35 Burst results for "Space Agency"

SpaceX Flight to ISS Postponed Due to Weather

Brian Mudd

00:17 sec | 1 d ago

SpaceX Flight to ISS Postponed Due to Weather

"X and NASA postponing tomorrow's planned launch of Amanda Crew to mission to the international space station. The weather not cooperating. The next launch attempt from the cable be Friday morning just before 62 American astronauts on board two colleagues from both the chip in Japanese and European space agencies.

Amanda Crew Nasa International Space Station
Japan Says Chinese Military Likely Behind Cyberattacks

Dennis Prager

00:11 sec | 2 d ago

Japan Says Chinese Military Likely Behind Cyberattacks

"Investigating cyber attacks on about 200 Japanese companies in research organizations, including the country's space agency, by AH hacking group. Believed to be linked to the Chinese military

Ah Hacking Group
NASA's Mars Helicopter to Make 1st Flight on Another Planet

NEWS 88.7 Programming

00:21 sec | 4 d ago

NASA's Mars Helicopter to Make 1st Flight on Another Planet

"Is preparing to attempt the first controlled flight of an aircraft on another planet tomorrow. Space agency is planning a short flight of a small helicopter buzzing over the surface of Mars called ingenuity. Ball goes well. The £4 solar powered helicopter will slowly ascend straight up to an altitude of 10 ft. Ever in place for 30 seconds and then descend. I'm

NASA Readies its $80 Million Mars Helicopter for Maiden Flight

The Steve Holland Retirement Wealth Show

00:23 sec | 4 d ago

NASA Readies its $80 Million Mars Helicopter for Maiden Flight

"Is hoping to get its first flight of Mars off the ground tomorrow morning, the space agency announcing the first flight of the ingenuity Mars helicopter is scheduled for 3:30 A.m. Monday. £4 helicopter first arrived on the Martian surface February 18th with its parent, the Perseverance Rover. It was hoping into a flight last week but ran into problems with Florida's news. I'm well all tough.

Florida
NASA readies its $80 million Mars helicopter for maiden flight

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:25 sec | 5 d ago

NASA readies its $80 million Mars helicopter for maiden flight

"Flight on Mars off the ground Monday morning, the space agency announced Saturday. The flight of the ingenuity Mars helicopter is scheduled for 3:30 A.m. Eastern Monday. £4 helicopter first arrived on the Martian surface February 18th with its parent, the Perseverance Rover. It was hoping to do the flight last week that ran into problems. You can watch it on NASA television. The app NASA dot gov. On Social Media and YouTube

Nasa Social Media Youtube
NASA Helicopter Set for Historic First Flight on Mars

WBZ Morning News

00:45 sec | Last week

NASA Helicopter Set for Historic First Flight on Mars

"Made by NASA. This weekend. For the first time ever, the space agency will attempt to fly an aircraft on another planet. CBS is Chris Martinez explains what a successful flight of the Mars helicopter could mean for the future of space exploration. On the first flight. NASA aims to hover the aircraft 10 FT. Above the ground for 30 seconds with each flight after that lasting a bit longer. Ingenuity will carry a bit of our history along for the ride a small piece of fabric from the original Wright Brothers plane, a token of good luck for an aircraft that could forever change how we explore other worlds, and NASA is hoping to attempt the first flight of the Mars helicopter. Sometime tomorrow. 8

Chris Martinez Nasa CBS Wright Brothers
NASA’s Mars helicopter touches down on the Martian surface

NEWS 88.7 Programming

00:27 sec | 2 weeks ago

NASA’s Mars helicopter touches down on the Martian surface

"Ingenuity mini helicopter has been dropped onto the surface of Mars to prepare for its first flight. U. S Space Agency confirmed that the robotic craft had detached from the Perseverance Rover and traveled the final 10 centimeters down to the ground tests will now take place to ensure ingenuity is able to charge and use a battery to power a heater. Essential for protecting its electrical components against the freezing temperatures.

U. S Space Agency
What Does It Take to Become an Astronaut?

BBC Newshour

01:57 min | 3 weeks ago

What Does It Take to Become an Astronaut?

"Libby Jackson is human exploration program manager of the UK Space agency, part off the E essa. So what does it take to be an astronaut? You have to be calm under pressure. You have to be willing to work as a team. You have to be happy to go and spend six months living and working on the international space station where there's no shower the portal. Ooh. And if it breaks it breaks often has to be fixed by. You know, plumber on orbit Long days, but with amazing views. You're carrying out science that can only be done in space that will help everybody down here on Earth. New to lead better lives to help discover new materials with researching drugs on of course, astronauts are the sort of faith of the space industry, but they are absolutely not the only part off the space industry. The space industry is global. There are jobs in every possible skill set that you can imagine. And if people want to join the industry if they think space is something that its sights and they should feel empowered I'm able to do so we'd love to have him so calm. Scientists who conducted of plumbing on bond maybe speaks few languages. You have to be fluent in English. Knowledge of other languages is an asset but not essential. But you do need to have a grasp will be able to learn other languages because the international space station works in both English and Russian. You've got to learn Russian. No, I'm a Russian speaking. But unfortunately I am. I'm just north of 50. So that counts me out. There is a maximum age limit, isn't there? There is it takes out 5 to 10 years to train our pastor rolls and you only will get a mission perhaps every 5 to 10 years so they can't put on upper age limit on it. But it's higher than the last call back in 2000 and eight all part of this drive to increase the Paul to be as diverse and inclusive as possible. Mrs. Really lovely to see that it's increased to 50. Actually, it's a shame we had to put in angel bid

Libby Jackson Uk Space Agency International Space Station Paul
Count Down for Australia's Return to Orbit

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:56 min | Last month

Count Down for Australia's Return to Orbit

"If all goes according to plan almost exactly a year from now. Australia will officially become a spacefaring nation. Again of course. Back in the nineteen sixties. The warmer iraq rain outback south. Australia was one of the busiest spaceport in the world. Second only to cape canaveral in florida and on october the twenty ninth nineteen sixty seven. Australia became only the fourth nation on earth to launch a satellite at built into from its own soil win the scientific spacecraft reset one blasted off from space launch complex. La eight at woomera but with a lack of foresight and vision. That would leave. Most people stunned. Australia's dimwitted politicians squabbling amongst themselves. Only ever seeing as far as the next election decided there was no future in space. And that's a direct quote now remember. This is at the very height of the space race. The satellite communications industry was already growing into a multibillion dollar giant shining and bacon on the path to the future. There's no benefit of hindsight here. It was clear to everybody at the time accept. It seems australia's elected representatives and the level of stupidity. Australia's politicians is really quite mind blowing. Not honey do they. Turn down an offer for australia to become one of the founding members of the then fledgling european space agency but the government also sold off most of the technology and infrastructure which had been painstakingly developed at woma scrap value. It's taken over. Half a century but australia is finally getting back in the settle with the creation of an official australian space agency and you space ports being developed for nasa by equatorial launch australia in the northern territories omland landing not and another company southern launch commencing missile tests slots rocket range. Niece agena and developing. Its own over. The launch complex. Whale is way mayport

Australia Cape Canaveral Iraq Florida LA European Space Agency Nasa
NASA concerned about space's growing trash problem

Chris Krok

02:43 min | Last month

NASA concerned about space's growing trash problem

"Is now more than 128 million pieces of trash. Left over from 128 Million, yes, left over from degrading satellites, byproducts of past flight missions and other cosmic accidents, and they just keep circling the earth. They just keep spinning around the earth. That is, um That's just the debris that we actually have the ability to detect. But here's the problem even like paint chips. Paint chips can actually be a fairly deadly if they are, you know, flying around at warp speed around the planet. And that's what that's what's happening out there and again when the astronauts get out onto the space station to try to fix stuff. I would think that you know, it could be kind of Bad situation. It was I quarter inch. Let's see. Uh oh. It was 2016 1 of the European Space Agency Astronauts took a picture of a quarter sized dent. It was in a glass window of the international space station. It turned out to be a tiny little teeny fleck of space junk. It was a paint flake. From a satellite. It was, they said few thousands of a millimeter across They said, not much bigger than a single cell of E. Coli. And it caused a quarter sized Out in a Pane of glass in one of the windows. I mean, seriously, You gotta watch out that something like that hit you in the helmet. You're not gonna have a good day. Um When it when something that small could do that much damage. Of course, the bigger stuff is going to be a really, really bad day 34,000 pieces of moderately sized debris. That's anything larger than four inches. Would just pretty much take out an astronaut. Anything bigger than that. Uh or anything bigger. I guess. Then the little tiny fleck of paint would be catastrophic. All comes down to full lot of philosophy, philosophy and velocity. Uh, Anything circling the orbit? With the space station. They're moving at 17,000 Miles an hour, 10 times faster. Than a speeding bullet. So the key is I think you wanna be rotating with the trash. Or simply tried to avoid it altogether.

