley AB- named after Sigourney Weaver's character Ellen Ripley from the alien movie franchise a flight later. This month will be the first time that live. Astronauts will be on board space x crew mission director. Benjamin Reed said at the May First Conference Dragon will be fully autonomous. Expectation is that can carry the crew safely to the station and bring them home without direct intervention even so hurley and Bankin are set to take control for a short period before the crew dragon. Docs they'll be able to guide the vessel using touch screens or physical switches. Both options are available for certain portions of the journey while aboard cruise expected to test out such components as the maneuvering thrusters and in my own. Mental Control System. And then there's the spacesuits one piece outfits designed by SPACEX to supply the astronauts with oxygen provide the appropriate temperature and maintain pressure spacesuits plug into the crew dragons chairs when their wares. Sit down read. Said suits also have an integrated communication system so that the crew can communicate through their helmets. Neither Bank nor Hurley are strangers to low earth orbit. Lincoln's logged more than seven hundred eight hours in space and Hurley a member of NASA's last shuttle era crew back in two thousand eleven but every mission presents its own unique challenges like the rest of the world NASA space x and these two astronauts had to make adjustments during the krona virus taking extra precautions. So what does that mean? Both SPACEX and NASA have implemented social distancing protocols like keeping work desk six feet or two meters apart at their respective control rooms. Meanwhile the cruise getting a wide. Berth contact with them by any other team. Members has been minimized and many training sessions have been done. Virtually and the safety of is S. crew the astronauts will observe a preflight quarantine for May sixteenth until the launch on May twenty seventh. Right now. There are three space fares two Americans and a Russian living and working aboard the International Space Station. The length of Benjamin's and Harley stay at the facility will be determined at a later date it could last anywhere from five to thirty days when the time to head home arrives the crew tracking should undock Disley and deliver. Its human charges to Florida by way of the Atlantic. There's a long proud tradition of civilians gathering near the Kennedy Space Center to witness rocket launches. Unfortunately NASA is discouraging people from following suit this time lest they spread or contract Cova nineteen. But you can tune in and watch launch online for just the fifth time in history NASA astronauts will be test flying a new type of spacecraft should bankin an early complete their mission objectives. We may yet see a golden age of space tourism and innovation with private industry taking on development roles long adopted by governments Breitenstein. Said this really is the next major step. In commercializing low earth orbit and having a really vital low earth orbit economy in which NASA is one of many customers.

Nasa Spacex International Space Station ISS Kennedy Space Center Hurley Florida Benjamin Reed Russian Government Richard M Nixon Kazakhstan Nasr Atlantic Ocean Eric Atlanta Rydin Stein President Trump Merritt Island
The First Spacewalk - March 18, 1965

This Day in History Class

03:18 min | 1 year ago

The First Spacewalk - March 18, 1965

"Hi Everyone I'm eaves and you're listening to this day in History Class. A podcast where we build the time machine and all you have to do is hop. Today IS MARCH. Eighteenth Twenty twenty. The day was March. Eighteenth nineteen sixty five so viet cosmonaut. Alexey Leonov became the first person to go. On a spacewalk spacewalk is one in astronaut leaves their spacecraft to a tether it's called EDA which stands for extra vehicular activity. Alexi Leonov served as a fighter pilot in the nineteen fifties by nine hundred sixty. He had been chosen as one of the first twenty cosmonauts for the Soviet space program and was training to take his first spaceflight. The Soviet Union launched the first person to space when Yuri Gagarin's made an orbital flight. And His boss doc wine spacecraft in nineteen sixty one the. Soviet program launched is first mission on October twelfth. Nineteen sixty four. Both hide one was the first to carry more than one crew person into space. It was also the first mission to carry an engineer and a physician into space hot. Too launched just months later on March eighteenth nineteen sixty five it carried to people commander Pal Bouillon and pilot Alexi. Leonov it was Leonov's first spaceflight and billiards first and only spaceflight the hard three K. D. space craft had an extendable airlock that allowed enough to go out into space without having to evacuate the main cabin air about an hour and a half after lines billions of open the outer airlock and Leonov walked out into space. Attached to tether his spacewalk lasted for about twelve minutes. A camera mounted on the airlock recorded the spacewalk. It was reported that Leonov's body temperature jumped about three point two degrees Fahrenheit or one point eight degrees Celsius twenty minutes and he was close to having a heat stroke. His spacesuit was full of sway. Though the spacewalk went relatively smoothly Leonov had difficulty reentering. The capsule the pressure difference between the air and his spacesuit and the vacuum of space expanded and stiffened his spacesuit that made it to big heart to fit back into the airlock so Leonov opened a valve to release oxygen and depressurize his suit. He was then able to fit back into the space craft but he did start to feel some of the effects of decompression thickness namely the sensation of pens and needles. The crew. Hit another snag when objecting inflatable airlock. Which sent the spacecraft into a Spin? Oxygen levels also began to climb which came with the risk of explosion. On top of this the automatic guidance system for re entry malfunctioned. They had to turn off the automatic landing program and instead conduct re entry and landing manually. The ended up off course and the orbital module did not separate from the landing module. They landed in snow in a forest in Siberia. The

Alexey Leonov Eighteenth Twenty Twenty Soviet Union Yuri Gagarin History Class Billiards Engineer Alexi Pal Bouillon Commander
Coronavirus Outbreak: How Scared Should You Be?

Science Vs

10:35 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus Outbreak: How Scared Should You Be?

"New virus infecting infecting people in China with the number of cases. Going up and up there are nearly three hundred confirmed cases eight hundred thirty convert cases. This is now heading towards three thousand more than forty five hundred have been infected. China has gone into full blown crisis mode building new hospitals closing schools and shutting shutting down transport between cities effectively putting millions of people on the lock down. The country has quarantined multiple cities. The streets are deserted. Shops shops are shut. It is cut off from the rest of the world but still their cases showing up around the world cases confirmed in Japan South Korea and Thailand in Europe Australia to the United States right now though. The vast majority of infected people are in China as of January thirtieth. That's today Chinese. As officials have reported almost ten thousand confirmed cases and more than two hundred people have died. The head of the World Health Organization has just raised the alert level. I'm declaring a public emergency of international concerned today on the show we're going to ground zero talk to a doctor in China who's treating patients now. We'll also talk to researches who tracing this virus back to its source and trying to figure out how bad this whole thing might might get a few months ago we didn't episode about a fictionalized pandemic with things got pretty bad will be anything like that and finally we will hear from the man who is advising the president about this outbreak. We have only five minutes Wendy five minutes without the president in the room. Well I can't tell you it was to stop let's head to Ground Zero Wuhan the CD in China where this virus broke out. She'll join us on condition. Luckily she is a doctor in John. Non Hospital at Ruhan University and he's seen the outbreak growth from its earliest days. Normally only works in the allergy department early in January. He got a call from his boss. Saying y'all needed elsewhere. Judicial Israel should sound law on January. Third I got a phone call from the director of our department. He said the medical services team had told us to send help to stop the virus spreading at the the time. I had no idea what I was going to get involved with that night. I was actually pretty nervous mainly because I had no idea what I was getting myself into or what I can do to help or where I'll be sent to help to shoot. Jesus in the next day he went to the hospital and because the people that were so worried about how dangerous this disease could be. Dr Way had to bundle himself into what he calls. It's a full body. Antivirus suit basically looks like a spacesuit time quoted with his hat and they'll be covered from head to toe in an antivirus suit and there's zipper which also had the Hoodie on top. Finally finishing up with an oral mask and face masks cover my whole face. His shift at the hospital was pretty calm. But then in mid-january mid-january things to Catan. It's winter over there and Dr Kway remembers that it was really cold outside and infected people will lining up at the hospital. Some some were really sick and they didn't have enough beds at the hospital that most of the patients were seated or waiting outside of the hallway standing. I felt overwhelmed and stress. Since I couldn't take care of many patients immediately. Your the disease that's infecting. People is a kind of virus cold corona virus. It's it's a family of related viruses and not all of them deadly in fact according to the CDC most people have been infected with a corona virus at some point in their lives. They typically give you just like a runny nose or a cough mild symptoms but this virus. It's new science. Didn't know no about it before for now. Scientists are calling it twenty nineteen and CR V. The novel Corona Virus and. Yeah some of the patients that's infected. They are also experiencing pretty mild symptoms but the patients that Dr Gray is saying they have high fevers some have chest and and muscle pain some have difficulty breathing. Dr kway remembers a patient that he sold one nice. Remember a more severe case Wanna made a huge impression. Russian on me was one case from before Chinese New Year around January fifteenth or sixteenth. I was working day shift. This patient was very fragile and she came in carried by her family to the hospital. She had so little spirit left in her that she couldn't even lift her head of she just seemed very fragile Schiro. She was sent to emergency care and he thinks she survived. But he's not shaw over Japan over me were totally unaware of the seriousness in time. And how many people would be infected Julia. The few currently the fatality rate of the virus is estimated to be between two full percent that means some to in every hundred people who get infected and get treatment. It meant a dying that doesn't mean that two percent of those who are infected. We'll die because that number doesn't include people who get sick have a bit of a cough. Maybe feel lousy but don't seek treatment this is all unfolding in real time though and there's still a lot we don't know so leaving the hospital next question. Where did this virus come from? There's a lot of reports beginning at two a wet market in Wuhan a place place where they sell seafood alongside porcupines foxes and snakes and other animals but then it became clear that some of the earliest patients never never been to that market. Leaving the question. Where did this virus come from? And just how long has it been infecting people for well. Really Elliott outright Chinese researchers worked out the genetic code of the Corona virus and they uploaded into an international database. They keep adding samples samples from other patients so now scientists in China and all over the world using these sequences to unravel where the virus came from and when it first emerged and one of the first things they did was to compare this viruses genetic code with other nasty viruses ones that we already know about and Bam. They found something. This virus was really similar to a virus found in bats. So we think that's bats. That's Christian Anderson. The Director of Infectious Disease Genomics at Scripps Research Institute. He's one of the scientists who's been researching the origins of this virus. The Bats Poli. Oh you don't get sick from this virus rights of the virus gets to infect pets and just sort of hang out there so this virus is hanging out in bats maybe for a while how. How did it jumped to humans? Well it might not have been a director like with SAWS which was another corona virus that emerged in two thousand and two and killed around around nine hundred people. Well that disease started in bats as well but it had what's called an intermediate host a middle animal that infected I Christian talk to produce a Marylebone about it. We know from sauce for example that there was an intermediate host as it's called recieve. It's what's a what's a sieve of it I think it's like a cat like googling it now. Oh it is yeah. It's kind of like a cat very long spotted cat it's pretty cute actual relate and okay cool. Yes so we think something similar probably happened with this corona virus to write for this virus if there was an intermediate host. We don't know what it was. An early paper suggested it might have been snakes but Christian doesn't think that's right. We also don't know how this virus arrest got from one of those animals in us. The state really don't know it's possible to animals simply just there and you know droppings or whatever around the animals people could get into contact with that. They could be traded in the market. They could be consumed for food but Christian told us that it's not surprising surprising that this happened when you have animals including humans living next to each of them. A virus has a lot of chances of leaping from one creature to announce how it happened with the ball. Love bird-flu even the bubonic plague. Okay so next question. When did this virus make make the jump? There's this idea out there that the virus has been around for awhile simmering away infecting people before the word got out Is that true well. He's how scientists like Christian finding out. First they take all those samples of the viruses from different patients. The ones that have been uploaded to the database and they compare them to each other now. And what you're going to see because viruses changed slightly over. What time is that? You're going to see that the viruses are going to be slightly different between different. Patients is a virus. Mutating all the time. It's not necessarily early dangerous mutations sometimes that just changing so the idea is that if a virus has been around for a while it will have accumulated lots of different tweaks thanks to its genetic card. There'd be lots of versions of it out there but if the virus is really knew it would look pretty much the same in every patient. Who who has it? And that's what Christian found him. He looked at the genetic code of the virus found in twenty seven patients and they were all really Sima camelot's other research has found the same thing so this means that this virus it's probably emerged really recently. Oh and what we can show is that it happens somewhere around mid November to early December based on this early research. It looks like this virus was first born on maybe in November China told the World Health Organization about it on December thirty first so this idea that the disease was simmering hiring away for ages before we knew about it Christian says now based on the genetic data we can show that. That's not what was going on. It really was a picked up very very rapidly after the break. How contagious is this new virus and if someone is infected what should you you do?

