18 Burst results for "Space Station Program"

"space station program" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

05:10 min | 10 months ago

"space station program" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"What are what is the message that you WANNA send to them? It's in. It is a very exciting time. Right, 'cause, 'cause We have this whole moon Mars Enterprise now the honors program is spitting up and we are going to you know, go to the surface of the moon to to do some very exciting science and with the goal. On the horizon of always tomorrow, so these systems that we are developing and partnering with Industry Partners to develop. Are GonNa set, lay the foundation for what we do Mars right and so It's very important for us to. Not only do the mission to to the moon, but also be very very cognizant of that. These are laying the steppingstone. We need to learn as much as we can us, we do. These things to to inform of all the things that we're going to be planning on doing when we. Build spacecraft to go to Mars right and so. I think it's it's a very exciting time for NASA. An exciting time in the future is is Exciting dunk is I think every year is just GonNa be is another step and you know it's like I said you know all I think for through. Balk as It's a challenging problem. His probably one of the one of humanity's greatest challenge ill and I think if there's a will we you know I I don't doubt that we can achieve it but it is a challenge, and and we have. We have some of the brightest people on the planet trying to solve it. and you know it's it's IT'S A. It's a great thing and it's. It's something that you know. I think it's. Going to be so rewarding for for all of humanity. It's one of those you know. Think about people talk about you know well. What does NASA do besides sending people to to to space? We do these innovations that we have to develop so that we can send people to Mars. They will have long lasting fight on our society and. We might not know what that is until years later, but it will and and. and. That's kind of the challenge for from you know cocoa. Pr Perspective Right. You know what you know causing x dollars to send people tomorrow. So what does that? You know we could spend that money here on earth, but you don't know what you're going to get out of it, but we know that it's going to be impactful because we we have. We have a track record of of all the great things that has spun off from NASA technologies that we've you know came out of the Lunar Program and the Space Station Program. Right and the Mars you know. program will be an exponential in terms of how challenging it is right. We're only two and a half miles off the coast of Spain. Right now we're going all the way to the to to to America. Right and so. Will you know whatever we come up with and some solution? Technology advancement will be. I think societal changing so I'm glad you're on the tank. And looking forward to bringing on others to continue it. It's GonNa. It's been great work and this has been fascinating conversation Patrick. Thank you very much for having me. It's been great awesome. You John Brinkley. myspace! Hey.

NASA Space Station Program Patrick Industry Partners Spain John Brinkley. America
"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

09:49 min | 10 months ago

"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"You already mentioned a little bit about artists program than what we can learn about. The near rectilinear halo been some of the technologies needed for gateway. What will that help inform when it comes to some? Some of these propulsion technologies, and some of the ways that we're thinking about how the moon can help us get from a proportions perspective I mean that's one of the benefit. Right WH-. You know for for their for the you know we what we've been looking at. The the subcamp hybrid is that the electric propulsion thrusters that we are you know that. We are planning on potentially using for Morris Transit is is being planned for the gateway as well right, and so there are some synergy there, and there's some you know. Obviously there's will be some challenges with the development cycle, because the power level was totally different. but there's you can draw little family tree back up to that that particular design I think the big thing for for for the artists program is of how the private part private public partnership is kind of you know unfolding in front of our eyes. I think getting kinda framework for this for this private public partnership. As part of the program. How we can leverage a lot of things that are happening in the in the in the in the in the industry and the private sector. Can really inform and really drive how we think about designing the mission and think about how we. Procure or or leverage all the things that are happening and and you know obviously the private industry have. Quite different objectives compared to what the government. Wants to do we want to explore we want to you know expand our knowledge, and and really drive and push the technological boundaries. and so that part is has to be the forefront of what we what we try to plan for and I think we are and but I think the industry in terms of their Push for innovation in areas that the governments are might not be interested in is also very beneficial, because they are very interesting, and in streamlining the manufacturing process, be more efficient with their design cycle, and and how robust their systems are the way they do their testing a lot we can learn from. The commercial! Operating. Implementing commercial partner I did see you know just just. Having a synergy with a lot of things that are doing and leveraging some of the stuff. And having just just dialogue, and just understanding how they're doing their. Business Model IF YOU WANNA call it and how we can learn from that and changed the way we're doing testing and doing development and things like that L. in in all industry in and tech in in particular you know you need to have these kind of breakthrough and these Industry kind of breaking. You know a moments right, and and to drive us out of these kind of complacency that we're in, and you know at some point. We gotTA decide Yeah. We got it. We want to go to Mars. And we want to be able to do certain things and we just have to. You know push for yeah, so it's that. There is a balance. I feel between innovation, trying new things and doing things a certain way, and maybe the tradition does have certain benefit of. Precedence, yeah, I informs what is possible because we as long as we learn from our history and we you know we learn from the mistakes we've we've. We've made right. You know struggle with every day you know, make sure that. I think this way. Is it because I'm being informed by data and I'm being informed by by good sound analysis, or am I you know leaning this way because of my you know inherent bias or in haired perception of preconceived notion of what the system is right. and that struggle is you know is is is real. In at all levels, and that's something that we have the kind of cognitive. Yeah, so when you're thinking about. Solving these problems with with team members. Finding away to think efficiently and making sure that you were. Considering all of these different things, but not getting too bogged down. By these decisions that that's a balance just. Not just not just designing these trajectories and thinking about these systems, but coming to a consensus on how to proceed. Yeah, absolutely and you know it's great that we you know our branch particularly had. Every year, so we get one or two a new hires, and we have a bunch of interns that come in, so it's always great when they come in. With fresh perspective, they have not been in the mud meal making these you know trajectories. And things like that, so they come in and say wait. What did you do it that way and we go. What did we do it that way? and. We need that right because you know you know you don't want to end up. In in in kind of an environment in which new people coming in you know our conforming, you know there are expected to conform to whatever standard you have. You want them to come in with a fresh mind with critical view, and to to provide us with a different perspective and that's I. Think the most valuable thing we have especially here. Here in NASA of you know our our notoriety and and people want to come to work at NASA, and it's a great thing and we need to keep hiring. We need to keep these people coming in and young minds, and and really get them engaged not just in school, but before so I think a lot of the public outreach things we we do is is extremely important I think NASA is still one of the. Most sought after thing, people say oh, NASA, that's amazing and it is You know I'm. I'm thrilled to go to work every day. and and we need that kind of enthusiasm and You know to continue for an in people coming in. Are you know they're brilliant and you may need to be make sure that we are doing the right thing and doing doing things that you know to to make them feel like they're in power to. Change the status quo. So thinking about what we've discussed today thinking about the difficulties of of. rendezvous with with Mars and with the different technologies that we're considering. Reaching out to those people who want to come work at NASA and and fight to innovate and fight to change the way that things are doing what are what is the message that you WanNa send to them? It's in. It is a very exciting time. Right, 'cause, 'cause We have this whole moon Mars enterprise now. the honors program is spitting up and we are going to you know, go to the surface of the moon to to do some very exciting science and with the goal. On the horizon of always tomorrow, so these systems that we are developing and partnering with Industry Partners To to develop. Are GonNA set. Lay The foundation for what we do, at Mars, right and so It's very important for us to. Not only do the mission to to the moon, but also be very very cognizant of that. These are laying the steppingstone. We need to learn as much as we can us, we do. These things to to inform of all the things that we're going to be planning on doing when we. Build spacecraft to go to Mars right and so. I think it's. It's a very exciting time for NASA. An exciting time in the future is is Exciting dunk is I think every year is just GonNa be is another step, and and you know it's like I, said you know all I think for through. Balk as? It's a challenging problem. His probably one of the one of humanity's greatest challenge ill and I. Think if there's a will we you know I i. don't doubt that we can achieve it but it is a challenge, and and we have. We have some of the brightest people on on on the planet, trying to solve it. and you know it's it's IT'S A. It's a great thing and it's. It's something that you know. I think it's. Going to be so rewarding for for all of humanity you. It's one of those you know. Think about people talk about you know well. What does NASA do besides sending people to to to space? We do these innovations that we have to develop so that we can send people to Mars. They will have long lasting fight on our society and. We might not know what that is until years later, but it will and and. And that's kind of the challenge for from you know cocoa PR perspective, right? You know what you know causing x dollars to send people tomorrow. So what does that? You know we could spend that money here on earth, but it's like you don't know what you're going to get out of it, but we know that it's going to be impactful because we we have. We have a track record of of all the great things that has spun off from NASA technologies that we've you know came out of the lunar. Program and the Space Station Program. Right and the Mars you know program will be an exponential in terms of how challenging it is right. We're only two and a half miles off. The coast Spain right now. We're going all the way to the to to to America right and so. Will you know whatever we come up with and some solution? Technology advancement will be. I think societal changing so I'm glad you're on the tank..

