39 Burst results for "Space Station"

Fresh update on "space station" discussed on Brian Mudd

Brian Mudd

00:39 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "space station" discussed on Brian Mudd

"Always were preparing for the worst degree air under this administration. We're always gonna air on the side of public safety. And this coming just a day after governor to Santa signed a controversial anti riot bill into law, which she's harsher punishments for violent protest Ng will all top news radio 16 w. Y o D Coming up down on 10, 33 ness and space sex are getting ready to send another four astronauts to the international space station this week, making a total of 11 astronauts on board the station. But NASA scientist Dr Liz Warren says the more the merrier. We're so excited for the launch of crew to these astronauts, along with the other astronauts already aboard the space station will be engaged with a variety of investigations over the coming months. Weather forecast is 80% go for Thursday morning's launch from Cape Canaveral Taking a look right now on Wall Street. Dow is now down 185 points at 33,893 NASDAQ just took a 43 point hit and the S and P just dropped 15 and a quarter mornings at 11 more Brian Mud on the way I'm Natalie Rodriguez News radio 6 10 Wi od big money with our progressive home.

Brian Mud 185 Points 33,893 Nasa 43 Point 11 Astronauts 80% Thursday Morning Cape Canaveral 15 Liz Warren This Week Four Astronauts 10 Santa Natalie Rodriguez Wall Street DOW Nasdaq A Quarter Mornings
Nasa’s Future Moon Rocket Completes Critical Hot-Fire Test

Mission Possible

00:16 sec | 2 d ago

Nasa’s Future Moon Rocket Completes Critical Hot-Fire Test

"Performed a static fire test of the Space X Falcon nine rocket at Kennedy Space Center. The mission to the International Space station is scheduled to launch at six a.m. Eastern time Thursday. NASA also announced that they will use space X is new spacecraft Starship Toe Land astronauts on the moon.

Kennedy Space Center International Space Station Nasa
Fresh "Space Station" from South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:43 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh "Space Station" from South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

"Says, must learn to balance all three in order to have a truly balanced workforce. That is Alisa Zee reporting at 905 exactly one month after the first day of spring, Old Man Winter still around snow storms are on track to move into parts of Kansas, Nebraska and Missouri this morning soon spread it to Iowa, Illinois, Indiana and Michigan just hours later. The Panthers are back in first place. Not alone. Though Florida beat Columbus 42 last night at the BB and T Center. It put them in a tie for first in the central division with Carolina, who earned a point in a three to overtime loss of Tampa Bay. Meanwhile, the Heat beat Houston won 13 91 at home last night. Thanks to Kendrick. Nuns season high 30 points, including a career high 63 pointers. 905, NASA and space actually getting ready to send another four astronauts to the international space station this week. That'll make a total of 11 astronauts on board the station. But NASA scientist Dr Liz Warren says the more the merrier. We're so excited for the launch of crew to these astronauts, along with the other astronauts already aboard the space station will be engaged with a variety of investigations over the coming months. The weather forecast is 80% go for the Thursday morning launch from Cape Canaveral of the Falcon nine rocket carrying the crude. Dragon Endeavor Capsule. More news at 9 30. It's nine Oh, six. I'm Natalie Rodriguez Ryan back to you. Thank you. Natalie Ryan Gorman in for Jimmy Stuff alone here on South Florida's first news coming up in a moment, we'll get you caught up on where things stand with the pandemic here in the state of Florida and across South.

Natalie Rodriguez Ryan 11 Astronauts Alisa Zee 80% Iowa Nasa Missouri Kansas Kendrick Michigan South Florida Indiana Thursday Morning Liz Warren Illinois Nebraska Cape Canaveral 30 Points Columbus Houston
NASA Astronauts Safely Return to Earth

America First with Sebastian Gorka

00:52 sec | 2 d ago

NASA Astronauts Safely Return to Earth

"Safely returned from the international space station yesterday. As for others get ready to go. Meanwhile, Elon Musk starship was picked by NASA for the mission. To the moon. We get more on all space news from correspondent Judy Walker Mission Control Houston, and there it is. That's astronaut Kate Rubins and four cosmonaut splashed down Saturday. A four member crew will blast off on Earth Day Thursday for the international space station. It will include astronauts from France, Japan, and the U. S. Is Megan McArthur and Spaceship commander Shane Kimbrough, excited to get ready to get a launch. Meanwhile, NASA says a woman and person of color will be on the mission to the moon. And it's not Hopping there, says acting administrator Steve Jersey. Eventually, our argument mission to Mars. Trump had said a 2024 deadline for the moon. NASA would only say later this decade. I'm Julie

Elon Musk Starship International Space Station Judy Walker Kate Rubins Nasa Megan Mcarthur Shane Kimbrough Houston Steve Jersey France Japan Donald Trump Julie
Fresh update on "space station" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:31 sec | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "space station" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

"Down seven cents in a month. A major launch is on tap this week from Cape Canaveral, NASA and Space X, preparing to send the next group of astronauts to the international Space station early Thursday morning at 60 Levin, Eastern time. Before astronauts will bring the total number on board the orbiting lab to 11. But NASA scientist Dr Liz Warren says the more the merrier. We're so excited for the launch of crew to these astronauts, along with the other astronauts already aboard the space station will be engaged with a variety of investigations over the coming months in overtime. The lightning down the Hurricanes 3 to 2 and in Miami, the Panthers over the blue Jackets 42. With Florida's news. I'm John Conrad,.

John Conrad Nasa Miami Space X Liz Warren Cape Canaveral This Week Florida Early Thursday Morning Seven Cents 60 Levin, Eastern Time Jackets 42 Hurricanes 3 Space Station A 11 Panthers 2
NASA Astronaut Kate Rubins, Crewmates Return Safely to Earth

AP 24 Hour News

00:49 sec | 2 d ago

NASA Astronaut Kate Rubins, Crewmates Return Safely to Earth

"Safely returned from the international space station Saturday as four others get ready to go. Meanwhile, Leland must Starship was picked by NASA for the mission to the Moon Mission Control Houston and there it is. That's astronaut Kate Rubins and four cosmonaut Splash down Saturday. A four member crew will blast off on Earth Day Thursday for the internationals. Base station. It will include astronauts from France, Japan, and the U. S is Megan McArthur and Spaceship Commander Shane Kimbrough. We're excited to get ready to get the launch. Meanwhile, NASA says a woman and person of color will be on the mission to the moon, and it's not stopping there, says acting administrator Steve Jersey actually, Our argument mission to Mars. Trump had said a 2024 deadline for the moon. NASA would only say later this decade. I'm Julie

Moon Mission Control Houston Kate Rubins International Space Station Nasa Megan Mcarthur Leland Starship Spaceship Commander Shane Kimb Base Station U. Steve Jersey France Japan Donald Trump Julie
Fresh "Space Station" from Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:34 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh "Space Station" from Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

"And creates a new law known as mob intimidation, The governor says. It also stops the insane theory of local governments de funding law enforcement if a local government were to do that, that would be catastrophic and have terrible consequences for their citizens. And so this bill actually prevents against Local governments, defunding law enforcement will be able to stop it. At the state level. Florida health officials reported just over 4200 covert 19 cases Monday. There were also a 32 more resident deaths from Corona virus. Coronavirus related deaths in the past day include five and Miami Dade County one and Broward and six and Palm Beach County. The Senate Appropriations Committee approved a bill allowing tax holidays in Florida. It would give discounts to back to school shoppers and people buying supplies for hurricane season. Gas prices. Slightly lower. Average price now for a gallon of regular is $2.82, down seven cents in a month. A major launch is on tap this week from Cape Canaveral, NASA and Space X. Preparing to send the next group of astronauts to the international Space station early Thursday morning at 60 Levin Eastern time, the four astronauts will bring the total number on board the orbiting lab to 11. But NASA scientist Dr Liz Warren says, the more the merrier. We're so excited for the launch of crew to these astronauts, along with the other astronauts already aboard the space station will be engaged with a variety of investigations over the coming months in overtime. The lightning down the Hurricanes 3 to 2 and in Miami, the Panthers over the blue Jackets 42. With Florida's news. I'm John Conrad. Bracing for the verdict on Jack Callahan. Fox News. As the jury deliberates the fate of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Children in George Floyd's death, the city is bracing for public.

Jack Callahan Nasa Miami $2.82 John Conrad Palm Beach County George Floyd Space X. Derek Children Liz Warren Miami Dade County Broward Seven Cents Monday ONE Senate Appropriations Committe Fox News Five Coronavirus SIX
SpaceX Picked for Moonwalkers, on Verge of 3rd Crew Launch

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 d ago

SpaceX Picked for Moonwalkers, on Verge of 3rd Crew Launch

"I'm Julie Walker three astronauts safely returned from the international space station Saturday as for others get ready to go meanwhile the lawn musk starship was picked by NASA for the mission to the moon mission control Houston and there it is that's astronaut Kate Rubins a bar because not splash down Saturday a board member crew will blast off on Earth Day Thursday for the international space station it will include astronauts from France Japan and the US is Megan McArthur and space ship commander Shane Kimbrough we're excited just to get ready to go to lunch meanwhile NASA says a woman and person of color will be on the mission to the moon and it's not stopping there says acting administrator Steve Jersey mentally our our our human mission to Mars trump had set at twenty twenty four deadline for the moon NASA would only state later this decade I'm Julie Walker

Julie Walker International Space Station Kate Rubins Nasa Megan Mcarthur Shane Kimbrough Houston Steve Jersey France Japan United States
SpaceX Prepares for Astronaut Launch on Thursday

The Car Pro Show

00:25 sec | 2 d ago

SpaceX Prepares for Astronaut Launch on Thursday

"That as crew members preparing for the next mission to the international space station arriving at Cape Canaveral yesterday, they're gonna be blasting off. In a space X Falcon nine rocket and the space that Space X capsule this coming Thursday. It's gonna be 5 11 in the morning. Today, the crew's gonna be going through the steps of a practice countdown. While NASA and space experts now perform a test firing of the Falcon nine

International Space Station Cape Canaveral Nasa
SpaceX Crew Dragon Cleared for Launch

1A

00:26 sec | 4 d ago

SpaceX Crew Dragon Cleared for Launch

"To launch another crew of astronauts into space. Next week. The four astronauts will replace the astronauts now on board the international space Station. They have a six month mission. A space X Dragon capsule and Falcon rocket is said to lift off from Florida's Cape Canaveral next Thursday. But the capsule and rocket had been flown before It's part of space sexes recycle and reuse mantra. Fresh air a date Monday is next, 706.

International Space Station Cape Canaveral Florida
SpaceX Crew Cleared for Launch to Space Station Next Week

AP 24 Hour News

00:20 sec | 4 d ago

SpaceX Crew Cleared for Launch to Space Station Next Week

"Was found dead. Space sex gearing up for its third astronaut launch in less than a year after getting the green light from NASA a week ahead of next Thursday's planned flight. The rocket that will carry the crew afford to the space station was used to carry current station crew members last November. The launch is set for Don next Thursday.

Nasa DON
Soyuz Launch Kicks Off Space Station Crew Rotation

City Lights

00:41 sec | Last week

Soyuz Launch Kicks Off Space Station Crew Rotation

"Astronaut and two Russian cosmonauts have arrived safely. But the international space station from member station W. M. F E Brendan Byrne reports the crew launched earlier today from Kazakhstan. The trio, including NASA's Mark Vanda, hi launched on Russia's Soyuz spacecraft, talking after two orbits and three hours in space. The arrival brings the number of residents on the orbiting lab to 10 with three departing next week, including NASA astronaut Kate Rubins. It's Vanda highs, Second space flight and he'll help the station crew with research and science while on board. Another crew of four set to launch to the station later this month, Launching on space sexes Crew Dragon capsule from Kennedy Space Center in Florida

W. M. F E Brendan Byrne Mark Vanda International Space Station Nasa Kate Rubins Kazakhstan Russia Kennedy Space Center Florida
What Does It Take to Become an Astronaut?

BBC Newshour

01:57 min | 2 weeks ago

What Does It Take to Become an Astronaut?

"Libby Jackson is human exploration program manager of the UK Space agency, part off the E essa. So what does it take to be an astronaut? You have to be calm under pressure. You have to be willing to work as a team. You have to be happy to go and spend six months living and working on the international space station where there's no shower the portal. Ooh. And if it breaks it breaks often has to be fixed by. You know, plumber on orbit Long days, but with amazing views. You're carrying out science that can only be done in space that will help everybody down here on Earth. New to lead better lives to help discover new materials with researching drugs on of course, astronauts are the sort of faith of the space industry, but they are absolutely not the only part off the space industry. The space industry is global. There are jobs in every possible skill set that you can imagine. And if people want to join the industry if they think space is something that its sights and they should feel empowered I'm able to do so we'd love to have him so calm. Scientists who conducted of plumbing on bond maybe speaks few languages. You have to be fluent in English. Knowledge of other languages is an asset but not essential. But you do need to have a grasp will be able to learn other languages because the international space station works in both English and Russian. You've got to learn Russian. No, I'm a Russian speaking. But unfortunately I am. I'm just north of 50. So that counts me out. There is a maximum age limit, isn't there? There is it takes out 5 to 10 years to train our pastor rolls and you only will get a mission perhaps every 5 to 10 years so they can't put on upper age limit on it. But it's higher than the last call back in 2000 and eight all part of this drive to increase the Paul to be as diverse and inclusive as possible. Mrs. Really lovely to see that it's increased to 50. Actually, it's a shame we had to put in angel bid

Libby Jackson Uk Space Agency International Space Station Paul
NASA to offer funding for studies of commercial space stations

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:37 sec | 3 weeks ago

NASA to offer funding for studies of commercial space stations

"Leo Destinations project, which could award up to $400 million in total to his many as four companies working to build private space stations. The agency is seeking to replicate the success of its commercial cargo and commercial crew programs, which sees private companies help send cargo and astronauts to the international space station. The IAEA says cost about $4 billion a year to operate, and as it gets older, the reality is it won't last forever. NASA believes it could save big bucks by becoming the user of future space stations rather than the owner and operator of them. Throughout the month

Leo Destinations International Space Station Iaea Nasa
Experts declare $6,000-a-bottle wine aged better in space

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:50 sec | 3 weeks ago

Experts declare $6,000-a-bottle wine aged better in space

"Have been sampling of pricey bottle of wine just back after a year of aging on the international space station. Absolutely. HS. Jane Anson writes about wine for the decanter, one of a dozen connoisseurs taking part in a blind tasting, comparing a bottle of Petrus Pomerol sent into space with a bottle of the same Bordeaux that it stayed in the cellar, the one that had remained on Earth. Me was still a little bit more closed a bit more tannic, a bit younger on the one that had bean up into space talents have softened the side that more floral aromatics came out bits of merlot and cabernet sauvignon. Grapevines also went into space, exposing them to new stresses that scientists hope could reveal how plants might be made More resilient to climate change and disease. I'm Ben Thomas

Jane Anson Petrus Pomerol International Space Station Bordeaux Ben Thomas
Cosmic mouthful: Tasters savor fine wine that orbited Earth

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 3 weeks ago

Cosmic mouthful: Tasters savor fine wine that orbited Earth

"Researchers in France are carefully studying a dozen bottles of wine that have returned to earth after a year long stay aboard the international space station it's the kind of research one can imagine John Luc Picard appreciating the captain of the starship enterprise of TV Star Trek the next generation who grew up on a French figure why send a dozen bottles of the finest wines into space to see how the aging process is working and how we can we can influence the aging process Dr Michael labored as a space biology it's the only way to find out sort of the old of certain substances is to go under conditions where you can exclude these these working off this substance for example oxygen J. Manson is a writer for the decanter and one of the expert tasters who compared the space wine one if it stayed in the cellar you too full the one that made on us with a little younger than the one that I'm Ben Thomas

John Luc Picard Dr Michael International Space Station France J. Manson Ben Thomas
NASA concerned about space's growing trash problem

Chris Krok

02:43 min | Last month

NASA concerned about space's growing trash problem

"Is now more than 128 million pieces of trash. Left over from 128 Million, yes, left over from degrading satellites, byproducts of past flight missions and other cosmic accidents, and they just keep circling the earth. They just keep spinning around the earth. That is, um That's just the debris that we actually have the ability to detect. But here's the problem even like paint chips. Paint chips can actually be a fairly deadly if they are, you know, flying around at warp speed around the planet. And that's what that's what's happening out there and again when the astronauts get out onto the space station to try to fix stuff. I would think that you know, it could be kind of Bad situation. It was I quarter inch. Let's see. Uh oh. It was 2016 1 of the European Space Agency Astronauts took a picture of a quarter sized dent. It was in a glass window of the international space station. It turned out to be a tiny little teeny fleck of space junk. It was a paint flake. From a satellite. It was, they said few thousands of a millimeter across They said, not much bigger than a single cell of E. Coli. And it caused a quarter sized Out in a Pane of glass in one of the windows. I mean, seriously, You gotta watch out that something like that hit you in the helmet. You're not gonna have a good day. Um When it when something that small could do that much damage. Of course, the bigger stuff is going to be a really, really bad day 34,000 pieces of moderately sized debris. That's anything larger than four inches. Would just pretty much take out an astronaut. Anything bigger than that. Uh or anything bigger. I guess. Then the little tiny fleck of paint would be catastrophic. All comes down to full lot of philosophy, philosophy and velocity. Uh, Anything circling the orbit? With the space station. They're moving at 17,000 Miles an hour, 10 times faster. Than a speeding bullet. So the key is I think you wanna be rotating with the trash. Or simply tried to avoid it altogether.