China Christian Anderson World Health Organization Director Dr Kway Japan Cough Europe Bats Poli President Trump Australia Dr Way Ruhan University Dr Gray Wendy Wuhan
Orion Suits

Innovation Now

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Orion Suits

"Are hours away from launching on Artemis missions to the moon they'll put on brightly colored orange spacesuits called the Orion crew survival system suit drying on six decades of spaceflight experience NASA has re-engineered the suit worn on the space shuttle to

Nasa
Space Tourism Is Here—Would You Want To Be On Board?

Travel Genius

02:17 min | 1 year ago

Space Tourism Is Here—Would You Want To Be On Board?

"Galactic announced that it'll be sending its first customers space next year after so many years of hyping this up and it's going to cost what two hundred and fifty thousand dollars per ticket. I must admit. I think people who already gone and just not talked about it. It's been going on silo. This has been the never ending story literally but okay two hundred and fifty thousand dollars per ticket a quarter of a million dollars. You don't get a hotel suite. You gotta spacesuit and it's this was kind of the story of a few months ago it's being designed by under armor it's got all of these different considerations built into it. You got a whole lot of training the ultimate bragging rights as soon as you book your ticket. Of course we have no idea. Who's going but rumored astronauts and waiting include. Theoretically angelina jolie. Tom hanks and yes victoria. Principal aka pam from the original series of dallas. How is she one of the first passengers. Good for her good for her is right. Those dallas residuals must be pretty pretty good. Who would have thought well. These people currently have pretty good company in real life travelers. Like you and i according to the app trip scout which is a really good travel community by the way. It's a fun one. They've pulled several thousand members to see what people think about going to space. And it's a mixed bag but there is surprisingly positive feedback. So what what did they say. Because i'm i'm really on the fence. I know i don't have the desire brazenly eighty four percent of the polls travelers at least registered an interest in visiting space. All right but there was a caveat. They said they don't wanna be pioneers. They don't wanna be on the first wife. Eighty two percent of travelers said. They would only go once they felt. It was safe enough and meaning once virgin. Galactic hit a thousand flights that was their critical thresholds. Twenty nine thousand nine. Who knows right. Twenty three percent. Were okay with at once. Richard branson himself went up and came back safely. Which was you know a different threshold for safety. I don't know what do you think mark. I'm totally with the eighty. Two percents. yeah i do. This is one of those moments where. I don't want to be an early adopter now. I'm very happy not to be the center. I stream space but also to stay alive.

Yes Victoria Aka Pam Galactic Dallas Tom Hanks Angelina Jolie Richard Branson Mark
The 5 Best Podcasts for Kids

Feedback with EarBuds

02:48 min | 1 year ago

The 5 Best Podcasts for Kids

"I'm Maggie McGuire. CEO of Penna the first and only audio on demand service for kids three to twelve. The theme. I chose is best podcasts for kids I chose this theme because it Pinna were passionate about. Oh kids audio we call it. Imagination lead entertainment. Here's my list of top PODCASTS. For kids that spark imagination and are fun entertaining and educational. So here are the podcast and episodes chosen by Maggie. Monday's episode comes from Story Pirates and is called glory and the friend adventure slashed the big chance chance featuring Jeremy Sisto. It's thirty seven minutes long. If you are a fan of sketch comedy and musicals then this podcast brings both together in half hour episodes so that are silly wacky filled with music and always surprising. A big bonus. Is that the ideas for each episode written by kids who submit them to the story pirates in the hopes of seeing their stories brought to life by troupe of professional actors storytellers and Comedians. Tuesday's episode comes from brains on and is called the secrets of the spectacular spacesuit. It's thirty seven minutes long. This is a must-listen podcast for curious. Kits every episode delves into why. And how how things work where things come from. And so much more the topics are wide ranging which makes it great for any kid they can learn. How elevators work to the design ideas behind roller coasters in why some of US feel sick when we're writing on them and on and on Wednesday's episode comes from mother-tongue with Serene and is called Italian Elian? It's a quick seven minutes long. This podcast takes listeners. Around the world to learn new words in new languages listeners will learn about culture music food and language and are encouraged to respond to Serena calls to sing speak and repeat throughout the episode Thursday's episode comes from Hero Hotel and is called called the side King. It's twenty four minutes long in this fiction comedy adventure podcast listeners. Meet Chet Zabriskie who works at his grandmother. Z's hotel for superheroes superheroes when trash monsters Glam rock singers and static electric villains invade the hotel all while the heroes are on vacation unwilling to lift a finger. It's is up to chat and his superpower cat boomer to save the day Friday's episode comes from the BBC's animal sounds Affari and is called the luckiest cat in the world world. It's eighteen minutes long. This podcast is delightful and chock full of animal facts along with some weird wacky and slightly gross facts listeners. Find out all about the luckiest cat in the world. How slots go from slackers to superstars and what odd noises? Cute Fluffy Koalas make those. Are The podcast recommendations chosen by Maggie for this week's theme best podcasts. For

United States Maggie Mcguire Hero Hotel Jeremy Sisto Pinna CEO Penna Chet Zabriskie Serena BBC Thirty Seven Minutes Twenty Four Minutes Eighteen Minutes Seven Minutes
"spacesuits" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

07:36 min | 1 year ago

"spacesuits" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"That's being tested space station right now for sure. One of the most important and Technologies in the we talked about of the suit water membrane of of operator. It's a brand new technology that we've never flown in space. And so it was one of the I'll say the highest I risk areas in terms of new technology so we made a decision a couple of years ago that we wanted to take that technology and use the space station to test it so we took that entire thermal system part of the suit and we put it in a box and we designed it to go into a payload rack on board the International Space Station. That box in the payload rack space station and will simulate exactly the environment that are spacey will be in for this thermal control system so we're GONNA actually run the cooling system. We have water that will put into it. That water will put heat in just like an astronaut. Would we'll subject it to vacuum just like the pseudo onboard space station and it will allow us to get a good probably year of testing on board the Space Station of our thermal control system which is again the probably the lowest technology readiness level of any part of the suit. So we wanted on station so that payload is actually being going through its final qualification. Now should be ready to fly in a couple of months and so we'll launch to space station early next year and so we'll be testing parts of the spacesuit Within the next six months on boards bass fishing fission wonderful. Yeah let's let's take the timeline now to twenty twenty four. We're looking to have a person on the moon. What are we looking to do? Are we talking like a full up. Test on the international final space station with the with the whole suit doing a spacewalk. Where like what? What are we looking forward to do? So there's a couple of phases we have The first thing that we're building we used to call him engineering development units we call this the development and testing and we're actually building to the best of our knowledge today. What the suit design looks like? We're building a DVD unit a spacesuit that has all the technology and features in it. We want that suit will be assembled and ready early next county or so really within the next six to eight months. We'll have that suit ready to go. Now that's it gives us a chance to to test all of these features. We can run test with it. We can put it in a vacuum chamber to make sure that as we when we set the final design and CDR that we have all this data with an actual spacesuit so we're going to do that testing eighteen over the next year then we're gonNA build then we'll start building the qualification unit We're going to build two of them at this. Point is the plan that allow us to do testing in parallel. So we can The two thousand twenty four schedule's pretty aggressive for us and we had a head start which helped but it's still pretty aggressive so by building two units that allows us to do testing in parallel a little bit We're going to build. Those qualification qualification units those qualifications will require us to take actual human beings and put them in actual vacuum chambers with the suit and test the life support system so They'll it'd be very complex. potentially hazardous tests with humans involved in the test to make sure the suits working We want we want to put that suit through as rigorous attest as we can on the ground around before we send astronauts up and ask them to use it so the qualification testing will happen. Once we get through the qualification testing program. We'll have a flight suit and with the flight suits will build a flight suit. We don't want to. We don't want to test those suits to these extreme boundary conditions. We want him. We do that with the qualification. And then the flight suits we wanna take care of on the ground so we put with them through a limited set of tests to make sure that they work. We will test those we'll put A crew member in though suits in a vacuum chamber on the ground to test them and make sure they're working then the plan is this. We're GONNA take a single flight suit and we're GONNA launch to the International Space Station and we're going to do an EVA with a regular EMU an axiom use side by side we already in the the process of modifying the space station systems to allow to service Xm You We need higher pressure. Oxygen we needed access to evacuate. So we're modifying the station right now. those designs are happening. So we'll do that. The ideas to check out that suit on space station before we get to the surface of the moon. How the schedule works out We'd like to get that test on space on space station before we get to the moon but depending on the timing of that we may or may not that may or may not happen At the same time we're building we'll build two more suits That will then go to the land or companies or however we launch those suits to get them likely they'll get launched a gateway separately. They'll it'll be at gateway waiting for the land to come when the lander shows up. Okay we'll transfer those over to the lander and then those are the suits that will go down to the surface of the moon for the first mission. Okay okay yeah that is aggressive. I'm sure the team is Really trucking along. It's a great team. Twenty twenty four seems like a long ways away until so you start thinking about all these tests and how long they take a run and then it seems a lot closer we have a countdown clock. Actually use it when we have to deliver the seats. now what about the OX. I'm I'M GONNA have to get used to calling you back in. But the Iran crew survival one is that won't being tested on ornaments too when we fly people I think that's their plan. Yeah they'll use the suiting in their their through their critical design review already. So they'll have those suits ready for whenever we put Crew members on the Orion vehicle. They'll have these suits have to have a launch entry suit for safety reasons on this. It was designed to be ready for them whenever I was ready to fly. So they'll have that they've already. They've already undergone vacuum testing with the suits and their system. So they've done a lot of the call human the loop testing with those suits against their head of us In terms of that. But yeah they'll have those suits whenever crew Fly on a Ryan. They'll be wearing those suits perfect. There's a lot to look look forward to. I did want to end with this one thing and this was actually I think asked During a presentation you know we're talking about especially for the X.. Amu the suit being designed we have all these steps to go for the moon. And there's there's a lot of challenges for the moon but what about Marce We you know this has always been a distant goal of ours but what what can we learn from the moon or what would need to change from the design of these suits to go from a suit. That's walking on the moon to assume a suit. That's walking yeah fundamentally there's a lot of The technology that these suits that will help us go to Mars in terms particularly in terms of. What do we need to do with these suits? And how did the cruise interact with them. There are some challenges at Mars that we're going to have to figure out Martha's atmosphere it's a co two Low Pressure Co two primarily atmosphere so our co two system that dumps co two into. The atmosphere doesn't have vacuum associated so we have to figure out how to get rid of that co two. Our current system won't work exactly the same way maybe a variant. The system will work We have to start thinking about that too. Cooling system will work differently With an atmosphere we are cooling system. Depends on evaporating water water into vacuum. And there's no vacuum there so the water so it won't be as efficient so we'll have to find ways to make these systems a little more efficient The thermal environment is likely to be different with atmosphere I don't know whether it's better worse yet. But our teams will have to figure out. What are the changes in the new environment? I think we're going to learn a lot by building a suit. That's going to be directly applicable to Mars and then very quickly as soon as we get past the designed for the lunar phase. We'll start thinking about new ways to test and develop those new system so we'll be ready when when we're ready to go to Mars. We'll have pursuit that threatening. That can do wonderful. This is an incredible time. Chris Hansen's thank you so much for coming on the podcast and talking about these suits excellent. Thanks for having me the carton bringing not the hey thanks for sticking around hope. You learned a lot about these artists generation spacesuits and are looking forward to actually seeing connection Till they're used to go to and from.