NASA Morris Transit Spain partner Space Station Program America
"space station program" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

15:45 min | 1 year ago

"space station program" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"I'm Pat Ryan on this podcast talk with scientists engineers astronauts and other folks part in America's space exploration program and today we're focusing on very cool science part honest when we talk about science being conducted on the International Space Station. We're usually talking about something happening. In one of the mini laboratory facilities inside station's modules the destiny lab or the Columbus or Kibo laboratories. But those are not the only spots where science is done for instance black November. We spent three episodes one seventeen when eighteen the one nineteen discussing spacewalks to restore operations of the Alpha magnetic spectrometer it gathers data on cosmic particles from out on the top of the stations. Trust pointed out towards space there are a number of other scientific experiments gathering data from out on the station's exterior. Many of them are pointed down from a perch. Two hundred fifty miles up. The space station provides a stable platform for scientists who are interested in a different perspective on the home planet. One of those scientists is Dr Williams. Stephan off an internationally recognized researcher in remote sensing of urban geological and ecological processes. He is manager. The expiration science office in the Astro Materials Research and Exploration Science Division located at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston Steffen off serves as the International Space Station Program Scientist for Earth Observations and Ajay AC- for remote sensing of Earth. Today we're GonNa talk about some of those experiments and why they matter including some experiments that turn out the really outstanding photographs of earth that have been taken from the station. Be Sure to check the episode Web Page and the show notes because there. We posted the photos that we're talking about so that you can see them and follow along as also. There are links to other sites where you can find other photographs so on the occasion of Earth Day. We offer a look at Earth from orbit with Dr Will Steph Nov. here we go On County Court we will.

International Space Station Johnson Space Center Exploration Science Division Pat Ryan Kibo laboratories Dr Williams America Ajay AC Stephan Astro Materials Research Columbus is manager NASA researcher Houston Scientist
"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"One the view from above. I'm Pat Ryan on this podcast. Talk with scientists engineers astronauts and other folks about their part in America's space exploration program and today we're focusing on very cool science part honest when we talk about science being conducted on the International Space Station. We're usually talking about something happening. In one of the mini laboratory facilities inside station's modules the destiny lab or the Columbus or Kibo laboratories. But those are not the only spots where science is done for instance black November. We spent three episodes one seventeen when eighteen the one nineteen discussing spacewalks to restore operations of the Alpha magnetic spectrometer it gathers data on cosmic particles from out on the top of the stations. Trust pointed out towards space there are a number of other scientific experiments gathering data from out on the station's exterior. Many of them are pointed down from a perch. Two hundred fifty miles up. The space station provides a stable platform for scientists who are interested in a different perspective on the home planet. One of those scientists is Dr Williams. Stephan off an internationally recognized researcher in remote sensing of urban geological and ecological processes. He is manager. The expiration science office in the Astro Materials Research and Exploration Science Division located at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston Steffen off serves as the International Space Station Program Scientist for Earth Observations and Ajay AC- for remote sensing of Earth. Today we're GonNa talk about some of those experiments and why they matter including some experiments that turn out the really outstanding photographs of earth that have been taken from the station. Be Sure to check the episode Web Page and the show notes because there. We posted the photos that we're talking about so that you can see them and follow along as also. There are links to other sites where you can find other photographs so on the occasion of Earth Day. We offer a look at Earth from orbit with Dr Will Steph Nov. here we go County court we will.

International Space Station Johnson Space Center Pat Ryan Exploration Science Division Kibo laboratories Dr Williams America Stephan Ajay AC Astro Materials Research is manager Columbus NASA researcher Houston Scientist
"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