European Space Agency International Space Station E. Coli
NASA's Mars Rover Perseverance takes it's first trek across Mars

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

03:12 min | Last month

NASA's Mars Rover Perseverance takes it's first trek across Mars

"Is new. Mas twenty twenty perseverance. Rover is undertaking. Its first tentative test. Drive across the surface of the red planet. The trick only about six and a half maters was designed simply to test. The car sized six science labs mobility along its violent launch from earth the freezing code seven month journey from earth to mars and it's rigorous entry descent and landing into jets crater still the mobility. Test max one of many milestones on mission managers checklists as they calibrate every system every subsystem an instrument on both perseverance and its companion helicopter drone ingenuity drive which lasted about thirty. Three minutes built the road before with by four meters then turned in place one hundred and fifty degrees to the left and backed up two and a half meters to a new temporary packing spot wants. The river begins pursuing scientific goals. Regular commutes extending two hundred made his a more expected. Kate objective of perseverance as mission on is is astro biology including search for signs of ancient microbial life. The rover will also characterize the mashing geology and past climate. It'll pave the way for fiji. Human exploration of the red planet adult will be the first mission to collect an save martian rock and regular for future sample collection and returned to worth subsequent nasa emissions. In cooperation with the european space agency will then send a sample return mission to mars to collect the samples from the surface and return them to work for in-depth analysis. The mass twenty twenty perseverance mission is all part of masses moon to mars nation approach which includes adamus missions to the moon that will help repay for human exploration of the red planet. The rovers mobility systems. Not the anything getting a test drive. During this period of initial checkouts visit variances also received a software update replacing the computer program that helped land perseverance with the one. It will rely on to investigate the red planet. She manages also checked out. Perseverance as radar image of mao subsurface experiment. And it's myers. Oxygen in situ resource utilization experiment instruments. They then deployed the mas environmental dynamics analyzer instruments to win senses which extend out from the rover's mast. Another significant mawson occurred on meisel day. Twelve engineers unstirred the robes to meet along robotic arm for the first time flexing age of its five joints over the course of two hours robotic arms. The main to the science team will use to close up examinations of geologic features and it will drill and sample the ones they find most interesting upcoming events and evaluations over the next week or so. We'll include more detailed testing and calibration of the scientists tournaments sending the rover on long drives and jettisoning the covers that part of the river sample caching system and the genuity mass helicopter during landing the experimental flight test program for the ingenuity helicopter will also take place during the rovers. Commissioning well well. This has been going on mission cameras being busy. They've already sent back more than seven thousand images

Adamus Rover European Space Agency Fiji Kate Nasa Meisel Myers
China, Russia Announce Plan To Build Moon Research Station

Fresh Air

00:48 sec | Last month

China, Russia Announce Plan To Build Moon Research Station

"Details from NPR's Emily Fang. Both China's and Russia's National Space Agency, said in separate statements that they would begin planning a joint international lunar research station. Ross Cosmo's Russia's Space agency said the station could orbit the moon or it could be on the moon itself. Neither agency said when construction and such a station might begin, though. China has invested heavily in its base conditions. It successfully sent a probe into orbit around Mars this year, and it could begin construction on an international space station as early as this year. Current international space station has been in orbit around Earth since 1998 but is set to be retired by 2030. Emily Chang. NPR NEWS Beijing Another glance at Wall Street. The Dow Jones industrial Average is now up 1.5%

Emily Fang National Space Agency Ross Cosmo Russia NPR China Emily Chang Beijing
China, Russia Announce Plan To Build Moon Research Station

Armstrong & Getty

00:16 sec | Last month

China, Russia Announce Plan To Build Moon Research Station

"The heads of the chinese and russian space agencies have signed an agreement to work to build a scientific station on the moon details fairly sparse specifying only that the countries would work together to create research facilities on the surface and or in orbit around the

European Space Agency seeks diversity in new astronaut drive

WBZ Midday News

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

European Space Agency seeks diversity in new astronaut drive

"Speaking of flying. If you're an aspiring astronaut, your dream could come true. If you have the right stuff. The European Space Agency is looking for you. It is launched and the astronaut recruitment try for the first time in 11 years. Timothy Peake is a British astronaut with the agency. When you look at what we're doing in human space bike, it is quite remarkable. We are pushing the boundaries, the agency's last recruitment drive in 2000 and eight Through 8000 applicants. 10 reached the final selection. Jim

Timothy Peake European Space Agency JIM
SPACE FARCE

Ground Zero Media

05:39 min | 2 months ago

SPACE FARCE

"Days ago. We observed the thirty fifth anniversary of the space shuttle. Challenger's bush in the killed seven brave astronauts and a chance to actually get into that. I just thought it kind of bring the room down and it would it. Would basically a habit gets reflect back on the failure that the shuttle program eventually became. I'm man i'm and it's arguable. That the shuttle missions were a failure but it just Conversations before with people who said it's the equivalent of taking a bus out of the garage. Hang around the earth a couple times. That's all it was but you know it was interesting. At least the space program had something going on at the time. And i thought it would. I even met a shuttle astronaut Good guy Just that by the time We had a conversation on a cable channel about moon landing in. I didn't like each other afterwards. And i i didn't. I didn't wanna cause trouble with him. In fact he was just an amazing astronaut. Let's astronaut my god guys space. You know pro. You know again. I look at astronauts. It's like i. I'd look at a veteran. Or i look at a soldier who fights. I mean they got more than i do. I sit studio. And gripe all the time but i just you know. I was amazed by The he was not my first astronaut. I've met a few Never met buzz aldrin or ordeal armstrong. Or anybody like that. A few shuttle astronauts. I've i've met a former nasa. Well no i interviewed chuck cernan but i was never. I interviewed him over the phone. So i i don't know i just have an affinity for space i i i love it because of course i love the topic of aliens. Ufo's avi lopburi more. We come on. Space travels amazing. I mean we'd star trek star wars. These are things. I really like And you know noticing too. I grew up in utah. Where more than fire call was twenty miles away thirty miles away from where i lived and this is where the rings were made for the space shuttle program of course the failed challenger explosion was because of the ordering problems were more than thiokol and only two failures in the whole space shuttle program where people were killed. Astronauts were killed. No real new information though. That was out there and You know and we kept being promised this was just you know the shuttle program was going to be used to not only take the bus out for a dry but it was also going to be used to go to the space station and bring astronauts food and stuff and now well for the longest time we were contracting russia. We're having a deal with russia to send astronauts to the space shuttle to the space station to well actually said food to the space as well and i thought why are we relying on russia in and this whole nonsense about how russia was our enemy and everything. They're our enemy. Why are they helping us with our space program. Just didn't make any sense. But yeah i mean looking back at our field. Space programs is important. Indicate that president. Barack obama crippled dass his efforts to send astronauts beyond low earth orbit. When obama came into office. he didn't want a number of other. Presidents have done to determine their goals for nasa. He formed a presidential commission to study the space agency and then he came up with some recommendations so he you a committee the committee. You basically. you're saying well. I think there are far more important things. We need to invest our money. And so i'm gonna cut your budget. You know basically what area. We're gonna bring you altogether. Cut your budget. So you're going to have to deal with you know whatever that's all it's been cutting budget and budget cutting and and And so that's why you have now space x that's why you have You know these other companies visas and others who want to do space because you know space has been neglected. The budgets have been neglected in our government for some time but we had a lot of conservative presidents like george w bush and of course donald trump. Who said yeah. We're all the speech program. Let's get it going. And the reason why is because there's brooke obama once said and this is one of the reasons why he basically said no to you know exorbitant budgets for space. He says well. You know spaces. In america. First issue. And we should be more universal. We she wore. We wore worldly with our concepts in our conquest of space. We need to do you know we didn't do it all together as a world. It's a it's a world bring people together in a world government or world philosophy. I think reagan kinda hinted to what he said. You know our differences worldwide would vanish. We were facing an alien threat from outside of this world but that was an alien threat. That was the idea that if there were aliens out there wanting to eat us then we would certainly band together as a group. I mean that's what independence day was all about right. See the independence day. Movie or armageddon were nasa saves the day. You know it's time and time again. We get told it. Our space program is amazing. Well yeah they do amazing things. But it's not as amazing as it used to be. I mean lockheed. Martin ceo norm augustine Headed up the augustine commission during the obama administration actually was named after maga sanofi headed up with the. It's called the augustine commission and basically they returned with a set of recommendations after few wants convening during the obama administration so the commission found the program then in existence project constellation was not execute under any reasonable