European Space Agency International Space Station E. Coli
Spacewalking astronauts manage possible ammonia leak

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:50 sec | Last month

Spacewalking astronauts manage possible ammonia leak

"Well, space walking astronauts are back safe inside the international space station after reading right ring their suits of any toxic ammonia. AP correspondent Ben Thomas. With more ready for me to come out, NASA's Victor Glover and Mike Hopkins had to take extra safety precautions after stepping outside Working on the space station's external cooling system. They had no trouble removing inventing a couple of old jumper cables to get rid of any ammonia still lingering in the lines. But so much spewed out of the first hose that mission control worried some of the frozen white flakes might have gotten on their suits. NASA did not want the ammonia, getting inside the space station and contaminating the cabin atmosphere. But after a nearly seven hour spacewalk, mission Control said the astronauts had spent so much time in sunlight. Any ammonia. Residue would have baked off.

Victor Glover Mike Hopkins Ben Thomas Nasa AP
Spacewalking astronauts perform six-hour long repair on the International Space Station

Kim Komando

00:41 sec | Last month

Spacewalking astronauts perform six-hour long repair on the International Space Station

"Two NASA astronauts are back safe inside the international space station After a walk in space. A couple of NASA astronauts took a saunter outside the international space station Saturday. They had some outdoor plumbing chores that needed doing, namely fixing the air conditioning system. Astronauts Victor Glover and Mike Hopkins, teaming up for the second time since performing back to back spacewalk six weeks ago on another repair job. One thing to be careful of venting ammonia. I thought it was more than I was expecting Justin this line, but it did stop. In addition, the out of this world handyman replaced an antenna for helmet cameras and tightened the connections on a European experiment platform. Talk about helping out your neighbors

Nasa Victor Glover Mike Hopkins Justin
ISS astronauts checked for toxic ammonia contamination during spacewalk

Kim Komando

00:24 sec | Last month

ISS astronauts checked for toxic ammonia contamination during spacewalk

"Station after conducting is several hours long spacewalk to rearrange space station plumbing well, carefully avoiding toxic ammonia coolant lingering in the law. Lines. I felt like it was more than I was expecting Justin this line, but it's just stop courtesy of NASA TV. It was 1/5 spacewalk for this. U S. Russian Japanese crew of seven. America is listening to Fox News.

Justin Nasa America Fox News
Spacewalking astronauts perform six-hour long repair on the International Space Station

Fork Report

00:16 sec | Last month

Spacewalking astronauts perform six-hour long repair on the International Space Station

"NASA astronauts have wrapped up a seven hour spacewalk outside the international space station. It was the 237th space walk and the fifth one this year for astronauts Victor Glover and Mike Hopkins. They did some repairs and symptom systems upgrades as they floated around in

Nasa International Space Station Victor Glover Mike Hopkins
Spacewalking astronauts wrap up maintenance work on space station

Leo Laporte

00:22 sec | Last month

Spacewalking astronauts wrap up maintenance work on space station

"Two NASA astronauts are wrapping up a seven hour spacewalk outside the International space station, Victor Glover and Mike Hawkins made some minor repairs and tackled some plumbing issues among their tasks. They had to invent a pair of ammonia cables used to repair a leak in the station's cooling system. The spacewalk today is the fifth for members of the US Russian Japanese

Victor Glover Mike Hawkins International Space Station Nasa United States
"space station" Discussed on Small Steps, Giant Leaps

Small Steps, Giant Leaps

05:11 min | 6 months ago

"space station" Discussed on Small Steps, Giant Leaps

"So leveraging on what we have done on board, the space station with our international partners for these. Two decades now. To leverage that into designing and building a mission that's going to allow the human race to go to Mars or build a colony on the moon or or a deep space space station or what have you I think that benefit from the International Space Station will be a measurable because we won't be starting from scratch like we did with the space station. Can you walk us through some of your experiences and what you've observed as the space station has evolved over the past couple of decades? Okay. I like I said I started out as a robotic officer, the Canadian Space Agency. Contributed the space station remote manipulator system, and the special purpose decades dexterous manipulator when we first started with the fledgling space station and the and the arm arrived there on the I assess six eight flight. That we really only had the Arben we didn't. We knew how to operate a, but we didn't know how to operate it as as we do today. In in when we first got the arm on board every time you wanted to operate that system crew had to move it. Right. We designed procedures for the crew when we verified all the trajectories and we understood all the forces and moments and how much the arm take how fast it could move and we did all that Legwork Ford eminem produced a procedure for them to go execute they then they did that. In today's world, the crew hardly ever touches the SRS except to do grapples of free flying cargo vehicles. But the rest of the operations for that system is done from the ground either from Houston or for. Montreal. With the flight controllers doing those activities remotely. So there they are actually operating the arm from Houston for Martha algae and all those maneuvers. The crew to my knowledge is never actually even operated the special purpose dexterous manipulator, the spam..

International Space Station Canadian Space Agency Houston Legwork Ford officer Montreal
"space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

09:19 min | 11 months ago

"space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Du Soleil so we created a adaptation in virtual reality of some of their shows, so we're not talking about filming and existing show. We're talking about re. To show completely four virtual reality for a one person audience, and trying to scale a big spectacle down to an experience that will feel very intimate. That will make you feel like you're one of the protagonists of the space. And that eventually led us to work with President Obama. So We got contacted. By the White House because they were interested in outreach and finding new ways to communicate with a younger audiences, and they were interested in that medium, so we created two projects with the Obama Administration. Was a tour of Yosemite National Park for the National Park sent to kneel, and the second project that we did was a virtual reality tour of the White House guided underrated by Barack and Michelle Obama, so we did this We also did a project with President Clinton So you know one thing leads you to another and the project started to grow in duration so it. They were very short at the beginning very often. It was just one shut when we started. One project was one shot of three minutes or six minute eventually started to get more and more elaborate and complex, and so the format that we landed with was about twenty minute more or less for our productions. and Eventually. We felt that we had all of the learnings and from creative standpoint, and from IT technology standpoint to go out and approach NASA and say hey. We now want to tell this story of space exploration through virtual reality. Here's what we've done. and. Here's what we want to do next, so we approached NASA initially with that desire to do this when we felt ready to to do this well, that's quite a journey with a lot of very recognizable names for. So moving on from there. You approach NASA. You say I want to do this now. I'm sure from there. It was quite a process to just get your foot in the door. And now we're having the challenge of telling a story about space now I. Know Some of the story that you tell through the space. Explorer series is something here on the ground, so that's a little bit more tangible, but I know that your goal was to send a a virtual reality three hundred sixty degree camera to space. Yeah, I mean so. The first thing we did when we started to visit JC and meet different NASA executives in different people that we had to basically convince that this was worth everybody's time. was showing them the work that we had done already and just that spoke. In itself expressed a lot and you could. You could extrapolate from that and think about you know. How will space exploration translate through this medium? It was kind of relatively easy to make that projection that translation from the work. That existed that we had done to what we wanted to create. And, then something that happened, that was very important that we started to meet with astronauts, and they became excited and they wanted to be part of it, and so that was a game changer that was when things started to really accelerate, and we found real momentum within NASA to go out and do these filmings and do these recordings. And Dan wanting leads to another. When we started to process shots, even before the final product, we started to show it to some folks and people got very excited about what we were doing. And then, when we finished episode, one of space, explorers which was launched at the Sundance Film Festival in two thousand eighteen. Then we came back here, and we showed it to everybody, and so we went from department to Department to show that twenty minute episodes, and then we really started to build I. Think Support for the medium and the the pertinence of of using. This medium to tell the story about space exploration, and then more astronauts, side and more NASA executive side eventually We became people that were no longer. You know, the newcomers with the new medium, but we were you know part of the family to a certain extent integrated one of the grade. So you know this is part of the family you WANNA. Tell these stories. What what are you trying to tell with? Space Explorers what? What was what was the immersive experience for those? That may have not heard of this series well, I think that you know space explorers is humanities journey. It's a journey that's about everybody, and it might sound like a cliche to say this, but it is true. All discoveries that were making in space are ultimately about understanding who we are as Specie on better understanding the biosphere better understanding our place in the universe where where? Where we're headed, and and and I think that that's a very profound important quest, and it's really about everyone on this planet, and so we felt that you know only just a few people get to go to space. A few hundred people visited space, but we felt a Durres journey truly matters, and that it's important to broaden the access to that journey to as large an audience as possible through that medium, and so we've. We've been interested from the get go to the full story arc of the astronauts journey from how they train here on earth you know how to get to learn the fundamentals of what it is to be an astronaut how they learn to fly, and then their missions on the ice says how they adapt to the environment of space station. How do they do all of the science the work? How did he experienced the overview? How did they live the human collaboration of being with astronauts from all those different national space programs all around the world? How did they prepare for a spacewalk and then documenting the space walk into post TV A and so and sharing with them thoughts in regards to the future of human spaceflight and the next step so every step of the way. It's a very exciting journey, but it's a journey that I think everybody can feel involved into because ultimately, the purpose of that journey is about everybody, so it's a story that we feel as a real universal appeal. You know sometimes. I think of it like. We're at this incredibly rare moment where. Humanities almost in a state of metamorphosis. Right like if you think back when. You know there were no ground-based creatures and everyone lived underwater, and then at some point some creatures. made it out there and you know there was no way to record that. By the only recording of that is is DNA in fossils and biology, and that's the record of that. And now we're making our first steps even though they started over fifty years ago, There is kind of an acceleration right now and in humans becoming. You know extraterrestrials. Basically we're we're it. It's almost inevitable unless we destroy ourselves before we get there that humans become. Interplanetary interplanetary species, so debts that seems to me like one of the most important and fascinating things you could possibly document today, and to get a glimpse as the earthling of what it is to take those first steps off of the planet I. Mean What? Is that yeah, and you know just from the clip I've seen of the just in-space. The one would divvied saint. Jack was the one. I'm thinking about right now, but he just looked so comfortable in that environment, and you talk about a metamorphosis it's it's you know you're transported to this moment, but it's like. You could see there is an established life. There that he's very comfortable and to be a part of that is That's an experience in and of itself I want to talk about how we got to that point how we got the camera up to space what it took to to make that happen to tell this story to get people to immerse in this particular location has its own difficulties, so what? What were those challenges? And and how did that happen? Well you know we. We built the first VR camera now six or seven years ago, and since then we've been iterating on that design, and and we've built a four. Generally, we're at the fourth generation of our land based camera, and we've built countless variations and special purpose cameras for shooting in different situations here on earth, or or under water or the air for this particular project. We kind of had to take a step back and look at. Not Sending one of our own cameras because. They're so custom designed, and they're not FCC certified, and all you know with the timeline that we had to get a camera. And, with all the requirements we decided. Let's look at all the cameras that are out there. Let's pick the one we think best suits what we're trying to do, and let's knowing what we know about virtual reality cameras, both on the hardware, software, processing and playback. How do we make that Cameron? Do things that could never do before right so we? We started with pre existing camera. In this case, it's Z. Cam v one pro..

NASA White House President Obama Obama Administration Du Soleil President Clinton Michelle Obama Barack Yosemite National Park Durres JC FCC Dan Cameron National Park executive
"space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

05:04 min | 11 months ago

"space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"We talked about which was called strangers, which was this intimate one on one experience with that musician called Patrick Watson. we met with Steven Spielberg's team in Hollywood and Colin trevorrow the. Director of Jurassic World told us. Hey, I love this experience so what you did with Patrick Watson musician. Can you do inside of the world of Jurassic World with which was an extraordinary brief, and so we did that, we created that piece. We did a project with Fox searchlight with Reese Witherspoon and Laura Dern, which was our first fiction piece, and we also explored interactively inside of that bees. Gays triggered interactivity depending. Depending on where you look certain events will happen or not in the unfolding of the story, so all of these early experiences were very short. They were below four minutes, but we were exploring different ways to articulate a story within immersion and eventually We started collaborating with Cirque du Soleil. So we created a adaptation in virtual reality of some of their shows, so we're not talking about filming and existing show. We're talking about re. To show completely four virtual reality for a one person audience, and trying to scale a big spectacle down to an experience that will feel very intimate. That will make you feel like you're one of the protagonists of the space. And that eventually led us to work with President Obama so We got contacted. By. The White House because they were interested in outreach and finding new ways to communicate with a younger audiences, and they were interested in that medium, so we created two projects with the Obama Administration. Was a tour of Yosemite National. Park for the National Park to Neil and the second project that we did was a virtual reality tour of the white. House guided underrated by Barack and Michelle Obama so we did this We also did a project with President. Clinton so you know one thing leads you to another and the project started to grow in duration so it. They were very short at the beginning very often. It was just one shut when we started. One project was one shot of three minute or six minute eventually started to get more and more elaborate and complex, and so the format that we landed with was about twenty minute more or less for our productions. and Eventually we felt that we had all of the learnings and from creative standpoint, and from it, technology standpoint to go out and approach NASA and say hey. We now want to tell this story of space exploration through virtual reality. Here's what we've done. And here's what we want to do next, so we approached NASA initially with that desire to do this when we felt ready to to do this well, that's quite a journey with a lot of very recognizable names for So moving on from there. You approach NASA. You say I want to do this now. I'm sure from there. It was quite a process to just get your foot in the door. And now we're having the challenge of telling a story about space now I know some of the story that you tell through the space explorer series is something here on the ground, so that's a little bit more tangible, but I know that your goal was to send a a virtual reality three hundred sixty degree camera to space. Yeah, I mean so. The first thing we did when we started to visit JC and meet different NASA executives in different people that we had to basically convince that this was worth everybody's time..