Space Station International Space Station OX Chris Hansen Twenty twenty Iran Really trucking Orion Ryan Martha Low Pressure Co EVA EMU
"spacesuits" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

09:38 min | 1 year ago

"spacesuits" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"In the vehicle right. Would you be in your seats. It's in this situation situation. You'll be flown around the you wouldn't get into the seats. Really you'd be in the seats really just for land for reentry and landing in those seats unless you were reentering so you'd be able to move about the cabin just in the suit just in the slug ten. Okay now you have to live in the suit right. He said worst case scenario gotta live in the soup for six days. Now what does that mean. What does it mean to live so thinking about it so you got to one of the things that keep you alive neurones? You'll breathe so you've got to be hooked up to the stress system of the vehicle so the vehicle has to be able to provide oxygen to those crew members. Now if you're in a depressed the vehicle your suit is now in. Your suit. is acting like a space sense that you have zero pressure on the outside the suit. What is designed to operate between four and eight PSI of pure oxygen so we have to feed pure auctioned that crew member now the vehicle does all all of the functions? We talked about an Xy. See the axiom. You the Orion vehicle has to do that for the Kurtz gotTa Scrub. Co Two ballot system. It's got to prevent oxygen got to provide cooling water tombs so it's got to keep them alive so that's the first thing second food so you've got to be able to Food and water. So you gotta be able to drink any so you got to do that and then you have to get rid of bodily waste and so the system is is designed to to make that possible over six days. That's a very complicated part of the you've got to be able to get rid of urine and fecal matter and all those things so lots of work went into designing a suit suit that you could actually survive in for up to six days in that condition. It's incredibly challenging task for those guys. We talked about decompression we mentioned. We mentioned smoke fire. Basically this would I in any of these you you have to think through. We actually had a podcast about Jason Hut came on and talked about a lot of these different things and it was about you know if this were to go wrong. What would you do that? This is designed in any phase of flight to do that. Let's skip ahead to landing because I know there's parts of the suit suit that even after landing would help you survive in the ocean for a little bit. Yes so they've got an integrated Life inflatable life. Saving device is that Will inflate when they hit the water. That will keep them. Afloat keep their head above water. You've got a lot of typical. We've got lots of experience with search and rescue in the ocean environment. So we've got lights and we've there's a satellite beacon that's being designed. That'll stay above the water that we'll talk to a satellite system so we can find the crew members lights glow sticks those kinds of things that you would see in a typical typical marine environment. The suits dry suit has got a neck dam. So that the it'll keep the crew from getting wet will help keep them warmer now. We're not landing in the North Atlantic Ocean so that helps so they're likely to be a little bit warmer water but it can be down in the fifty degree range so you wouldn't want to spend a Lotta time in a wet. So the suits designed to deal with that environment and protect them until we can get them and rescue. That's why it's called the Orion crew survival day and they're gonNA help them survive. What fascinating pieces of technology? Let's go into the development interesting because We've talked about all the different features of the suit Tell me about the history is but let. Let's start with the axiom. You because that's what you've been looking at for for the most part the how you've developed this suit to be what it is and test it where you've tested it those sorts of things. Yeah let's so it's an interesting history with the spacesuit We've had like we've talked about. We've had the IMMU since the early eighties. And so we've known that the agency needed a new space suit the MU wasn't gonNA work. We've only got eleven of them in existence. The technology is very old We spent a lot of time as technology gets older trying to figure out how to keep working Obsolete obsolescence becomes TMZ in issue for lots of the materials and they like onyx in those kinds of things. So we've known for quite a while that we needed a new space suit How ever there hasn't been a destination by the agency for a while? When when the Constellation program was stood up there was a suit program? A contract was let for that. So there's a company that was out coming sharing was off developing a spacesuit for constellation so they got quite a quite a ways down the line to the point where we call a preliminary design review before the Constellation program was cancelled but we knew that no matter where we were going whether it was the moon or Mars sis lunar space or a lagrange point or anywhere. We were going all the way to Mars down to the surface of Mars. We were GONNA need a new suit so a lot it really smart. Spacesuit engineers got together with industry with inside NASA outside NASA to talk about woke at given that we could go any of these places. What technology should we put in a new space suit and we came up with lists that everybody agreed on and we started working on all of those technologies and so as we got through all the different phases of the building test units and we test them and they'd break and we'd make it a little better and we'd kind of work through that that's been going on for almost a decade and then two years ago? We made a decision to build a suit to go test on the International Space Station. One of the things with space station. Officially it's a life is twenty twenty four. It is the best place to space suits in the entire universe. Right now And so we wanted to make sure our new spacesuit all this new technology got tested in-space Before the space station retire so two years ago we made a plan to to build a flight. I unit to go test it on the International Space Station. So we've been working on that suit for two years. It was perfect timing when the agency when the country decided when the president gave us the challenge to go back to the the Moon in two thousand twenty four we were two years into our project already for a suit that was designed to work on space station but it was also designed to work on the surface of the moon. We already thought ahead head that the suit needed likely to be able to do that. And so the suit already had most of what I needed. And it's designed so a lot of what we do so then we got together and we talked about requirements. It's always restart and that's really asking the question rebuilding the suit that we need so we talk about. What does he need? This soon. Need to do so. We define all those requirements and we make sure that we're all in agreement with that and then we go start building. The current today is that what we call a preliminary design review state. That's a state where we kind of say okay. We've looked at the requirements. We have a design. We think that meets all of those requirements and this is what that designed looks like. We haven't built it all yet. We haven't tested at all but this is the design that we think will work lots of experts in the room and we talk about the design and see Do we agree that we've met the suits going to work. So we've completed that for the just completed a couple months ago so now the team has to take all that input and then and go start actually designing the final one that will lead into what we call a critical designer view work okay. We've got a design. Where about radio building? Do we have the right design and and then once we have that right design. Then we'll start building what we call a qualification unit. And we'll go then we'll test that suit. And all of the boundary conditions the extreme cases that we want the suit to work the cat that we hope never to put an actual suit through with a crew member in it but we check and make sure the design works. That's called the critical design review about a year. Probably about a year out for the Axiom Mute from that and then we'll start qualification testing and then we'll build the flight units will test those and we'll send him to the moon so for the. Xm You that's all right. We just finished our preliminary design Zayn phase now the teams off working really hard to put those designs together. Well Awesome. I mean so this the suit we saw was essentially what it will be but just maybe deep through these extra reviews would find little things here and there that you WanNa fix before you actually put a person in it on the moon. Yeah exactly and there's a lot of work when going from conceptual design nine or design that works in lab to an actual working physical flight unit. That's been tested and qualified to work in these extreme environments very reliably. There's a lot of work getting between between those two points. And that's what our teams are offering to do. Now They Ryan suits a little farther along there actually. At they've completed their critical design review. So they have a design that's already set. And and they're getting ready to build their flight units so they're quite a bit of us The I'm the Orion vehicle should fly sooner than we're GonNa need our suits right so they are ahead of us now in terms of the the X.. CMU I'm remember Kate Reuben's on the same panel that you were talking about. She put it on and went into the neutral buoyancy laboratory. The Big Pool we have here at the Justice Center and she was praising talking about how awesome it was And and so that was one of the tests you did to actually check out. Hey how has this this thing is this thing as maneuverable as we think we designed it to be. What's great is being here Jesse where we have the astronauts we have a whole group of astronauts who've done actual eve as they've done training in the pool the neutral buoyancy lab they've done actually in space with an EMU they've got a ton of experience having access to those astronauts is a huge advantage to us so we take an astronaut? Kate who's WHO's done EDA. She's done to as in space and put her in this new suit and we ask okay. What's different between this suit? And the MMU and she can give us really elite good valuable feedback on the differences and We built a pressure garment Put Kate in it. Did we've done over twenty runs in the neutral buoyancy lab with a suit And the reviews have been fabulous by her. She said the mobility now getting. We're not testing the life support system in the pool. But we're testing the pressure garment and the mobility and those features and got. We're getting rave reviews from all the astronauts that the astronauts and our engineers and OPS team that given the suits and they've done a lot of work in both Lots of good feedback on us. That the do design where we're heading in the right direction that it works really well. Perfect a lot more ground testing you did and I think is there elements of the suit. That's being tested space station right now for sure. One of the most important and Technologies in the we talked about of the suit water membrane of of operator. It's a brand new technology that we've never flown in space. And so it was one of the I'll say the highest I risk areas in terms of new technology so we made a decision a couple of years ago that we wanted to take that technology and use the space station to test it so we took that entire thermal system part of the suit and we put it in a box and we designed it to go into a payload rack on board the International Space Station..

