35 Burst results for "Soviet Union."

The Exponential Trend Line on the Gold Price

Crypto Voices

02:09 min | Last week

The Exponential Trend Line on the Gold Price

"So here we are with our gold price curve. Again, we've looked at this so much. Don't think I need to go over the history of the last 50 years. You have the timeline there. You can check prior videos. If you're interested, but here we have the interest rates going up to 22% during the Volcker years kind of pricking the gold bubble in the United States and gold being priced here in dollars and floating freely for the first time since bretton Woods collapsed ten years prior. Gold actually peaked at about $850 an ounce for about two seconds and then in 1980 and then in December of 1980. Paul Volcker took interest rates to 22%. And then from here we had a falling interest rate period all during this period, the great moderation it was called some people called it the end of history at certain times. We had the Soviet Union ended the Berlin Wall fell. All sorts of great things for freedom, but this also happened during a falling interest rate environment, which is quite different from now. And then of course we have the global financial crisis and then gold popping back up in price. First and 2011. And again, in recent years, during COVID. So the current price as of a few days ago, December 31st, 2022, $1812 per Troy, ounce. And again, remember way back in August 1971, when many economists thought that gold would go to zero, gold was a deep pegging, the brenton Woods agreement was falling apart, the Nixon shock, the Smithsonian agreement ended. Even though they still statutorily have a value for gold on the books in the United States, there is nothing tying the dollar to gold. On the books of the United States, nor anywhere else in the world for that matter. And that all ended in the early 1970s. And then we had gold pretty much for the first time floating freely in the market. In the last 50 years.

Volcker Bretton Woods Paul Volcker United States Brenton Woods Soviet Union Berlin Nixon
Where Are the Latest Reports of Russian & Iranian Injustices?

Mark Levin

01:06 min | Last week

Where Are the Latest Reports of Russian & Iranian Injustices?

"Yeah it's amazing when the Putin and his army slaughter innocent civilians like they've done all weekend long He gets almost no attention And when I post it mister producer on social media almost nobody cares Have you noticed that He gets the fewest number of reads fewest number of hits It's not why I post I'm just curious I don't know when we became supporters of the Russia the old Soviet Union and Putin a mass murder As conservatives And we can have a debate over money but that's very strange to me There's almost no reporting in Iran where the people are still rising up and still being slaughtered and executed I only saw one report it was on Fox That Netanyahu and the Israeli government said if the Iranians don't stop building their nuclear system they're going to attack them Well these things are big deal

Putin Army Soviet Union Russia Israeli Government Iran Netanyahu FOX
The Union of Soviet Socialist Restaurants

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:58 min | 2 weeks ago

The Union of Soviet Socialist Restaurants

"When I was in the Soviet Union, at the height of the Cold War, so when I speak Russian, so obviously I read Russian and there was no such thing as Mike's restaurant. If you wanted to go to a restaurant when I was in the Soviet Union, you would you would just see a sign restaurant that's the Russian for restaurant. And that was it. There was no, there was no proper noun. It was not Dmitri's the restaurant. It was no such thing. And when you went in, there was there was a menu, but it was almost nothing on the menu available at the restaurant. And you would not get served, I don't know if I've retold this on my radio show about what it was like to go into a Soviet restaurant. There were very few, but they existed. And if you would go in, you would be given or you would have a piece of paper inside a plastic. That was the menu. And then you would wait about a half hour till one of the waiters walked over to you. They would and why were they doing? I remember in most restaurants I was the only person there. And what were they doing, after all, you would think with no other patrons, they could just rush over to you, and you would be served or at least your order would be taken within minutes. But it was about a half hour. And what they would do is they would just stand on the other side of the restaurant talking to each other. And of course, I knew why this was happening. There was no such thing as tipping. They would get paid whether or not they did a good job that you couldn't be fired, excellence wasn't demanded, mediocrity was the norm.