NASA Jurassic World White House Patrick Watson President Obama Fox searchlight Colin trevorrow Cirque du Soleil Obama Administration Steven Spielberg Reese Witherspoon Michelle Obama Patrick Watson. Director Hollywood Laura Dern Yosemite National National Park
"space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"You <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> runner <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> only. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Hey <Speech_Male> thanks for sticking around Hopi. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Listen to two <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of these parts <Speech_Female> with our conversation <Speech_Female> with Dr Gary <Speech_Female> Gary Kit Macher. This is <Speech_Male> episode. One thirty three. <Speech_Male> If you haven't go <Speech_Male> back and listen to episode <Speech_Male> one thirty two it's a fascinating <Speech_Male> compass <Speech_Female> Conversation <Speech_Female> on everything that happened before <Speech_Male> the International Space <Speech_Male> Station. Hope you tune <Speech_Male> in. You can find it at <Speech_Male> NASA GOV slash <Speech_Male> podcasts. <Speech_Male> Along with the other NASA <Speech_Male> podcasts. That we have <Speech_Male> there are the many space <Speech_Male> centers here <Speech_Male> at NASA. <Speech_Female> If you <Speech_Female> want to learn more about the <Speech_Male> international space station <Speech_Male> I'd be surprised. But <Speech_Male> there is more the investigate <Speech_Male> and NASA <Speech_Male> GOV slash I <Speech_Male> S S. We <Speech_Male> got Social <Speech_Male> media places <Speech_Male> where you can go facebook <Speech_Male> twitter instagram. <Speech_Male> Just search the International <Speech_Male> Space Station. We gotTA <Speech_Male> count on all three of those <Speech_Female> use the Hashtag <Speech_Female> ask NASA on your favorite <Speech_Male> platform to submit an <Speech_Male> idea for the show and <Speech_Male> make sure to mention it's <Speech_Female> for Houston. We have a podcast. <Speech_Male> For our students <Speech_Male> out there I have a quick plug <Speech_Male> for you. <Speech_Male> Research in the microgravity <Speech_Female> environment of <Speech_Male> the International Space Station <Speech_Male> is still <Speech_Male> as important as ever <Speech_Male> and to

"space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

13:03 min | 1 year ago

"space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"It comes to Michigan troll Before the International Space Station a lot of what we know is mission. Control was staffed for a mission and you. Would you would train and you would do simulations and you would do that. But this now we're talking about continuous staffing making sure that someone's in the room at all times because you already mentioned it. Almost twenty years of continuous human presence. Now someone's gotTa be honoring those guys on the one hand we have people on the ground. Continuously monitoring and continuously operating the systems and on the other hand Through the use of Intelligence Systems and a lot more understanding of how the systems operate we can have a relatively small number of people operating the station and so The number of people we have during a holiday or on a weekend is not narrowly what we would have during a normal workday Whether in Houston or in other parts of the world now keep in mind While this is somewhat simplified and made somewhat less expensive the operation of the station today When we start talking about whether it's a moon base where there's a communications lapse of several seconds or Mars mission where the communications laps can be more on the order of forty five minutes We have to start rethinking Is Is this going to be the way in which we can operate How do we? How do we operate the systems When you can't do it real time yeah definitely a huge consideration and I want to kind of take that as a jumping off point from. We've had this long conversation about the International Space Station. And what I what that really. I'm trying to establish is just what went into this thing. What it what it takes to put this thing together to construct it to to make it permanently habitable for twenty years thinking about that thinking about those lessons. What are we taking now and putting towards the gateway which is not meant to be continuously inhabited? But there's you know. We talked about improvements of technology and just lessons that we've learned throughout the whole year all of these years going towards a moon orbiting platform. Well the Right from the very start. We envisioned the Space Station and low-earth orbit is being prototype for the kind of vehicle that you would use for not so much lunar as much is planetary missions vehicle. That would take off for many months in years to carry astronauts to distant planets early on we were thinking about the planets Venus and Mars now our our main focus is particularly Mars and so depending on the mission that we would be going on it could be a mission of anywhere from eighteen of probably at the minimum to several years three or four years. Maybe even longer than that. A gateway is a particularly particular kind of space station. That would be used to support the lunar missions and so Because of the way in which the Orion is developed it would need a base in orbit around the moon that it would be able to to dock to stay there while astronauts. You're down on the lunar surface and then carry the astronauts back from the gateway back to the year and so Right from the outset were looking at developing the kinds of systems that would be required for taking care of people for very long durations and when I say taking care of people they not only have to be operable They really have to be able to operate with minimal maintenance with minimal kinds of systems difficulties over very long periods and. I think we've been doing that. We've been doing that with the not only the environmental control system The exercise systems that are Fairly critical and keeping the people Healthy and active But with computer systems communication systems all of the different systems that we need to support a space station were learning how to depend upon them and Through some of the problems we have faced. Were were learning how to redesign and develop them in such a way that they are dependable for future years. Now What's interesting is we're talking about the international space station being a lesson for travelling further out into solar system which I think was one of many purposes from the get-go was was to learn how to how to do that. Zion systems how to live and work in space for a long period of time. But I know we still want low earth orbit as a place to continue to practice to continue to develop technologies to continue to train. Crews this is. This is a place we need and looking further further into the future of the International Space. Station's not meant to be there forever so the transition is to a more commercial economy. Tell me about the transition on the International Space Station. What we what we're learning and what we're doing now to eventually transition to this low-earth-orbit economy of course the space station. Because of its location in lower orbit as a number of attributes that are useful. One of them is a micro gravity or zero gravity so that we can look at different kinds of physical processes in orbit in this very low gravity field environment as compared with one gravity. Here on the your another aspect is the the observational aspect. And so we have Scientific Windows we have the KUPUNA windows of the station. And the astronauts suspend a fair amount of time looking at the earth and particularly Looking at things which really haven't been planned in advance so if there are fires in Australia volcanic eruptions They're right there looking at them. Taking Pictures Making observations And of course these were all things that were foreseen from the outset. And we've seen that they Have been useful for different kinds of companies some of them looking at very basic research. Others are more specific Looking much more specific kinds of products In two thousand five the ISS was designated a National Laboratory and in two thousand eleven they brought in an independent organization called Casus to operate the national lab and They go out around the country and try to tell people about the The availability in the possibilities of using the International Space Station Other companies have been coming along. axiom space Mister bigalow with his inflatable modules and so Others are coming along and depending on whether there is a A commercial opportunity or not whether they can make access to space reasonably inexpensive and they have an orbiting platform then in the future the The opportunity will be there for commercial operations in a space station in the meantime the ISS is being used in this way already Not only by the US the Russians. Of course have Famously been bring various tourists up to To the space station for visits and in the future we think that we'll have more opportunity For various kinds of commercial activities on the station. Do you think I what you're talking about now? I mean we talked about International Space Station Informing Lunar Exploration Informing Mars exploration everything. It takes their Being in this place where there's commercial viability For for operating space. Do you think the Internet. How how big of a role do you think? The International Space Station played in that. And do you think we can even be in this place without the International Space Station? I think the the International Space Station has been critical in learning how to design build and operate different kinds of hardware and systems learning how to work together with international partners. Keep in mind. We have not only the Russians but Sixteen or seventeen. Different countries number has varied over the years And we've learned how to work with them I know early on. I worked cleric closely with the Russians. They did not really have a good of how the US went about Putting things in orbit on the shuttle or on the station and we developed joint integration processes joint documentation. I know I was talking with my Russian counterpart from the mirrors just a few weeks ago and he says well the work that we had laid in nineteen ninety four nineteen ninety three is still the basis for how the Russians work today so they were learned a great deal about How the more advanced world I guess? does payloads in science and experiments in orbit At the same time we've learned how a lot of their hardware is built and designed. I know I was involved in the design of moon bases and Mars vehicles back during the first President Bush's space exploration initiative and a lot of the hardware that we have actually built for the space station today whether it's the most basic hardware the modules the nodes the racks the Cupola or down to the more detailed aspects of the CTB's the stowage bags the computer systems. The communication systems. A lot of these will actually become the components of future moon bases and Mars spacecraft justice. Today we're looking at using a lot of these pieces on the Gateway in orbit around the Moon. Well what are you looking forward to the most then for the future you have this gigantic history in your brain of everything. That's happened over the years to get to this point. What are you looking forward to the most? Well I've I've been lucky enough to participate in a lot of these programs and even have a hand in the design and development of the law. A lot of the hardware and so every time I see whether it's the CTB's or the Cucolo or the cost computer system. These were all things that I had a direct hand in and I'm looking forward to seeing some of those same systems on the first moon base Or on the first Mars spacecraft Right now I'm looking at them in orbit around the earth. The the cool of course is famous as the the astronauts favorite place in space to observe the earth That grew out of a lot of In terms of what we the astronauts needed what we had to be able to provide for the astronauts and We're lucky that we have in orbit today. But now I'm looking at putting the system just like that base on March leaving your mark on human space exploration forever. That's amazing Gary. Thank you so much. We're going through this history. This has been fascinating to discussions really through the concept of space stations. Through what we've learned in what would what is taken to put together the International Space Station and laying the groundwork for what's to come really appreciate your time. Thanks for having me as a glide that is able to to offer something of interest. I loved it. Thank you.

International Space Station Space Station International Space Intelligence Systems US CTB Michigan Houston ISS Gary Australia KUPUNA Mister bigalow
"space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

13:51 min | 1 year ago

"space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"This is allowed the people on the ground to have almost as much sometimes even more insight into situation on the station the crew has It also means that you can have specialists all over the world Specializing in their own systems. They don't necessarily have to come here to Houston or in the case of payloads the Marshall Center in Alabama They can oftentimes stay in their own. Local control centers and operate their systems from Oberpfaffenhofen Germany or from From Chikuba in Japan or from wherever the location is So that means A lot more of the people that maintain and operate the station. can do it remotely Not only remote from the station but remote parts of the Earth. And what is it? What did it take to switch to Because when it comes to Michigan troll Before the International Space Station a lot of what we know is mission. Control was staffed for a mission and you. Would you would train and you would do simulations and you would do that. But this now we're talking about continuous staffing making sure that someone's in the room at all times because you already mentioned it. Almost twenty years of continuous human presence. Now someone's gotTa be honoring those guys on the one hand we have people on the ground. Continuously monitoring and continuously operating the systems and on the other hand Through the use of Intelligence Systems and a lot more understanding of how the systems operate we can have a relatively small number of people operating the station and so The number of people we have during a holiday or on a weekend is not narrowly what we would have during a normal workday Whether in Houston or in other parts of the world now keep in mind While this is somewhat simplified and made somewhat less expensive the operation of the station today When we start talking about whether it's a moon base where there's a communications lapse of several seconds or Mars mission where the communications laps can be more on the order of forty five minutes We have to start rethinking Is Is this going to be the way in which we can operate How do we? How do we operate the systems When you can't do it real time yeah definitely a huge consideration and I want to kind of take that as a jumping off point from. We've had this long conversation about the International Space Station. And what I what that really. I'm trying to establish is just what went into this thing. What it what it takes to put this thing together to construct it to to make it permanently habitable for twenty years thinking about that thinking about those lessons. What are we taking now and putting towards the gateway which is not meant to be continuously inhabited? But there's you know. We talked about improvements of technology and just lessons that we've learned throughout the whole year all of these years going towards a moon orbiting platform. Well the Right from the very start. We envisioned the Space Station and low-earth orbit is being prototype for the kind of vehicle that you would use for not so much lunar as much is planetary missions vehicle that would take off for many months or even years to carry astronauts to distant planets early on we were thinking about the planets. Venus and Mars now. Our our main focus is particularly Mars and so depending on the mission that we would be going on it could be a mission of anywhere from eighteen of probably at the minimum to several years three or four years. Maybe even longer than that. A gateway is a particularly particular kind of space station. That would be used to support the lunar missions and so Because of the way in which the Orion is developed it would need a base in orbit around the moon that it would be able to to dock to stay there while astronauts. You're down on the lunar surface and then carry the astronauts back from the gateway back to the year and so Right from the outset were looking at developing the kinds of systems that would be required for taking care of people for very long durations and when I say taking care of people they not only have to be operable They really have to be able to operate with minimal maintenance with minimal kinds of systems difficulties over very long periods and. I think we've been doing that. We've been doing that with the not only the environmental control system The exercise systems that are Fairly critical and keeping the people Healthy and active But with computer systems communication systems all of the different systems that we need to support a space station were learning how to depend upon them and Through some of the problems we have faced. Were were learning how to redesign and develop them in such a way that they are dependable for future years. Now What's interesting is we're talking about the international space station being a lesson for travelling further out into solar system which I think was one of many purposes from the get-go was was to learn how to how to do that. Zion systems how to live and work in space for a long period of time. But I know we still want low earth orbit as a place to continue to practice to continue to develop technologies to continue to train. Crews this is. This is a place we need and looking further further into the future of the International Space. Station's not meant to be there forever so the transition is to a more commercial economy. Tell me about the transition on the International Space Station. What we what we're learning and what we're doing now to eventually transition to this low-earth-orbit economy of course the space station. Because of its location in lower orbit as a number of attributes that are useful. One of them is a micro gravity or zero gravity so that we can look at different kinds of physical processes in orbit in this very low gravity field environment as compared with one gravity. Here on the your another aspect is the the observational aspect. And so we have Scientific Windows we have the KUPUNA windows of the station. And the astronauts suspend a fair amount of time looking at the earth and particularly Looking at things which really haven't been planned in advance so if there are fires in Australia volcanic eruptions They're right there looking at them. Taking Pictures Making observations And of course these were all things that were foreseen from the outset. And we've seen that they Have been useful for different kinds of companies some of them looking at very basic research. Others are more specific looking much more specific kinds of products In two thousand five the ISS was designated a National Laboratory and in two thousand eleven they brought in an independent organization called Casus to operate the national lab and They go out around the country and try to tell people about the The availability in the possibilities of using the International Space Station Other companies have been coming along. axiom space Mister bigalow with his inflatable modules and so Others are coming along and depending on whether there is a A commercial opportunity or not whether they can make access to space reasonably inexpensive and they have an orbiting platform then in the future the The opportunity will be there for commercial operations in a space station in the meantime the ISS is being used in this way already Not only by the US the Russians. Of course have Famously been bring various tourists up to To the space station for visits and in the future we think that we'll have more opportunity For various kinds of commercial activities on the station. Do you think I what you're talking about now? I mean we talked about International Space Station Informing Lunar Exploration Informing Mars exploration everything. It takes their Being in this place where there's commercial viability For for operating space. Do you think the Internet. How how big of a role do you think? The International Space Station played in that. And do you think we can even be in this place without the International Space Station? I think the the International Space Station has been critical in learning how to design build and operate different kinds of hardware and systems learning how to work together with international partners. Keep in mind. We have not only the Russians but Sixteen or seventeen. Different countries number has varied over the years And we've learned how to work with them I know early on. I worked cleric closely with the Russians. They did not really have a good of how the US went about Putting things in orbit on the shuttle or on the station and we developed joint integration processes joint documentation. I know I was talking with my Russian counterpart from the mirrors just a few weeks ago and he says well the work that we had laid in nineteen ninety four nineteen ninety three is still the basis for how the Russians work today so they were learned a great deal about How the more advanced world I guess? does payloads in science and experiments in orbit At the same time we've learned how a lot of their hardware is built and designed. I know I was involved in the design of moon bases and Mars vehicles back during the first President Bush's space exploration initiative and a lot of the hardware that we have actually built for the space station today whether it's the most basic hardware the modules the nodes the racks the cupola or down to the more detailed aspects of the. Ctb's the stowage bags the computer systems communication systems. A lot of these will actually become the components of future moon bases and Mars spacecraft justice. Today we're looking at using a lot of these pieces on the Gateway in orbit around the Moon. Well what are you looking forward to the most then for the future you have this gigantic history in your brain of everything. That's happened over the years to get to this point. What are you looking forward to the most? Well I've I've been lucky enough to participate in a lot of these programs and even have a hand in the design and development of the law. A lot of the hardware and so every time I see whether it's the CTB's or the Cucolo or the cost computer system. These were all things that I had a direct hand in and I'm looking forward to seeing some of those same systems on the first moon base Or on the first Mars spacecraft Right now I'm looking at them in orbit around the earth. The the cool of course is famous as the the astronauts favorite place in space to observe the earth That grew out of a lot of In terms of what we the astronauts needed what we had to be able to provide for the astronauts and We're lucky that we have in orbit today. But now I'm looking at putting the system just like that base on March leaving your mark on human space exploration forever. That's amazing Gary. Thank you so much. We're going through this history. This has been fascinating to discussions really through the concept of space stations. Through what we've learned in what would what is taken to put together the International Space Station and laying the groundwork for what's to come really appreciate your time. Thanks for having me as a glide that is able to to offer something of interest. I loved it. Thank.