International Space Station Kate Reuben NASA North Atlantic Ocean Orion TMZ Jason Hut IMMU Ta Scrub Kurtz Ryan Jesse Justice Center
"spacesuits" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

09:10 min | 1 year ago

"spacesuits" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Get you to that safe state as quickly as you can in the vehicle right. Would you be in your seats. It's in this situation situation. You'll be flown around the you wouldn't get into the seats. Really you'd be in the seats really just for land for reentry and landing in those seats unless you were reentering so you'd be able to move about the cabin just in the suit just in the slug ten. Okay now you have to live in the suit right. He said worst case scenario gotta live in the soup for six days. What does that mean? What does it mean to live so thinking about it so you got to one of the things that keep you alive neurones? You'll breathe so you've got to be hooked up to the stress system of the vehicle so the vehicle has to be able to provide oxygen to those crew members. Now if you're in a depressed the vehicle your suit is now in. Your suit. is acting like a space sense that you have zero pressure on the outside the suit. What is designed to operate between four and eight PSI of pure oxygen so we have to feed pure auctioned that crew member now the vehicle does all all of the functions? We talked about an Xy. See the axiom. You the Orion vehicle has to do that for the Kurtz gotTa Scrub. Co Two ballot system. It's got to prevent oxygen got to provide cooling water tombs so it's got to keep them alive so that's the first thing second food so you've got to be able to Food and water. So you gotta be able to drink any so you got to do that and then you have to get rid of bodily waste and so the system is is designed to to make that possible over six days. That's a very complicated part of the you've got to be able to get rid of urine and fecal matter and all those things so lots of work went into designing a suit suit that you could actually survive in for up to six days in that condition. It's incredibly challenging task for those guys. We talked about decompression we mentioned. We mentioned smoke fire. Basically this would I in any of these you you have to think through. We actually had a podcast about Jason Hut came on and talked about a lot of these different things and it was about you know if this were to go wrong. What would you do that? This is designed in any phase of flight to do that. Let's skip ahead to landing because I know there's parts of the suit suit that even after landing would help you survive in the ocean for a little bit. Yes so they've got an integrated Life inflatable life. Saving device is that Will inflate when they hit the water. That will keep them. Afloat keep their head above water. You've got a lot of typical. We've got lots of experience with search and rescue in the ocean environment. So we've got lights and we've there's a satellite beacon that's being designed. That'll stay above the water that we'll talk to a satellite system so we can find the crew members lights glow sticks those kinds of things that you would see in a typical typical marine environment. The suits dry suit has got a neck dam. So that the it'll keep the crew from getting wet will help keep them warmer now. We're not landing in the North Atlantic Ocean so that helps so they're likely to be a little bit warmer water but it can be down in the fifty degree range so you wouldn't want to spend a Lotta time in a wet. So the suits designed to deal with that environment and protect them until we can get them and rescue. That's why it's called the Orion crew survival day and they're gonNA help them survive. What fascinating pieces of technology? Let's go into the development interesting because We've talked about all the different features of the suit Tell me about the history is but let. Let's start with the axiom. You because that's what you've been looking at for for the most part the how you've developed this suit to be what it is and test it where you've tested it those sorts of things. Yeah let's so it's an interesting history with the spacesuit We've had like we've talked about. We've had the IMMU since the early eighties. And so we've known that the agency needed a new space suit the MU wasn't gonNA work. We've only got eleven of them in existence. The technology is very old We spent a lot of time as technology gets older trying to figure out how to keep working Obsolete obsolescence becomes TMZ in issue for lots of the materials and they like onyx in those kinds of things. So we've known for quite a while that we needed a new space suit However there hasn't been a destination by the agency for a while when when the Constellation program was stood up? There was a suit program. A contract was let for that. So there's a company that was out coming Ocean hearing was off developing a spacesuit for constellation so they got quite a quite a ways down the line to the point where we call a preliminary design review before the Constellation program was cancelled but we knew that no matter where we were going whether it was the moon or Mars sis lunar space or a lagrange point or anywhere. We were going all the way to Mars down to the surface of Mars. We were GONNA need a new suit so a lot it really smart. Spacesuit engineers got together with industry with inside NASA outside NASA to talk about woke at given that we could go any of these places. What technology should we put in a new space suit and we came up with lists that everybody agreed on and we started working on all of those technologies and so as we got through all the different phases of the building test units and we test them and they'd break and we'd make it a little better and we'd kind of work through that that's been going on for almost a decade and then two years ago? We made a decision to build a suit to go test on the International Space Station. One of the things with space station. Officially it's a life is twenty twenty four. It is the best place to space suits in the entire universe. Right now And so we wanted to make sure our new spacesuit all this new technology got tested in-space Before the space station retire so two years ago we made a plan to to build a flight. I unit to go test it on the International Space Station. So we've been working on that suit for two years. It was perfect timing when the agency when the country decided when the president gave us the challenge to go back to the the Moon in two thousand twenty four we were two years into our project already for a suit that was designed to work on space station but it was also designed to work on the surface of the moon. We already thought ahead head that the suit needed likely to be able to do that. And so the suit already had most of what I needed. And it's designed so a lot of what we do so then we got together and we talked about requirements. It's always restart and that's really asking the question rebuilding the suit that we need so we talk about. What does he need? This soon. Need to do so. We define all those requirements and we make sure that we're all in agreement with that and then we go start building. The current today is that what we call a preliminary design review state. That's a state where we kind of say okay. We've looked at the requirements. We have a design. We think that meets all of those requirements and this is what that designed looks like. We haven't built it all yet. We haven't tested at all but this is the design that we think will work lots of experts in the room and we talk about the design and see Do we agree that we've met the suits going to work. So we've completed that for the just completed a couple months ago so now the team has to take all that input and then and go start actually designing the final one that will lead into what we call a critical designer view where we say okay. We've got a design. Where about radio building? Do we have the right design and and then once we have that right design. Then we'll start building what we call a qualification unit. And we'll go then we'll test that suit. And all of the boundary conditions the extreme cases that we want the suit to work or cat that we hope never to put an actual suit through with a crew member in it but we check and make sure the design works. That's called the critical design review about a year. Probably about a year out for the Axiom Mute from that and then we'll start qualification testing and then we'll build the flight units will test those and we'll send him to the moon so for the. Xm You that's all right. We just finished our preliminary design Zayn phase now the teams off working really hard to put those designs together. Well Awesome. I mean so this the suit we saw was essentially what it will be but just maybe deep through these extra reviews would find little things here and there that you WanNa fix before you actually put a person in it on the moon. Yeah exactly and there's a lot of work when going from conceptual design nine or design that works in lab to an actual working physical flight unit. That's been tested and qualified to work in these extreme environments very reliably. There's a lot of work getting between between those two points. And that's what our teams are offering to do. Now They Ryan suits a little farther along there actually. At they've completed their critical design review. So they have a design that's already set. And and they're getting ready to build their flight units so they're quite a bit of us The I'm the Orion vehicle should fly sooner than we're GonNa need our suits right so they are ahead of us now in terms of the the X.. CMU I'm remember Kate Reuben's on the same panel that you were talking about. She put it on and went into the neutral buoyancy laboratory. The Big Pool we have here at the Justice Center and she was praising talking about how awesome it was And and so that was one of the tests you did to actually check out. Hey how has this this thing is this thing as maneuverable as we think we designed it to be. What's great is being here Jesse where we have the astronauts we have a whole group of astronauts who've done actual eve as they've done training in the pool the neutral buoyancy lab they've done actually in space with an EMU they've got a ton of experience having access to those astronauts is a huge advantage to us so we take an astronaut? Kate who's WHO's done. UVA's she's done to as in space and put her in this new suit and we ask. Okay what's different between this suit. And the MMU and she can give us really elite good valuable feedback on the differences and we built a pressure garment Put Kate in it. Did we've done over twenty runs in the neutral buoyancy lab with a suit And the reviews have been fabulous by her. She said the mobility now getting. We're not testing the life support system in the pool. But we're testing the pressure garment and the mobility and those features and got. We're getting rave reviews from all the astronauts that the astronauts and our engineers and OPS team that given the suits and they've done a lot of work in both Lots of good feedback on us. That the do design where we're heading in the right direction that it works really well. Perfect a lot more ground testing you did and I think is there elements of the suit..

International Space Station Kate Reuben NASA North Atlantic Ocean Orion TMZ Jason Hut IMMU UVA Jesse Ta Scrub Kurtz Ryan Justice Center
"spacesuits" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

09:21 min | 1 year ago

"spacesuits" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Out at you. When you're looking at this suit are you already talked about a little bit later? The bearings you know the shoulders are in a little bit more. It looks like you're almost like hunched forward a little bit. But it gives you that reach and those bearings give you the yes mobility you talked about Kris whenever she was doing this demonstration in reaching all the way across in touching her other shoulder But there was there's also does protection and is part of those bearings as well right. That's that's part of the design. Yes it was a couple air so one of the things things the suit we needed to be as light as possible. One for the person that's in moving around that has to carry the mass around but to the launch vehicles landers themselves have limitations in terms of how much mass they can get down and back up off the surface so because those barriers are metal. They're heavy. They're heavy part of the suit. They they give us a lot of functionality. But there's there's a price to be paid for that and that's in mass So we've looked at making those bearings titanium it's not It's a little tricky from baron standpoint to make those work but but we've worked with titanium bearings a lot over the years. We've kind of learned the secrets to how to make barons out of it. So the bearings are titanium. There's also a lot of technology if you look at The military they build a lot of moving machines a lot of environments with dirt and dust and sand and so they've learned a lot about how to protect bearings with shields and other things to protect the the rolling elements that are inside inside those pairings. So these suits will incorporate a lot of that. We'll probably have a cover layer over the top of it helps keep the dust from even getting to the bearings So those are the things that we've got to look at for sure and we've we started a lot of that work but there's definitely still some work to be done The suits that we send to the Moon in twenty four are perfect with that. We think that's okay We'd liked to have to build a new space suit. Every time I go to the moon we'd like to make them reusable but if the first ones aren't as perfect as as we can make them. That's okay for these first couple missions. We'll get smarter. Arden will upgrade them as we go with better technology and other areas that we see we have the. We're having trouble with now in terms of the logic of the design. You've already alluded to this a little bit. When we were talking about the control panel upfront mentioned there was a hard upper torso and I believe the the legs are are soft material? It was their reason for choosing those elements. The current designed the harder Pretoria. There's some other design concepts out there that have a less hard upper torso Some of the challenges that we have to interface a lot of equipment with life support the system has to interface with it. The bearings are the bearings are hard they have to interface with it and interfacing. Those two upper torsos easier in some senses than a soft editors. We're still looking at all those concepts But in the end that that hard upper torso gives us a little more flexibility. How we attach things to it? Now we'RE GONNA make we're going to make that that hard upper torso. We're looking at lots of different materials. the current EMU hard upper torsos are made out of fiberglass we're looking at composites carbon composite materials and some other more more exotic things to try to make those things as light as we can the one that you saw was made out of aluminum Because it's easier to machine and it's easy for us to do conceptual studies with that. So as we look looking evaluate those new materials. We have an aluminum one that lets us do other evaluations. And she'll be loud moves and those kinds of things nice. Yeah see as you describe all of this it gives me more and more of an appreciation from head to toe. Just how much thought had to go to all of this One of the things you mentioned I think right up front when you were talking about designing again the control panel was you started small and then you went big. We're talking about different suit sizes. So what are the how. How does that work? What how's everything sized? Yeah so one of the things what the current amu there were or limitations As the the initial program had Lots of desires for a lot of different sizes but financial constraints made them kind of Limit the number sizes sizes. They built kind of skewed towards the upper end. And it makes it makes it difficult for our smaller astronauts which generally are. The female astronauts generally have less broad shoulders And so it makes it a little more complicated to use the suits. They have to fight the suits a little more than than someone that's got long arms and brought her shoulders older. We'd like to fix that and we would like to enable all of our astronauts to be able to use this suit So one of the things that the suit does is by pulling the shoulders in. We've We've there's the bearings are actually reversible. So that we can get significant variation in shoulder with with a single hut design. There's harnessing and other features inside that allow. I'm a broad range of individuals to fit in a single size suit and then ultimately we like to do is fit a much wider population from fifth tonight at percentile percentile. That gets complicated because no human is any one of those things. Different parts of your body are different sizes and so fitting actual people is much more more complicated than just picking a fifth percentile person ninety fifth percentile person. So we've done years studying of what people actually look like. And how their bodies are built. This is designed to accommodate a very wide range of individuals with just too hard upper torso sizes because of the adjustability that we've built into this As opposed to today on orbit we we have three sizes of hard upper torsos and really could use more on the smaller end. And we've got today but we think we can accommodate a much larger range of people with just too hard upper torso torsos sizes. Data's awesome. What a detailed explanation of the CMU? That was awesome If you're ready to do that okay. Let's go right into it one of the Highlighting I guess phrases that I pulled from the presentation was at the Orion crew. Survival suit is tailored to the individual and to the vehicle. Then what does that mean. Yeah so one of the things you want to do is One of the differences when we do in we've got a lot of work to do with the cruise. Don't spend more than about eight hours inside that suit for the launch entry suit. They potentially have to spend a lot of time in there are failure modes that they're looking at it will make a crew member potentially have to use that suit for for up to six days so in a suit like that it needs to fit really well In addition the the pressure garment itself doesn't have to you. Don't have to accomplish as much as you. You would outside walking around on the surface of the moon so you don't need a lot of the bearings and things that we've put in our system so it's the pressure garment part of. It is simpler in a sense. So it's easier to custom build those suits perk remember in addition though suits have to be integrated the way the protection system works for Ryan. Is those suits or integrated very closely with the seats. Beats themselves so those seats in the suits together create a system that make landing much safer in an Orion vehicle. We don't have to deal with that in the expiration ration- suit it's not something we're wearing during launch entering those kind of dynamic events so we don't have to protect the crew in the same way. This suit has to protect the crew members and so it makes sense to make those suits Much more custom fitting and really interact with the vehicle in a way that makes it much safer for all of the occupants. So what does that mean to integrate. Is I mean you have the mold. On the seat that's custom fit to the person is integration and some of it has to do with just the size of the seat in the different panels. There's clips on the bottom of the feet that actually you clip your feet into the seats themselves else to help. Restrain your feet and there's other features there's harnessing in there that works with the seat to make sure that the seat belts phychi properly like that. Okay so I mean for the most part When we're on these missions going to and from the moon the expectation is that since it's a nominal situation you put on the suit you do your thing and you go to the moon you come back But but the crew. The suit is designed to protect you in the event of some contingency where you have to you have to survive. You have to protect yourself off. What does it what does it look like a nominal situation what are you? What are you putting on one of the layers? What's happening through through the through the phases of flight? Yes so they'll put on a suit so the suit has a liquid cooling in garment underneath very similarly although it just covers the chest area We run cooling water from the vehicle so the the vehicle has heat exchanger that will run cool water through the suit so the crew remembers will be comfortable. You'll put on an undergarment and then you'll put this the Sudan just Really on the ground before you get in the vehicle you put this on your putting in gloves report on the helmet so it's less complicated than getting into the axiom you there's less Interfaces to it so it's really putting on a flight suit in a sense. Typical pilots using airplanes. Okay now I think you know it'll be used to protect the astronauts in in in some sort of event that were to occur now now in transit to the moon. You don't necessarily need the whole time right. That's going to be a couple of days long. No in fact they'll take that suit is designed for launch and then when they get to a stable on position in orbit. They'll take the soon off. They'll be shirt sleeve environment for most of the time. It's there and there's requirements that the vehicle has to protect that crew for up to an hour There's a depressive income and so the crust to get into those suits and save themselves before a catastrophic event happens okay now now the reason that we have this catastrophic event. Something something were to happen. Let's say it's a it's a decompression event. What would the crew be doing to get ready to to start getting into survival mode owed and put the suit on and and start you know? Would they plug into. He said they go use the life support systems of a Ryan. They plug it in that way they were put on the plug in. They'll be umbilical attached to those suits and they'll plug plug into the vehicle and fundamentally because you don't have much time to do it. The first crew member has to be able to get into that suit within thirty minutes. So you know have a lot of time you'll put the suit on your plug in. You'll elite checks and you'll make sure everything's working fine and then you'll be set okay. So it's designed to be flexible and.