Russia Chuck Cernan Avi Lopburi Thiokol Nasa Buzz Aldrin Challenger Armstrong Bush Barack Obama Brooke Obama Utah George W Bush Donald Trump Augustine Commission Obama Administration Reagan Martin Ceo Norm Augustine
Missions to Mars, the Moon and Beyond Await Earth in 2021

Geek News Central

02:44 min | 3 months ago

Missions to Mars, the Moon and Beyond Await Earth in 2021

"He may have been asked to have that. Removed nasa net nasa gets pumped for twenty twenty one with hype video full of moon dreams and mars. Hope nasr's big plans for the year but doing space is still pretty hard. Last year was a big one for space missions. We got We got man missions back to the international space station. After many years of the shuttle being retired it's amazing. How long we relied on the russians. Now we don't have to write them a check but the russians are still lifting astronauts. The iss many most of them are from other countries. Now the space agency released a video previewing hyping. His plans for the new year and the moon is the star of the show. Why are we going back to the moon. Really you know honestly is that. Make any sense for some of you. Don't think we went to the moon begin with i think they ought to land on one of those missions close to a nasa landing site from the early days in. Show us some of that stuff. Did they left while the video. Swallow hope and optimism We know that the space launch system has delays is largely because of coronavirus pandemic parts parts parts and parts and parts and parts. I'm having issues getting some stuff here too that i need because there's no parts the first big test of the orion spacecraft is in the works for twenty twenty one with artists one. But we'll have to wait and see if the unscrewed mission able to launch this year after all and Of course the presser veers roller is set for a landing on mars on february tnt. So we got that to look forward to the twenty one minutes of how or whatever it's called If all goes well mark the start of a long range plan to bring martian rock samples back to earth and of course the much much delayed. James webb space telescope is still on the calendar for an october thirty first launch date. We spent so much money on the james webb space telescope. I just everyone will probably be holding their breath all the way to or visit with this thing and at the same time. The hubble is well you know well at its end of life you know well close to its end of life issues and we got a lot of the hubble is operating in your systems have died and there's no way to go and repair it so I wonder what they're gonna would have to do. If the james webb space telescope had issues once they launched but so

Nasa Nasr International Space Station James Webb
Turns out that the universe is growing heaps faster than we expected

Kottke Ride Home

03:31 min | 4 months ago

Turns out that the universe is growing heaps faster than we expected

"The european space agency is a spacecraft is the gift that keeps on giving telescopes latest is measuring the parallel axes of over a billion stars. Paradoxes are tiny shifts in star's apparent positions which reveal their distances and the ones measured by guy are quoting astrophysicist. Joe bovi by far the most accurate and precise distance determinations and quotes now apart from just being cruel. Why is this important because included in the one point. Three billion star measurements are some special stars whose distances can be used to calculate farther cosmological distances. Meaning some big questions have been thrust into new more accurate lights namely the hubble tension the hubble tension refers to the expansion of the universe and these statistically significant discrepancies between calculations and measurements quoting quantum magazine. The cosmos is known ingredients and governing equations. Predict that it should currently be expanding at a rate of sixty seven kilometers per second per mega carsick meaning that we should see galaxies flying away from us sixty seven kilometers per second faster for each additional mega of distance yet actual measurements consistently overshoot. The mark galaxies receding too quickly. The discrepancy thrillingly suggests that some unknown quickening agent may be a foot in the cosmos and quotes. So what's going on well to make headway on figuring it out. Scientists have needed to reduce potential sources of error in the measurements especially when it comes to the distance to nearby stars. And thanks to guy. Oh we now have a ton of new exceptionally more. Accurate measurements to work with and astrophysicists are stoked papers are being turned out with new calculations at top speed. The how do these calculations work quoting again in broad strokes. The way to gauge cosmic expansion is to figure out how far away distant galaxies are. And how fast they're receding from us. The speed measurements are straightforward. Distances are hard. The most precise measurements rely on intricate cosmic distance ladders. The first wrung consists of standard candle stars in and around our own galaxy. That have well-defined luminosity. He's in which close enough to exhibit para lacks the only sure way to tell how far away things are without traveling there. Astronomers then compare the brightness of these standard candles with that of fainter ones in nearby galaxies to deduce their distances. That's the second rung of the ladder knowing the distances of these galaxies which are chosen because they contain rare bright stellar explosions called type one. A supernova allows cosmologists to gauge the relative distances of farther away galaxies that contain fainter type one a supernova 's the ratio of these far away galaxies speeds to their distances gives the cosmic rate and quote so the precision of the tax being that i rung of the ladder is of utmost importance and can change the whole calculation. If it's off and that is why astronomers are so stoked about this new data it really could hold the key to understanding the question of the hubble attention that they've been trying to crack for years

Joe Bovi European Space Agency
China prepares for return of lunar probe with moon samples

Morning Edition

00:27 sec | 4 months ago

China prepares for return of lunar probe with moon samples

"Is expected to return to Earth today with fresh samples of moon, rock and debris. If all goes as planned, the spacecraft will land in Inner Mongolia. China's official Xinhua News Agency says China's space agency cautions recovery of the probe will be made more difficult by its small size heavy snow and darkness. The Chinese spacecraft landed on the moon 15 days ago on collected more than £4 of samples.

Inner Mongolia Xinhua News Agency China
"space agency" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

03:05 min | 10 months ago

"space agency" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Launch an orbital that will study the Martian atmosphere. What makes his mission remarkable, is it? It's coming from a space agency. This is just six years old. The you a new any other Arab nation has ever launched a planetary mission before. I've come to the Mohammed. Bin Rashid Space Center in Dubai to hear more about this audacious mission. First up I spoke to Sarah, L. Mary, deputy project. Manager and science lead the mission. When I first heard about this mission, my impression was. That sounds crazy. You wouldn't be the only one we get that a lot because one where new country that has entered into the space race and it was something that was a day. She's but for us. It's in the city, so the UAE is going to mass. Where did the IDEA I? Come from the idea of going tomorrow started ministerial retreat towards the end of two thousand and thirteen, where the government's re looks at the General Strategy Direction that the government's going down and. And sets his priorities and objectives, and it was in their retreat, the his highness ship, but I should on the tomb was the Prime Minister Buea, and also the ruler of Dubai discussed the idea of going to Mars as a means by which we can challenge the development of science and technology skills across the board, and elevate that and be a country. A nation was able to design and develop complex systems, and it was from there that the team at the. Space Center was tasked with looking at. How do we get tomorrow? How to design develop a mission there? How are you going to develop the capabilities around that and most importantly? How are you going to get there? Before the second of December twenty twenty, one, whereas the second of December Twenty One is the fiftieth anniversary of the creation of the as a nation. And how ambitious was this plan? How much experience had the already in? In going to space, so you eight has been a user of space systems since the eighties, and we transitioned designing and developing spacecrafts in two thousand, six, so late, two, thousand, thirteen, beginning, two, thousand, fourteen, what sort of amid point journey for us in developing Earth observation satellites, and it was about point that we took experience that we had from Earth observation built with knowledge partners and move towards developing this the hope probe. And so what will probe do at Mas to the hope pro for the very first sign, we'll give us a full understanding of the weather of Martin's that occurs in the lower obser- Morris, and we'll be studying most of the major constituents within the lower atmosphere to better understand what happens. Who Water Vapor there happens to the dust storms and more importantly, what we also want to look is atmospheric loss, and the loss of hydrogen oxygen from the top of the Martian atmosphere, and this allows us to have a more holistic understanding of the planet, and how it's awesome, atmosphere and also. Also, the dynamics of the atmosphere as a whole now. Why is that different? Why is it noble than other missions? Because we all know about what what makes up the atmosphere, Mars we know about temperatures, but prior to this missions have looked at it not throughout an entire day, so looked at it during two timeslots of the day. Either two am to be and for us we'll.