13:17 min | 1 year ago

"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Stelo. What does it mean to be the chief scientist in the ISS Program Science Office or thanks Patrick? That's that's a good question and it's interesting from the perspective of what it means to be a program scientist so the ISIS program is a group of of managers that helped bring all the wonderful experiments that we have to the space station Those managers have the responsibility. For not only assuring that The vehicles the rockets get there with all of the payload and that the station operates the way it should But also in terms of the chief scientists making sure that all the science is integrated into the plan so that it can be performed on orbit so we serve a purpose to both prioritize all the incoming science and to provide an independent advisory role to the program manager for Questions regarding the the the flight of that science and because the the science is an important part of the International Space Station Program. But not the only part. This is an so you're helping with the integration of that that science Goal into the whole program. That's absolutely correct. I mean space station has been a great vehicle. Not only to showcase our engineering capabilities being able to assemble it on orbit This huge juncture and ultimately awesome laboratory. That we've got up there but it's it's also this international collaboration so as we have our NASA science solve our international partners have their science and we need to integrate our roles with with their sciences. Well if we focus on the science part of it how do you characterize the overall science mission of the space station apart from any individual experiment? Yeah that that's a great distinction. Because I really see it as a two-fold science mission first of all there's the the science to bring discoveries and knowledge about how we're going to continue and enhance our capability to explore space and secondly there's the National Lab mission which is to return benefits to the earth so both of those science focuses are really the heart of what we do on space station to help with our exploration mission and then also return new discoveries and science benefits to Earth at you point out an important point that the International Space Station is designated as a United States national laboratory in a and that's the point of that designation it is and it's also a unique national laboratory in the fact that it is multidisciplinary nature most for national labs are focused for one specific scientific area. Where the I S is. Just this incredible multidisciplinary laboratory where you have biology right next to physics in in Iraq onboard. The space station. It is also unique in the sense that it is in space and it has very little gravity. A what makes that environment attractive to researchers. Why do they WanNa do experiments where there is no gravity so unlike here on earth all right so let's talk about microgravity and what that is just a to help everybody out of course there is gravity in space in fact most of the gravity we feel on earth is right there present on the space station however it's counterbalanced by the centrifugal force that we feel as we're in orbit so essentially were in free-fall the entire time and that results in a micro gravitational force That our experiments are exposed to over time. And it's that overtime part. That's unique about the space station. We can simulate microgravity on earth but we can only do it for a few seconds in the case of a drop tower where you drop an item in freefall. That's good for about two to ten seconds or you could go on a parabolic flight like some of our aircraft to and that gets you about twenty two seconds of microgravity exposure. Or if you're on a sounding rocket one that just goes up and comes comes back down you're talking about six minutes of microgravity on Space Station in orbit were able to maintain that microgravity level for very long time and that allows us to look at processes that need to develop over a long time for instance wound healing. We WanNa know what happens to At if they have to recover from a wound in microgravity. Does it take longer does it? He'll differently. That's a process that takes time and so being able to study that in analog models on the space station requires us to have a long amount of time. Growing plants is another great example. You can't grow plant in a couple of second so we need that exposure over time to be able to tell us what the impact of microgravity is on this organism both of those examples. Strike me as research. That's really important if you're planning to send people to keep them in space for long periods of time like you would do if you sent them away from Earth. That's part of what we're what does kinds of experiments are aimed learning more about. That's absolutely the exploration part of our mission. It's how do we conduct science? That's going to help us with our exploration goals especially for the artist program. Artists of course has multiple destinations one of them being sustainable presence on the lunar surface the other being the eventual exploration of Mars and those voyages are going to take a lot longer times to to be able to reach those destinations and also to be able to make maintain our astronaut health during that time so a lot of our investigations are focused on doing those tasks. We also need to look at things like technologies. How do we close the environmental control system loop that means? How do we make sure all of the stuff that we used to keep ourselves healthy? Oxygen Water food is recyclable and We can get back as much as possible of that. We need to close those loops to be able to support a mission to Mars over a long duration. Because we can't bring all of those things brand new things with us. That's right as we step out across the solar system those platforms we have get and smaller. I assess is a big stepping stone. However are lunar base will be much smaller and Mars probably a much smaller outpost as well so we can't just afford to bring all of that mess with us. We have to figure out ways to be smart and recycle. Most of our goods are there. Particular kinds of experiments that are the International Space Station is really good at hosting Providing a place for certain ones of the disciplines that that are underway in terms of discoveries. I think what you're getting at is is oftentimes were surprised when we make discoveries in orbit about the way something behaves and two of those fields while we make discoveries in in all of them two of them are most prevalent. And I think that's in fluid physics because of the way fluids behave in microgravity In microgravity the the surface tension force is the largest force you have and that has impacts on the way fluids behave in systems and we want to know how they behave because fluids are prevalent in fuel tanks in Marino Nicolas systems in all areas. Where you know you have to process water or other Critical fluids and eclipse being environmental control. That's right But I think it's good example in that environment where there's only microscopic level of gravity fluids liquids. Don't come down to the floor. They don't they're not pulled down like they are on earth and you've gotta find out what they are going to do exactly and bubbles don't separate so bubbles can delay havoc on your your system so if they don't come out or you can't position them correctly it becomes a difficult Case for your system to be able to manage that the other area where we're continually making discoveries is in the human system just exactly what extended duration microgravity exposure does to the human system A couple of years ago We discovered What we now refer to as sands or spaceflight Acquired Neurotic Syndrome sands is A case where we've seen astronauts vision deteriorate after long duration stays on orbit and this happens to some people and it doesn't happen to everyone and so is very critical for us to understand one if we can tell if someone's going to be susceptible to to this deterioration and to how to prepare counter-measures to help them and and make sure that their vision is in severely impacted on a long duration mission to be clear the the impact is. I've understood it as has been. I guess the best way to say is fairly minimal. That astronauts have their vision has has degraded a bit. But it's not like they've had a dramatic decrease in vision. Is it well? Some of it can be most of it has been reversible but some has not I again it is variable based on the individual But some of the impairment can be significant with cotton wool spots noticed in the field of vision and and other impediments to to normal twenty twenty vision. Which would like our astronauts all to have short. And and it's gotta it's gotTa be annoying to know that it happens to some and not others and you're trying to figure out why absolutely and this is where the human research program comes in and they're dedicated. Research is really aimed at scientifically looking into the background. Cause for this happens and then investigating countermeasures to help it Help tolerated over time. Those two examples then fluid physics in the human system that the human life sciences the International Space Station is trying to figure out things we need to know to support future exploration does right. Is there a running total in you know? In more than nineteen years now with human crew members on board. How many experiments have have been run on the station? I'll say a lot. But the actual number is two thousand nine hundred seventy one investigations as retailers as of the end of increment Fifty nine so close to three thousand in that represents just over four thousand different investigators that we've had participate in that research and those investigators have come from one hundred eight countries and regions so just not The US and its international partners. But we've Taken in research and had a CO principal investigators in principal investigators from one hundred eight different countries. And that's more countries than our even partners in the space station project. Far for the whole world is pretty much in. Well not yet do we. We would love to have them join good We're getting there. We're getting in the introduction. I mentioned that you are also had the responsibility as the station's R- In the Stations Research Integration Office. Can you explain to somebody outside the building what that means sure so When we get a research sponsor who comes in and now might be somebody like NASA's Human Research Programmers Base life Biology program come in and they sponsor research and select a Pi. And give them a grant to do this research that. Pi then needs to figure out how to get their experiment to the space station. They do that. Using payload developers and the Research Integration Office as the office here in the NASA I s Pergram that helps those payload developers through all the sea of bureaucracy that surrounds NASA requirement to fly your investigation on federally owned via. I can't imagine so we step in to help them with the tough stuff that understanding the safety and vehicle requirements making sure. They've put together a schedule that gets them to the launch on time and then understanding their science requirements and how that translates into Performance of their investigation on orbit so being able to help Our Payloads Operation Center in Huntsville understand how.