Soviet Union Dmitri Mike
The Marxist Wave Sweeping the Globe With Frank Gaffney

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:01 min | 2 weeks ago

The Marxist Wave Sweeping the Globe With Frank Gaffney

"Frank, we're talking about Brazil and you said that there is a kind of a Marxist wave that you think is sweeping across not just South America and Central America, but in some degree, also washing across the United States, how do we explain or understand this? I mean, we lived through when we were somewhat younger men, the collapse of the Soviet Union, Francis fukuyama wrote his book the end of history, basically saying liberal constitutional democracy is now the kind of wave, not just of the future, but of the indefinite future history itself as kind of come to an end. Clearly, that does not seem to be the case, but how do you account for an ideology that has accumulated a record of failure upon failure upon failure, enjoying such political revival and apparent political success? Well, I should be interviewing you on this subject because you've done with your films, among other things in your books, border on this subject than anybody. I guess my take on it is this. There is no limit to the willingness of people to suspend belief based on past experience in the hope that things will be different. If they're made to sound seductive enough. And I think you're right, there's been an unbroken track record of disaster at the hands of marxists. And yet there is this endless appeal to the idea that, well, it was just bad done badly in the past, but we're going to get it right this time. And it'll be fairer for everybody. There will be equity. It will be equal outcomes. Everybody will prosper and so on. It won't happen this time any more than it has in the past, but it has been the single minded purpose of Lula da Silva personally.

Francis Fukuyama Central America South America Brazil Frank Soviet Union United States Lula Da Silva
"soviet union." Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

04:28 min | 3 weeks ago

"soviet union." Discussed on Between The Lines

"I start my book with that vignette in order to perhaps underline a remarkable the fact that scarcely more than a decade later, this Soviet Union has gone out of existence. Things were looking bright a decade earlier as you just said, but things obviously deteriorated dramatically in the course of a decade. What happened? As I see it, contingency has so often plays a big role. And here, the major contingencies appear to me to be Gorbachev's reform program, which he started with the political sphere. And that meant opening everything up for criticism. The criticism, especially of the past, turned out to be very demoralizing for the society. You have sort of a degree of crisis of faith. I think and legitimacy. Which ended with the very rapid and remarkable disintegration of the Soviet Union, which was actually only possible because of its union structure that is the fact that it consisted of a number of union republics with strong leaders who, in the end, led by the Russian republic and yolks and decided to leave the union. You attach no significant to the role Ronald Reagan played in the collapse of Soviet communism, but many American conservatives would push back and say to you Sheila, what about Reagan's increased defense budget in the 1980s? What about putting those pushing missiles into Europe in the 1980s? SDI derided as Star Wars at the time. He's blunt condemnation of the evil empire. They'd say this all put economic and moral pressure on the Soviets. Sheila Fitzpatrick. Americans do always like to have themselves in this center of the story. And to feel that whatever happens in the world happened because of their actions. I don't say that these actions were what irrelevant. They're part of the general picture and no doubt part of Klobuchar's feeling that reform was necessary. But

Soviet Union Gorbachev Russian republic Ronald Reagan Sheila Fitzpatrick Sheila SDI Reagan Europe Klobuchar
"soviet union." Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