Rashid Space Center Dubai UAE Prime Minister Sarah obser- Morris Buea Martin L. Mary
"space agency" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"space agency" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

"So I'm going to take over for most of this episode and take you along on my journey to Irish space lab. Because it's not too often that you get to see the founding of a country space program. Imagine being at the birth of NASA. We're going to send a man to the moon, or maybe some monkeys or something I things so what's so cool about the Irish space program is that it's being started by a group of students at the University College Dublin, they're the first people ever in their country to figure out how to send things into space in study the universe. So one member of the team named Lana. Solomon promised to show me round. That is if I could figure out her directions, I luck by the building site and the big building you see in front of you is science a meet you at the spiral staircase inside. There's just a huge building site. I might call her. Hi, I'm in front of the building site. But I can't find the sciences building. Walking kind of very the biggest building for turned out. I was in front of a completely different building site. Lana had to start a search party of just one person which with her. Eventually we ran into each other. Good. Good to. Okay, I feel like I finally found it. Lana has one of the super friendly faces. She was smiling constantly as she led me to the science building. Do you want to take this moment to introduce yourself? Hi, my name is Lana salmon, I'm a PHD student at University College Dublin where I work on election. Awesome. What are we going to see today? So today, the spotlight has actually gone to Brussels where it's going to European Space Agency Cilla, she should be tested. So it's actually not here today, but we will see the facilities where we build satellite. We reached the lucid science building. In like, Lana had said, it was big even lawn was bigger. There was a big picture me on the ground there. What? Gosh, that is you crazy. Isn't it? Does look like stars. But the stars are in your face. Wow. At the bottom of the spiral staircase where we were supposed to have met a photo of Lana with melded with an image. She taken with a telescope. She was gazing up towards the sky her head dotted with stars and pink gas clouds. I was totally star struck people ever me you and you're like in. They're like you're the girl from the floor enough. No. I'm actually I'm on all of the brochures for science, here's while. But nobody ever kind of tuned to know me as a later find out one is kind of an unlikely poster child for the scientists, in fact, lots of people she'll never get to be a scientist. But she couldn't have seemed more at home as she led me to the lab where she spent most of her time we're going into the physics building which is much older than the science building. You might tell it smells different here, doesn't it clean room? Oh, wow. This is different than I imagined. It. People say because it's kind of a room within a room. We were in a big lab that looks like it was from the nineteen seventies. The counters and shelves were cluttered with boxes and papers built against the wall was a smaller room that looked modern or almost Sifi. It was perfectly organized the clean ram, basically is three by three meter looks. Like, a kind of a cage, I suppose. That's right. A cage for scientists the clean rooms real purpose was to be the place where it's safe to build a satellite far away from the germs and dust of earth. But before we talked about the satellite. I wanted to know how Lana ended up building on it when I was eight or nine my family, and I went to Florida, and we went to can be space center was just for a vacation. Yeah. Exactly. There was like an exhibition of satellites and is going. It's incredible. But you can send a piece of technology into space..

Lana salmon University College Dublin European Space Agency scientist NASA Solomon Brussels Cilla Florida three meter
"space agency" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"space agency" Discussed on The Science Show

"It's like we have an excel read it from the perspective, the right of change with saying in the last sixty years since I satellites into orbit is unprecedented in human history like this fast stuff, which I think just makes it all the more important that we're on top of this with following this stuff have opinions, and you don't have to agree with any of us up here. You can have completely opposing opinions. But I think it's important that people make sure that. Politicians, and I'm going to say one more thing because commercial space is on the rise these big private operators lucky. Low must not accountable to the public that have to tell us what's going on. And we need to be watching what they're doing of a wise. They will go and do all of this stuff. And we will have had no say, and the consequences will occur whatever they are able of had no input into that. And I think it's really important the point. I was to get there was digging druids doesn't upset anyone. But every culture in the world has an association with the moon. They may not have seen snow or they may not have seen the c- or a tree or something. But every culture in the world has some sort of relationship with the moon, so digging the moon is lucky to upset people. A lot more than digging up an asteroid to people tend not to have strong attachment to astronaut. That's. Extinction bowls as bracingly benign. So yes, I think that's really a really important point. I think that's droids a cipher in terms of the development of commercial industry. You know, I think we actually do have time because these things will take some time before we get there. My entry door is through engineering and making sure that we educate the new engineers, and that the engineers that will create those stations out there, we really in favor, by the way will integrate right up front in the way, the design is sustainability issues one very concrete way of how that can be done as been shown by the European Space Agency has a program called clean space and one of the branch of this space program is how to create clean sats satellites that are clean, and they have done what we call life cycle assessments on two space missions and to launch vehicles and those life cycle assessments or studies which look at how many people worked on it. How much time that worked on it with materials did? A us. What was the chemistry of the propellant? And would do you need for constructing and testing your satellite, and you actually get interesting. Very interesting result. One of them is that when you built you satellite. If you use the typical technology for solar panels, which is based on gallium arsenide germanium. This is actually what you're taking the most resource out of meaning that I will teach my students that instead of using this very rare material this gallium arsenide, we should use simple, silicon solar panels. There are very concrete things that are starting to happen which will inject also in the design of new space missions, and we should in order to reduce the environmental impact. So that's feasible. Final positive section. I'd like to take us on appointed you stopped up tourist agency. I want you to advertise your first trip so that people can sign up and. Then Jennifer about ways in which we can train to keep fit on these missions. Okay. Where we gonna go. Well, I've got to selling points to Menton. I according to professor wall to pages he's to be in charge of ISA astronaut training eighty three percent of people physically fit enough to go into space. So who so that's like a huge point number two right here in strata. And in fact, some of the testing was done at the UT up teller, the first spice qualified Beal was made. So when we get up there, we can drink an Australian beat. So..

European Space Agency Menton professor UT Beal Jennifer eighty three percent sixty years
"space agency" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"space agency" Discussed on The Science Show

"It's like we have an excel read it from the perspective, the right of change with saying in the last sixty years since I satellites into orbit is unprecedented in human history like this fast stuff, which I think just makes it all the more important that we're on top of this with following this stuff have opinions, and you don't have to agree with any of us up here. You can have completely opposing opinions. But I think it's important that people make sure that. Politicians, and I'm going to say one more thing because commercial space is on the rise these big private operators lucky. Low must not accountable to the public that have to tell us what's going on. And we need to be watching what they're doing of a wise. They will go and do all of this stuff. And we will have had no say, and the consequences will occur whatever they are able of had no input into that. And I think it's really important the point. I was to get there was digging druids doesn't upset anyone. But every culture in the world has an association with the moon. They may not have seen snow or they may not have seen the c- or a tree or something. But every culture in the world has some sort of relationship with the moon, so digging the moon is lucky to upset people. A lot more than digging up an asteroid to people tend not to have strong attachment to astronaut. That's. Extinction bowls as bracingly benign. So yes, I think that's really a really important point. I think that's droids a cipher in terms of the development of commercial industry. You know, I think we actually do have time because these things will take some time before we get there. My entry door is through engineering and making sure that we educate the new engineers, and that the engineers that will create those stations out there, we really in favor, by the way will integrate right up front in the way, the design is sustainability issues one very concrete way of how that can be done as been shown by the European Space Agency has a program called clean space and one of the branch of this space program is how to create clean sats satellites that are clean, and they have done what we call life cycle assessments on two space missions and to launch vehicles and those life cycle assessments or studies which look at how many people worked on it. How much time that worked on it with materials did? A us. What was the chemistry of the propellant? And would do you need for constructing and testing your satellite, and you actually get interesting. Very interesting result. One of them is that when you built you satellite. If you use the typical technology for solar panels, which is based on gallium arsenide germanium. This is actually what you're taking the most resource out of meaning that I will teach my students that instead of using this very rare material this gallium arsenide, we should use simple, silicon solar panels. There are very concrete things that are starting to happen which will inject also in the design of new space missions, and we should in order to reduce the environmental impact. So that's feasible. Final positive section. I'd like to take us on appointed you stopped up tourist agency. I want you to advertise your first trip so that people can sign up and. Then Jennifer about ways in which we can train to keep fit on these missions. Okay. Where we gonna go. Well, I've got to selling points to Menton. I according to professor wall to pages he's to be in charge of ISA astronaut training eighty three percent of people physically fit enough to go into space. So who so that's like a huge point number two right here in strata. And in fact, some of the testing was done at the UT up teller, the first spice qualified Beal was made. So when we get up there, we can drink an Australian beat. So..