Space Station International Space Station International Space Station Pr NASA US ISS Program Science Office scientist program manager Stations Research Integration Patrick ISIS Research Integration Office Huntsville Iraq Marino Nicolas Our Payloads Operation Center Neurotic Syndrome cotton wool spots principal
"space station program" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

16:09 min | 1 year ago

"space station program" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"It's brought us more of an understanding about the universe about the effects of gravity about the benefits that research can bring to all of humankind. The International Space Station has taught us what humans are truly capable of and inspired so many more to do and pursue great things all because in the pursuit of human space exploration space stations have held an important status in its history and generations of space explorers before us and even early thinkers new. This pursuit was so important. So today we're taking a journey through history and the history of space stations coming on the podcast. Today is Dr Gary Kit Macher Communications and education mission manager in the International Space Station program. Kim Mockeries worked at NASA for thirty five years and has written several books about space. Stations including Nasr's reference guide to the ISS and he's also taught several courses about space station spaceflight and space commercialization at Mit Sloan School of Management and the University of Houston. So here we go from concept on paper to space stations of history with Gary Kit. Macher enjoy five county mark. You have to ask Gary Kit.

International Space Station Macher Communications Gary Kit Dr Gary Kit Nasr Mit Sloan School of Management Kim Mockeries ISS NASA University of Houston
"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

15:35 min | 1 year ago

"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"That story is Dan Goldin. Who was the administrator Peter. I think he's the longest serving administrator of NASA if I'm not mistaken but he sort of laid the foundation pre decatur planning team. I know one of the slogans slogans was faster better cheaper. you know he had a lot of focus on. Mars and there were a lot of good things that were happening. Pre Nineteen Ninety nine. You had this discovery of a meteorite India right that could brought them more questions of is there really life on Mars. There were like maybe a little hints in there yet. Great things like Pathfinder. You had the Hubble servicing mission. Things were things were going well right. In the late nineties well Yes for the most part they were the faster better cheaper. Initiative initiative was really considered a great success and like you said Pathfinder and sojourner rovers were really really very very highly acclaimed. The there were a couple of notable failures. You had the one thousand nine hundred ninety nine Mars Polar Lander and then the Mars climate orbiter which impacted Dan Goldens thinking at that time hi and Ed also the space station and the shuttle were starting to encounter some cost overrun so he was really starting to think at that point in time that we needed to start planning for the poche shuttle and post station Shen period right yeah and that's kind of where where this all kicks off right so so one thousand nine hundred ninety nine the formation of the Takeda Planning Team. Let's get right into it what were some of the first steps to get to what would be the EPA of if i May I just wanted to mention engine. A couple of the reasons that Dan Gordon wanted to establish a decatur point planning team when we interviewed him for this book he just sort of take them off in quick fashion but the more we thought about them the more significant they seemed so in no particular order he mentioned four different factors one was this again. This is one thousand nine hundred ninety nine so the next year would be a new presidential election a new administration because President Clinton already served two terms so he wanted to prepare a slate a game plan for the next president whoever that would be so. That's that's one item. another thing was he wanted to prepare for such a time where there would be a a a bull market if you will there would be money available in the economy to do big things in space right and then a third thing was he wanted to integrate robotic spaceflight and human spaceflight previously he felt that culturally. NASA had suffered from operating under these distinct silos if you will were the people who did robotic space science didn't didn't really cooperate much for the people who did human spaceflight and then last and perhaps at least. I don't know he he sort of decried. What was the slogan that was common. Lee heard at the time of Moore's or bust and by that what he meant was he wanted a truly compelling rationale to send humans to Mars if if there was one and he wanted more even more than that he wanted Eh truly compelling rationale to do whatever the game plan would be not just talk about things that sounded cool but why are we doing doing them fundamentally and I know one of the one of the I guess main items to make this successful was to have the right people. I know there are some key players in this whole story and I'm. I'm Mike Butcher the name so just correct me if I if I do. Steve Zaka wits yeah okay okay. I know he's a very key player in this. I believe at the time in one thousand nine hundred nine he was with the office of Management and Budget Chief of science and space programs but there's also Jim Garvin Lease Guerra some other folks that he recruited to really focus on these initiatives well so Steve Asako. It's over at O. M. B. He came up with the idea he and his team to give NASA five million dollars per year over the next few years to initiate these studies which became the Decatur Planning Team the people at Naso like Lisa Guerra and Garvan and Harley thrown sin were chosen and by the heads of the office of spaceflight and and Science Joe Rothenberg was in charge of spaceflight and Ed Weiler was in charge compliance at that time I say so as taking it was it was a signing these folks to different areas and having them focused their efforts on unifying into a common common goal that's correct and it was top down it was it was control of this and the inspiration of course came from Dan Goldin Steve Izhak quits but it was really being managed at NASA headquarters and I by by the by the heads of spaceflight and science and they were or pulling from the NASA centers but the idea was that whatever policy would be developed would be implemented by headquarters in the priorities would would be set by headquarters wiler and Rothenberg work dubbed the stakeholders and so they they got to choose who would be on this his team okay were they were they were some of the leadership of this decatur planning team and and you are mentioning a top down sort of strategy and I believe that was you know the Decatur Planning team team was organized or maybe executed in phases and that was part of phase one which was the charter was this top down strategy and I believe part of that was a a forward-looking strategy not to not to look at past concepts as much and I know one of the big key drivers here was to be science driven and technology enable able right. That's correct yeah and what was the what was the I guess reasoning behind that why why be science-driven well they breath part of it was Dan Goldin was looking for a new rationale for spaceflight and a lot of people at NASA at that time also thought that the scientific tiffin goals as they were being articulated by the science community. The National Academy of Sciences were really solid ones that deserved consideration. Shen and could really help set the pace for future space flight and determine where we should go for how long we should go so Dan Goldin I think grabbed onto that and some of the personnel on the team reflected that desire to have science the scientific goals determining the pace and the the destinations and the other half of that was technology enabled and the idea there it would really be that technology are the state of technology would influence the pace of exploration program as well and where we could go yeah. I know that in terms of being science driven I can. I can say confidently now. You know working very closely with the International Space Station Program. That's is definitely one of the main drivers of communication and efforts even on the space station now so that's that's definitely still true today. You know when we're talking about laying the foundation for what is his twenty first century space travel. I believe that's still true today. I know especially in these early phases I believe one of the one of the ideas was to be quote destination independent you know like designing technologies and and being technology enabled and understanding and driving toward that science but being having no place to go initially. I believe had its own hazards. Yeah that's correct. That was a big discussion from the very beginning from the very first meeting was not being tied to any specific destination although they were later kind of lay lay out clear destinations to go the the real concept here's to develop the capabilities to go wherever you want wherever later on the science determined or whatever other factor determined would be the best place to go and one of the funding strategies. Was this other quote buying and by the yard what does that what does that mean well. It's really the same concept oh it's related to to the other science driven driven technology enabled in the sense that you have to devise the program to sustain the political winds and the budgetary ups and downs and and so we were and and this is what distinguishes has the DPT This is one of the things that distinguishes dpt from what eventually was the vision for space exploration. The concept at the very beginning was that under Dan Goldin was that this was not a big announcement was not likely a big announcement of sending humans beyond low-earth orbit so the idea was really to to slowly early gradually develop these capabilities so when the time came if there was a shift in public opinion or a shift in Nasr's budgetary fortunes than we would have the technologies in place to do it but we couldn't do that with one with a big apollo announcement we they were really thinking this was going to be gradual and so we had to slowly develop those capabilities and technologies right and sort of the idea that we knew new basically what kinds of technologies we needed so we might as well get started on those so whether it's in space propulsion or crew and Creuse crew in life sciences safety issues to maintain the health of the crew on the mission long duration mission those kinds kinds of things we knew what we needed to develop so we might as well just get started as much as we could sort of building generic technologies that then could be tailored toward toward the particular mission right and that eventually led to I guess in two thousand phase two of this whole to cato planning team was actually thinking one of specific architectures and I know one of the key points here in this story was the why river retreat what happened there well will some people who participated indicate oh planning team felt that it was certainly a watershed moment but not a good way and for a variety of reasons there were some go golden sort of the DPT participants at the time sort of felt that Gordon lost interest in what they were doing when before he was very interested in what they were doing joked about being part of the team himself and this kind of thing and it turned out that there were some other things that were weighing on the administrators mind at the time such as ISS assez cost overruns that not everybody knew about within at the time and other things so it sort of shifted a little bit but and things moved on from there a little bit but at the same time they were still thinking about some of their earlier goals and this phrase of sneaking up on Mars came about a little bit earlier before then and it's worth just mentioning that the idea was sort of as Glenn was saying before that we would have sort of a plan on the shelf for when circumstances dictated it because the idea was that a lot of people in the space community wanted to send humans to Mars but we again needed to find a compelling rationale and the right time for the right time period to initiate such big program so until then we the decayed planning team sort of worked not in secret but they were their work was was called embargo meaning wasn't widely discussed with other NASA people and certainly not outside because the idea was that they would be given some figurative space to work out these different ideas for how to build these technologies now they they would need that we now would need to have the science driven missions right. Yeah is kind of enabling the capabilities so in that time did head come. They were already ahead of the game terms of technology and capability right okay now now after that. I believe this is when George W Bush comes in and now we're starting to get away from the decatur planning team. I know there's some changes in administration and then even the name of the Cato Planning team so what's happening there. They're so at that point. The Decatur Planning team becomes the next exploration team or the exploration team all these names get a had to keep in mind and and actually soon thereafter whereafter we also have a change in leadership over a NASA Sean O'Keefe succeeded Dan Goldin as as the NASA administrator and at the level of the planning team Jim Garvin who was the leader was replaced by Gary Martin who who was then also named the space architect yeah NASA space architects based architect okay so so then what title right that is pretty awesome right so so Sean O'Keefe and Gary Martin this. I believe these leadership changes are are one of the key drivers in. I guess the how the the difference between the Decatur Planning Team and next what's how is how is O'Keefe a little bit different from golden in terms of the ways thinking well. O'Keefe walked in and he the first presentation to him from the team he was. He was really kind of shocked by chocked because he thought that's what NASA did. He didn't think this was new. He thought he thought NASA was supposed to be doing this kind of long term planning all along long and and so he was just. Kinda surprised that they were keeping it secret and he was surprised that it was it was such a big deal he he and he gave them full room to to go ahead and and do more studies dig deeper into the the issues that they you had been thinking about now..