Ryan Kris Pretoria Arden Orion CMU toe Sudan
"spacesuits" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

09:25 min | 1 year ago

"spacesuits" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"So that's a lot of what we're studying now that we'll get integrated ingrate into the suit as we move forward man iron man on the moon. This is cool this the suit itself we talked about. I know one of the points during the presentation station was about the pressure of the suit. Now I think the spacesuits on station are four point three PSI. This one is variable variable right. Yep exactly so what does that mean so one of the so. You have to understand a little bit. How the spacesuits work if we ran the spacesuits at atmospheric pressure fourteen point? Seven PSI. you never be able to move in them the pressure it's like being in a giant balloon. It'd be so stiff you'd never get any work done so we have to lower the pressure in the suits enough to make the suits usable. The problem is if you lower the pressure the suit down to four PSI and you just have regular breathing air. You'd be unconscious very quickly. It would be very dangerous for the human body. Can't live in that condition addition. You can't however live at that pressure if you're breathing pure oxygen and so we feel those suits with pure oxygen the downside with data something called decompression sickness. Yes or the Benz if you're in a pure oxygen environment you naturally have nitrogen your blood if you drop the pressure that low just like scuba divers coming up too fast. The pressure's lower and too quickly. Gli those nitrogen the nitrogen. That's in your blood can come out of solution and make little bubbles. They get inside your systems and Kaj a lot of problems so the suit itself runs at low pressure but we have to run at Pure oxygen at four point two PSI because of that the crew members in the suit actually have to pre brief so for several the hours before the. EVS happened we put them on oxygen masks. They breathe pure oxygen to to purge all of that nitrogen out of their body takes hours to do that and ultimately we would like to not have to spend hours with the crew on Pure oxygen before we go out and and do spacewalks one of the ways around that is by raising the pressure crusher. If you can raise the pressure of the suit to something higher like eight PSI than the amount of time you need to spend pre breathing. Pure oxygen goes down dramatically. The problem is running a suited. ATS is a little more complicated. It's stiffer again. It's also You in order to change the pressure you need eat. Something called an oxygen regulator and they're just really aren't oxygen regulators designed to change pressure until our until this project came on so we worked with a company called Cobb actually developed. Melania a very high tech oxygen regulator the can actually change pressures and so that's one of the features of the suit is we can actually start the astronauts at a much higher pressure. Get them mm out the door to go start exploring and that regulator can actually lower pressure as they go so that as the. Va goes on the pressure gets lower gets a little easier. These suits but we didn't have to take take all that time upfront pre breathing so that technology allows us to be much more flexible as we do is we plan is great. You get out the door faster but you can still have that extra mobility that you need to eventually bend over and pick up rocks. Dr Perfect is the pre breathing so it sounds like it's going to be shorter but with a process process of that be essentially the same. You'RE GONNA have to breathe you're gonNA have to Don. You're sue it's GonNa there's because there is even now with space box on the space station. It does take a while to get to get ready. So that will look the same on the Lunar Lander fundamentally but some of it's going to depend on how that lander gets designed as you know the agency has asked the commercial industry to propose lander designs is in those landers Have Lots of flexibility in terms of how they meet that you could theoretically run. Those landers with pure oxygen like we did back in the Apollo program you could get out of the crew members breathe your oxygen and the way today again because of that time has less with the way the suit works. It gives you a lot more flexibility. In how you deal with that but the land or companies that are are developing landers Can kind of choose and figure out can solve that problem. In whatever way makes most sense for their architecture. We try to give them as much flexibility pretty By lowering the amount of time needed pre breath. But then we'll see what will we're interested. We'll see what designs they come up with that they bring to NASA. Yeah and then make it work. But you're that you have this flexibility. This is awesome. I know I remember one part of the presentation to was something to look at. Was the differences with working and operating on the surface of the moon. One of them was walking on the surface and possibly the thermal concerns on and the boots. That was something you had to be concerned. Because I don't know if there's differences is of temperature there. Yeah obviously what we're walking on those. The surface temperatures can vary in that wide range. So it's just something you have to deal with. There are materials available that can handle those kinds of temperatures But like with every part of the suit we just have to look at. What is the environment that we're GONNA be in however we understand it and then designing systems that can deal with it? I don't know from a material standpoint. The boots will be that tricky. I think we'll figure we'll figure that out one of the things we want those. We want them actually walking rather than hopping so the suits are the Shoes are probably going to have to be designed the boots. We'll have to be designed to be a little more rugged then what we had during Apollo because we want them again to geologist we want them to walk around. Are there similar things for the gloves as well. 'CAUSE now you're dealing with you're dealing with rocks that may or may not be sharp swift to talk about that. One of the things is on the International Space Station. You mentioned before your legs. Aren't that helpful. And so almost all of the work you're doing with your hands and so we've designed we call the face gloves that we use for the AMU. We've designed design those to allow us to very long very hand intensive evs on the International Space Station There are some things we can improve on them that we're looking at but they're pretty good and so off on the surface of the moon on the surface of the moon. I don't think the effort for the Georgia where we're going to do and he's going to challenge the gloves. More than space station does in terms the physical efforts now. Obviously we're going to have to deal with rocks and abrasion and some things we don't so the the outer layers likely have to be toughened up so we're looking at that but fundamentally mentally particularly for these early missions we will likely use the same face X. gloves on with maybe a different Thermal overlay for thermal and abrasion resistance but fundamentally gloves is a pretty good. There are some areas we definitely can improve particularly on folks with smaller hands. The gloves a little bulkier than we'd like them so we've already started looking at ways to improve the flexibility l. e. those gloves That's one of those long term things for us. We think the gloves will probably work fine for their early missions and then as we get smarter will evolve those gloves to make them a little no more useful on the moon as we kind of learn the things will be doing on the surface of the moon. We'll get smarter as we go again. This is a sustainable campaign. We want to go there and learn and as we learn earn will upgrade these systems to make them better for you. We talked a little bit about the materials spacey. You already went through I. I think there was one that was thermo right. So you have to. You have to design the suit to withstand these huge swings temperatures. What about the logic of some of the other layers of the suit like I mean you? You are dealing with pressure you're dealing with Extreme environments it's maybe a little bit of toughness to deal with the lunar dust. What are the logic of some of the layers of yes we think so? A lot of it is thermal control. Okay inside the there's many layers there's an EMU on the the the most inner layers that bladder and it actually has to hold pressure now suits today the am Utah. Also have to old pressure. So we've learned a lot about how to do that so we don't expect act huge changes in that technology thermally were also in very extreme thermal environments outside the International Space Station in orbit the earth. And we come in and out of the Sun essentially every forty five minutes so it gets very hot and very cold so the suit was designed to deal with that so the the suit that you see on the moon we'll have a lot of very similar materials In terms of that again. You talked about abrasion so we'll have to deal with the dust and the rocks a little bit. We'll have to toughen up a few things but we beat on are pretty good on the space station. So we've had to Kinda already do that. We've made our gloves tougher over the years. The space station has lots of micro meteoroid hits sharp though the crews have to deal with gloves. We've toughened the gloves up quite a bit From the material standpoint. I don't see anything major. That'll be different in the new suits probably now throughout history. There's been lessons learned and different designs lines. You know if you if you look up an astronaut the first thing you see is basically a spacesuit so you see these differences in the way that the space is designed and we've learned a lot. I have a couple of notes here from from lessons. Learned what you should and should not do. When Designing Spacey One thing was no zippers or cables? What did we learn from that? Somebody came from a lot of the Apollo. Oh program okay The cruise the Apollo suits had zippers are formed a lot of pressure and they were a lot of trouble. The dust particularly particularly got into the regular got into the Zippers and made it very difficult. We had a lot of cable failures. Lot of mechanism failures durden really sharp. Find US getting into so a lot of at least for the lunar part took a lot of lessons from that and that's obviously a problem. You don't have to deal with onboard space station but we remember a lot of the issues we had back in Apollo. So we've taken some of those design features that have caused this issues and we've tried to design them out. We've had failures of the EMU onboard space station and we talked about the twenty three event. And we've taken lessons from from those failures and we've tried to incorporate features in the new suit that will help prevent those things I say now some of those new suits you already talked about. Dust does is a huge one. I know one of the things that really jumped out at you. When you're looking at this suit are you already talked about a little bit later? The bearings you know the shoulders are in a little bit more. It looks like you're almost like hunched forward a little bit..