05:54 min | 3 weeks ago

"soviet union." Discussed on Between The Lines

"Trotsky, who was extremely visible and famous, was also in a sense hesitant to put himself forward for anything like a leadership role in part, I think that he thought that being Jewish was a problem in terms of leadership in the Soviet Union. Well, let's turn to stalinism. I mean, because that really defines the Soviet Union for about a quarter century from what the late 20s to the death of Stalin, 1953. This is a question that's dog historians for generations did Stalin betray linen and the Bolsheviks or was he the logical outcome of the revolution? Sheila, Fitzpatrick. He certainly saw himself as the logical outcome and the successor to linen in his major initiatives the early policy initiatives which involved collectivization and the first 5 year plan, which was essentially an industrialization plan. He certainly felt that that was squarely in the line of linens modernization, socialist modernization objective. And I think that was a reasonable supposition. Now, if we get to things like the great purges of the late 30s, whether that sort of almost random bloodletting is something one could imagine Lenin doing well, I think it's hard to give a definitive answer, but the notion of a complete betrayal by Stalin. I think in the sense that we got that from Trotsky and Trotsky was the man who didn't get the job, so to speak. And of course, a significant part of the Stalin's story is World War II. Tell us briefly about the significance of the great fatherland war. This is a war to save Russia from its foreign invaders rather than as a war to save the world's first socialist state. That's what you say in your book, Sheila. Yes, well, the Second World War or great fatherland war was tremendously important for Russia. And it became in a sense for the Soviet Union. It became something like the new foundation myth crowding out the revolution in a sense, because it was a very hard fought struggle. Which ends in a victory that was, I think, astonished many people. And that became the sort of, yes, a foundation of the Soviet sense of identity and self worth. By the way, you think that Vladimir Putin today plays off those sentiments when he rails against NATO expansion into Russia's near abroad? Oh, I'm sure. It's absolutely. Yeah, because he always makes the argument that Ukraine's a vast terrain of flat land that the Nazis crossed to attack Russia. But the counter argument and this is the conventional wisdom Sheila is at Putin really just wants to recreate the Soviet Union. Yes, well, probably there was two things that are a bit hard to separate on the he would have undoubtedly on the NATO question Putin would know as did his predecessor. His two predecessors Gorbachev and yeltsin that basically are Russia thought they had a promise from the west that NATO would not expand even into Eastern Europe. Later alone into the republics had left the Soviet Union in 1991.

Stalin Trotsky Soviet Union Sheila Russia Fitzpatrick Lenin NATO Vladimir Putin Putin Gorbachev yeltsin Eastern Europe
"soviet union." Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

04:35 min | 3 weeks ago

"soviet union." Discussed on Between The Lines

"You are absolutely right. China faces very serious long-term structural challenges, like the demographic challenge, like the challenge of climate change and its impact on China's environment. Yes. The question is whether China will be able to handle these challenges and to overcome them. And so it is possible that China may not succeed in becoming the worst number one economic power. And if that happens, frankly, then there's less to worry about. It's not the world is not going to change fundamentally. But the likelihood is that China is going to succeed. And it's better to plan for scenario, which is going to be more challenging rather than to indulge in wishful thinking and think the world is not going to change fundamentally because when China becomes number one as I expect it to then frankly the world changes dramatically. And if you're swimming in a different ocean with different types and currents, don't use your all your old methods and practices of the past. And that's where my big message that the world is changing fundamentally in Australia should basically do a major strategic reset. And ask itself, this is a new world, how do I adjust and adapt to it? And in my Australian foreign affairs article, I suggest that Australia can play a very valuable role by becoming a bridge between the west and Asia and also frankly over time bridge between the United States and China. That gives us tremendous diplomatic opportunities that you should take advantage of. But to take advantage of those opportunities, Australia must learn to be able to get along equally well with both Beijing and Washington D.C.. Well, that's keyshawn Abu ban, one of Southeast Asia's most distinguished public intellectuals. He's a former Singaporean ambassador to the UN, an author of has China won. The Chinese challenge to American promising. Up next, the shortest history of the Soviet Union.

China Australia swimming Washington D.C. keyshawn Abu Asia United States Beijing Southeast Asia UN Soviet Union
Reagan's Gift Was His Ability to Elevate the Common

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:30 min | Last month

Reagan's Gift Was His Ability to Elevate the Common

"Started. Let's dig in on this speech, which Reagan gave. This was, again, a speech right before he was leaving office, and it was a 34th time. He says this in his speech that he has spoken from the Oval Office. As you look at this, Reagan's gift to the presidency besides his policies and besides his steadfastness or in the world stage as far as peace through strength and his work with Gorbachev and the Soviet Union, was his ability to remind us of the common. The ability to remind us of the commonplace, the common aspects of everyday life and raise them up in some ways to a more sacred position. And I know that sounds, you know, flowery for language, but you have to understand Reagan truly understood people. He truly cared about people and it showed in everything he did. As he started this speech, listen to his words. He said, one of the things about the presidency is that you're always somewhat apart. Now think about that for a second. He's acknowledging something that we sort of know, but we don't want to admit that the presidency is sheltered. In many ways, their shelter from advisers are sheltered from their transportation. He talks about it here. He said you spend a lot of time in cars going too fast in a car someone else is driving, seeing people through tinted glass. The parent holding up a child and a wave you saw too late and couldn't return. And so many times I wanted to stop and reach out from behind the glass and connect. Well, maybe I can do a little of that tonight. He

Reagan Oval Office Gorbachev Soviet Union
How Much More Money Should We Give Zelensky?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:10 min | Last month

How Much More Money Should We Give Zelensky?