NASA Dan Goldin Decatur Planning Team decatur Takeda Planning Team administrator Ed Weiler Sean O'Keefe Dan Goldin Steve Izhak International Space Station Pr Mars Polar Lander Dan Gordon Mike Butcher office of Management and Budge India Peter Dan Goldens National Academy of Sciences President Clinton
"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Correct. Get them with the test to get three operational missions. Do we envision that? Boeing and SpaceX would continue this into the indefinite. Future. Yeah. Well, they're they we have awarded three for each. There's there's actually six on the contract. So they each get six missions. And you know, as long as space station is there our long the life space station is we envision these vehicles, you know, flying up and serve as the transportation vehicles. And then the lifeboat, and we just have to make sure station it's extended we look at the lead time required to build the vehicle and get the launch vehicle ready. And and then yeah, we could continue to serve this function from Nasr's point of view. It's not a finite program. But at least as long as there's a destination the fly to station is our destination right now from Anassa perspective. So as long as base stations viable this. This these vehicles make sense to do this function from a US perspective from the company's points of view. Can they do anything else? They want to with their space vehicle. Yeah. They could take the vehicle and as long as they meet Nasr's mission needs. They could take the vehicle and and down the road propose a different mission because it's commercial capability say it's their their spacecraft. It's their mission control. It's their launch vehicles. And and you know in the case of the pads SpaceX is leasing pather DNA from NASA, but they could propose a non NASA mission. And that's something that we actually encourage them to do if you think about we're really we really have to purposes it's to support the space station program. And most of my time is spent working on these missions for space station. But it's also to foster this commercial this, you know, flying people in the lower orbit on these vehicles, and so they could propose their own missions and do their do their own things with these vehicles..