International Space Station Space Station International Space Houston US Intelligence Systems Oberpfaffenhofen Germany Michigan Chikuba ISS Marshall Center Alabama Japan Gary Ctb Australia
"space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

15:48 min | 1 year ago

"space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"We were developing was not put through a lot of testing When we first launched it into orbit and so the first crew started using it around the year two thousand immediately collapsed it had not been tested adequately and So we had to go back and redesign and rebuild it to be much stronger and we discovered that if the crew cannot exercise this as a critical failure and you start thinking about bringing the crew home within a matter of a month or less and So it turns out it is really critical hardware and it is something that you need to give serious thought to and has to be adequately tested before it goes into orbit so we were learning a lot of these lessons as we were going We started out with the Mir flights that allowed us to test a lot of this equipment. including some of the scientific payloads we sent up the first microgravity glove boxes Prototypes for what would later fly on the ISS. We sent up Other kinds of devices that were intended to limit the number of vibrations between the payload and the vibrations of the structure of the space station. So we tested those out and then we would launch more Significant systems for the ISS. We looked at the design of the Russian waste management system and also how they use different systems for recycling air and water and We were already involved in developing some of that for the ISS But the Russian approach was often very simple Almost elegant in its simplicity. And so we adopted some of those approaches And made our systems a little bit simpler to and I think in the long run that has worked out better In terms of being able to maintain and support the system in orbit about data and communications. I know that was a big one over time. And the improvements there will a lot of A lot of things really did improve significantly mirror. showed us a lot of the problems of a space station. A lot of the potential problems lot of the art experience on Mir was pretty negative because first of all Mir was very old when the US started flying the shuttle up there it was only intended to last about five years and by the the first shuttle visited it was had been there for nine years allow and by the end of the program We were going on about fifteen years. Mir had very limited communications Because of the the collapse of the Soviet government They really no longer had the t teed risk kind of a satellite that would allow them to maintain continuous communications geosynchronous communication satellite and therefore astronauts and cosmonauts could only communicate when they were within range of a few ground stations mainly across the old Soviet Empire and so they're fairly limited. How much communications could go back and forth. In the meantime we had computer systems that were growing more sophisticated For instance we had wi fi In the first laptop computers that we put on the Mir but the Russians were somewhat hesitant to use something like that because of the potential interference electromagnetic signals and so on and so we were learning a lot about how to do that and they were learning quite a bit about How that could affect things by the time. The International Space Station comes along just a few years later We we have learned a lot of those lessons. We had grown somewhat more sophisticated Our systems were new and they were working well We were very dependent on computers on the ISS whereas Mir had evolved from being a pre computer age kind of a station in the seventies and early eighties prior to Mirror They were more dependent on computers but by the time of ISS in nineteen eighty eight We we are very dependent on computers. In fact the The first crew that reaches the space station says they can't turn the lights on. They can't turn the lights on because you do it through the computer and they can't find the computer because the lights are off and so So that were some of the lessons that That we were learning at that time so So the computers were going far. More sophisticated and capable. Communications was Was almost continuous Because we did have the cheater system in orbit. Now what did we learn about life on the station because this was really are? We were jumping right into some of these long expeditions. And whatever it takes to operate over these periods of time again we have learned on the mirror that a lot of the crew time spent just maintaining the station and fortunately because the the ISS was somewhat simpler and there wasn't as much stuff in on the inside it was a little bit easier to access different areas so it didn't take quite as much time to maintain the systems. And what I'm talking about maintaining just wiping down the interior with the various kind of biological materials to control the growth of any kind of hazardous contaminants That was something that we had faced on Mir man Don. I assess Fortunately we didn't have to deal with that as much but we still had to spend at least about a day a week for by the crew cleaning and maintaining a lot of the systems We learned quite a bit about The health of the astronauts and how the health of the astronauts interface with the environmental control and Life Support. System so for instance. We knew for a long time that the astronauts were losing minerals from their bones. Her bones were growing weaker. Like in osteoporosis. In the case of the elderly it was the same kind of thing in Orb as well as the muscle. Mass of the astronauts was decreasing. And so these were things that we needed. Various kinds of countermeasures Exercise Countermeasures What we did not appreciate was a lot of these minerals that were coming out of. The astronauts was coming out in the urine and therefore in our waste management system which was processing the urine We formed What you mystically call urine brickell and it was clogging up the systems on the environmental control recycling equipment and so we were learning quite a bit And had to go back and redesign. Some of the components said that it was a less susceptible some of these kinds of problems. Wow now you talked about a lot crew time especially on Mir was dedicated to just maintaining fixing this or scrubbing down that. But I think the the goal of the International Space Station was eventually to move towards maximizing utilization time or the time you dedicate the science we had Looked at how best to use the space station right along from the very beginning A lot of the top level NASA management felt that it was all about science. It was all about building. He user community. That was going to be supportive of human spaceflight and therefore we were trying to develop experiments. I on shuttle later for SPACELAB. And then Mir that took could be developed into more sophisticated systems for use on the ISS. the problems early on on the ISS was that with the small number of crew members. Initially Just a three and then eventually growing to four and not getting to eight until Later years after about ten years or so We really did not have as much crew time as we would have liked if you take a look at the crewman's day and how much time they have to spend Maintaining themselves whether for exercise or cleanliness and so on but then How much time they actually had available for a for doing scientific work. It was a pretty constrained so we're learning quite a bit about how to either automate. Some of the systems how to operate a lot of the systems from the ground and so This has been developed really to the point now where the astronauts although they do have to do. Some on-orbit Actual maintenance of the station most of the system level activities operating the systems is done from the ground and so the astronauts do not have to focus on that so much and they do have more time to focus on scientific experiments. Yeah and they're every kind that you can imagine there earth observation. Their biological their systems. They're they're really everything going. I WanNa take a kind of zoom in on International Space Station history to the Columbia accident. What happened there in terms of the assembly? And then what we had to rethink and Redo and then get back up on our feet turf. Thin eventually finished construction of the space station or of course the initial Assembly mission occurred in nineteen eighty eight and so from eight until two thousand and three when the Columbia accident occurred We were able to do a fair amount of assembly work although we were somewhat limited because the Russians Were not moving along quite as quickly as we had hoped with the service module The survey the Russians only have a limited number of people that they apply on any of their modules. And so they had to I. do the F. B. B. and it wasn't until the F. was in orbit that they were able to move on to the service module and get it ready to fly That was finally ready The first crew went up of the first long duration crew went up in. I think two thousand and so they took their place in orbit and so then we had it about another Almost three years to work in space before the Columbia accident occurred at the time. The Columbia accident occurred. We really were not In the best of situation in terms of having all of the electrical power and and radiator systems in place. We had just started building out the trust We in a way. We were fortunate in that. We did have a fairly balanced station. Where equal amounts of trust had been placed on both sides and therefore it was somewhat easier to control and maintain in orbit. But of course we had been so focused on building assembling the station using the shuttle that when the shuttle stopped flying after Columbia We really were not able to do any more assembly work and so that That stopped everything for about two years or so until the return to flight and they returned to fly. Did that kick off a rapid set of assembly missions. So one of the problems we had run into prior to Columbia was we were bringing the different elements of the station Down to Kennedy and preparing them to fly but often times we would have one element there and the next element to add to connect Was Not really there to do any kind of testing on So we frequently had to do simulators place of the actual test articles when the Columbia accident happened In a way it worked out fortunate. Net all of the equipment began to coalesce at Kennedy Space Center. And so we could put a lot more of it together. Test it out more thoroughly Prior to launch and that way when we when we returned the shuttle to flight the the assembly missions could go off Much more rapidly almost at the pace of about one month or so when one of every month and a half or so and so we were able to move along pretty quickly. Okay now I WANNA Talk Abou Operations for a second. Because I think you've mentioned it a few times that You you mentioned this. Space Station was designed to be a bit simpler so the crew didn't have to do much but really this is different from even shuttle where it was the crew that was that was flying the shuttle. The space station is almost flown from the ground operated from the ground. Twenty four seven operations and then on top of that you have international operations. Tell me how that structure can about well. Of course computers and computer networking has evolved quite a bit over the years over the course of the last twenty years and so this is allowed the people on the ground to have almost as much sometimes even more insight into situation on the station the crew has It also means that you can have specialists all over the world Specializing in their own systems. They don't necessarily have to come here to Houston or in the case of payloads the Marshall Center in Alabama They can oftentimes stay in their own. Local control centers and operate their systems from Oberpfaffenhofen Germany or from From Chikuba in Japan or from wherever the location is So that means A lot more of the people that maintain and operate the station. can do it remotely Not only remote from the station but remote parts of the Earth. And what is it? What did it take to switch to Because when it comes to Michigan troll Before the International Space Station a lot of what we know is mission. Control was staffed for a mission and you. Would you would train and you would do simulations and you would do that. But this now we're talking about continuous staffing making sure that someone's in the room at all times because you already mentioned it. Almost twenty years.

Space Station International Space Station ISS Mir Columbia Kennedy Space Center osteoporosis US Soviet government Oberpfaffenhofen Germany Life Support Japan NASA Michigan Houston Chikuba Marshall Center
"space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

18:06 min | 1 year ago

"space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Bay. Stage going into an ambient food system. Wow so on this topic of systems tell me about the logic of designing the space station as we see it now with a trust segment with with solar rays with batteries with a the habitable modules. The Way to those we started out the different systems are going to be developed and built by different what we called work packages different contractors and different NASA centers managing them and so the power system was originally going to be a product of the Glenn. what is now the Glenn Research Center up in Ohio The modules became a product of the Marshall Space Center in Alabama although with an important role for Johnson in managing those modules A lot of the supporting systems the guidance navigation control Computers were being developed here at the Johnson Space Center because of our role in managing the spaceflight program We looked at How do you package those systems? And how do you tie them together on the inside of the modules We looked at the Spacelab racks and we went to a somewhat a simpler and more elegant design of a common rack. That could be put into the floor. The in the walls of the space station They were basically refrigerator sized up to a mass of about a thousand pounds and they were sized in such a way that if we ever got punctured by micrometeorites or a piece of orbital debris and we had to plug a hole the route could be pulled away from the wall very quickly to gain access to the pressure. Shell keep in mind we were looking at. How do we maintain these modules over a very long period of time decades? And so it was very important that it be modular in approach and so A lot of the keywords that we we wrote into the documentation both for our requirements and into the contracts were associated with modulate parity and upgrade ability and So that we would be able to recover from any kind of problems and issues in orbit the other systems such as the solar power cells and the radiators and eventually even the computers We looked at. How can you put those things on the outside of the station? How can you attach them? Originally on the Space Operation Center it was a somewhat simpler design approach But they were not quite as easy to put into place during assembly. And if you've ever had to change them out it would be difficult thinking about eating park thinking span so looking at. Va Robotics and how you assemble the pieces. We designed around this idea of the central trusts and attaching these as as different modular entities that could be attached to the trust. The trust self went through quite an evolution. Originally we were going to build the trust Out of what we called sticks and balls kind of a of a Lego set in orbit lots of little pieces and because of some of the concerns associated. With all the EV hours We went to a modular truss approach. Where the trusses were pre integrated so he would fill the truss up with as much of the equipment as we could. It would be pre assembled and then we would launch them into fairly large segments on the shuttle and So from nineteen eighty five through about nineteen eighty nine or so Those aspects of the space station what became space station. Freedom Grew pretty definitive. Now keep in mind. We did a lot of the early work at different NASA centers Looking at the design approach to us and specifying the requirements ultimately. What was built was an outgrowth of the contract competition So for instance A number of us from Johnson Space Center because of our Integral work on the modules actually went off to work package one into the Marshall Space Center. I was one of those people who worked out of Marshall for about a year during the source board and Ultimately what came back from the different bidders was what was built for the space station and still Looks pretty much like the space station today. Now some of the things The contractors and NASA did not necessarily get right in for instance. One of these things was the size of the modules Nasa specified in the requirements that the contractors were to bid to that The modules were. Take up the full capacity of the space shuttle. Payload Bay and so one of the bidders on the work patch one contract that you bidders. By the way we're Boeing and Martin Marietta and so one of the bidders said they could put a sixty or sixty five foot long module and they could launch it. Fully outfitted fully loaded with gear and then the other contractors said well a fully outfitted module would never be able to be lifted by the shuttle into the required orbit and therefore we would have to either short in the modules or we would have to launch the modules up largely empty and then send them up send the the interior contents up later in logistics modules and fact because I had been involved with shuttle payload integration I one of my jobs during the source sport was to write a white paper comparing the two approaches and who was right and my My statement was neither one is right because NASA specified the wrong requirements. So what the need them. What what we end up choosing What we ultimately ended up doing was shortening most of the modules and launching the mop partially outfitted so much of the equipment that could be integral Integrated inside as we could given the mass limitations. Okay so the the modules wound up not being They were probably never going to be sixty feet long. But the original modules. The space station were supposed to be about forty eight feet long and in fact now the longest. Us module the US lab is only. I believe about thirty feet long. Okay and so We did have to constrain the length because the mass limitations so you're defining these requirements for the contractor and go on having this back and forth with the contractors for some of the US segment. What about the international side? The internationals were going through a similar kind of approach and in some cases they were a little bit further behind us. So for instance although we were working right from the very outset with the Japanese and with the Canadians and with the Europeans They were learning a lot from how we were looking at the situation. For instance as I mentioned earlier we were building the mockups of the modules here at Johnson and the work was being done within our group. That was not in engineering. It was in the space in life. Sciences Organization called Man's systems man dash systems These days it probably would not be politically correct to call it. That we were not So forward thinking at that time It was interesting because the Japanese came. I remember Sh- MR CHIRAC. Who was their program manager? Came very early on probably in eighty six or eighty seven and we toured him through the MOCKUPS and showed him how we were approaching the design and they thought it was very interesting that we would have such a focus on the human aspect of the space station. That was something he said. The Japanese really did not know how to do The next year they said we're coming to Houston with our man systems advisory group and so they learned very quickly from us how to establish exactly what we already had in place here in. Houston and Pretty soon they were using the same approach Some of the aspects were political for instance The Japanese just as we have to fight in Congress for a monetary support to build all of these things had to do the same thing with their government and They went through and they said you know. We want to build this large laboratory and along with the laboratory logistics module and External Platform. There was a lot of concern over robotics and so the Japanese said well the Canadians rebuilding the main robotic arm for the station. But we'll build a robotic arm to so a lot of these things wound up on the Japanese module when we ran into problems such is the mass limitations of the modules the Japanese because they had sold it to their government that they were going to have a big laboratory stuck with their big laboratory. Hasn't pro as a compared with the US where we reduce the size. And that's how the the Japanese wound up with the largest lab on the station. All right now Tell me about construction. You already alluded a little bit earlier in our discussion about this wall of. Va Sins with some of the early construction. Tell me about how started and where we were. We had a series of as going on in the shuttle program through the early nineteen eighties We had rescued some satellites that had been put into Aaron orbits they weren't the right orbit or the state and the satellite did not start working the way it was supposed to. In so NASA shuttle were sent to rescue the satellites Sometimes activities went as planned other times. Didn't we sent up some chests of space station hardware for instance we built A segment of trusts off of the space shuttle and some of the problems that we focused on during that test said it was going to perhaps be more difficult than we originally assumed We had a study conducted by Astronaut Bill Fisher And Charlie price of the engineering director so is called the Fisher price study and they said. Oh this E. V. A. situation could be a pretty difficult with thousands of hours required to build the station and especially if something doesn't go right if we can't get certain things put in place then it could affect the entire assembly sequence so that was what got us looking at the idea of the pre integrated trust Some of the people in the engineering director at Who are still here today. actually patented that idea of the pre-integrated trust and so that changed our direction little bit although ultimately a the number of as his that have been required on the International Space Station has been far more than any prior program. Still in the I believe thousands of hours now I think we'RE UP INTO THE O. Two hundred devier's thereabouts today. And so So it's required quite a number bb as a lot of activity just as was foretold back in the nineteen eighties. Yeah for sure I think. Yeah we're we're way up there thousands. Yeah I think fifteen hundred hours was the last statistic for last spacewalk that we did so. It's definitely because it's it's not just we're not we're beyond construction now. This is construction. This is maintenance you know. We're talking about switching out. The batteries. Use The batteries. Don't components have been up there for decades. Now that's exactly right so tell me about some of the early years of space station with some of the smaller segments. Here we're talking. Sds Eight Expedition One Life there and how that technology has improved over time going from the small station and then eventually building on with this assembly sequence what changed what upgraded. And how what we learned improved our understanding of how to operate this thing. We'll bring in NASA Mir here because NASA Mir was a program that we conducted between about nineteen ninety five in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight so it was leading up to the first Assembly missions of the ISS and especially for those of us who were working on the inside of the station was very important We learned What kinds of equipment we would need? We learned how to work with the Russians we learned how to establish appropriate documentation and immigration processes. And so a lot of that was done early on in my own case I had been the storage manager on the shuttle during the mid eighties and also was responsible for integrating a lot of the payloads on the shuttle. And so when I was put in charge of one of the last modules on Mir I said well we streamline the process for integrating payloads if had common interfaces an so I designed the the CTB's the soft storage bags That quite honestly with something no one else had ever thought of previously and so when the first mission was getting ready to dock with the Mir Sti Seventy one in nineteen ninety five. They discovered just a few weeks before the flight. We have no way to carry things over between the shuttle and the MIR. How can we do this and I said well I have these? Ctb's manufacturer we were actually building them here on site JSE. They were in orbit within a matter of really weeks and So we we were fortunate in having that of eligible. computers When we started the design of computers For the space station in the nineteen eighties. There was no such thing as a laptop computer The first small apples apple computers were coming out probably around eighty seven or thereabouts. I remember when I went off to the source board Because I was the scribe. I was the person writing a lot of these documents. The repackaged one of these apple computers. It wasn't by any means a portable. We called it a lovable and But We were looking at large refrigerator size racks full of computer equipment in the nineteen eighties By the time of Muir When our first astronaut went up to the Mir he said he really could have used some kind of a computer system to re documents on re training manuals because otherwise we had no way of sending up lots of different manuals Even during his off hours he said boy I could use something just to watch a movie on and so I was given the job to develop the first portable computer to be used as A training aid and also to be able to be used in off. Duty HOURS ARE MEMBER. We recorded onto small eight. Millimeter cassettes the Apollo thirteen movie among others sent those up in nineteen ninety five and of course now today all of the computers on the Space Station are basically portable computers the PCs system of the of the space station really is the heart of the computer system. That drives everything We have no rack sized computer equipment anymore thankfully so we've gone away from that but keep in mind in nineteen eighty five. When we got started just didn't exist. You hadn't been invented A lot of the other equipment. We were testing out. I on NASA Mir And then we were observing some of the equipment that the Russians were using their waste management system there treadmill We got into some arguments here at the Johnson. Space Center about how critical some hardware was so for instance The ISS program at the time did not feel that exercise equipment was critical and the exercise equipment..