European Space Agency Menton professor UT Beal Jennifer eighty three percent sixty years
"space agency" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"space agency" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"Well, I mean, it is true. We all become friends, you know, flyers. Well, kind of think the same way. So when we meet each other, we kind of have an immediate common bond. And so we do become friends, and we do have differences of opinion, just like friends do and particularly when I was training in Russia, depending on the world events that were going we'd have sometimes heated debates about what was going on. But you know, but we were always still friends. And so there is that I don't know if you'd call competition, but just just long friends you always have differing opinions as well. But should we have more cooperation between nations and then competition between the companies that are increasingly get volt hit. Well, I think it's natural the companies are going to be in competition with each other because they're competing for making profit countries. I think you know, basically, it's two countries advantage. You're not looking economics because -ssarily because you're being funded by your state right now, there is some competition in that. It's good in that it makes your state. Thank oh, I need to put more money into this. Because they're going to pull ahead of me. Just like we saw during the nineteen sixties. But I think we've evolved in seeing that the vantage is of working together in the international space station is just a great example of that same after depit wanted to come to you wettest, the the UN fit into this. And how does it help ensure that we talked about cooperation predominantly adult competition space from a personal perspective? I always been convinced that in order to have a good collaboration unique to partners, which are balanced because otherwise amend this is not a real corporation. Right. So developing Cup abilities in countries in private sector is is really important to assure a long term sustainable corporation so in my bus professional life. When I was the director human spaceflight the European Space Agency. I even was always supporting the idea of autonomy for cooperation cell, for example in the space station. Not to be able to really cooperate you need to be able to develop your own model your own experiments in also being able to train your own astronauts, otherwise, then it becomes difficult and unbalanced in as little it was mentioning. I mean, the international space station in the activities is a clear, let's say evidence of the fact that the only way it's to bring together different cultures different experience different lesson learned in then all together. Let's do the next logical step it. All sounds wonderful. All sounds like Star Trek and all the nations of together and so on, but we all saying the landscape change now way all the skyscraper price probably say because China and India with big ambitions, India's prime minister saying earlier this year that India wants to put people into space much sooner than than people thought. And then we've got these private companies also have a plan to do things you certain that we can to continue to see this cooperative spirit, prevail or might. It be imperilled by these changes for the UN, the office space affairs. We have strong corporation with all the main spacefaring nations by the Finnish. We have a cooperation with the Member States of the UN so went onto ninety three but with face vetting nations for sure so China is is one of our main Bob nurse. We have a lot of agreements with them. For example, recently, we issued a joint announcement of opportunity which is open to all Member States was open to all Member States, the China offer, the Chinese space station for experiments for all over the world. So this announcement the will put unity which was issued by us by the office out this basis that line was the end of September. And now we are in the process of selecting there you got to be a new kinds of collaboration about being Donald Trump is talking about a space force. And this concerns about the weaponization of space, the logical science pointing in a different direction. This becoming increasingly competitive geopolitical environment again from our standpoint, I'm dealing with the peaceful uses of space. So what we tried to do really is to create coordination mechanisms to do what we call transparency and confidence building measures. So being really open trying to bring everyone at the table. Trying to bring them on the stand that the more. They're open the Monday, tell us and through us to the word what they are doing the more. We can really help them in collaborating with the others..

UN China Member States European Space Agency India Russia Donald Trump depit director prime minister
"space agency" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"space agency" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"But that does not really compare in many ways to the impacts which will be felt by many in the developing world. Absolutely. I mean worries about be a consumption pale in comparison to the kind of life changing life, threatening effects of climate change in the developing world. But if this kind of. Research can help reveal to people in developed world the impact of habits and all consumption than it's one way of getting the communication. Of course, that might encourage people to make some changes in the long run. Okay. So from one long running problem to another long running mission, this is the Becky Colombo mission to mercury which is due to launch any day. No, absolutely. So this is just the second of mission to get into mckee's oput on it is the most expensive mission from the European Space Agency coming in at one point, six billion euros on. It's not just the European Space Agency involved the Japanese of involved as well. Absolutely. It some Japan's largest contribution yet to an international collaboration space. No. This mission has been in the planning stages for a long time since the nineties. Tell me what is it that they're trying to achieve. So what they do is they will be sending Colombo often its mission. It will take seven years to get to mercury in arrive in orbit. Hopefully in early December twenty twenty five. And then it will release too. Appropes one built by e said the European Space Agency and the other by Jackson, the Japanese space agency, though there have been various missions by ISA on Jaksa and others to MAs, to commit to asteroids, have dropped things on those asteroids. Why is this a particularly tricky mission to get to mercury? Mercury is deep in the sun's gravitational well said to get their the craft tester lose initial momentum that it's got from earth orbital nation, so that it can fool toward the sun in the first base, but then it's got to avoid overshooting. So altogether, all these complex bits of the journey which is nine billion kilometers. It will take eight times more energy and several years longer than San equipment mission to get to Mars. So told me what does the journey from earth to mercury look like? How is Becky Colombo gonna get that. So it's using some really advanced technology. It's using solar powered Ionic thrusters and combining that with some gravitational help from total of nine fly-bys of earth Venus and mercury itself, but mercury. Up until relatively recently was considered to be fatty dull planet that was hot round, not much going on, but actually there's maybe more things to look at. Then we at one point thawed. So Yan recent years. There's been a few surprises from what we thought was quite a dengue planet in context of all the other planets. It's had an unusual magnetic field water ice deposits founded some of its craters, but partly because of the difficulties in getting there. Some of the some of those things have made it. One of the least explored at the four planets of the inner solar system. So far there's only been one other mission that's entered mercury's orbit, which was necessary messenger mission, which meant for years studying the planet a few years ago. This'll be just the second one ever of heart from that one to into the open, find out more about it. And I have to ask why Becky Colombo it's a great name. Where does that come from? A great name is named after just peppy Colombo his late Italian scientists who studied mercury and he conceived of at the trajectory there. Was used for a mission in the seventies known as marina ten. So this is a collaboration between the European Space Agency and Jackson, the Japan, aerospace exploration agency, and this is a particularly busy time for Jackson because they have another mission that we reported on the poker recent could high abuser to that is currently in a crux point. And there has been some more news about that as well. Jackson was hoping that they'd be able to make a landing this month on the regal asteroid, but they've had to delay that until January. And why has that delay occurred as something going wrong? No, nothing's wrong. It's just that the asteroid that they're landing on is considerably rookie than they rent painting..

European Space Agency Becky Colombo Colombo Jackson Japan mckee dengue Jaksa Yan e nine billion kilometers seven years
"space agency" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"space agency" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"Been spent on it so far let's not waste that money which has been sent an spent already and actually try and develop a new system wanna go with the news with the existing system and actually the. European Space Agency which runs this this actually predates the EU and also. Is completely separate from the, EU so the European Space Agency although Galileo is the program The UK is a prime member of that. Which is where all the science programs she talked about an also that communications programs all of that are inside the European Space Agency so keeping in and keeping in in the Galileo system I think is the. Best way ultimately and you simply do not believe that it would compromise. Our trustworthiness in the eyes, of our allies people families I, don't think so because we're already in that, system anyway we're very good partners with. The US also very good partners with Europe. And another tell you the best thing would be. To have a foot in both of those that sure, Sherry so helpful Frana quick thought them, what why the enthusiasm if that's what it is if it's not just a bluff for pulling out. Of it Well I mean nothing A demonstration would be that actually the UK could of course. To its own system and so that would? Be, nice then potent Demonstration of the UK's most villages sending a message and that could be. That, could. Be what's being. What's. Being suggested here and maybe take much less than the. Eighteen years which. Is taken already professor. Andrew. Coates thanks very much indeed it is three minutes to seven time for the weather here's Mark Taylor thank you very much Nick very good morning to working with goes. Today's the day where you're most likely to see one or two shows, get a little bit wet for. The morning commute everywhere some we'll stay dry and certainly the end of the day looking dry then some will begin the. Morning let's start with south east England and, eastern England.