SpaceX Nasr NASA Boeing US Anassa
"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Traffic pattern. If you will would then become I guess the purview of the space station program. Here's what we need. And here's where we can fit it in. Do you guys have any sense at this point of of how frequently then down the road these vehicles may be flying? Yeah. We've we've been working with the space station program, and we really have the vehicle setup to fly. Each company have a vehicle ready one one vehicle per year. So one Boeing flight per year one space x light per year. In fact, those missions are actually on the contract today. So they are they already have three flights on contract. So if you think about SpaceX they right now have an encore tesla that they're working on been a launch very early next year accrue test flight, and then they have three of these station missions on contract. Same thing for Boeing. They have they have those those five flights. And so, you know, if you look at vehicles in flow. I if you go down to the Kennedy Space Center, for example, and look at hardware for the orbital flight test for Boeing all the hardware is there. The atlas launch vehicles are already. They're being processed by United launch alliance and the vehicle for that flight is being built in the crew and cargo process facility that's used to be the old orbiter process facility three right? And then for SpaceX the launch vehicle for demonstration mission one which will fly early next year is there and both the first and second stage or there for that falcon nine rocket. Then the dragon capsule is is they're both. It has two parts trunk and the main part of the ical. It's it's already there. If you went to other places around the country, you'd see the other pieces in flow in and for Boeing, the service modules are Boeing has a crew module and the service module much Apollo. Those are starting to be be all assembled there at the C three PF and SpaceX has also there crew dragons, you could see the crew flight test vehicles there at Hawthorne. And then this first increment missions vehicle is is there at Hawthorne built so lots of hardware all across the country. It's it's really an incredible time to be part of this program. You mentioned acronyms and you just flew one by me that I don't want to let go unremarked upon the seat PF. He said, let's see see three P F. And I'll have to think about what this is now. But that crew. Process processing facility. Yeah. That's clever. Yeah. That that they, you know, there's a little marketing toward all these things. But of course, it wouldn't be NASA..

Boeing SpaceX United launch alliance Kennedy Space Center NASA
"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"And that's where things I guess, it's the it's the first flight that leads to the certification. Well, post certification really means the vehicle has been certified after these test flights, and then we're ready to do the mission. And the mission really is supporting supports space station. So have any vehicle that can transport for four crew and some cargo, and including returning some some powered cargo for the space station program and then. Decor service lifeboat? So we really want to test them out twice once on crude and once crude, and then, you know, our overall objective is to then have these vehicles be ready for these regular increments that the space station program needs. So at that point, you know, every flight you're learning still by experience in human spaceflight has been it's just a complicated business, and you always want to be looking at what happened in the previous flight. Sure. Looking at all the data. You do that with machines on earth to do that? Right. The they always show us something about the vehicles. You know, human spaceflight, the systems are complicated. And both companies do a great job of putting together these complicated vehicles. But we'll always be watching and learning and looking at the data and making sure it's performing the way it should. So we'll always be learning. But when we get into these post certification missions, it's really for space station. And now it's official. It's bits were really had in business. Exactly. So that. That means how long would they be how long instead will they still be only a week or two or thirty day missions? Or would they then become longer? Now, these poster advocation missions can be whatever the station the vehicles would be certified for this long durations. So they could be six months like could be six month flights, and we'll we'll depending on when these missions fly. We will work with station to figure out how long they should be because they have to work into the station rotation. And so right, and you mentioned a second ago that each of them is capable of bringing four crew members to space there's only two assigned to each one. So I'm guessing you're going to fill those other seats. Yes. Yes. Those other emissions will get other crew members assigned the two that are signed those caroling. Currently, I really, you know, if you will the pilot and the commander the people that would be responsible for flying the vehicle, and then we'll have two more mission specialists that gets assigned later on to fill out that complement of of four for for the space station. And Kermit knee, but in but all four of them would then arrive at the station and becomes bay stay shops. At that point. They become space station crew members in those those crew members are trained on the vehicles, but they're also trained to do the task on space station that they need to do. So it's similar to the current crew members who are also trained on the vehicle that they ride up and down in this case Soyuz, these crew members will be chained trained on their star liner or their crew dragon as well as on over the regular things that station crew members abs- absolutely they'll get a little different version of training. You know, the the crew test flights. They're going to get a little bit of space in space station training to do things you need to do exercise hygiene use the the the potty on space station if you will. But then these these other crew members for Boeing and SpaceX sunny Williams and Josh Kasahda, and Victor Glover, Mike. Skains? They're going to be part of an increments that's going to stay on the space station, or however long the space station program needs them to stay. So and at the time they fly they will have to additional true mates who will also be able to digital crewmates assigned to those missions. Just like, you know, every most Soyuz today have three sometimes too. But that that increment, and that's the point right by the time, we get to there and these post certification missions are flying..

Boeing Kermit knee commander Victor Glover official Josh Kasahda Williams Mike six months thirty day six month
"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Under your area? We will tell you right now, whereas underway recovery tests going on just off the shore of San Diego as we're preparing to make sure that we're ready to support the recovery of the Orion capsule in our crew members. So we conduct quite a number of tests both at our neutral buoyancy facility here and out in open seawater. So we can make sure that all of the pieces of the puzzle that have to work together. That we know where they're gonna land that we can get there in time that we can get the crews out of the vehicle so they are not throwing up get them safely onto a ship. Get that ship safely to shore. If there's any medical conditions that occur. Do we have the right helicopters and have we made arrangements with the local area hospitals? So there is a lot of effort going on by a lot of different people to make sure that we have this capability in place. Whether we're landing on one of the commercial vehicles or whether we're landing in our Orion capsule. S Q question about it. I don't know Ryan. One I strongly recommend not going through that. If you don't have to especially since you'll have you'll probably having crews that have been up there longer. Okay. And originally years ago? Remember, the Ryan was going to land on land. Can you tell me why they changed? Now, it's water landing to feel sorry for I feel like I should call up. Our Senator director and former Orion program manager to answer that question. No, I cannot tell you exactly why that happened. What I can't till you is the original plans, whereas est- and this new proposal came up, but we do understand. And we do recognize that it is not preferable. But there were technical decisions that were technical considerations. That were put in place to make sure you can ask Mark when we get off stage. It's back to gender. So four gateway into Ryan are there additional lessons learned from a hollow that you think will be incorporating? Absolutely. So. As the administrators stated in the video that we watched for Paulo our goal was to get to the moon. But for the gateway program our goal is to stay there. So from this space policy directive, we have been chartered to lead the development of an innovative and sustainable exploration program that starts at the moon and allows us to use the gateway as a base as a base to go off beyond the moon to Mars. The program that we're we've been chartered. You're set up we've been tasked with combining with joining forces with our international partners, and even new international partners that we have not had any experience within the space station program and also joining forces with the commercial industry. So when you look at Apollo, certainly we're going to look to the Apollo programs for lessons learned about remembering what it's like to operate in the lunar vicinity and potentially one day on the surface of the moon for the international space station program..