Space Station NASA Johnson Space Center Marshall Space Center Johnson US Space Operation Center International Space Station Space Center Spacelab NASA Mir Glenn Research Center apple Houston Va Robotics Va Payload Bay
"space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

18:06 min | 1 year ago

"space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Bay. Stage going into an ambient food system. Wow so on this topic of systems tell me about the logic of designing the space station as we see it now with trust segment with with solar rays with batteries with a the habitable modules. The way towards those we started out the different systems are going to be developed and built by different what we called work packages different contractors and different NASA centers. Managing them and so the power system was originally going to be a product of the Glenn. what is now the Glenn Research Center up in Ohio The modules became a product of the Marshall Space Center in Alabama although with an important role for Johnson in managing those modules A lot of the supporting systems the guidance navigation control Computers were being developed here at the Johnson Space Center because of our role in managing the spaceflight program We looked at How do you package those systems? And how do you tie them together? On the inside of the modules We looked at the SPACELAB and we went to a somewhat Simpler and more elegant design of a common rack. That could be put into the floor. The in the walls of the space station They were basically refrigerator sized up to a mass of about a thousand pounds and they were sized in such a way that if we ever got punctured by micrometeorites or a piece of orbital debris and we had to plug a hole the route could be pulled away from the wall very quickly to gain access to the pressure. Shell keep in mind we were looking at. How do we maintain these modules over a very long period of time decades? And so it was very important that it be modular in approach and so A lot of the keywords that we we wrote into the documentation both for our requirements and into the contracts were associated with modulate parity and upgrade ability and So that we would be able to recover from any kind of problems and issues in orbit the other systems such as the solar power cells and the radiators and eventually even the computers We looked at. How can you put those things on the outside of the station? How can you attach them? Originally on the Space Operation Center it was a somewhat simpler design approach But they were not quite as easy to put into place during assembly. And if you've ever had to change them out it would be difficult thinking about eating park thinking span so looking at. Va Robotics and how you assemble the pieces. We designed around this idea of the central trusts and attaching these as as different modular entities that could be attached to the trust. The trust self went through quite an evolution. Originally we were going to build the trust Out of what we called sticks and balls kind of a of a Lego set in orbit lots of little pieces and because of some of the concerns associated. With all the EV hours We went to a modular truss approach. Where the trusses were pre integrated so he would fill the truss up with as much of the equipment as we could. It would be pre assembled and then we would launch them into fairly large segments on the shuttle and So from nineteen eighty five through about nineteen eighty nine or so Those aspects of the space station what became space station. Freedom Grew pretty definitive. Now keep in mind. We did a lot of the early work at different NASA centers Looking at the design approach to us and specifying the requirements ultimately. What was built was an outgrowth of the contract competition So for instance A number of us from Johnson Space Center because of our Integral work on the modules actually went off to work package one into the Marshall Space Center. I was one of those people who worked out of Marshall for about a year during the source board and Ultimately what came back from the different bidders was what was built for the space station and still Looks pretty much like the space station today. Now some of the things The contractors and NASA did not necessarily get right in for instance. One of these things was the size of the modules Nasa specified in the requirements that the contractors were to bid to that The modules were. Take up the full capacity of the space shuttle. Payload Bay and so one of the bidders on the work patch one contract that you bidders. By the way we're Boeing and Martin Marietta and so one of the bidders said they could put a sixty or sixty five foot long module and they could launch it. Fully outfitted fully loaded with gear and then the other contractors said well a fully outfitted module would never be able to be lifted by the shuttle into the required orbit and therefore we would have to either short in the modules or we would have to launch the modules up largely empty and then send them up send the the interior contents up later in logistics modules and fact because I had been involved with shuttle payload integration I one of my jobs during the source sport was to write a white paper comparing the two approaches and who was right and my My statement was neither one is right because NASA specified the wrong requirements. So what the need them. What what we end up choosing What we ultimately ended up doing was shortening most of the modules and launching the mop partially outfitted so much of the equipment that could be integral Integrated inside as we could given the mass limitations. Okay so the the modules wound up not being They were probably never going to be sixty feet long. But the original modules. The space station were supposed to be about forty eight feet long and in fact now the longest. Us module the US lab is only. I believe about thirty feet long. Okay and so We did have to constrain the length because the mass limitations so you're defining these requirements for the contractor and go on having this back and forth with the contractors for some of the US segment. What about the international side? The internationals were going through a similar kind of approach and in some cases they were a little bit further behind us. So for instance although we were working right from the very outset with the Japanese and with the Canadians and with the Europeans They were learning a lot from how we were looking at the situation. For instance as I mentioned earlier we were building the mockups of the modules here at Johnson and the work was being done within our group. That was not in engineering. It was in the space in life. Sciences Organization called Man's systems man dash systems These days it probably would not be politically correct to call it. That we were not So forward thinking at that time It was interesting because the Japanese came. I remember Sh- MR CHIRAC. Who was their program manager? Came very early on probably in eighty six or eighty seven and we toured him through the MOCKUPS and showed him how we were approaching the design and they thought it was very interesting that we would have such a focus on the human aspect of the space station. That was something he said. The Japanese really did not know how to do The next year they said we're coming to Houston with our man systems advisory group and so they learned very quickly from us how to establish exactly what we already had in place here in. Houston and Pretty soon they were using the same approach Some of the aspects were political for instance The Japanese just as we have to fight in Congress for a monetary support to build all of these things had to do the same thing with their government and They went through and they said you know. We want to build this large laboratory and along with the laboratory logistics module and External Platform. There was a lot of concern over robotics and so the Japanese said well the Canadians rebuilding the main robotic arm for the station. But we'll build a robotic arm to so a lot of these things wound up on the Japanese module when we ran into problems such is the mass limitations of the modules the Japanese because they had sold it to their government that they were going to have a big laboratory stuck with their big laboratory. Hasn't pro as a compared with the US where we reduce the size. And that's how the the Japanese wound up with the largest lab on the station. All right now Tell me about construction. You already alluded a little bit earlier in our discussion about this wall of. Va Sins with some of the early construction. Tell me about how started and where we were. We had a series of as going on in the shuttle program through the early nineteen eighties We had rescued some satellites that had been put into Aaron orbits they weren't the right orbit or the state and the satellite did not start working the way it was supposed to. In so NASA shuttle were sent to rescue the satellites Sometimes activities went as planned other times. Didn't we sent up some chests of space station hardware for instance we built A segment of trusts off of the space shuttle and some of the problems that we focused on during that test said it was going to perhaps be more difficult than we originally assumed We had a study conducted by Astronaut Bill Fisher And Charlie price of the engineering director so is called the Fisher price study and they said. Oh this E. V. A. situation could be a pretty difficult with thousands of hours required to build the station and especially if something doesn't go right if we can't get certain things put in place then it could affect the entire assembly sequence so that was what got us looking at the idea of the pre integrated trust Some of the people in the engineering director at Who are still here today. actually patented that idea of the pre-integrated trust and so that changed our direction little bit although ultimately a the number of as his that have been required on the International Space Station has been far more than any prior program. Still in the I believe thousands of hours now I think we'RE UP INTO THE O. Two hundred devier's thereabouts today. And so So it's required quite a number bb as a lot of activity just as was foretold back in the nineteen eighties. Yeah for sure I think. Yeah we're we're way up there thousands. Yeah I think fifteen hundred hours was the last statistic for last spacewalk that we did so. It's definitely because it's it's not just we're not we're beyond construction now. This is construction. This is maintenance you know. We're talking about switching out. The batteries. Use The batteries. Don't components have been up there for decades. Now that's exactly right so tell me about some of the early years of space station with some of the smaller segments. Here we're talking. Sds Eight Expedition One Life there and how that technology has improved over time going from the small station and then eventually building on with this assembly sequence what changed what upgraded. And how what we learned improved our understanding of how to operate this thing. We'll bring in NASA Mir here because NASA Mir was a program that we conducted between about nineteen ninety five in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight so it was leading up to the first a assembly missions of the ISS and especially for those of us who were working on. The inside of the station was very important. we learned What kinds of equipment we would need? We learned how to work with the Russians we learned how to establish appropriate documentation and immigration processes. And so a lot of that was done early on in my own case I had been the storage manager on the shuttle during the mid eighties and also was responsible for integrating a lot of the payloads on the shuttle. And so when I was put in charge of one of the last modules on Mir I said well we streamline the process for integrating payloads if had common interfaces an so I designed the the CTB's the soft storage bags That quite honestly with something no one else had ever thought of previously and so when the first mission was getting ready to dock with the Mir Sti Seventy one in nineteen ninety five. They discovered just a few weeks before the flight. We have no way to carry things over between the shuttle and the MIR. How can we do this and I said well I have these? Ctb's manufacturer we were actually building them here on site JSE. They were in orbit within a matter of really weeks and So we we were fortunate in having that of eligible. computers When we started the design of computers For the space station in the nineteen eighties. There was no such thing as a laptop computer The first small apples apple computers were coming out probably around eighty seven or thereabouts. I remember when I went off to the source board Because I was the scribe. I was the person writing a lot of these documents. The repackaged one of these apple computers. It wasn't by any means a portable. We called it a lovable and But We were looking at large refrigerator size racks full of computer equipment in the nineteen eighties By the time of Muir When our first astronaut went up to the Mir he said he really could have used some kind of a computer system to re documents on re training manuals because otherwise we had no way of sending up lots of different manuals Even during his off hours he said boy I could use something just to watch a movie on and so I was given the job to develop the first portable computer to be used as A training aid and also to be able to be used in off. Duty HOURS ARE MEMBER. We recorded onto small eight. Millimeter cassettes the Apollo thirteen movie among others sent those up in nineteen ninety five and of course now today all of the computers on the Space Station are basically portable computers the PCs system of the of the space station really is the heart of the computer system. That drives everything We have no rack sized computer equipment anymore thankfully so we've gone away from that but keep in mind in nineteen eighty five. When we got started just didn't exist. You hadn't been invented A lot of the other equipment. We were testing out. I on NASA Mir And then we were observing some of the equipment that the Russians were using their waste management system there treadmill We got into some arguments here at the Johnson. Space Center about how critical some hardware was so for instance The ISS program at the time did not feel that exercise equipment was critical and the exercise equipment..

Space Station NASA Johnson Space Center Marshall Space Center US Johnson International Space Station Space Operation Center Space Center SPACELAB NASA Mir Glenn Research Center apple Glenn. Houston Va Robotics Va
"space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

13:36 min | 1 year ago

"space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Mir Space Station really didn't happen until the nineteen ninety s at the same time on the NASA side in the. Us We were trying to build the space shuttle and right from the very beginning the shuttle was intended to be a an assembly and servicing vehicle for a space station The first shuttle of course was ready for launch in nineteen eighty one and although the NASA management was trying to get congressional and presidential support for Space Station The president Kept deferring it and Jimmy. Carter was not a big fan of the space program. They felt lucky that they kept the shuttle going Ronald Reagan. They thought was More amenable to supporting a space station but even he did not come across with support early on and So we flew the first number of shuttle flights at the same time the European Space Agency came in and said we would like to work cooperatively with the US and help to develop our own European space program. How about if we build you a space laboratory that would go inside the space shuttle and that became the European Space Agency spacelab? So they started working on the space lab in the late nineteen seventies and it flew. I think on the first The FIRST FLIGHT WAS ON S. Nine in one thousand nine hundred eighty three. I believe if I recall correctly and We flew a number of flights with the space lab. Other people came along with similar ideas. there was a commercial group called the Spacehab which we think today about the commercialization of space Going full speed ahead with SPACEX and Boeing in the CS T. One hundred and so on but really the first big manned Commercial Space Program was spacehab that launched for the first time on sts fifty seven And that was a commercially owned module There were others. Who were less successful for instance Max v j? After he retired from NASA wanted to build a small space station that he called the industrial space facility and he was never successful with that There were a lot of ideas that were carried on into other programs but the ISF never actually happened. So I guess. Space lab was are kind of inbetween cooperative way of having some way to work and live in space and figure out how that works and then moving forward to Mir. That was a way to work cooperatively with Russia but sort of the same thing the the shuttle docked to the Mir space station and then we had astronauts and cosmonauts living in working on that there were a whole series of spacelab flights Europeans working together with the US On the shuttle some of the SPACELAB flights were Basically operated and managed by the European Space Agency others were operated by NASA. Some were operated by a specific countries Japan or Germany and there were a whole series of them The Europeans especially were working very closely with the Russians. They had a number of their own French and European cosmonauts who flew on the space stations and then later on the Mir space station and then in nineteen ninety one The US started looking at the space station freedom. In how could we do things cooperatively with the Russians One of the first things we looked at was Could we use any of the Russian hardware for our freedom space station and we thought about using the saw us as an emergency rescue vehicle and the first group of American of NASA managers went over to Russia and they saw not only do they have the Soyuz spaceship they have an airlock and docking module that they had built and designed for their Buran shuttle and the branch shuttle and the US shuttle was. We're both very similar in size and capabilities and so they looked at using those modules in together with the US shuttle in the Mir space station. Then we started talking about doing flights of cosmonauts on the US shuttle and astronauts on the Mir and that happened The first two cosmonauts were Surrogate Creek Eleven Vladimir Titov came to work here in the US and we train them for some of the early space hab missions and so we worked very closely with them. norm staggered in. Bonnie Dunbar became our first astronauts to go to work with the Russians over in Russia. They were trained as COBB cosmonauts to go up on the Mir space station and almost as soon as that got started. We started talking about a series of docking missions. With the mirror the initial docking mission would bring a space lab module up to the Mir so that we could actually use it to do the The Human Life Science Studies on the first astronaut to be returning on the shuttle which became nap norm. Fagor D- In nineteen ninety five but then we started talking about an additional six to ten docking missions with Mir which became a whole series of shuttle. Mir flights We started with. Sts Seventy one in ninety five. And I think the last flight was an SDS ninety one in nineteen ninety eight where we still talking in the background about another space station. You did mention space station freedom in the early nineties but the shuttle Mir was was through in the nineties. How was that what was going on in the background for planning for the future. Well the the Freedom Space Station got started in Nineteen eighty-four and originally the plan was that we were going to have it in orbit operating by the five hundredth anniversary of Columbus in nineteen ninety two above by nineteen ninety ninety one. We were really that far along with the Freedom Space Station. We started talking with the Russians. The Russians had had plans for a much larger space station and so we started discussing with the Russians ideas of may be their space station could join our space station and we would have one large international space station which is exactly what happened even before that we started working with them on the mirror and the US essentially bought and paid for two of the modules. That would go up to Mir the last two modules on Mir coach Peralta Inspector and so they were launched in one thousand nine hundred ninety five and nineteen ninety six and we actually test a lot of the International Space Station hardware on those two modules We were responsible for a lot of the Electrical Power Systems. The computer systems the stowage and logistic systems. A lot of that was actually tested out. I on Mir and is still in use on the ISS on the International Space Station today When the Russians joined the program we were still using the freedom hardware. Pretty much the The modules the nodes The whole structure of the space station today is pretty much. What was initially envisioned for the Freedom Space Station starting in the Mid Nineteen Eighties But when the Russians joined the program we renamed at the International Space Station and by that time in nineteen ninety three or thereabouts. We'd already been working for quite a long time with the Japanese and European so they were fully invested in the program and In one thousand nine hundred ninety eight of course. We launched the very first module of the International Space Station which was one of those Almaz military modules at the Russians had developed starting in the late nineteen sixties and So the F. G. B. Which was the first module of the space station was very important very critical in terms of saving us a lot of money because it provided the electrical power the guidance and Control Systems Propulsion Systems. A lot of things that the US no longer had to develop for the International Space Station. So where does the story of the spy on the International Space Station go from there? We're launching Zarya F G B in in ninety eight. How do we more from collaborating you talk about there was already a strong foundation of collaboration The the end of Mir and the rise of the construction of space station going forward. Well we were talking. Some of US would have liked to have seen our modules that we had designed and built for mere continue on to the International Space Station and so some of US actually tried to talk the program manager at that time Randy Brinkley into Having the Mir and the International Space Station in a CO cleaner orbits and so we would be able to visit from one to the other carryover hardware modules but The program manager was not too enthusiastic about that and so The Specter in pro two modules really did not get the kind of use that they might have had otherwise does remodels. You worked goes where modules. I was the lead. Us manager on Priroda and so we barely began to use them quite honestly In the meantime The US wanted to focus fully on the International Space Station so we began to do that in nineteen ninety eight. We were very dependent on the core module. The base block What would become on the International Space Station the service module of the International Space Station because that was our initial habitation quarters provided the life support equipment and the Russians had very limited capability to produce these modules? They basically only had one set of workers and they had been working for twenty five years by this time and so they would build one module and then they would go on to the next module so the Gbi was in work until it launched and then they got started really on the service module and outfitting in finishing. So we knew it wasn't going to be ready for immediate launch and it wasn't until about two thousand and That was when we sent the first crew up to take take up life on the International Space Station. The Mir in the meantime reentered in two thousand and one burned up in the atmosphere As it did so and I had enjoyed as I say if a fifteen plus year lifespan when it was only originally intended to last for about five years the Russians did not let Mir die that easily they wanted to go back but Quite honestly without the support of the US and the shuttle they really could not do both programs together and so they did. Let me or die There were a lot of choice to it as re entered and then they turn their full attention to the International Space Station. All right well Gary. I think that's a. That's a good place to end this discussion for now. What we did was. We talked about a brief history of space stations up to just the beginning of the International Space Station on a really believe that we should split this into another part and just talk space station and the progression of that because right now we're still at nine hundred ninety eight We talked about Mir de orbiting in in two thousand and one really give the International Space Station. The Justice deserves Gary Kip mark. Thank you so much going through this really brief but fascinating discussion about space stations. Let's continue this. Let's keep going. I enjoyed doing it anytime..