"How much more money should we give zelensky? I mean, I'm thinking another 150 billion ought to do the trick. Yeah, yeah. There's no limit. Look, I'd like to know what the objective is. I like to know a short term objective the long term objective. And I'd like to debate it. Look, I can be convinced. You and I both grew up learning to kill Russians. So Dylan Russians, to me, is like, okay. Well, mother's milk. Yeah, I don't have a problem with it. Fury, I'd like to know what the purpose is. You know, the greatest foreign policy disaster last 30 years. I do not think it was Iraq or Afghanistan. I think it was the failure to take Russia and turn it into an ally, which I think could have been done. And we're still paying for it. All right, so now we've got a situation where the big problem and the reason everybody in the foreign policy community was all up in arms about this is because Russia was a threat and they could potentially try to take all of the former Soviet Union back. Now, if one thing was proven by this debacle, it's that Russia no longer has an expeditionary military that is a threat to anybody who isn't right next to their border.

Dylan Russia Afghanistan Iraq Soviet Union
Paul Kengor on the Shallow Indoctrination of Marxism

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:15 min | Last month

Paul Kengor on the Shallow Indoctrination of Marxism

"My contention, and he agreed, but you're right there in the trenches teaching, is that when you talk to these 20 somethings or even 30 somethings? Yes, they are indoctrinated. Yes, they're told this is the only way to social justice to have not even a quality. Now it's forced equity. However, unlike the Soviet Union or the Warsaw Pact, the indoctrination Paul is incredibly shallow, they can quote the nostrums, they can quote the boilerplate, but if you give them any meaningful challenge to try and justify what they're doing or the lack of equality that actually necessitates to enforce equity, everything crumbles. Is it truly a very shallow indoctrination? Where do you stand on this issue? Yeah, it really is. An infamous quote from Lenin Lennon said, give me four years with a child and to see that I had planted will never be uprooted. And that's a real quote from Lennon. And so four years, it's a time to get a college degree. But I would say that students that were studying, in fact, I know there were studying Marxism, a hundred years ago who joined the communist youth league. And then when on the Communist Party, USA, they were much more steeped in what they were reading, what they were learning. They actually knew marks. They actually knew Lennon. And today you're right, seve, it is really shallow. I've been, I've been going around since the early 2000s speaking for Yao, a young America's foundation. Also, ISI intercollegiate studies institute, giving a speech a talk called why communism is bad. And I've gotten so many emails. I mean you should see my box from students kind of desperate pleading from this or that university saying, dear professor, I saw, I saw your lecture on YouTube. I see that this is up, but yeah. Could you please come to our college because we've got an economics professor who literally has a bus of Karl Marx in the office. And I come in and I speak in these rooms, and first of all, there's never any professors in there. The professors don't even come.

Lenin Lennon Lennon Soviet Union Isi Intercollegiate Studies In Paul America Communist Party YAO Youtube Karl Marx
The Latest Twitter File Exposes U.S. Propaganda and Disinformation