European Space Agency UK EU Galileo Mark Taylor Sherry US Europe Coates east England professor Frana Nick Andrew eastern England Eighteen years three minutes
"space agency" Discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"space agency" Discussed on Liftoff

"Those support systems, they're not ready. So you can find this. It's basically a uncrowded Ryan obese slightly different when it's ready for all. The environmental stuff will be up and running, but it's going to be like three to six weeks. I have read everything. I think everything I've read has a different period of time for 'em one. So my notes went three to six weeks because I don't actually know seems they're still maybe aren't that out. But it also is gonna include the flight of the new Orion service module, which of course is being built by the European Space Agency that is not flown before, and it seems like in this these news reports of the crew module is more or less on schedule, and we made it to the service module. Once it arrives, there are some critical path issues. It seems like with the service module, it's a little behind, but they think they think catch back up. But interesting is that parts for the Orion capsule for EM three have already been ordered. So you have 'em one is uncrowned EM to basically a repeat. VM one, but you have crew. So again, it'll be lunar orbit, but you'll have astronauts their first time that Ryan has seen human crew. And then EM three is really sort of unknown at this point. It'll be another CISL ner mission of some sort, but they have begun the very early stages of building that Orion capsule my understanding is at some point, these things will be more usable. But right now they're not. So of course, AM one one doesn't have any of the environmental control life support to them. So it's like an odd rawal sort of out, but I am to three will use different capsules. So the idea is that there's this test capsule and they're going to put what dummies or something, I don't know, but because they wanna they wanna fly it, but not with people in it and they'll repeat it with people. Maybe the man company that supplied the tesla dummy. Maybe this is like their business. You know, this fake fake astronauts. Let's cool. A small customer base. Action figures, whatever space,.

Orion Ryan European Space Agency six weeks
"space agency" Discussed on Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"space agency" Discussed on Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

"Stuart g like to have the first roll of the dice on this game, I should the object to reach Pluto. So we started Conly and then comes out with concentric circles from that. And then Pluto at the, of course, we wouldn't do that now. Pluto not a planet anymore. I, it's still a planet in my heart, their best explain. Actually, it's got a square blue space board. We've each got a control panel which is yellow with with different circles on with moving. Living, you can move the dials and there's also even a separate control. I haven't quite words whether it's for the planet, the origin sexually. We have to achieve orbit and then stay at the right speed. It's quite a quite a little about orbital of the lawsuits. I think there's a sort of educational element to this otherwise, you about two and we have these lovely little plastic counters which in two parts. So there's a a space capsule which is very much considering this is ninety sixty nine remarkable of that. They're like the Gemini capsule and then there's the satellite. So that's a satellite as well. So if you want to roll first and see if you can achieve orbit now we haven't got a dis dice app, but click the dice rather than the bit of the bottom because that's for a casino ad. Okay. Okay. So. Is my phone and my credit card linked to it. So run both of the side of that failed already. Is to rate enjoying dice. That. Six straight which colored you want to be blue, yellow green or green the nearest team. Okay. So if you want to take that up to six. Six. I think you have to roll it again at this point. One. Well, let's go to the to the real stuff now because white recently, the phone bre show, it's always from place to visit, not just if you like planes, actually. But also you like space because it's a dedicated space day. There's always an area where you can spot members of the European Space Agency, young Verner, and various people with spotted, and you can go from stand to stand where companies are sort of showcasing what UK space has got to offers European companies as well. But this time and this year it turned out UK space has got to offer quite alot. The UK space agency announced it was providing funding for proposed spaceport in Sutherland northern Scotland, and it's also supporting development for plans to launch rockets from aircraft in coamo, glance go and Snowdonia. Now, some of the money will go to two companies again to help launch the UK. Into a commercial space fight. Most people heard of one of the that was US company, Lockheed Martin, but not the other one. It's called all backs as you heard of them, Stu it, no. I noticed on the press release said that they were coming out of stealth mode. Well, they are actually based in Britain, and it's hardly surprising that few of us knew about them because until recently they didn't even have a website. Now, all back since found out it's a micro launch company. It's got the putting small satellites into space and it was only founded in twenty fifteen. And yet now he's firmly on the map. Well, I spoke to all exes chief executive, Chris Law more. I want to say more, but it's like love law more must be anyway. I asked him whether that low profile was intentional. Absolutely. Walsum we deliberately set out to do things talk about them. In fact, the lost three years. I've only one public speaking of enter the roller lost number fifteen minutes. I think there we shocked people that were already far engines and showing avionics this former 'T'-share show. We've come out of it more on the back of the and. Outs space very happy to be selected in the final two virtual solutions. They're on the same site which was selected completely independently by the way, it's great to see both came to the same conclusion, and it's always great to be in the company of such major airspace players. Tell me about your might Colonel. It's cooled prying. That's is far as I know about. Tell me more prime because we want our customers feel like they are the prime payloads not a secondary chose the name to make them feel like they are the key customer or not some after which is what happens with my Chris. Yes..

European Space Agency UK Chris Law Stuart g Lockheed Martin US chief executive Sutherland northern Scotland Britain Verner coamo fifteen minutes three years
"space agency" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"space agency" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Real people gradually as wills prepared for what are the biggest celebrations in its sporting history, young Reuters from getting Thomas's first club, the mainly flyers were in the rain practicing. It was by chance alone. He fell into the sport coming out to the swimming pool next door when he was intrigued by the writers sprinting around the track and he joins up the following week draw even in hard work with the attributes. His coach Debbie, Watson. I noticed in the nine year old, he was lovely. He's just like he is now. He was a lefty boy, very funny and good character, and also very popular with the other teammates vary. Inspirational in himself to younger riders coming through even when he was thirteen, fourteen years of age. Cardis pip is built. Cycling cafe has never been as busy as today an amongst the Welsh. Red dragon flags draped around the customers. Shoulders is this sea of yellow Jesus, in homage to the torture fronts, surreal. He's been there for so long now in support of a very minute Wiggins and just to him, do this result them for Wales, I think, really tops off phenomenon. Someone who's connected connect you not from cars, we will watch the journey vantage evasion. She is a bean relentless then more so than when they watch going for the first time on TV raise the Welsh flag over his head on his ceremonial Royd in Paris. He is the ideal role model to youngsters like Eleanor blacks did who also begun with a mainly flyers on his now. Part of team GBD's youth academy. All the main flyers hopefully will inspire of young, cyclists as well. All the people in the club to be like him in the future when he comes back to me so good, but everyone the debate has begun in Wales as to which of the three Wichita school pupils is the cream of the Cardiff crop gathering Thomas the former Wales and lions rugby captain ceim Warburton or the football superstar Garth bail. Although there is no doubt, this is a golden age in Welsh sports. Some believe this tour de France win could be the greatest achievement of the mall. Thomas Morgan in Cardiff the American space agency, NASA celebrated its sixtieth birthday on Sunday in the decade since it was founded, it's been at the forefront of space exploration, including, of course, putting a man on the moon in nineteen sixty nine, but of all nurses, many accomplishments, one in particular stands out to former employees and the current editor of NASA watch dot com. Keith cone partnered with other, you know, with European Space Agency's with Canada. Which opinion and so forth. So a lot of the stuff we did early on was was an had an international flavor to it. And I think that was probably in addition to landing on the moon Hubble telescope, we have a spacecraft that have left our solar system. I mean, those are all great things. But I think one of the other things that is overlooked the international space station, which is a vast piece of hardware with dozen a dozen or more nations involved. And I think to be honest, the greatest accomplishment, and it's not just the US alone. It's all the nations involved is that while we're all arguing about, you know, the Russians being, you know, not our friends invading or threatening to invade countries, and you know, lots of angry, political rhetoric going back and forth. I can tell you because I know the people who run this the one place where none of those politics have an effect is in space because all they should have you. When you talk of sanctions when you talk NASA and the rose cosmos, and the other space agencies know that the space station's offline. It's there's something important about that. If we can cooperate in space to this level above terrestrial, you know, complaints in food fights, maybe spaces potus something more important than just watching rockets and take pictures. It's taught us how to get along and maybe the most profound lesson. If I can export is to take a little bit of that cooperation that we have up in outer space and bring it back to earth after sixty years. That would.