International Space Station Mir Space Station Freedom Space Station Mir US European Space Agency Space Station NASA Mir de orbiting Russia Ronald Reagan Carter Bonnie Dunbar ISF SPACEX Jimmy president
"space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

18:11 min | 1 year ago

"space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"What could we do with the Apollo hardware? Could we build a space station? Could we build long-term basis on the Moon And ultimately out of that came the. Skylab program the Russians unsuccessful with they A large moon rocket had to focus on the smaller space stations which they called salute. I one went up and seventy one and they had a series of about eight of them between then and nineteen eighty-six not all of them successfully made them made it into orbit. I think Out of a total there were about four or five that were successful in the later stages of that on solid six solid seven they would launch up not just the main core of the space station but they would send up an additional module or two that would dock to it that would allow them to expand the space station. Skylab on the US side went up as one large space station basically folded up and unfolded once it reached orbit The astronauts went up an Apollo capsule. The it was sent up essentially loaded with all of these supplies. They would need for three missions. The last mission on Skylab four which was the third crew of astronauts Stayed for almost three months They extended the mission in order to observe comment that had been discovered earlier that year. Comic Hotek The astronauts got down to rationing food bars and some of the astronauts said that was the most difficult part of the flight was the pack that they had nothing to eat for the last several weeks. In the meantime the Soviets were launching these salute. Space Stations with these large resupply modules. They had been designing a follow on module. Actually part of the Almaz Program and these follow on modules. Were supposed to carry up. Space Capsule called a key K S. That look very much like an Apollo in American Apollo ship They took the Apollo ship off and they sent them up unmanned and they perfected this idea of unmanned rendezvous and docking. So they were ahead of us in that way also and So the first modular space stations were sal six and seven in the early nineteen eighties and then they decided will mirror would be the true modular space station. They were all launched by the smaller Proton rocket and They were composed of a central module. That was based on their civilian space station. The True Salad and series of additional modules were based on their military space station the Almaz and so Mir Had the main core module the base block. They would call it and in time they would add for additional large modules. Actually five if you include Quant to which was module designed to go up on their space shuttle and the docking module. That would actually go up on an American shuttle. So a lot of the lessons about constructing and operating a modular space station was learned on salad. And then maybe perfected or enhanced in some way on Mir It was I I wouldn't say it was perfected. Mirror had a lot of problems because it was only supposed to last for five years and instead they kept it going for about fifteen years and so a lot of the systems were breaking down. One of the problems at the Russians did have was the lack of a logistics capability they had intended for the Baronne space shuttle the Russian space shuttle to service the space station and after its first flight. They cancelled the Braun program. And so they had very little capability to return. Anything to the ground 'til the US started flying space shuttles there But they did perfect the idea of these modules coming in Operating truly independently on their own autonomously and then when the US got involved with the Russians in the Nineteen Ninety S. We actually worked with them. Developed a lot of their integration processes and developed a lot of the hardware that we use even today on the ISS. So I want to back up for a second to Skylab because I do I do feel like it is a different concept. What we're talking about with salute with with Mir. You said it was. It was one big element. It was a it was spun from this Idea to reuse Apollo hardware for something and. They came up with this large station. You talked about three crews living on living on Skylab what did Skylab show the United States in terms of living and working in space because at the time these missions that last one you said was three months that that was the longest we've ever been living and working in space. So what did that show us about? How the Skylab actually grew out of a program that I was thought about in the mid nineteen fifties by one of the German Engineers Craft. Erica who worked for the US Air Force on the atlas ICBM missile and As one of the ideas of what else could we do with the Atlas Craft? Erica thought about If we could launch these missiles into orbit around the earth we could evacuate them. Fill THEM WITH AIR. And then people could live on board as and it would be the first base station That was not followed too seriously but then in one thousand nine hundred sixty one in London England they were putting on home show and the British asked the US McDonnell Company which was building mercury and Gemini Space Ships. Can you design us a space station to put on exhibit in our home show in London and they thought about the idea of a second stage of a Saturn rocket being used as a space station and That was actually built in full scale and on display in London in nineteen sixty Verner von Braun comes along and initially the Apollo program was going to launch a series of Apollo Command service modules and lunar modules on smaller Saturn. One or uprated Saturn one rockets. And so they were building a lot of these rockets When the Apollo fire occurred in nineteen sixty seven and Apollo was already running behind schedule The associated administrator for spaceflight decided we could not afford to launch all these earlier Apollo ships we would just go directly to using the Saturn five rocket and test out the command service and lunar modules together. This left a lot of these smaller. Saturn one rockets available and von Braun started thinking about using the evacuated upper stage of the Saturn rocket as a space station. Actually they didn't call it space station. It was going to be They termed it an orbital workshop and a lot of the early ideas were not for space station at all. They were simply going to open up. A hatch and astronauts would be able to go in and essentially be able to do an EVA inside of this upper stage Von Braun and George Miller. Who was the associate administrator? Da Dove into the water tank at the Marshall Space Center and actually tried to unbolt the hatch on one of these Saturn upper stages and they were unsuccessful and they said there was no way you'd ever be able to get it open and orb about that time in nineteen sixty seven or sixty eight The Apollo program even though they had not flown the first mission yet was already being cut back. They had decided to To cancel several of the Apollo missions. Were they were going to go to Apollo twenty-five and they were only GonNa do Apollo Twenty at that point and so- Miller decided well we will use the last Saturn five rocket to launch a space station so they basically took one of the Saturn Moon. Rockets decided it would be used the integrated around this upper stage. The second stage stage of Saturn one third stage of a Saturn five There were a lot of studies at this time by Robert Gill Ruth. Who is the director here at the Johnson Space Center at the manned spacecraft Center What could we do with space station? And they decided they needed to enlist the support scientists and so they went off off after scientists who were doing astronomical work in solar observations they went after Earth Observation. Scientists are earth resources and so here at the manned spacecraft center we started up some new projects To actually incorporate science into the program we already had a pretty active life. Sciences Program Studying Human Beings In orbit space so Between these three themes of astronomy astronomical observations Earth Observations and Human Life Sciences. These were the main themes of the. Skylab program and so they built a large solar observatory They had a large package of Earth observation experiments and they had a lot of life. Science experiments all focused on human beings. the one problem with the Skylab was it was going to be launched as a single unit fully loaded and so that somewhat limited lifetime in its ability to be extended. Some people were thinking as the space shuttle was coming along later in the nineteen seventies while we just save the Skylab and it could become a space station but the people who actually manage the Skylab Kenny calling connect. Who was the program manager Bob Thompson? Who developed a lot of the ideas had the systems were never designed for an extended capability so they never thought seriously about extending Skylab at all And as it turned out the shuttle was ready to late in so skylab because of solar flares had reentered the earth's atmosphere early in nineteen seventy nine and there is a backup Skylab but by that time they had shut down all the Saturn rocket activity and so that backup Skylab is on display today at the Smithsonian up in Washington DC right. I've seen it so no you. You mentioned the shuttle that was that was what we're looking forward to. That shuttle eventually came online in the eighties and I know there's a story of it being integrated with Mir in terms of its story with space station in terms of Early story at least As well as something called Spacelab in nineteen seventy five we first. We flew the first mission with the Russians called. Esdp APOLLO Soyuz test project in which we talked the last Apollo capsule the last American Apollo with the Russian Soyuz And we had a lot of thoughts about launching space shuttles to dock with a salad space station but because of the Cold War That really never took off and We kind of went our separate ways for a long time until the Soviet Union fell At the beginning of the nineteen nineties and then we were looking at ways to work cooperatively with the Russians helped shore up the Russian space program in order to support their science and technical organizations. And so we although there were had been thoughts earlier about docking shuttle with a salad and later on. Mir Space Station really didn't happen until the nineteen ninety s at the same time on the NASA side in the. Us We were trying to build the space shuttle and right from the very beginning the shuttle was intended to be a an assembly and servicing vehicle for a space station The first shuttle of course was ready for launch in nineteen eighty one and although the NASA management was trying to get congressional and presidential support for Space Station The president Kept deferring it and Jimmy. Carter was not a big fan of the space program. They felt lucky that they kept the shuttle going Ronald Reagan. They thought was More amenable to supporting a space station but even he did not come across with support early on and So we flew the first number of shuttle flights at the same time the European Space Agency came in and said we would like to work cooperatively with the US and help to develop our own European space program. How about if we build you a space laboratory that would go inside the space shuttle and that became the European Space Agency spacelab? So they started working on the space lab in the late nineteen seventies and it flew. I think on the first The FIRST FLIGHT WAS ON S. Nine in one thousand nine hundred eighty three. I believe if I recall correctly and We flew a number of flights with the space lab. Other people came along with similar ideas. there was a commercial group called the Spacehab which we think today about the commercialization of space Going full speed ahead with SPACEX and Boeing in the CS T. One hundred and so on but really the first big manned Commercial Space Program was spacehab that launched for the first time on sts fifty seven And that was a commercially owned module There were others. Who were less successful for instance Max v j? After he retired from NASA wanted to build a small space station that he called the industrial space facility and he was never successful with that There were a lot of ideas that were carried on into other programs but the ISF never actually happened. So I guess. Space lab was are kind of inbetween cooperative way of having some way to work and live in space and figure out how that works and then moving forward to Mir. That was a way to work cooperatively with Russia but sort of the same thing the the shuttle docked to the Mir space station and then we had astronauts and cosmonauts living in working on that there were a whole series of spacelab flights Europeans working together with the US On the shuttle some of the SPACELAB flights were Basically operated and managed by the European Space Agency others were operated by NASA. Some were operated by a specific countries Japan or Germany and there were a whole series of them The Europeans especially were working very closely with the Russians. They had a number of their own French and European cosmonauts who flew on the space stations and then later on the Mir space station and then in nineteen ninety one The US started looking at the space station freedom. In how could we do things cooperatively with the Russians One of the first things we looked at was Could we use any of the Russian hardware for our freedom space station and we thought about using the saw us as an emergency rescue vehicle and the first group of American of NASA managers went over to Russia and they saw not only do they have the Soyuz spaceship they have an airlock and docking module that they had built and designed for their Buran shuttle and the branch shuttle and the US shuttle was..

Mir Space Station European Space Agency United States Apollo Space Station Marshall Space Center Johnson Space Center NASA Mir Nineteen Ninety Rockets London Verner von Braun Apollo missions Almaz Program manned spacecraft Center
"space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