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:48 min | Last month

The Latest Twitter File Exposes U.S. Propaganda and Disinformation

"Now, the latest Twitter files drop actually has to do not with the FBI. It has to do with the military, the CIA, the, if you will, the U.S. central command that is sometimes called centcom. And as it turns out, the U.S. central command, the U.S. Military, and the U.S. intelligence agencies have been using Twitter as a vehicle for you guessed it, disinformation abroad. They're putting out basically lies. And they're not only putting out lies in the sense that their content is lies. But it's a double lie because they're creating fake accounts with fake people who are pretending to be Middle Eastern or pretending to be African or pretending to be Asian. And so people who see this on Twitter go, oh wow, this is an Afghan woman and she's really upset about the Taliban. Oh, this is somebody in Iraq protesting against the Iraqi regime. No, it's not. It's not so many in Iraq. It's basically someone at Langley. Or it's someone at the, in the U.S. Military. Now, look, I mean, it is not a secret that the U.S. Military engages in sort of psyops psychological operations, but let's remember that yesterday, of course, I had a guy on talking about American exceptionalism and part of American exceptionalism is that other people do these official lies. They do this official propaganda. They have pravda and his vestia onto the Soviet Union. The Chinese don't hesitate to lie, but we're different. Why we don't do those things and you think we don't need to do those things. If we're a free society and they're not, if the Taliban is doing these horrible things in the Syrians are doing these horrible things, well, just describe what they're doing.

U.S. Central Command Twitter U.S. FBI CIA Iraq Middle Eastern Taliban Langley Soviet Union
Doug's Hot Take on the Russian Prisoner Swap

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:58 min | Last month

Doug's Hot Take on the Russian Prisoner Swap

"Going to do some hot takes today on some things that are going on that, you know, frankly, as you look at them, they bother you and you begin to look at in different ways. I'm going to start off with one that probably you're going to be on one side of the other list. It doesn't matter which way I go. And that's going to be the Brittany gronner situation. And the weyland situation, this whole hostage deal negotiation in which we let go a known arms dealer for Brittany gronner. What is interesting to me is, and I know, let me just start over with a few points. And I'll go back and fully acknowledge that waylon Paul William was in custody in the Soviet Union during Trump's administration. He's been in custody in my administration. Trump did not choose to make the deal that was just made for him. Let it go and nothing happened. There were other dynamics going on at play there. And now you've had the dynamic in which Biden and the Biden administration made the deal to get Britney grinder out. I think the problem that put most people with this deal is that, you know, and I've seen it as the WNBA player versus the marine or and the others. And granted, there's issues on both of these cases. And he was not a marine is not a marine Niall. He was a former who was actually dishonorably discharged. From the marines, but again, he's an American, and I think that's the first and first most point that needs to be made here. Number two, grinder is a superstar. Her topic was on the news almost every time you turn on ESPN. Every time you watched it, a sports broadcast every time I come up, something about WNBA. Brittany, your honor's name came up. Which made in the minds of a lot of people that this was getting special attention that a normal person like waylon was not getting.

Weyland Brittany Gronner Waylon Paul William Trump's Administration Biden Administration Soviet Union Wnba Donald Trump Biden Britney Niall Marines Espn Waylon
"soviet union." Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

History Unplugged Podcast

01:56 min | Last month

"soviet union." Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

"Scott here at the short announcement, tomorrow I'm beginning a series called failed futures, where I look at the extensive plans drawn up by empires, nation states and world leaders of what they would do after a war was won that they eventually lost. Or somebody in command died or was deposed before they could bring about their plans. For example, some historians think that Alexander the Great, after he turned back west from his conquests in India, with that launch a new campaign to conquer the Mediterranean coast all the way to the pillars of Hercules in Spain, build the tune for his father Philip, it would be as large as the Great Pyramid of Giza and launched sea voyages that would circumnavigate Africa and the Arabian Peninsula while he was at it. But of course it wasn't just Alexander who had extensive plans that never came to fruition. Archival documents produced during a war that come from a general or head of state. Always include extensive plans about what they plan to do after the war is won, even if they lose because who enters a war, planning to lose. In the series we're also going to look at what the Confederate States of America plan to do after they won the Civil War. And it was really ambitious, including becoming a global trade power and spreading slavery across the western hemisphere, we're also going to look at the Soviet Union's plans after it won the Cold War. And it makes sense that they would have plans like this because baked into the ideology of communism was that it would spread around the globe. The point of the series isn't just a dabble in counterfactuals. I mean, it is a lot of fun, and that's why an entire genre of fiction called alternate history exists. And I even have episodes of my archive looking at the plausibility of some of these books like Philip K Dick's The Man in the High Castle, or Kim Stanley Robinson's the years of rice and salt, but the point instead is to put ourselves in the shoes of the people who were there at the time. To see how they drew up plans for a future that to them was extremely plausible. And through this, we can better understand the mindset of the leaders of the confederacy or Alexander's empire or the Soviet Union, and at least understand their thinking better. So I hope you enjoy this series unveiled features coming up.