International Space Station Apollo EMU landers decompression sickness Lunar Lander US Va EVS NASA Kaj Cobb Dr Perfect lander AMU Georgia Utah
"spacesuits" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

10:47 min | 1 year ago

"spacesuits" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Chip comes out. We want our components upgradable to change as we learn as we get smarter as this exploration program continues. We want to be able to upgrade the system as we go without having to the design develop whole new suit and bring those suits back to the ground to change them out. See this huge. Because we're talking about one of the one of the things is when this artem is mission. It's it's The idea sustainability. So we're going to stay so naturally that means years down the road technology's going to change. You don't WanNa be stuck with old suits having that sort of flexibility awesome exactly We we we started talking about some of the different systems. He's talked about portable life support systems. I know this carbon dioxide side. Scrubbing is actually being tested on station. Right now. Isn't it absolutely so. How's IT performing? Yeah so the so the the swing that we have onboard station day has been working great. We flew a smaller payload that tested that out a few years ago We had the typical problems with new technology. took us a little while ago to work in but once we got up and running it worked fabulously and so I. I can't say enough about the space station and the role that it's played in allowing us to test these technologies in the real environment. We've learned so much especially in the life support arena The life support systems onboard. Space Station are very complex. And they've really allowed us to learn and grow and then it's expanded into things like spacesuits because a lot of our life support it systems on the space suits are very similar to the life support systems. The vehicles need the space station and Orion but in our case we have to make them smaller but the technology is very similar and so those systems have been tested on station for a while and they've been working great. Yeah no they re they really are We've talked about the reliability. Any of these. You know like you said. We've we've taken a lot from stuff that we know works on the Space Station and we've learned so much going going down I think you know controlling the life support or systems. I know I know. One of the things on the on the extravehicular mobility unit on station as they have this they have these control dials right there at the front of their chest on the helped the two of you talked about the cooling health into cool offer or heat at depending on where they are in the sun those look a little bit different on the CMU right. Yeah so what you're describing is what we call all the displaying control module in the control box on the front of the suit. Now that is how the crew interacts with the suit their switches on it and their vows in there. There's a the temperature control valve that affects how much cooling water is going to their cooling system to adjust the comfort levels of the cruise inside their switches just to turn on the pumps and fans and power those things So we still need the crew to be able to interact with the suit However one of the problems with that displaying control module on the current EMU is how big it is and it limited how small we could make the hard upper torso that that things attached to the crew? It's sort of the chest part part of the the spacesuit it limited how small we can make that which then limited how easily smaller crew members could use them. You know we've had discussions ends lately about our Our female astronauts and struggling and even our small suit This will help us tremendously. Because we've made that system significantly smaller. It's allowed us is to move the bearings inside farther In addition we started with When we designed the axiom you we started on the small side because the small one is the hardest one integrate all these controls to so? We've we knew that it's easy to scale up. It's a lot harder to scale down. So we started with a small one that displaying control unit will give the crew messages. Um about the suit. Status gives them switches that turn the systems on and off and and we're still evaluating today. What kind of information we want the crew members to have We have this great project project that we do with. The university students called suits. Were asking them to help us design the information system. We all Ironman were big fan of iron man a lot. Ah Lotta things about fantasy but one of the things. That's not really. Fantasy is the way that in the movie. He gets information from the heads up. Display the reality is when you look at that and that would be overwhelming. Probably for the average person so we're trying to study what kind of information to our astronauts want while they're doing. How do we want the suit to interact with them? Do we want them to be able to talk to the sued to the suit to talk back. Do we want Gauges dials those kinds of things. So that's a lot of what we're studying now that we'll get integrated ingrate into the suit as we move forward man iron man on the moon. This is cool this the suit itself we talked about. I know one of the points during the presentation station was about the pressure of the suit. Now I think the spacesuits on station are four point three PSI. This one is variable variable right. Yep exactly so what does that mean so one of the so. You have to understand a little bit. How the spacesuits work if we ran the spacesuits at atmospheric pressure fourteen point? Seven PSI. you never be able to move in them the pressure it's like being in a giant balloon. It'd be so stiff you'd never get any work done so we have to lower the pressure in the suits enough to make the suits usable. The problem is if you lower the pressure the suit down to four PSI and you just have regular breathing air. You'd be unconscious very quickly. It would be very dangerous for the human body. Can't live in that condition addition. You can't however live at that pressure if you're breathing pure oxygen and so we feel those suits with pure oxygen the downside with data something called decompression sickness. Yes or the Benz if you're in a pure oxygen environment you naturally have nitrogen your blood if you drop the pressure that low just like scuba divers coming up too fast. The pressure's lower and too quickly. Weekly those nitrogen the nitrogen. That's in your blood can come out of solution and make little bubbles. They get inside your systems and caused a lot of problems. So the suit itself runs at low pressure but we have to run at Pure oxygen at four point two PSI because of that the crew members in the suit actually have to pre brief so for several the hours before the EVS happened. We put them on oxygen masks. They breathe pure oxygen to to purge all of that nitrogen out of their body takes hours to do that and ultimately we would like to not have to spend hours with the crew on Pure oxygen before we go out and and do spacewalks one of the ways around that is by raising the pressure crusher. If you can raise the pressure of the suit to something higher like eight PSI than the amount of time you need to spend pre breathing. Pure oxygen goes down dramatically. The problem is running a suited. ATS is a little more complicated. It's stiffer again. It's also You in order to change the pressure you need eat. Something called an oxygen regulator and they're just really aren't oxygen regulators designed to change pressure until our until this project came on so we worked with a company called Cobb actually developed galloped. A very high tech oxygen regulator the can actually change pressures and so that's one of the features of the suit is we can actually start the astronauts at a much higher pressure. Get them mm out the door to go start exploring and that regulator can actually lower pressure as they go so that as the. Va goes on the pressure gets lower gets a little easier. These suits but we didn't have to take take all that time upfront pre breathing so that technology allows us to be much more flexible as we do is we plan is great. You get out the door faster but you can still have that extra mobility that you need to eventually bend over and pick up rocks. Dr Perfect is the pre breathing so it sounds like it's going to be shorter but with a process process of that be essentially the same. You'RE GONNA have to breathe you're gonNA have to Don. You're sue it's GonNa there's because there is even now with space box on the space station. It does take a while to get to get ready. So that will look the same on the Lunar Lander fundamentally but some of it's going to depend on how that lander gets designed as you know the agency has asked the commercial industry to propose lander designs is in those landers Have Lots of flexibility in terms of how they meet that you could theoretically run. Those landers with pure oxygen like we did back in the Apollo program you could get out of the crew members breathe your oxygen and the way today again because of that time has less with the way the suit works. It gives you a lot more flexibility. In how you deal with that but the land or companies that are are developing landers Can kind of choose and figure out can solve that problem. In whatever way makes most sense for their architecture. We try to give them as much flexibility pretty By lowering the amount of time needed pre breath. But then we'll see what will we're interested. We'll see what designs they come up with that they bring to NASA. Yeah and then make it work but a year that you have this flexibility. This is awesome. I know I remember one part of the presentation to was something to look at. Was the differences with working and operating on the surface of the moon. One of them was walking on the surface and possibly the thermal concerns on and the boots. That was something you had to be concerned. Because I don't know if there's differences is of temperature there. Yeah obviously what we're walking on those. The surface temperatures can vary in that wide range. So it's just something you have to deal with. There are materials available that can handle those kinds of temperatures But like with every part of the suit we just have to look at. What is the environment that we're GONNA be in however we understand it and then designing systems that can deal with it? I don't know from a material standpoint. The boots will be that tricky. I think we'll figure we'll figure that out one of the things we want those. We want them actually walking rather than hopping so the suits are the Shoes are probably going to have to be designed the boots. We'll have to be designed to be a little more rugged then what we had during Apollo because we want them again to geologist we want them to walk around. Are there similar things for the gloves as well. 'CAUSE now you're dealing with you're dealing with rocks that may or may not be sharp swift to talk about that. One of the things is on the International Space Station. You mentioned before your legs. Aren't that helpful. And so almost all of the work you're doing with your hands and so we've designed we call the face gloves that we use for the AMU. We've designed design those to allow us to very long very hand intensive evs on the International Space Station There are some things we can improve on them that we're looking at but they're pretty good and so off on the surface of the moon on the surface of the moon. I don't think the effort for the Georgia where we're going to do and he's going to challenge the gloves. More than space station does in terms the physical efforts now. Obviously we're going to have to deal with rocks and abrasion and some things we don't so the the outer layers likely have to be toughened up so we're looking at that but fundamentally mentally particularly for these early missions we will likely use the same face X. gloves on with maybe a different Thermal overlay for thermal and abrasion resistance but fundamentally gloves is a pretty good. There are some areas we definitely can improve particularly on folks with smaller hands. The gloves a little bulkier than we'd like them so we've already started looking at ways to improve the flexibility l. e. those gloves That's one of those long term things for us. We think the gloves will probably work fine for their early missions and then as we get smarter will evolve those gloves to make them a little no more useful on the moon as we kind of learn the things will be doing on the surface of the moon. We'll get smarter as we go again. This is a sustainable campaign..