13:57 min | 1 year ago

"space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Oh Wow so How long did salute continue on and then winded? We really start thinking about taking some of the Apollo hardware and going ahead with Skylab we were thinking about a skylab all through the nineteen sixties we had a program wasn't really a program it was a study called Apollo applications that we were looking at. What could we do with the Apollo hardware? Could we build a space station? Could we build long-term basis on the Moon And ultimately out of that came the. Skylab program the Russians unsuccessful with they A large moon rocket had to focus on the smaller space stations which they called salute. I one went up and seventy one and they had a series of about eight of them between then and nineteen eighty-six not all of them successfully made them made it into orbit. I think Out of a total there were about four or five that were successful in the later stages of that on solid six solid seven they would launch up not just the main core of the space station but they would send up an additional module or two that would dock to it that would allow them to expand the space station. Skylab on the US side went up as one large space station basically folded up and unfolded once it reached orbit The astronauts went up an Apollo capsule. The it was sent up essentially loaded with all of these supplies. They would need for three missions. The last mission on Skylab four which was the third crew of astronauts Stayed for almost three months They extended the mission in order to observe comment that had been discovered earlier that year. Comic Hotek The astronauts got down to rationing food bars and some of the astronauts said that was the most difficult part of the flight was the pack that they had nothing to eat for the last several weeks. In the meantime the Soviets were launching these salute. Space Stations with these large resupply modules. They had been designing a follow on module. Actually part of the Almaz Program and these follow on modules. Were supposed to carry up. Space Capsule called a key K S. That look very much like an Apollo in American Apollo ship They took the Apollo ship off and they sent them up unmanned and they perfected this idea of unmanned rendezvous and docking. So they were ahead of us in that way also and So the first modular space stations were sal six and seven in the early nineteen eighties and then they decided will mirror would be the true modular space station. They were all launched by the smaller Proton rocket and They were composed of a central module. That was based on their civilian space station. The True Salad and series of additional modules were based on their military space station the Almaz and so Mir Had the main core module the base block. They would call it and in time they would add for additional large modules. Actually five if you include Quant to which was module designed to go up on their space shuttle and the docking module. That would actually go up on an American shuttle. So a lot of the lessons about constructing and operating a modular space station was learned on salad. And then maybe perfected or enhanced in some way on Mir It was I I wouldn't say it was perfected. Mirror had a lot of problems because it was only supposed to last for five years and instead they kept it going for about fifteen years and so a lot of the systems were breaking down. One of the problems at the Russians did have was the lack of a logistics capability they had intended for the Baronne space shuttle the Russian space shuttle to service the space station and after its first flight. They cancelled the Braun program. And so they had very little capability to return. Anything to the ground 'til the US started flying space shuttles there But they did perfect the idea of these modules coming in Operating truly independently on their own autonomously and then when the US got involved with the Russians in the Nineteen Ninety S. We actually worked with them. Developed a lot of their integration processes and developed a lot of the hardware that we use even today on the ISS. So I want to back up for a second to Skylab because I do I do feel like it is a different concept. What we're talking about with salute with with Mir. You said it was. It was one big element. It was a it was spun from this Idea to reuse Apollo hardware for something and. They came up with this large station. You talked about three crews living on living on Skylab what did Skylab show the United States in terms of living and working in space because at the time these missions that last one you said was three months that that was the longest we've ever been living and working in space. So what did that show us about? How the Skylab actually grew out of a program that I was thought about in the mid nineteen fifties by one of the German Engineers Craft. Erica who worked for the US Air Force on the atlas ICBM missile and As one of the ideas of what else could we do with the Atlas Craft? Erica thought about If we could launch these missiles into orbit around the earth we could evacuate them. Fill THEM WITH AIR. And then people could live on board as and it would be the first base station That was not followed too seriously but then in one thousand nine hundred sixty one in London England they were putting on home show and the British asked the US McDonnell Company which was building mercury and Gemini Space Ships. Can you design us a space station to put on exhibit in our home show in London and they thought about the idea of a second stage of a Saturn rocket being used as a space station and That was actually built in full scale and on display in London in nineteen sixty Verner von Braun comes along and initially the Apollo program was going to launch a series of Apollo Command service modules and lunar modules on smaller Saturn. One or uprated Saturn one rockets. And so they were building a lot of these rockets When the Apollo fire occurred in nineteen sixty seven and Apollo was already running behind schedule The associated administrator for spaceflight decided we could not afford to launch all these earlier Apollo ships we would just go directly to using the Saturn five rocket and test out the command service and lunar modules together. This left a lot of these smaller. Saturn one rockets available and von Braun started thinking about using the evacuated upper stage of the Saturn rocket as a space station. Actually they didn't call it space station. It was going to be They termed it an orbital workshop and a lot of the early ideas were not for space station at all. They were simply going to open up. A hatch and astronauts would be able to go in and essentially be able to do an EVA inside of this upper stage Von Braun and George Miller. Who was the associate administrator? Da Dove into the water tank at the Marshall Space Center and actually tried to unbolt the hatch on one of these Saturn upper stages and they were unsuccessful and they said there was no way you'd ever be able to get it open and orb about that time in nineteen sixty seven or sixty eight The Apollo program even though they had not flown the first mission yet was already being cut back. They had decided to To cancel several of the Apollo missions. Were they were going to go to Apollo twenty-five and they were only GonNa do Apollo Twenty at that point and so- Miller decided well we will use the last Saturn five rocket to launch a space station so they basically took one of the Saturn Moon. Rockets decided it would be used the integrated around this upper stage. The second stage stage of Saturn one third stage of a Saturn five There were a lot of studies at this time by Robert Gill Ruth. Who is the director here at the Johnson Space Center at the manned spacecraft Center What could we do with space station? And they decided they needed to enlist the support scientists and so they went off off after scientists who were doing astronomical work in solar observations they went after Earth Observation. Scientists are earth resources and so here at the manned spacecraft center we started up some new projects To actually incorporate science into the program we already had a pretty active life. Sciences Program Studying Human Beings In orbit space so Between these three themes of astronomy astronomical observations Earth Observations and Human Life Sciences. These were the main themes of the. Skylab program and so they built a large solar observatory They had a large package of Earth observation experiments and they had a lot of life. Science experiments all focused on human beings. the one problem with the Skylab was it was going to be launched as a single unit fully loaded and so that somewhat limited lifetime in its ability to be extended. Some people were thinking as the space shuttle was coming along later in the nineteen seventies while we just save the Skylab and it could become a space station but the people who actually manage the Skylab Kenny calling connect. Who was the program manager Bob Thompson? Who developed a lot of the ideas had the systems were never designed for an extended capability so they never thought seriously about extending Skylab at all And as it turned out the shuttle was ready to late in so skylab because of solar flares had reentered the earth's atmosphere early in nineteen seventy nine and there is a backup Skylab but by that time they had shut down all the Saturn rocket activity and so that backup Skylab is on display today at the Smithsonian up in Washington DC right. I've seen it so no you. You mentioned the shuttle that was that was what we're looking forward to. That shuttle eventually came online in the eighties and I know there's a story of it being integrated with Mir in terms of its story with space station in terms of Early story at least As well as something called Spacelab in nineteen seventy five we first. We flew the first mission with the Russians called. Esdp APOLLO Soyuz test project in which we talked the last Apollo capsule the last American Apollo with the Russian Soyuz And we had a lot of thoughts about launching space shuttles to dock with a salad space station but because of the Cold War That really never took off and We kind of went our separate ways for a long time until the Soviet Union fell At the beginning of the nineteen nineties and then we were looking at ways to work cooperatively with the Russians helped shore up the Russian space program in order to support their science and technical organizations. And so we although there were had been thoughts earlier about docking shuttle with a salad and later on..

Apollo Marshall Space Center United States Johnson Space Center Verner von Braun Rockets Apollo missions Mir Nineteen Ninety manned spacecraft Center Apollo Command Almaz Program George Miller London program manager US Air Force
"space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

15:40 min | 1 year ago

"space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"War Two knew that this would be a very powerful tool if he could have reconnaissance satellites his concern. Was that the Russians the Soviet Union And was very concerned that the US was flying over their territory without permission and so Verner von Braun in about nineteen fifty. Six was actually had a rocket and was capable of launching the first satellite and he was told to stand down. Do not launch a satellite and that was because Eisenhower wanted the Soviets to show the idea of free overflight that satellites would be passing over the nations of the earth with basically unlimited Capability and I talked to Von Braun about this one time as a matter of fact when I was a college student Von Braun came to give a lecture and I asked him you know. He had been very disappointed in fifty six about not launching the first satellite and he told me well in the end it worked out well because there was a space race and he thought that because of this we made to the Moon in his lifetime which was a a major objective was so they had the technology but it was more of a strategic idea to wait veteran. Okay and let the Soviets at first so then that catapults us into the space race. Obviously we all know that. Sputnik launched And from there it wasn't too long later than NASA was formed Next thing you know. We're entering some of the first human spaceflight programs Napa National Advisory Committee for nautical. I didn't become NASA until Nineteen Fifty. And so they had been studying vehicles. That could fly higher and faster. They had out a whole series of explains beginning in the late. Nineteen forties in cooperation with the military Beginning with chuck yeager in the bell x one and then The two vehicles that could fly even faster and they were the x fifteen was on the drawing board it would eventually make it to six times the speed of sound and could actually reach space but in a ballistic trajectory They were looking at. How could you send a person into orbit and so people like Max v J here at the manned spacecraft center before it became Johnson Space Center was looking at the idea of a small capsule that could carry a person In some ways the Russians were further along than we were They had They're great designer. Sergei Korolev and he once he had the first ballistic missile being tested in the mid nineteen fifties knew. He was capable of launching a satellite and their first satellite He was able to get their polit bureau to support the idea that this could be a reconnaissance satellite or by changing out the pod that would carry the cameras. He could send up what he euphemistically called biological samples which he was really thinking would be a human being and they were developing that first satellite. That verse first sophisticated satellite when they decided the Americans were getting a little bit too far along with our vanguard project that was supposed to launch the first satellite and then with von Braun capable of launching a satellite on his redstone rocket which became the Jupiter C. And so they said we. We need to advance a little bit faster. And so they came up with the idea of what they called. Simple satellite which became sputnik one and so in nineteen fifty seven They I launched the first successful ballistic missile and the very next launch was the first satellite called Sputnik One We were a little bit delayed. I we were aiming to launch a satellite on the vanguard which was a totally new rocket civilian rocket being developed by the US Navy We were not too successful with that. First one blew up on the launchpad in early December shortly after the sputnik launch in October and sold von Braun was called in at that point in toll. Can you get your missile that he'd been sitting on for two years by this time? Ready and launch a satellite. He said Yeah I can do it. And the next couple of months and so in January thirty first nineteen fifty eight. He launched the first American satellite explorer. One explore okay so skipping ahead and and making the space race itself a little bit briefer. You already mentioned that it was. It was kind of a competition of technological prowess. Almost you know we had to be the first. But it was the Soviet Union to put the first man in space I believe the Soviet Union had the first war. Bit The first spacewalk. They had a lot of. I think it was Kennedy. Who made that declaration to skip ahead and shoot for the moon? Which is how that started or NASA had been studying the idea of sending on lunar flight. Although initially it was just a flight around the Moon Beginning in the late nineteen fifties The US army was competing with NASA. The military was competing. No one was sure at this point. Who would be in charge of the space program and so the US army actually led by Von Braun? Who worked for the? Us Army at that time had a project of very top secret called project horizon and it was GonNa put a moon base and they would be using space stations in orbit around the Earth as a resupply depot. So they would actually store fuel there they would fuel the different spaceships as they would take off from the Moon. So this is another Recurring idea about space station being used future trips to the moon in the later the planet's In nineteen fifty eight Nasr's formed the civilian space program is basically turned over to NASA Von Braun is turned over to NASA and he becomes the director of the Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama And of course the manned spacecraft center is formed here in Houston Which becomes the Johnson Space Center after the death of Lyndon Johnson so The Johnson Space Center starts looking. At what should we do next and in nineteen sixty one? Shortly after he is elected President Kennedy asked his vice president Lyndon Johnson. What should the? Us Do what goal should we Proce- pursue what can we beat the Russians at and? They studied a number of options. One of them was a moon. Landing and other one was space station and because the Russians had these very large rockets. He's lapore large ballistic missiles the The agreement was well the Russians if they really wanted to could launch space stations today in order to get to the moon. They're going to need an even bigger rock that rocket that they don't have and so it was at that point in early nineteen sixty one that Kennedy decided we would try to go to the moon and we would do it. He announced before the end of the nineteen sixties. Actually the initial date was in nineteen sixty seven. They thought they could do it. and so that is what started us on a On Project Apollo in the first moon landing The Russians were also Got Into the moon landing phase although there was a lot of disagreement over this in the mid nineteen sixties. A lot of people wondered where the Russians really competing to go to the moon. But we know now that They were they were building a large moon rocket along the lines of the Saturn five the US moon rock There was called the n. One For those of us who have gone to Baikonour and traveled around that area there are remnants of an ones all over the place And you may have seen some of them that are used as storage sheds and and children's sandboxes and so on but they were developing them and they attempted to launch it several times all all of which were unsuccessful. It was a pretty complex vehicle. Had A lot of engines on the first stage. One of the problems was they could never get all the engines to work simultaneously now. They're n one rocket not only was going to be used to launch their moon ship but they were also going to use it to launch a very large space station. And they were thinking right through the nineteen sixties about the idea of a space station They had lots of designs for them. But they really were not Catapulted I guess into the Space Station Race until we were successful landing on the moon at that point. They decided well if the Americans are successful landing on the moon. Maybe we better be successful at launching the first space station They were thinking about different kinds of space stations. One of them was a military space station. Called the Almaz They were the only ones thinking about military space stations we in the US The US Air Force was pursuing a program called manned orbiting laboratory and so we were going to try and launch a space station in the mid to late nineteen sixties and their Almaz was going to compete with that The mole manned orbiting laboratory was cancelled the same week is the Apollo Eleven Moon Landing July nineteen sixty nine and favor of a NASA project which became called Skylab and SCO Skylab became our first space station when we announced that we would have Skylab in orbit in one thousand nine hundred seventy three or four the Russians decided. We'd better have our space station in orbit a little bit earlier Almaz was not ready at that. The N one rocket was not working and so they came up with the idea of a small modular space station Based in part on the Soyuz spaceship and actually use Soyuz Systems you saw use solar panels and so that became their first base station solid one which was launched in one thousand nine hundred seventy one. And what did they do on? Sell it one The first flight was unsuccessful and was not able to dock properly with the seller but the second mission up there By a Soyuz was successful So three cosmonauts lived on board for just about a month and because the US had been publicizing the moon landings by this time. The Russians decided they would publicize this Crew living on board the space station so they actually had a special series of TV programs. Every evening the crew would broadcast images down to Russia and So they consider that a great Success until on the last day when the Soyuz reentered There was a valve the inadvertently opened a loud all the error to escape and the spacecraft landed as it should but all the cosmonauts were found dead inside. That's right it was shortly after that they introduced the pressurized Socal suits are because of the earlier spacecraft the low such as the Voskan they had stopped wearing pressure suits regularly In the mid nineteen sixties Before that they had to wear pressure suits because the cosmonauts had to bail out of the spacecraft they did not land inside they landed on a separate parachute. So the I saw uses. Were launched without pressure suits and after the These for solid one Depressurization they did have to add. Pressure suits thoroughly spacecraft. Lands with shoots had to jump out of the spacecraft while it was falling well the The early spacecraft was very heavy and it also was designed around this idea of a photographic pod being deployed separately and so the capability was there to To a checkout cosmonaut. So on their first space craft the Vostok's The cosmonauts would always eject out and land separately on Vasco one. We were getting ready in nineteen sixty four to send the first two man. Crews up the Soviets decided wealthy. Us IS GONNA launch two man. Crews they would end up for three man crew and they took the Vostok spaceship which was only designed for one person. They basically stripped the interior out. There was not enough space for space suits and so a lot of the Russian engineers by the way posed the idea but they went ahead They put three cosmonauts on board but in order to make a soft landing. They had a last minute rocket that would slow them down so they used a parachute but then a rocket retro rocket would slow them down at the very last second They use the same approach on Vasco. Chiu which was the first spacewalk by Alexi. Lay Off nineteen sixty five. There were supposed to be several more vaas cod missions but they were all cancelled in favor of Soyuz by that time. Oh Wow so How long did salute continue on and then winded? We really start thinking about taking some of the Apollo hardware and going ahead with Skylab we were thinking about a skylab all through the nineteen sixties we had a program wasn't really a program it was a study called Apollo applications that we were looking at..

US Verner von Braun NASA Johnson Space Center Nineteen Fifty President Kennedy Soviet Union And Marshall Space Flight Center Apollo Eleven Moon Landing Us Army Soviet Union Lyndon Johnson Sergei Korolev Napa National Advisory Committ chuck yeager Eisenhower US Air Force Soyuz Systems
"space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