Alexander Great Pyramid of Giza Mediterranean coast Arabian Peninsula Scott Philip Spain India Africa Soviet Union Philip K Dick High Castle America Kim Stanley Robinson
Former Assistant Sec. Of State Len Khodorkovsky's Journey to America

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:59 sec | Last month

Former Assistant Sec. Of State Len Khodorkovsky's Journey to America

"Welcome Len. It's good to have you. Can you tell us your background and your connection with former president Trump? Well, thank you for having me. I appreciate that. My background is, I am a refugee from the Soviet Union. I came to the United States with my family and early 80s during the Cold War. This was way before Gorbachev and it was still hard for Jewish refugees to get out of the Soviet Union. We got lucky because the KGB the new pager B tree in town like my grandparents apartment, so they threw us out. And we had three weeks to pack our stuff and get to get out. That's what we did. So I came to America because, you know, because of the institutional antisemitism in the Soviet Union and being here, I'm from America. And I think we won the lottery.

Soviet Union LEN Gorbachev America KGB
Rod Dreher's Warnings From Christians Who Fled Communist Countries

Focus On the Family Daily Broadcast

02:10 min | Last month

Rod Dreher's Warnings From Christians Who Fled Communist Countries

"Back in 2015, I think it was. I got a phone call from an American physician who was really frantic. He told me that his mother, who had spent four years in a Czech prison in the 1950s because she refused to stop going to church, she immigrated to America and his lived here most of her life, but she said, son, the things I see happening in America today remind me of what I escaped from. I thought that was really alarmist, but I made a point Jim every time I would travel and I would meet people who had grown up in the Soviet Union or the Soviet bloc and had come to America during the Cold War. I would just ask them are the things you're seeing today. Does it remind you of what you left behind? Every single one of them said yes. And if you talk to them long enough, they get angry that American Christians won't take them seriously. Well, and I think it's important for us to know what that looks like. What are they expressing that we should be concerned about? I mean, for some people, we're so blinded, we don't even see it right in front of us. They've had the experience of seeing a government take control of people's liberties and squash them. And I think that's the right question. What are they seeing? They're seeing cancel culture going everywhere. They're seeing people having to be afraid for their jobs for their livelihoods and for their reputation. Well, and afraid to speak their minds. Exactly. That's a good point. Yeah, exactly. They get on the wrong side of the ideology. And what's interesting about this, Jim, is it's not just coming from the government. It may not at this point even primarily be coming from the government. It's coming for the fact that the left has taken over all of the major institutions of American society, started at the universities and the media. And now let's expand it to big business to sports to law to medicine even the U.S. Military. We call it wokeness. This is a softer form of the totalitarianism they left behind, and these people, these emigres, these precious people who came to this country looking for freedom, they're warning us if you don't step out of your complacent comfortable zone and speak out now and make a preparation for what's coming, it's going to be too late.

U.S. JIM Soviet Union
Why Is the Biden Regime So Silent on China? Boris Epshteyn Explains