Thomas Morgan NASA Wales Watson Cardiff European Space Agency Reuters Wiggins Cycling Debbie Eleanor blacks Paris GBD US Keith cone Wichita school ceim Warburton
"space agency" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"space agency" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Young Reuters from gathering saw MRs first club, the mainly flyers were in the rain practicing another another by chance alone. He fell into the sport coming out to the swimming pool next door when he was intrigued by the writers sprinting around the track and he joins up the following week draw even in hard work for the attributes. His first coach Debbie, Watson, I noticed in the nine year olds here left lovely. He's just like he is now. He was a lovely boy, very funny character and also very popular with the other teammates, various. Inspirational in himself to younger riders coming through even when he was thirteen fourteen years away. Cardis purpose built cycling cafe has never been as busy as today and amongst the Welsh. Red dragon flags draped around the customers. Shoulders is this e of yellow Jesus in homage to the tour de France as just surreal. Fantastic. Fantastic. Long now in support of in just the same day, this result for Wales, I think really talk off after phenomenal readiness, someone connected connect you. Is from cars, we will watch this journey anticipation. She has been relentless then more so than when they watch Garin for the first time on TV raise the Welsh flag over his head on his ceremonial Royd in Paris, he is the ideal role model to youngsters like alanon blocks state who also began with a mainly flyers on is now part of team GB youth academy. Ration- all the main flyers and hopefully will inspire of young people. Deputy patent cypher while uninspired all the people in the class. To be like him in the future when he comes back to maintain so good, but everyone the debate has begun in Wales as to which of the three Wichita school pupils is the cream of the Cardiff crop gathering Thomas the former Wales and lions rugby captain Sam Warburton or the football superstar Gareth bale. Although there is no doubt, this is a golden age in Welsh sports. Some believe this toward France when could be the greatest achievement of the mall. Thomas Morgan in Cardiff the American space agency, NASA celebrated its sixtieth birthday on Sunday in the decades since it was founded, it's been at the forefront of space exploration, including, of course, putting a man on the moon in nineteen sixty nine, but of all Nassar's, many accomplishments, one in particular stands out to former employees and the current editor of NASA watch dot com. Keith carrying we partnered with other with European Space Agency's with Canada, which opinion and so forth. So a lot of. Stuff we did early on was was had an international flavor to it. And I think that was probably in addition to linear, the moon, apple telescope, we have space craft have left our solar system. I mean, those are all great things. But I think one of the other things that is overlooked the international space station, which is a vast piece of hardware with dozen dozen or more nations involved. And I think to be honest, the greatest accomplishment and it's not just the US alone. It's all the nations involved is that while we're all arguing about, you know, the Russians being, you know, not our friends invading or threatening to invade countries, and you know, lots of angry, political rhetoric going back and forth. I can tell you because I know the people who run this the one place where none of those politics haven't affect is in space because all they should have you. When you talk of sanctions when you talk NASA and the rest cosmos, and the other space agencies know that the space station's off limits. There's something important about that. If. We can cooperate in space to this level above terrestrial, you know, complaints in food fights. Maybe space is Potter something more important than just watching rockets and take pictures. It's taught taught us how to get along and maybe the most profound lesson. If I can wax, poetic is to take a little bit of that cooperation that we have up in outer space and bring it back to earth after sixty years..

Wales NASA European Space Agency Watson Cardiff Thomas Morgan Reuters Debbie Gareth bale Sam Warburton Garin Paris US France Potter Wichita school Canada
"space agency" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"space agency" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Massar and Jason Kelly. On Bloomberg radio All, right so this next story is really a group effort by many. Folks here, at, Bloomberg BusinessWeek it's on all things using satellite imagery, and how the industry includes of course Jason those companies that are deploying. The, satellites into, space but that information that's collected is. Being used across so many different sectors well not surprisingly. I found a Wall Street angle here you hear about the hedge. Funds and private equity firms they're monitoring all sorts of things, that are happening here on. Earth, maybe. Looking at a parking lot may be looking, at agriculture. Maybe looking at weather patterns yeah exactly we got more about this story from editor Jillian Goodman we have all these satellites up there. That are sending us more, images and, more data than. We've really ever had before about things like, agricultural production commodities levels international development? You name it get crowded up in space? With, interesting. Though is they've gone from being, right these huge satellites really expensive. Many lo fi yeah lights we talked about one company called is that actually developed its own Own. Version of a satellites it's usually the size of a city bus right and so they've made it ten literally ten times smaller and. As a result you know, they're able, to put more. Up there and you know just get better, quality images one of the interesting? Uses of satellite imagery that I was go? Back, to. Because I'm a Wall Street geek, is this idea of monitoring parking I mean like looking at that so I mean this does play more and more into the financial markets as well and as you say commodity prices and whatnot so where does. It go from here I mean is it higher quality is it different uses what happens next I mean it's really you name it I think. Just because it's gotten so much cheaper to operate them and made that made the data someone. To, more accessible until it allows people to, be a little bit more creative. With how they're using it as well. As the kind of data they're collecting but I thought it was, interesting about this story to it's not just all the companies that are actually putting the satellites up up into the there's a lot of companies that are actually. Tapping into other people's, data that's collected by satellite yeah that was, something? That struck me, too, is that we're talking about NASA. We're talking about the European Space Agency we're, also? Talking about companies like iside the developed its own satellites. And then eyesight cells, that data, to other companies that do their own special breed of, analysis and combine it with. Other data and sell that analysis to customers so it's a really really interesting vibrant ecosystem for the financial guys right you can say well wait I'm interested. In either crop production, or I'm interested in, the tesla parking lot their cars there? Or whatever, I mean they are? Really kind of customizing? All this information? Exactly that, and they're making money off. It yeah well and one of the things that strikes me about this is you know we're in the middle of this new age space race right and it is fueled by a lot of billionaires whether it's Jeff Bezos or Elon Musk and others who are. Getting into this mix and they probably are approaching it with an eye toward how to use the data that's ultimately collected from all these adventures. Maybe in a way that NASA wasn't always thinking about yeah I mean there are companies that. Are, using the data from those satellites to, crop production I don't think that. That was the goal of you know. The Apollo missions I don't think that was what we were thinking, about when we saw Sputnik go up and up there so you do dig into a lot of different industries and one that certainly uses a lot of satellite. Imagery is pilots and, the airline industry and there's a company think, earth? Cast technologies also, founded, with Also interesting too is a lot of these companies, were founded, by nasty better. But earth cast is one of them yeah so earth cast can do really, really hyper-specific weather forecast not. Just like your city block but your specific plane route. So they can do it at different elevations in the in the atmosphere different altitudes which, is really kind of cool right and playing by plane yeah Weather is, such an interesting application for this too because I. Feel. Like we have all gotten especially with our smartphones we've gotten a lot more a lot less tolerant, I? Should say about weather.