Ryan Orion San Diego program manager Apollo Paulo Mark Senator director one day
"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"I think the whole crew was very pleased with how things went okay, I think we also had kind of a collective X paling. Because you know, we knew that this entire space station program really was on our backs to get it off and going properly and Ryan this successfully. So we I think we felt collectively a lot of SAS action. But also some relief that everything had gone. So well now you had I think one more mission right where I went to space. But you stuck around at NASA for quite some time. Correct. Yeah. So what was what were you doing during that those, you know, those years? Okay. So my last flight was another space station assembly flight, it was SDS one ten and we went up and added the s zero truss element to the station. The centre section of the trust. And we did a total four space walks on that mission. Two different teams went outside. And I went outside on the second four spacewalks with LeBron. Okay. And leeann I or the first pair of grandparents to do spacewalks together. Until the rest of their told us the silver team. Wonderful. Yeah. So so then after that they put me into a management position as the head of the vehicle integration testing. Okay, or fit. And as such I led a team of engineers some who worked here at the Johnson Space Center and another set that worked down at the Kennedy Space Center, and we provided a lot of direct engineering support to cruise getting ready to fly into space, and sometimes would crews couldn't go to the Cape to do fit checks on hardware or to some other manufacturing facility around the country. Or in fact, around the world, some of our people would go to those places and do those fit checks. I talked about earlier with with the flight hardware to make sure that everything was proper that everything was dimension properly that everything was going to defeat as planned, and we would also verify the the labeling was as the checklist said a labeling was going to be a lot of other things we look for sharp edges that could cause problems the crew members and maybe damaged their space suits and things like that. There's a lot of things like that. We did we also then I operated I was the head of the crew quarantine facility down at at the Cape. Okay. Which was the astronaut Houghton? L during the time they're in quarantine before launches. So I was down there for every practice countdown. We had or TC DT turmeric oh down test was there with them during the period of time. They are in quarantine prior to the launch. I would ride in the Astro van with them out to the launch control center. Arrive get off before they proceeded on out to the launch pad was up on the roof. Oh, the launch control center with their families during the launches. And then I met them at the hatch when they got off the vehicle after landing and help to extract them and their hardware that need to come off with them. And brought them back to the crew quarters and help them get through their post landing activity, which included a physical exam and things like that. Get them to their post flight press conferences at the Cape. And then then put them on airplanes and send them back here to Houston. Right. Yeah. Yeah. A lot of the that human factors is the important thing that you were doing there making sure that the crew was going to be safe and then everything worked for the human element. But yeah, you're right by their side. And you had a lot of space fight experience. I'm sure you're sharing. No, I it was keeping me as close to the flying game. So I could stay delight to me. And also, I think having somebody with my background and experience I think it was benefit to the crew's coming down because I can understand what they're going through. And what they felt and what what things to try to protect them from that, you know, from interference from the outside or things like that. So I think it was all beneficial to to the crews C were you were very close to the crew. But you stayed at NASA to actually see the space station program through to the completion of assembly, right?.

Johnson Space Center Kennedy Space Center NASA X Ryan TC DT leeann I LeBron Astro van Houston Houghton
The International Space Station Begins

Houston We Have a Podcast

04:22 min | 2 years ago

The International Space Station Begins

"So today is another very special episode because we're celebrating the twentieth. Anniversary of the beginning of the international space station. The I s a critical mission in this story is S T S eighty eight. It's the shuttle mission that brought the unity module to join the first element Zara in space. It was the first ISS assembly mission for the space shuttle, the first time I s elements join together and the first spacewalks for ISS assembly and maintenance SDS Eighty-eight launched on December fourth and return, December fifteenth nineteen ninety eight so tell the story we're bringing in Jerry Ross, he's a former astronaut and flew with Mr. Cabana, Mr. Bob. Cabana the commander and currently the director of the Kennedy Space Center on SDS Eighty-eight. Ross went out with astronaut Jim Newman back during the mission for the first three spacewalks of assembly and maintenance to give you some idea of how cool that is where over two hundred now for I s assembly and maintenance base walks at the time of this recording. So with no further delay less giambra head to our talk with mister Jerry Ross for the twentieth. Anniversary of the international space station and the milestone mission SDS Eighty-eight enjoy. Jerry. Thank you so much for being here today. I really appreciate you actually taking the time to come on here. I'm glad to be with you. So today, we're going to be talking about a milestone mission SDS ADA. This was a lot of I this was the first time that the first ISS assembly mission, the first ISS, our international space station space walk to actually do assembly and maintenance very important milestone in the beginning of the international space station program. So I kind of wanted to start by just sort of setting the scene. This is late nineteen ninety eight hour talking about what is what's going on at NASA where we coming from what's going on right now. What's going on one thousand nine hundred eight? Okay. Well, for me, personally, I'd been on one of the MIR missions SEO seventy four when we'd gone up and visit the MIR station, and we actually added the docking module to the MIR station that all subsequent SP. Official visits. There used to dock to the MIR station after that was done. I went into a fairly lengthy period of leading the spacewalking team to try to figure out how we were going to build a space station from spacewalking standpoint, we build a large cadre of crew members and engineers and and flight controllers. We went through evaluated every piece of hardware to make sure that we could physically do what we're supposed to do. Or what the engineers needed us to do to do the assembly and maintenance activities on that? We found many things that were not adequately designed and sent those back to the program and said, we can't do that. And we worked hand in hand with them to figure out ways to fix things and get things ready for us to be able to confidently build the station and maintain it. So this was coming from experiences on MIR to right because that was also a collaborative. Endeavor even said, you were talking about the docking module that fit the US shuttle to the MIR. Right. We didn't do any spacewalking on MIR except for one or two times. Okay. And that really didn't feed into to this effort. But certainly what we did learn on MIR about longer term stays in space in the logistics of it and how to do the care and feeding for the crew members that were up there for long periods of time. That's all certainly folded into our our thought processes in our planning and our execution of station. Once we start staffing it. Okay. So then how how did you even start with if learning to spacewalk, and knowing what you were going to do to actually assemble the international space station. Okay. Well, I had done five spacewalks already by that sorry for spacewalks by that time