Space Station International Space Station Apollo Chip decompression sickness CMU landers Va Lunar Lander NASA AMU Georgia Cobb Dr Perfect lander
"spacesuits" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

10:53 min | 1 year ago

"spacesuits" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"We we bring in experts. Scientists engineers astronauts all to let you know what's going on in the world of human spaceflight so on October fifteenth two thousand nineteen NASA unveiled the next generation of space suits. That will take humans to the moon with Nasr's artists program. I say spacesuits plural because there are two one forgetting to the moon and back and one for exploring the surface of the moon the Orion crew survival suit does exactly what it sounds like helps the crew survive in Orion the deep space capsule that will transport the crew to and from the moon but there are many layers to that and a lot of interesting technologies added to the spacesuit that you might not have thought about then there's the X.. EMU that will be used on on the moon's surface for those familiar with human spaceflight or those who have listened to our space suits episode episode. Sixteen intent you might recognize the extra drove the Hitler Mobility Unit in there the EMU. This is the suit used for spacewalks on the space station. Today the X.. In front is for exploration. Sure the name looks a little a little bit of the same but there are a lot of differences that makes the suit the right one for the moon so here to go into great detail about each of these suits and what we have to look forward to. Is Chris Hansen Jason. Chris is the manager of the extra vehicular activity office here at the Johnson Space Center. And he's here with us to go over the intricate details of the Orion crew. Survival suit the OX and the X.. Amu some of the development and testing and some of the milestones to look forward to until we actually see these suits in action both for testing and for when they're done take the first steps on the moon since nineteen seventy two so here we go. ARTEM is generation spacesuits with Chris Hanson. Enjoy the county. You have Chris Hansen. Thanks for coming on the podcast today. Sure thanks for having big event recently at headquarters the administrator brought out It was Chris Davis and Dust Gohmert and my per se awesome event. They were right in the suits. They were moving around. It looked really cool. Then you had accused with the administrator Kate Rubens was there and everything everything how is that. How was the whole then? Yeah so it's really exciting for me. It's the first time I've really spent any kind of close time with the administrator so that was really exciting. He's a very interesting in guy he's like a a storm roll into the room and he's very excited about what we do. He's very supportive of what we do. for those that have ever been lucky enough to meet Kate Ruins silence. She's also really really cool. She's one of the nicest smartest people I've ever Manso. It was really fun to be able to do that. Event with those two particularly talking about space suits and it was great because we're talking about the next generation of suits. I know a lot of us. You know we the EMU we've had a podcast about before this is the this is the space that's on the International Space Station right now but thinking about that next generation. You know you're looking at it and it feels real. It's like wow. That's that's going to be the suits we're going to be seeing on on. The surface of the moon is pretty cool so I wanted to go into all all the details with you. This will be great. You are the manager of the extra vehicular activity office mostly over the axiom. You write one of the WE'RE GONNA be talking about today so not mostly so actually my responsibility ability for EVA activities across the entire agency so everything and that includes the current Uva work. We do on space station with the AMU so my office is responsible for all of that. including exploration. Work that we do with the axiom. You and the TV systems that we'll be talking about today okay. Well let's start with the. Va Part of things. Because I think that's where you're at your expertise here we're talking about the X.. Is the exploration extravehicular mobility unit. We Love acronyms. So what is the. What are the main differences if you if you had a if you compare the EMU that we know today on the space station to the this X. Amu what the main differences that you would highlight? Yes let me start with a little bit of we've been doing. EVs for fifty years all the way back from Gemini by the Apollo Program. You saw hopping around on the moon. We learned learned so much from that. And then we we graduated into the space shuttle program so the EMU that we use today was actually developed in the late seventies early eighties and hasn't been modified significantly for use on the International Space Station. So the suit you see today is fundamentally the same suit. We used back in the late seventies early eighties. So we've learned a lot using that suit and so today we've tried to take everything we've learned about the old suit and an upgraded it improved. It tried to make it better for the axiom. You so in the axiom you. A lot of those lessons learned have been rolled in inc.. If we start with the part that you can see so Chris Chris was out walking around and you got to see one of the main features features of what we call it the pressure garment system so the pressure garment system for sues. The part that you can see on the EMU it's white part. It's the arms the legs the body the helmet all of that is what we call the pressure garment. The other part of that system is the portable life support system which is in the backpack. There's a lot of things in the background. It's a backpack. It's a very high tech check system There's a lot of differences between that and the current immune. I'll talk but let me start with the part. You could see so yes so. Chris was walking around the stage. And that's one of the important differences what we want when we go back to the moon this time and on to Mars is to actually do exploration and to do that. We have to allow astronauts to work like geologists fundamentally a a lot of science will be doing early on on the moon is geology. And if you've ever hung around with a geologist They don't like taking pads. They like getting off ties. They like climbing over rocks. They like interacting with the environment around them to learn. And so we've got to have a suit that allows them to do that. The original policy. It's it was very difficult for the crew to bend their knees. Bend down to loans wants to grab things they practically fall over At to pick up a rock and kind of do a push up to get back to back up and so we want to suit that enables them to move. And what you saw in the Xia Mu was a suit that's got lower torso mobile. You can actually bend your knees in. Bend your legs and Ben Down USA even in one G which is six is times more gravity than we'll have on the surface of the moon. Chris Chris was able to bend down. pick up a rock on the stage handed to the administrator In addition to that. So that's lower body mobility we've learned the current suit that upper body mobility is almost just as important the crew needs to be able to move their arms particularly are are smaller crew members in this suit it's gotta be fitted to them in such a way that allows them to move so that the joints lineup with joint of your body so that it acts really much more like your body so the axiom. You has some very important features in the shoulders that allow you to move the bearings at the shoulder. We call them the side bearings s why the Siberians are much closer into the body. So aligns much better with Are Smaller crew members and allows them to move much more. Naturally Chris did. Some demonstrations demonstrations where she could actually really reach all the way across her body to grab something. In the current EMU are smaller crew members. Have a lot of difficulty doing that. It's a very difficult to reach the controls up around their head where the lights are where the cameras cameras are. It's much more difficult. So this is changing a lot of that and the pressure system. In addition what. You didn't see some problems. We'll have to tackle as the environments very different on the surface of the moon than it is in the space station. One of those is microgravity On the Space Station in one sixth gravity on the surface of the moon. So we have to deal with that. In addition there's there's a lot of dust We Learn Apollo. We took we brought a lot of that dust back with us. That dust is very sharp. It's very corrosive gets into our equipment and gets into the materials tinkle's in the bearings and so this suit has to protect itself from all of those environments. I'm so that's from the pressure garment. The helmet was different. The helmet hemispheric and it allows the crew members inside that suit ability to look down and see their feet to look up and see the sky look right and left to have a much wider range of vision in this suit from the pressure garment side now in going. Well what I'm hearing now is if if thinking about the the space that we have on the space station Shen if you look at them actually doing spacewalks. They're not really using their feet too much. They're using mostly arms. They need that mobility. But what I'm hearing now is the Xia Mu is All about mobility is about mobility about the flexibility of the legs. It's about the mobility of your arms. It's about that reach. You're getting all of those little extra things that are going to help you. You in exploring the surface of the moon exactly right. That's one of the major differences in terms of the pressure garments system. Now the life support system is also very different now the was is a beautiful youthful machine. It hasn't worked really well for us. But there's some features in that suit that we definitely WANNA change one of those as we wanNA make it safer. We wanted to have fewer failure modes a lot. Are you familiar with the NBA. twenty-three incident we had water in the helmet. Some of that is because of the complexities in that design. The water and air loops are in kind of close contact so we wanted to separate those sloops of the loops are completely separate. I'm in addition if you ever watch. TV as one of the main limitations for how long we can go is how much co two absorption capability the suit has has to absorb co two as the crew members bill work and build up that. Co Two in the system every system. We have today. Let him dockside the metrics cans that we use. Today I'll have a limited capacity once that system is full of carbon dioxide. You're finished you have to come back inside so it's A. It's a limit for how long you can stay outside the new system we built this. Call a swing swing bed That's been tested out on the space station or Ryan uses the system and it continuously scrub co two so it has to absorption beds. One of those beds is active. It's actively absorbing co two when it gets full we switch the system over to the other bed and we let it absorbs co two and while it's absorbing co two that I bet is exposed to vacuum and so all that co two was burned off into the environment and it empties the the case as you were and then when it's full then we switch back and forth back and forth so we have a continuous with ability to get rid of CO two out of the system. So what is it will no longer be a consumable limitation for us. We can go for as long as we have battery power on it will. We'll continue to develop CEO's so that's a big difference from the system we use today. That's huge these are. I can't wait to go into the details I do. I did want to switch over to the other to the other suit because I really wanted to do like a high level of like what is what is this suit and it sounds like it's it's just this it's this if you wanted to go outside of a habitat ed or your your land or whatever and explore the moon. This thing is great because of these reasons perfectly it now this Orion crew survival suit. This was the other one that they rolled out. It looks a little bit different now. What purpose does this? So there's something similar between both home. Fundamentally they have the same job they have to keep a human alive in a very extreme environment airmont but the environments that are designed to work in our significantly different.

Space Station Chris Chris EMU Chris Hansen International Space Station Orion Kate Rubens Johnson Space Center Chris Hanson NASA OX Nasr Chris Davis Xia Mu ARTEM Dust Gohmert Uva USA
"spacesuits" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