15:16 min | 1 year ago

"space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"War Two knew that this would be a very powerful tool if he could have reconnaissance satellites his concern. Was that the Russians the Soviet Union And was very concerned that the US was flying over their territory without permission and so Verner von Braun in about nineteen fifty. Six was actually had a rocket and was capable of launching the first satellite and he was told to stand down. Do not launch a satellite and that was because Eisenhower wanted the Soviets to show the idea of free overflight that satellites would be passing over the nations of the earth with basically unlimited Capability and I talked Ambron about this one time. As a matter of fact when I was a college student Von Braun came to give a lecture and I asked him you know. He had been very disappointed in fifty six about not launching the first satellite and he told me well in the end it worked out well because there was a space race and he thought that because of this we made to the Moon in his lifetime which was a a major objective was so they had the technology but it was more of a strategic idea to wait veteran. Okay and let the Soviets at first so then that catapults us into the space race. Obviously we all know that. Sputnik launched And from there it wasn't too long later than NASA was formed Next thing you know. We're entering some of the first human spaceflight programs Napa National Advisory Committee for nautical. I didn't become NASA until Nineteen Fifty. And so they had been studying vehicles. That could fly higher and faster. They had out a whole series of explains beginning in the late. Nineteen forties in cooperation with the military Beginning with chuck yeager in the bell x one and then The two vehicles that could fly even faster and they were the x fifteen was on the drawing board it would eventually make it to six times the speed of sound and could actually reach space but in a ballistic trajectory They were looking at. How could you send a person into orbit and so people like Max v J here at the manned spacecraft center before it became Johnson Space Center was looking at the idea of a small capsule that could carry a person In some ways the Russians were further along than we were They had They're great designer. Sergei Korolev and he once he had the first ballistic missile being tested in the mid nineteen fifties knew. He was capable of launching a satellite and their first satellite He was able to get their polit bureau to support the idea that this could be a reconnaissance satellite or by changing out the pod that would carry the cameras. He could send up what he euphemistically called biological samples which he was really thinking would be a human being and they were developing that first satellite. That verse first sophisticated satellite when they decided the Americans were getting a little bit too far along with our vanguard project that was supposed to launch the first satellite and then with von Braun capable of launching a satellite on his redstone rocket which became the Jupiter C. And so they said we. We need to advance a little bit faster. And so they came up with the idea of what they called. Simple satellite which became sputnik one and so in nineteen fifty seven They I launched the first successful ballistic missile and the very next launch was the first satellite called Sputnik One We were a little bit delayed. I we were aiming to launch a satellite on the vanguard which was a totally new rocket civilian rocket being developed by the US Navy We were not too successful with that. First one blew up on the launchpad in early December shortly after the sputnik launch in October and sold von Braun was called in at that point in toll. Can you get your missile that he'd been sitting on for two years by this time? Ready and launch a satellite. He said Yeah I can do it. And the next couple of months and so in January thirty first nineteen fifty eight. He launched the first American satellite explorer. One explore okay so skipping ahead and and making the space race itself a little bit briefer. You already mentioned that it was. It was kind of a competition of technological prowess. Almost you know we had to be the first. But it was the Soviet Union to put the first man in space I believe the Soviet Union had the first war. Bit The first spacewalk. They had a lot of. I think it was Kennedy. Who made that declaration to skip ahead and shoot for the moon? Which is how that started or NASA had been studying the idea of sending on lunar flight. Although initially it was just a flight around the Moon Beginning in the late nineteen fifties The US army was competing with NASA. The military was competing. No one was sure at this point. Who would be in charge of the space program and so the US army actually led by Von Braun? Who worked for the? Us Army at that time had a project of very top secret called project horizon and it was GonNa put a moon base and they would be using space stations in orbit around the Earth as a resupply depot. So they would actually store fuel there they would fuel the different spaceships as they would take off from the Moon. So this is another Recurring idea about space station being used future trips to the moon in the later the planet's In nineteen fifty eight Nasr's formed the civilian space program is basically turned over to NASA Von Braun is turned over to NASA and he becomes the director of the Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama And of course the manned spacecraft center is formed here in Houston Which becomes the Johnson Space Center after the death of Lyndon Johnson so The Johnson Space Center starts looking. At what should we do next and in nineteen sixty one? Shortly after he is elected President Kennedy asked his vice president Lyndon Johnson. What should the? Us Do what goal should we Proce- pursue what can we beat the Russians at and? They studied a number of options. One of them was a moon. Landing and other one was space station and because the Russians had these very large rockets. He's lapore large ballistic missiles the The agreement was well the Russians if they really wanted to could launch space stations today in order to get to the moon. They're going to need an even bigger rock that rocket that they don't have and so it was at that point in early nineteen sixty one that Kennedy decided we would try to go to the moon and we would do it. He announced before the end of the nineteen sixties. Actually the initial date was in nineteen sixty seven. They thought they could do it. and so that is what started us on a On Project Apollo in the first moon landing The Russians were also Got Into the moon landing phase although there was a lot of disagreement over this in the mid nineteen sixties. A lot of people wondered where the Russians really competing to go to the moon. But we know now that They were they were building a large moon rocket along the lines of the Saturn five the US moon rock There was called the n. One For those of us who have gone to Baikonour and traveled around that area there are remnants of an ones all over the place And you may have seen some of them that are used as storage sheds and and children's sandboxes and so on but they were developing them and they attempted to launch it several times all all of which were unsuccessful. It was a pretty complex vehicle. Had A lot of engines on the first stage. One of the problems was they could never get all the engines to work simultaneously now. They're n one rocket not only was going to be used to launch their moon ship but they were also going to use it to launch a very large space station. And they were thinking right through the nineteen sixties about the idea of a space station They had lots of designs for them. But they really were not Catapulted I guess into the Space Station Race until we were successful landing on the moon at that point. They decided well if the Americans are successful landing on the moon. Maybe we better be successful at launching the first space station They were thinking about different kinds of space stations. One of them was a military space station. Called the Almaz They were the only ones thinking about military space stations we in the US The US Air Force was pursuing a program called manned orbiting laboratory and so we were going to try and launch a space station in the mid to late nineteen sixties and their Almaz was going to compete with that The mole manned orbiting laboratory was cancelled the same week is the Apollo Eleven Moon Landing July nineteen sixty nine and favor of a NASA project which became called Skylab and SCO Skylab became our first space station when we announced that we would have Skylab in orbit in one thousand nine hundred seventy three or four the Russians decided. We'd better have our space station in orbit a little bit earlier Almaz was not ready at that. The N one rocket was not working and so they came up with the idea of a small modular space station Based in part on the Soyuz spaceship and actually use Soyuz Systems you saw use solar panels and so that became their first base station solid one which was launched in one thousand nine hundred seventy one. And what did they do on? Sell it one The first flight was unsuccessful and was not able to dock properly with the seller but the second mission up there By a Soyuz was successful So three cosmonauts lived on board for just about a month and because the US had been publicizing the moon landings by this time. The Russians decided they would publicize this Crew living on board the space station so they actually had a special series of TV programs. Every evening the crew would broadcast images down to Russia and So they consider that a great Success until on the last day when the Soyuz reentered There was a valve the inadvertently opened a loud all the error to escape and the spacecraft landed as it should but all the cosmonauts were found dead inside. That's right it was shortly after that they introduced the pressurized Socal suits are because of the earlier spacecraft the low such as the Voskan they had stopped wearing pressure suits regularly In the mid nineteen sixties Before that they had to wear pressure suits because the cosmonauts had to bail out of the spacecraft they did not land inside they landed on a separate parachute. So the I saw uses. Were launched without pressure suits and after the These for solid one Depressurization they did have to add. Pressure suits thoroughly spacecraft. Lands with shoots had to jump out of the spacecraft while it was falling well the The early spacecraft was very heavy and it also was designed around this idea of a photographic pod being deployed separately and so the capability was there to To a checkout cosmonaut. So on their first space craft the Vostok's The cosmonauts would always eject out and land separately on Vasco one. We were getting ready in nineteen sixty four to send the first two man. Crews up the Soviets decided wealthy. Us IS GONNA launch two man. Crews they would end up for three man crew and they took the Vostok spaceship which was only designed for one person. They basically stripped the interior out. There was not enough space for space suits and so a lot of the Russian engineers by the way posed the idea but they went ahead They put three cosmonauts on board but in order to make a soft landing. They had a last minute rocket that would slow them down so they used a parachute but then a rocket retro rocket would slow them down at the very last second They use the same approach on Vasco. Chiu which was the first spacewalk by Alexi. Lay Off nineteen sixty five. There were supposed to be several more vaas cod missions but they were all cancelled in favor of Soyuz by that time..

US Verner von Braun NASA Johnson Space Center Nineteen Fifty President Kennedy Soviet Union And Marshall Space Flight Center Apollo Eleven Moon Landing Us Army Soviet Union Lyndon Johnson Sergei Korolev Napa National Advisory Committ chuck yeager Eisenhower Ambron Soyuz Systems US Air Force
"space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

16:09 min | 1 year ago

"space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"It's brought us more of an understanding about the universe about the effects of gravity about the benefits that research can bring to all of humankind. The International Space Station has taught us what humans are truly capable of and inspired so many more to do and pursue great things all because in the pursuit of human space exploration space stations have held an important status in its history and generations of space explorers before us and even early thinkers new. This pursuit was so important. So today we're taking a journey through history and the history of space stations coming on the podcast. Today is Dr Gary Kit Macher Communications and education mission manager in the International Space Station program. Kim Mockeries worked at NASA for thirty five years and has written several books about space. Stations including Nasr's reference guide to the ISS and he's also taught several courses about space station spaceflight and space commercialization at Mit Sloan School of Management and the University of Houston. So here we go from concept on paper to space stations of history with Gary Kit. Macher enjoy five county mark. You have to ask Gary Kit.

International Space Station Macher Communications Gary Kit Dr Gary Kit Nasr Mit Sloan School of Management Kim Mockeries ISS NASA University of Houston
"space station" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"space station" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"I'm appear in the snow. It's twenty any degrees. We have about six inches of fresh snow last night. Some freezing rain so pretty cool. That Florida is launching rockets. So anyway this is what's going to happen. During the launch the dragon which is the module the stores everything everything that will separate from Falcon Nine second-stage about nine minutes after liftoff and then it'll make its way to the space the station and get their September or sorry Saturday December seventh and if this doesn't work out his plan if something happens if there's some weather there's always a backup so Thursday December fifth at twelve twenty nine p. m. eastern or seventeen twenty nine you. TC So both the Dragon spacecraft it will support the SIERRAS nineteen mission it also previously obviously supported the Sierra's four mission September of twenty fourteen and the Sierras eleven mission in June of two thousand seventeen and following stage separation. Shen SPACEX will attempt to recover felker nine's first stage and the of course I still love you. Drone ship will be stationed in the Atlantic Gauchan. This is one of the cool. Things about the space craft is that the Falcon comes was back down to earth and it lands either on the landing pad on the Earth on the land or it landed in the ocean. If there's no place for Ford to land so if the trajectory is a little bit further away than what's expected it's easier for them to land in the ocean than it is to try to get it back to a landing pad from where they started. So they're gonNA be landing out in the ocean on. Of course I I still love you. That's a drone ship in. They've done this successfully in the past so it's pretty routine for them and sometimes you know if you're watching the `blanche which you can launch what you can watch that with me tomorrow I'm going to be streaming live on my youtube channel YouTube dot com slash space news pod and you can go to YouTube dot com slash species news pod slash live and that will have my livestream. And I'll start a little bit early. So this thing launches at twelve. Oh fifty one so. I'll be there at about her. y'All be there at about twelve thirty PM eastern tomorrow and I'll be hosting hanging out talking to you guys just doing normal spacey nerdy things with everybody talking about space. Stuff and SPACEX Elon. Musk and stuff so I'll let the professionals channels takeover when the actual launch happening. Because they have more and better information than I do. Because I'm just a person like you guys so I'm out here. I'm doing my thing. And they have all the insider scoop so this dragon spacecraft. Let's go to be going to the ISS it'll be filled with approximately fifty seven hundred pounds hounds of supplies and payloads which include critical materials to support more than two hundred and fifty science and research missions that that will be going on on the International Space Station on this orbiting laboratory that we have. That's flying around Earth pretty cool see us. Nineteen is the nineteenth of up to twenty missions to the ISS. The space x will fly for NASA under the first crs contract in January. Two Thousand Sixteen NASA announced a SPACEX Falcon Nine and dragon were selected to resupply the space station through twenty twenty four as part part of a second commercial resupply services contract award and under the SIERRAS. Contracts SPACEX has restored the. US's capability the to deliver and return cargo which includes cool stuff like plants animals and scientific experiments airman to and from the ISS crew dragon which is a variant of this supply dragon spacecraft will be me sending people people to the International Space Station next year. If all goes well it should be early next year that people from US soil on a US spacecraft in a US rocket with all sorts of US flags all over it. We'll it'd be going to the International Space Station. I've just poking fun at Jim Breitenstein. He always says You know a US rocket from US soil with US astronauts. What's going to the International Space Station? He's really big proponent of it but it's cool because it's the first time since the space station sincere space shuttle. Pardon me there So desperately cool. This can happen next year. But this one's going to be happening Wednesday about noon thirty eastern time and the ISS capture of if this capsule They'll be using the fifty seven point seven foot robotic arm to capture dragon in attach it to the space station Saturday December seventh and there will be live coverage of that happening on my youtube channel. So you can go to that again. Make sure to subscribe to that too. By the way we're going for seven thousand subscribers were almost there Brit sixty three sixty four hundred somewhere around there. So going for seven thousand subs on the Youtube Channel. You Com slash space news pod and then once this is all over once they get all the stuff into the ISS. Everything's unloaded everything looks good it will return to Earth with more than thirty eight hundred pounds of cargo after a stays of the space station for four weeks because they have to unload and load and do all sorts of checks and balances and stuff like that and after about five hours of the dragon leaving the space station. It will deorbit right. So it'll do a deorbit burn and that will last about ten minutes. It's all fiery and cool looking takes about thirty minutes for dragon to reenter the earth's atmosphere. Sure and then it'll splashdown in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Baja California. This is a pretty cool thing to watch you. The launches are pretty cool but the Re entries are pretty cool. The return flights are pretty cool too. So I'll be there for you on that one as well so my friends make sure to head on over to my youtube channel. Check that out once again. I don't mean to be your brains with it but as youtube dot com slash space news pod and we can watch sat together. Hope everyone's there. It'd be really cool. If you're not able to make it you know you can watch the replay of a replay up there too so pretty cool and it'll be hanging out with everybody over there so thank you so much for listening to this. PODCAST DO appreciate it. I'm going to be posting on both my space news. pod And the Elon. Musk doc pod podcast so check both those out thank you everybody for all the continued support. And thank you for taking the time out of your day to spend two here with me on the Space News Pod my name is Willa Walden. And I'll see you soon..

International Space Station US ISS youtube SPACEX NASA Florida Pacific Ocean Musk Atlantic Gauchan Elon Ford Willa Walden Jim Breitenstein Baja California Re
"space station" Discussed on Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

05:10 min | 2 years ago

"space station" Discussed on Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

"I really wanted to go find space again in. I I got assigned to fly that first space station assembly mission. From the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This is space shuttle endeavour launch control this mission. Will Mark the beginning of a five year orbital assembly of the space station and kick off a new era of international space exploration using the resources and expertise of sixteen nations. What's that moment? Like, I mean, that's got that's got to feel like really special. Well, it was just cool. I mean, it's always cool to fly. I, but it was it was great to be back in in the training flow for another mission. So if I look back on you know, that time while I was chief the astronaut office we established our relationship with the Russians I developed a relationship with the Russians that I worked with in Star City. We had crews flying on the MIR space station, and I I started assigning the cruise for the future international space station missions and hid signed cruise to the to the first three missions essentially in folks didn't necessary. Early want to be assigned to space station missions at that time because the program had been delayed. We were flying eight to nine shuttle missions a year, and you could buy a lot more frequently or flash shuttle mission, you know, committing to fly on a space station mission meant training in Russia event learning Russian it meant being assigned at least two years ahead of time to train to go. Fly on the space station. Hey, it was very challenging. It was not something that was easy and our method of training, astronauts, fine space station and working with our partners has changed over time. It's still a two year training flow for a specific play. But I think we have a better understanding what's required. And we have a better understanding how to work with a Russian partners in in learning. The so you systems and the Russian systems on the space station and so on so bottom line. It was a challenge for those folks on those first missions. Now the assembly mission that that was run just like an a standard NASA space shuttle mission and we were assigned is a cruel year ahead of time. We ended up flying about a year late from home. We were supposed to because delays were encountered. But I remember it was it was November of nine hundred ninety eight ahead. The entire crew over to my house and watch the F GB launch on a proton rocket from the Baikonour cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, and that was a successful launch. And we knew we had a mission. So that was the Russian portion the first the first segment that was actually it was if you look at the designation of that that was assembly mission one a are American Russian in nets because it the F G was built in Russia, but we paid for through Boeing. On a contract with Boeing, and it was a a US paid for module built by the Russians. Well, so in the F JV functional cargo block was named Zarya which means sunrise in Russian and that wants that launched. We knew we had a mission to weeks later. We were definitely going to space with the with node one the the unity node. So we were STS eighty eight. It was the space shuttle designation, but from an I point of view we were flight to a the second American assembly ISS, but it was the first assembly mission. So I had an awesome crew. You know, my pilot Rix Turco, he a marine that was his first flight Rick is now one of the test pilots for virgin, galactic flying various is rocket plane know, and he he went on to fly four space shuttle missions commanding, two of them, Jerry. Ross was doing he was lead for the EV as an expert. Nancy Currie was my flight engineer and prime. Mom. Arm. Operator Nancy has a PHD in industrial engineering and had been a helicopter pilot before coming to NASA. Jim Neuman, Jim is an expert in rendezvous and proximity operations. He was on the crew and also one of my v members in and then we had Sergei creek Olov added to our crew Sergei had flown on on the space shuttle deck when Vladimir Tito also flew on a on a space shuttle mission in it trained in the United States is part of our exchanges, and he got added on to have Russian experiences as we went up. I think we'd have hardly. If we didn't have him help it out..

Kennedy Space Center Russia NASA Jim Neuman Boeing Nancy Currie United States Vladimir Tito Florida Kazakhstan Sergei creek Olov Star City Rix Turco Sergei ISS Rick engineer Ross Jerry