Mir Station Jerry Ross ISS Kennedy Space Center SDS Zara Spacewalking Nasa United States Jim Newman Commander Official Mr. Cabana Director Mr. Bob Nineteen Ninety Eight Hour
"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Coming up here in the future as well yeah that's right because your your job position now is working with those companies right and we all right yeah that's right so i've got of worked in the past i've worked space shuttle and space lab and i've worked been with the space station program now for some time and mccur job i'm helping with the fleet of spacecraft that come to and from the space station and of course they have a fleet of five now including two us vehicles as well as vehicles from from russia and one from japan but we have two more on the horizon here in the next year or so and then we have another commercial us commercial crew vehicle commercial cargo vehicle come in a few years down the line and another japanese one in the future so we're going to be taking our our fleet of five spacecraft today and expanding those as the come to and from the space station in the coming years so what are the what are the five that you're working with right now then let's see today we're working with the us vehicles are orderly tk cygnus and the spacex dragon with the russians we have russian progress and so us and with the jackson the japanese partners we have the h two h t transfer vehicle so those are those all cargo these are all cargo vehicles so what the exception of the russian soyuz which we're dependent on us right okay so then yeah besides the saw us all of these different companies are developing these cargo vehicles to work with one vehicle right the international space station so that's is that where you come in with you are working to make sure that you know these companies are going to be able to when they create these unique vehicles there it's going to work with the space station absolutely right so there are so many factors that go into how do you launch a spacecraft from the planet catch it up to the space station traveling and seventeen thousand five hundred miles per hour orbiting the planet and then have it closed at a very to a very safe distance and then ultimately come up either birth or docked to the space station so we help and there's so many aspects of that there's a guidance navigation and control there's.

russia jackson us japan spacex
"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Active and so i thought i don't want to do with this job where i have to travel every other week i wanna be more available to my children and so i was looking for other opportunities and someone tapped me on the shoulder and said hey should consider the hugh human health and performance directorate they're looking for a deputy director maybe should go there which is again completely outside of my comfort zone because i don't have any background in anything medical and that it's my perception of the organization was that it was strictly a medical organization and it was wrong about that perception the human health and performance directorate does medical but it also does human performance related activities which has an engineering flair to it so i was fortunate enough to have been selected as the deputy and then a year later to be given the opportunity to be the director of the human health and performance directorate how about that so i mean if you were being considered as deputy director for hbu when you said you were in the international space station program kind of moving around that's when you started kind of moving up because obviously to be considered as a deputy director you have to have some level of management experience i did yeah i i when i went to the space station program and actually if you looked at it from an org chart perspective actually look like it took a couple steps backwards as i went from being on a director staff to being a deputy division chief so to speak so down several layers in the organization or in a different organization but that really gave me the opportunity to rely on on different skills on my management skills and my leadership skills it gave me an opportunity to go back in to be a supervisor and to help develop other people and i really get a lot of joy out of doing that for people i enjoy developing individuals helping them reach their goals i get tremendous joy from just seeing them be successful and so the opportunities that i had in the space station program.

deputy director hbu division chief supervisor hugh director
"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"space station program" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Was there for a little while and then came here to the johnson space center and was hired right away into mission operations so what does now flight operations originally when i got here was called mission operations i did shuttle flight control for many years i was a propulsion expert that's my background and then after spending several years doing that and working my way through certifications and working lots and lots and lots of shuttle missions over fifty of them actually in my career i ended up with the privilege of becoming a flight director why spent seven years as a flight director for both space shuttle and international space station got my opportunity to both of those when the columbia accident happened my portion of the investigation was completed as shuttle flight director and i had opportunity to train and become an isis flight director second to do that as well so i have been here at the johnson space center for over twenty five years most of my background is an operations i've kind of worked my way up through mission operations organization and was on staff to the director and then my husband became my boss and they said how can we help you find a new job mrs kerner which actually was really great and it's one of the things that i'd like to encourage people about if you get in a situation where you have to step out of your comfort zone because mission operations clearly was my comfort zone take advantage of that and and try something new and different which is what i did i ended up going to the space station program office and i worked in the space station program office for seven years in varying roles and having different responsibilities most of them having to do with the international space station as a vehicle or with the visiting vehicles that approach the international space station and then after doing that for a while i had i was really traveling a lot and i had some kids that were at an age where they were very.

johnson space center director mrs kerner seven years twenty five years
"space station program" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"space station program" Discussed on WTMA

"Launch on this is resuming launches after a very long delay all when the long march five launch failed in early july and uh i had said on your show on on behind behind the black that i didn't expect any launches until october well just before october postseptember ended they got this launch off put up three satellites with a small rocket back they used a smaller rocket that hadn't been launched in a long time it was almost like a went back to old technology play it safe and they put the satellites on this rocket a solid rocket to make it a mix short would happen on they have not launched anything more though in a couple of days they're going to do and other launch um uh they have not yet released an investigation into the failure of the long march five and we have to wait for that because it key that's going to be their whole leuna program and that's also going to be this space station program it's gonna be that's gonna be the heart of their future space programme entirely and it they've only wants to twice and they have won fail yeah and they advance some problems on the first launch as well and until they can get that straightened out due there there's going to be serious given delays in the chinese space programme opening less than thirty seconds ariana space and other copy of the original sputnik is continuing is back in space yeah they launched to commercial satellite this is just part of the competition by the launch industry who's gonna get the most launches this year the racists essentially because spacex and russia but on space is bullying uh you know is in is a dot caught in the rear and they've got to commercial satellites will launch on this on an area of five last week bob zimmerman he keeps the website beyond the black the author of the scifi novel pioneer i'm john batchelor.

spacex russia bob zimmerman john batchelor thirty seconds
"space station program" Discussed on The Infinite Monkey Cage

The Infinite Monkey Cage

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"space station program" Discussed on The Infinite Monkey Cage

"But you can't just get there with words you need a real plan it needs to like actually have steps in and you need to stick to it which is really hard in the american to in for your political cycles that we have in a needs to be affordable so i agree that we should be doing these things but unless we come up with actual steps in actual architecture like in the martian i love the movie the martian but this space ship appeared and took them tomorrow faith and that's like the minor detail in the movie is how you know you got to build that spaceship so anyway we should be going there but we need to come up with a plan that we can stick to like we do with apollo you think it will be different to apollo in the sense that it will be a publicprivate partnership for big partnership amongst nations isaac too big for a single nation and single government my view america could do it but are we have the short attention span that it won't happen the space station famously method was ninety three 94 it passed congress by one vote i mean like 250 249 something like that and the only reason a debt is because there was an international space station so if we did not have that international partnership aspect it would have been easy to cancel an in recent years we've seen big nasa plans cancelled but they were american only plan so i think internationally it can be more effective and you bring other nations there's a lot of benefits to that but one of the most important benefits is it's harder to cancel an international plans you're just you're you're not dating you're kind of mary admits it's harder to cancel that than it is they naturally that's true for all of the international partners on the space station program it's not just every country had has gone through its ups and downs with support in in that particular country and because the the actual what drives the international space station program their treaty level documents are not just.

america mary nasa