10:53 min | 1 year ago

"spacesuits" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"We we bring in experts. Scientists engineers astronauts all to let you know what's going on in the world of human spaceflight so on October fifteenth two thousand nineteen NASA unveiled the next generation of space suits. That will take humans to the moon with Nasr's artists program. I say spacesuits plural because there are two one forgetting to the moon and back and one for exploring the surface of the moon the Orion crew survival suit does exactly what it sounds like helps the crew survive in Orion the deep space capsule that will transport the crew to and from the moon but there are many layers to that and a lot of interesting technologies added to the spacesuit that you might not have thought about then there's the X.. EMU that will be used on on the moon's surface for those familiar with human spaceflight or those who have listened to our space suits episode episode. Sixteen intent you might recognize the extra drove the Hitler Mobility Unit in there the EMU. This is the suit used for spacewalks on the space station. Today the X.. In front is for exploration. Sure the name looks a little a little bit of the same but there are a lot of differences that makes the suit the right one for the moon so here to go into great detail about each of these suits and what we have to look forward to. Is Chris Hansen Anson. Chris is the manager of the extra vehicular activity office here at the Johnson Space Center. And he's here with us to go over the intricate details of the Orion crew. Survival suit the OX and the X.. Amu some of the development and testing and some of the milestones to look forward to until we actually see these suits in action both for testing and for when they're done take the first steps on the moon since nineteen seventy two so here we go. ARTEM is generation spacesuits with Chris Hanson. Enjoy the county. You have Chris Hansen. Thanks for coming on the podcast today. Sure thanks for having big event recently at headquarters the administrator brought out It was Chris Davis and Dust Gohmert and my per se awesome event. They were right in the suits. They were moving around. It looked really cool. Then you had accused with the administrator Kate Rubens was there and everything everything how is that. How was the whole then? Yeah so it's really exciting for me. It's the first time I've really spent any kind of close time with the administrator so that was really exciting. He's a very interesting in guy he's like a a storm roll into the room and he's very excited about what we do. He's very supportive of what we do. for those that have ever been lucky enough to meet Kate Ruins silence. She's also really really cool. She's one of the nicest smartest people I've ever Manso. It was really fun to be able to do that. Event with those two particularly talking about space suits and it was great because we're talking about the next generation of suits. I know a lot of us. You know we the EMU we've had a podcast about before this is the this is the space that's on the International Space Station right now but thinking about that next generation. You know you're looking at it and it feels real. It's like wow. That's that's going to be the suits we're going to be seeing on on. The surface of the moon is pretty cool so I wanted to go into all all the details with you. This will be great. You are the manager of the extra vehicular activity office mostly over the axiom. You write one of the WE'RE GONNA be talking about today so not mostly so actually my responsibility ability for EVA activities across the entire agency so everything and that includes the current Uva work. We do on space station with the AMU so my office is responsible for all of that. including exploration. Work that we do with the axiom. You and the TV systems that we'll be talking about today okay. Well let's start with the. Va Part of things. Because I think that's where you're at your expertise here we're talking about the X.. Is the exploration extravehicular mobility unit. We Love acronyms. So what is the. What are the main differences if you if you had a if you compare the EMU that we know today on the space station to the this X. Amu what the main differences that you would highlight? Yes let me start with a little bit of we've been doing. EVs for fifty years all the way back from Gemini by the Apollo Program. You saw hopping around on the moon. We learned learned so much from that. And then we we graduated into the space shuttle program so the EMU that we use today was actually developed in the late seventies early eighties and hasn't been modified significantly for use on the International Space Station. So the suit you see today is fundamentally the same suit. We used back in the late seventies early eighties. So we've learned a lot using that suit and so today we've tried to take everything we've learned about the old suit and an upgraded it improved. It tried to make it better. Her for the axiom. You so in the axiom you. A lot of those lessons learned have been rolled in inc.. If we start with the part that you can see so Chris Chris was out walking around and you got to see one of the main features features of what we call it the pressure garment system so the pressure garment system for sues. The part that you can see on the EMU it's white part it's the arms the legs the body the helmet all of that is what we call the pressure garment. The other part of that system is the portable life support system which is in the backpack. There's a lot of things in the background. It's a backpack. It's a very high tech check system There's a lot of differences between that and the current immune. I'll talk but let me start with the part. You could see so yes so. Chris was walking around the stage. And that's one of the important differences what we want when we go back to the moon this time and on to Mars is to actually do exploration and to do that. We have to allow astronauts to work like geologists fundamentally a a lot of science will be doing early on on the moon is geology. And if you've ever hung around with a geologist They don't like taking pads. They like getting off ties. They like climbing over rocks. They like interacting with the environment around them to learn. And so we've got to have a suit that allows them to do that. The original policy. It's it was very difficult for the crew to bend their knees. Bend down to loans wants to grab things they practically fall over At to pick up a rock and kind of do a push up to get back to back up and so we want to suit that enables them to move. And what you saw in the Xia Mu was a suit that's got lower torso mobile. You can actually bend your knees in. Bend your legs and Ben Down USA even in one G which is six is times more gravity than we'll have on the surface of the moon. Chris Chris was able to bend down. pick up a rock on the stage handed to the administrator In addition to that. So that's lower body mobility we've learned the current suit that upper body mobility is almost just as important the crew needs to be able to move their arms particularly are are smaller crew members in this suit it's gotta be fitted to them in such a way that allows them to move so that the joints lineup with joint of your body so that it acts really much more like your body so the axiom. You has some very important features in the shoulders that allow you to move the bearings at the shoulder. We call them the side bearings s why the Siberians are much closer into the body. So aligns much better with Are Smaller crew members and allows them to move much more. Naturally Chris did. Some demonstrations demonstrations where she could actually really reach all the way across her body to grab something. In the current EMU are smaller crew members. Have a lot of difficulty doing that. It's a very difficult to reach the controls up around their head where the lights are where the cameras cameras are. It's much more difficult. So this is changing a lot of that and the pressure system. In addition what. You didn't see some problems. We'll have to tackle as the environments very different on the surface of the moon than it is in the space station. One of those is microgravity On the Space Station in one sixth gravity on the surface of the moon. So we have to deal with that. In addition there's there's a lot of dust We Learn Apollo. We took we brought a lot of that dust back with us. That dust is very sharp. It's very corrosive gets into our equipment and gets into the materials tinkle's in the bearings and so this suit has to protect itself from all of those environments. I'm so that's from the pressure garment. The helmet was different. The helmet hemispheric and it allows the crew members inside that suit ability to look down and see their feet to look up and see the sky look right and left to have a much wider range of vision in this suit from the pressure garment side now in going. Well what I'm hearing now is if if thinking about the the space that we have on the space station Shen if you look at them actually doing spacewalks are not really using their feet too much. They're using mostly arms. They need that mobility. But what I'm hearing now is the Xia Mu is All about mobility is about mobility about the flexibility of the legs. It's about the mobility of your arms. It's about that reach. You're getting all of those little extra things that are going to help you. You in exploring the surface of the moon exactly right. That's one of the major differences in terms of the pressure garments system. Now the life support system is also very different. Now the was is a beautiful beautiful machine. It hasn't worked really well for us. But there's some features in that suit that we definitely WANNA change one of those as we wanNA make it safer. We wanted to have fewer failure modes a lot. Are you familiar with the NBA. twenty-three incident we had water in the helmet. Some of that is because of the complexities in that design. The water and air loops are in kind of close contact so we wanted to separate those sloops of the loops are completely separate. I'm in addition if you ever watch. TV as one of the main limitations for how long we can go is how much co two absorption capability the suit has has to absorb co two as the crew members bill work and build up that. Co Two in the system every system. We have today. Let him dockside the metrics cans that we use. Today I'll have a limited capacity once that system is full of carbon dioxide. You're finished you have to come back inside so it's A. It's a limit for how long you can stay outside the new system we built this. Call a swing swing bed That's been tested out on the space station or Ryan uses the system and it continuously scrub co two so it has to absorption beds. One of those beds is active. It's actively absorbing co two when it gets full we switch the system over to the other bed and we let it absorbs co two and while it's absorbing co two that I bet is exposed to vacuum and so all that co two was burned off into the environment and it empties the the case as you were and then when it's full then we switch back and forth back and forth so we have a continuous with ability to get rid of CO two out of the system. So what is it will no longer be a consumable limitation for us. We can go for as long as we have battery power on it will. We'll continue to develop CEO's so that's a big difference from the system we use today. That's huge these are. I can't wait to go into the details I do. I did want to switch over to the other to the other suit because I really wanted to do like a high level of like what is what is this suit and it sounds like it's it's just this it's this if you wanted to go outside of a habitat ed or your your land or whatever and explore the moon. This thing is great because of these reasons perfectly it now this Orion crew survival suit. This was the other one that they rolled out. It looks a little bit different now. What purpose does this? So there's something similar between both home. Fundamentally they have the same job they have to keep a human alive in a very extreme environment airmont but the environments that are designed to work in our significantly different.

Space Station Chris Chris EMU International Space Station Chris Hansen Anson Orion Chris Hansen Kate Rubens Johnson Space Center Chris Hanson NASA OX Nasr Chris Davis Xia Mu ARTEM Dust Gohmert Uva
Abducted: Emanuel Swedenborg

Extraterrestrial

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Abducted: Emanuel Swedenborg

"Emanuel Swedenborg floated freely through the void of space. Is he wasn't in a vessel nor did he wear a spacesuit and yet he was able to move comfortably through the vacuum the earth spun far below. Oh Him Emanuel couldn't see it but he could sense it on a spiritual level struck by a sudden bout of inspiration Emmanuel produced a pen then paper and began to write. He'd seen incredible things wonder if things and he didn't WanNa Forget. A single detail Emmanuel scrawled several beings aliens from the planet mercury approached Emmanuel. Couldn't see their physical bodies for the existed stood only as disembodied spirits. They asked to see what he was writing. But Emanuel was too caught up in his literary frenzy to answer like their namesake. Mm Sake the mercurial were all about speed and so. They were impatient when they couldn't get an immediate answer. From a manual they began to berate and consult him. They claimed that he was a terrible person and deeply selfish but even this didn't distract Emmanuel from his writing then he began to feel a pressure on both sides of his skull moment by moment the pain grew more intense. The Pen and paper finally forgotten forgotten Emmanuel presses. Palm's too these sides of his head writhing in Agony Emmanuel survived the psychic attack and and his trip through space but when he woke up in his home in Stockholm Sweden in Seventeen fifty eight he knew no one would ever believe his accounts of his interplanetary journeys with aliens from Mercury.

Emmanuel Emanuel Swedenborg Stockholm Palm Sweden
Custom Fit Spacesuits

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Custom Fit Spacesuits

"When it comes to spacesuits orange is the new gray this is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave save our future when astronauts are hours away from launching on Artemis missions to the moon they'll put on brightly colored orange spacesuits called the Orion crew survival system suit drying on six decades of spaceflight experience NASA has re-engineered the suit worn on the space shuttle to enhance range of motion and improve safety for the astronauts? The helmet is lighter stronger comes in more than one size is helps reduce noise and is easier to connect to communication systems the outer cover is orange to make crewmembers easily visible bowl especially for sea rescues a re-engineered Zipper allows astronauts to put the suit on quickly gloves are more durable and touchscreen screen compatible each suit is equipped with a suite of survival gear that would allow astronauts to stay inside the suit for up to six days if necessary necessary Orion suits will be custom fitted for each crew member designed to accommodate astronauts of all sizes for innovation innovation.

Orion Nasa Six Decades Six Days
Finally, An All-Female Spacewalk

Short Wave

02:01 min | 1 year ago

Finally, An All-Female Spacewalk

"Back in March NASA got US real jazzed up about an all fee Male spacewalk for the first time a one hundred percent female team was gonNA float outside the International Space Station and take care of some astronaut business needed a medium sized spacesuit and only one medium suit was ready to go not a great look for NASA Women Social Media blasted the decision including Hillary Clinton who tweeted make another soup and then fast forward to last Friday Christina Jessica with that the emergency service closed it finally happened I can't we are so proud of you and got a degree today astronauts Kristina Cook and Jessica Mirror both in medium-sized suits floated. into open space to replace faulty equipment related to powering the station but I'm pregnant working with us this morning in this is thirty five years after the first woman space walked in for Ellen Sto fan a former chief scientists at NASA that's too long to wait the you know the time that we have between these milestones You know I just shake my head a little bit because I it's just women are completely capable of getting the job done and in this case it really was a question of opportunity and equipment and now that it's happened it's great you know the fact that they were women was irrelevant they got the job that needed to be done on today on the show NASA celebrates the first all female spacewalks doc but how much progress has actually been made and I get to talk to Christina and Jessica the history-making spacewalkers themselves very briefly from space station this is NPR how do you hear me we have you loud and clear NPR. How'd you hear US

Christina Jessica Nasa International Space Station NPR Jessica Mirror Hillary Clinton Kristina Cook Ellen Sto One Hundred Percent Thirty Five Years
The first all-female spacewalk is underway

WSJ What's News

01:37 min | 1 year ago

The first all-female spacewalk is underway

"NASA is trying again for its first ever all female spacewalk the initial attempt was abandoned earlier this year because NASA didn't have enough space suits in the right size Taylor whom law has more so what happened was they had a different astronaut in the International Space Station in the spring it was Ann McLean And she was she had trained on earth in both medium and large suits space suits And once she got to space and did a spacewalk she discovered she preferred her fellow astronaut Kristina Cook preferred the medium as well and there is only one spacesuit aboard the International Space Station so they had switch it up a little bit and she did at different spacewalk and they didn't get an opportunity to do it together so today Nasa Astronauts Kristina Cook and Jessica Mayor or scheduled to venture outside the International Space Station they're going to replace a power controller that failed over the weekend here's Taylor again she'll be originally intended to go out Monday October twenty first to upgrade some of the batteries and the outside of the station there was work done previous weekend and when they did that they discover that they had to fix it's part of that component so they moved up there walked today instead so the original goal is to upgrade the batteries instead they're going out to fix part of it so they can continue with the upgrades George the spacewalk which is the two hundred twenty first one to occur at the International Space Station since December nineteen ninety eight is scheduled to begin at about seven fifty. am eastern time it will be streamed on NASA's website if you WanNa

Nasa Taylor International Space Station Kristina Cook George Ann Mclean Jessica Mayor Wanna