Bloomberg NASA Jason Kelly European Space Agency Massar Jillian Goodman Jeff Bezos editor Elon Musk
"space agency" Discussed on Hard Factor

Hard Factor

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"space agency" Discussed on Hard Factor

"The victim in bitcoin to avoid detection. So we all know what pets. This is going to be indicated from bitcoin, maybe ten percent this week to get on the train. Did you sell still have sold a buy back in or did you scammer you, this guy? No. I'm just saying, man, wait till September. I on stamps in your car. Twenty two thousand babies going to twenty two. On a side note a similar scam, but I think everyone should know about their is involved sending you an Email claiming to have hacked your search history porn sites, unless you pay them money, they'll share your perversions with your Facebook friends and Email contact. So I mean, basically everyone would know that I really love desks. West is west is a big time watches porn with desk in it. Like student teacher, detentions, if guys are just setting up desks for lonely, housewives into that part of it is the secretaries. The other half of it is he really wants a job, never been triangle guy. Yeah. Yeah. It's a fuck you to corporate. Wait a minute l. corporate life. Are you putting your Email address into point sites? No, I've never got excuse me ma'am. Where would you like this desk setup? I'm still waiting for my free shit west just just readjusted his pants. So the FBI incurred is anyone who receives these things to send complaints, internet crime complaint center and just be careful out there. All right. Well, the Italian space agency on Wednesday announced that they've discovered a large body of stable liquid water under about a mile of ice on Mars south pole. So also known as a lake. The Italians discovered this twelve mile wide lake using their radar radar system called Mars this, which is just Mars with an IS at the end of it, it orbits the red planet on the European Space Agency's Mars express spacecraft, which it sounds fancy. But when you look at it just looks like a normal satellite. So Mars has been collecting data from Mars southern hemisphere since twenty twelve, they discovered the lake because the water looks significantly different creates more bright reflections than the other solids around it like rock and ice. So that's why they think it's water. They're basing that off of reflections from fucking thing. They named Mars, like without any creativity, it could be anything. It could be a giant liquid monster, the fucker it's on Mars. They have no idea. Yeah, yeah, could be could it could be something else other than water, but it looks exactly like on radar what the subterranean lakes on earth look like. So that is bullshit. Yeah, they're pretty much like looking for a reason to send. Oppressively someone farts in the Italian space agency or whatever they sent a press release out into alliens are out there. A lot of scientists are saying, this is like pretty much ninety. Nine point, nine percent. This is water, but the reflections. Yeah, but they haven't ruled out giant space alien though. That's for sure. Disappoint again, man at probably. But the biggest questions now are these does the lake contain any biological life because all biological life needs is water something to live on and then just some sort of pre existing biological life. Are there any other subterranean lake some ours. So that's that's another big one. And then the final question everybody's asking himself is how soon until on musk drugs, everybody at burning man kidnaps them and start new county on Mars where he's the emperor. He's got someone to put it's fucking submarine now that's for sure. Yeah, he desperately wants to be an emperor. I'm glad you said. Yeah, wonder if mmediately just thought there's my new submarine doc. He definitely got most likely to be a number, whatever South African boys school. He went to the fucking nerve at south by southwest this year, someone asked him what kind of. Political thing that you have when you were in Mars needs like, I'm so glad you asked. We would have a direct democracy where everyone would get an equal say, and I was like, but you just instituted the fact that they have to have a fucking direct democracy taking away the entire point of direct democracy because you institute, right? It's the first emperor direct democracy. I mean, he's above the democracy. Let's not do that. After after the entire basis of the rest of our lives is set after guys can start everyone on brother..

Mars European Space Agency FBI Facebook nine percent ten percent
"space agency" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"space agency" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Think beyond earth orbit and they're not going to mars they're just going to loop around the asteroid belt uh and uh had orbit the sun for a long time so only players in this game so far uh at the highest level of protocol had been nasa european space agency uh the russian space agency the soviet space agency and they all abide by the international protocols that her text protocols i talked about uh uh your second question about uh you know if we do to find evidence of uh or or organic life out there elsewhere it could have come from that light that's that's a great question there was a uh swedish physicists around the turn of the 20th century who came up with the who basically uh came up that same idea hypothesize that that uh maybe earth life was seeded from life on other planets and we know that the planet treat rocks back and forth we have media rights from the mood and meteorites from mars he around the earth is probably heard rocks on mars and i'll be venus rocks on mercury you know just the way that crash and asteroid to combat into a planet and you checked a bunch of materials some of it travels to other planets so we know that that is a possibility you know wedded wife could survive that kind kinda ride uh whether that ever really happened is totally speculative it may not be something we can have a really figure out but you know one way to tell would be if we do find uh say simple bacterial life on mars maybe deep underground and it's has the same exact kind of you know dna structure has life on earth that would be uh have just an amazing he's an amazing coincidence or that or there's a really a relationship uh between those those two guys have life you know dna can is is made of those four base pairs and there's a lot of different ways is different molecules that could be those those base pairs and so if it is exactly the same as on earth and we're convinced it's not contamination than uh than maybe that kind of uh of uh hypothesis about planets treating life exports maybe that.

soviet space agency nasa
"space agency" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"space agency" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"And then landed on earth right fiery and trish and then you and i are descendants of marked martian microbes grad is extraordinary see now that is wild and that would change i hope the way you feel about it what it means to be a living thing and i hope it gives you just that much more reverence for the cosmos and are placed within it it is worth exploring this the nasa budget now is point four percent of the federal budget western half a percent and you could keep it right there just adjusting for inflation and you could change the world then immune gauge international partners canadian space agency european space agency right uh japanese airspace expiration agency is throw it indian space research organisation chinese space the demonstration in here we are changing the world together vice mckay and wow that was that was already a truck communities water 'cause that was fantastic for helmer who is as good who all right let's go to the question from right let's do a couple of conquest your style we uh let's hear it hey bill this is sam i think i live in brooklyn met comecon had this thought and i wanna know what you think about eighty there must be a finite number uh possible molecules that we can catalogue and understand in the same way that we've done with human genes is there any chance will ever have a full catalogue of all the possible a safe organic molecules available to us on planet earth hey.

mckay brooklyn comecon trish nasa four percent
"space agency" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"space agency" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Then in 2013 the cold spot was detected again by the european space agency's plank mission and then more recently it was detected yet again by the very large array radio telescope and they found that the cold spot and get ready for this is this giant void that is one billion lightyears across it is huge it is largely empty of everything we understand to be in space there's no galaxies there's no dark matter as far as they can tell so maybe this is evidence of a bubble collision or i guess a bread collision the these these universes have have come together and that's the van diagram i'll mandate they could call it the bread zone though doubt so k here's the stranger things like eight attempted explaining this so maybe the stranger things universe and the upside down there part of all of space and time that around us right but they inflated at different rates in you can either think of them has bubbles or bread whatever works for you subsequently the upside down could have different laws of physics than we do however based on what we see in the show the laws that have to be fairly aligned with ours and not just because we don't see people defying the laws of physics but like the universe of the upside down his held together as ours is lee or woon a writer and held boy only experience the upside down as jurors room three dimensions and then the fourth dimension of time so maybe what we've seen in the show the idea of the upside down is actually not another universe but it's where to universes are overlapping well that that opens up all sorts of storytelling possibilities for future seasons total if when you're in the upside down you can defy the your expectations of physics if you just you know believe in yourself so positive vibes man hypothetical question there could be other universes with different laws of physics than our own.

european space agency lee writer
"space agency" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"space agency" Discussed on WCHS

"Wow voted yes there's no doubt about the fact that space travel has certainly captured the public's imagination in movies and television programmes uh records pop culture of all types and we're talking tonight with someone who pursues this in a very serious ways use cassi conley planetary protection officer at mess ahead go orders as we go back to the calls you're you mentioned that you were one of two such people on the planet who's the other one from the european space agency my counterpart uh we often work together there is also a enter an international organization that maintains the international guidelines uh the russians have nobody they has partial people but not people working fulltime the japanese space agency the canadian space agency the french space agency the german space agency and there's quite a few speeches and cheese that have part time people pay only nasa and the european space agency has fulltime people one eight six six five oh jimbo's talk to greg in pittsburgh low greg hello thanks for taking my call i wanted to ask a question regarding the shuttle that broke up over texas that i had read that bacteria in the form of so and also the nematodes survived that fiery reentry and just a comment and that i'm trying to look for life i wonder if we're actually spreading lies throughout the universe well that's obviously a part of the job of of cassi conway before we get into that particular question though said there were many pieces of course of that uh that this shuttle that to the burned over texas because of the the whole burden did the lead leading edge of the the wing of the of the liftoff of was there any uh bacteria found on they recovered pieces of that the shuttle uh not a big hit the deadliest caller is correct in the.

officer nasa jimbo greg texas pittsburgh cassi conway