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:02 min | 2 months ago

Why Is the Biden Regime So Silent on China? Boris Epshteyn Explains

"China. I think he's been speaking at my notes. Let's listen to president Trump's son, who had this interesting explanation as to why this administration is eating 200 lobsters at the state dinner last night in The White House and seeing nothing about the events in China. Almost shocked that the level of silence. And then I remembered, you know what? China's $1 billion investment into Hunter Biden when he flew over there on air force two and walked away. You know, China invested in a lot of crackheads folks. It's what they do. They definitely don't do other diligence than that. They get every crackhead and they give them a billion dollars into their fund, right? No, no, no. That investment is paying off in spades right now, folks. Yeah, very wise investment on behalf of Beijing when vice President Biden flew to China with his son on air force two. We played multiple times or played it again with our next buddy Jim carafano. The clips from Kirby from The White House saying no, we're not going to comment on the events occurring in China, which are utterly historic as somebody born in a former communist dictatorship whose family got out of there. Did you ever expect to see this from? I don't care political parties. Any political administration in America now? No. This is not America. And let's be honest, if you look at the history of America in the fight against the Soviet Union, Soviet communism, the same that Nixon was a Cold War warrior, Carter became a Cold War warrior. And Reagan was a call. It was bipartisan. JFK, LBJ. It was bipartisan. Right. Bill Clinton was strong, right? The events in the former Yugoslavia, right? Lack of leadership. The lack of presence. The lack of hegemonic from this administration isn't just troubling. It's treasonous. That's what it is. They are selling our country down the river,

China Hunter Biden White House Buddy Jim Carafano Donald Trump Biden America Beijing Kirby Soviet Union Nixon LBJ Carter JFK Reagan Bill Clinton Yugoslavia
Eric Metaxas: China's Strict COVID Policies Are Evil

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:29 min | 2 months ago

Eric Metaxas: China's Strict COVID Policies Are Evil

"First serious one here. What do you think about China's strict COVID policy and the resulting protests? Well, anybody who's been listening to me on this program knows what I think, but in case you need me to give you the short answer. There are sometimes we see evil. There's no other words. Satanic evil. An authoritarian regime behaving in such a way that is as cruel and inhuman as anything you saw under the Nazis or in the old Soviet Union. And the question is, are you speaking up about it? And are you watching those who are saying nothing? The Biden administration, which is very timid about being proud of American liberty. They blather about democracy, but let me tell you, if we had a Ronald Reagan in The White House or a Donald Trump in The White House or probably a George W. Bush in The White House, they would be saying something very strong to support the protesters in China. Many of whom are profound Christians in the underground church. So COVID has been used by authoritarians from Michigan to New York to California to China as a way of oppressing people as a way of crushing liberty and nothing is more dramatically true than in the case of China. So that's what I think of that.

Biden Administration China Soviet Union White House Ronald Reagan Donald Trump Covid George W. Bush Michigan New York California
Chinese Government Shows the Same Evil as Soviet Union, Nazi Germany

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:42 min | 2 months ago

Chinese Government Shows the Same Evil as Soviet Union, Nazi Germany

"Also encouraged that the nightmare of what's happening in China is causing the Chinese people to stand up. But I want to say that if you want to know, I think I put out a tweet this morning that a lot of times people say, well, I wonder what I would have done if I was alive during the rise of Hitler and the Nazis. Well, you can find out literally now right now because what you have happening in China, it is no different than the worst evils perpetrated by in the Soviet Union. Under the darkest days of communism and Stalin, it's no different than the worst evils perpetrated by the Nazis under Hitler. It is absolutely evil and how people react tells you everything about who they are. And so when you have companies like Apple, apple is basically a Chinese company. It would be like in the middle of the Cold War, somebody making money off of the Soviets and basically siding with them never criticizing them and criticizing the United States. Apple, the NBA, a lot of corporations, the Biden administration, the left leaning sort of Marxist leaning apologists for Chinese style authoritarianism have been muted in their criticism. This is astonishing. Imagine if Ronald Reagan were president, or if Donald Trump were president, what would he be saying about what is going on in China right now? And I think we really need to look ourselves in the mirror and understand that if you want to know what you would have done back then, look at what you're doing right now,

Hitler China Apple Biden Administration Stalin Soviet Union NBA United States Ronald Reagan Donald Trump
Winston Churchill's Warning of the Iron Curtain

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:45 min | 2 months ago

Winston Churchill's Warning of the Iron Curtain

"To get this visual idea of a curtain coming down, when this speech came out, this was a fault that had been around that you used a mini, this separated the two sides. This iron curtain is a movable object that is coming down in which the east and the west were separate. If you read deeply into the speech, you can see that Churchill's desire, is there not to be a separation. I think he believed inherently that if there would be more cooperation, there would be more influence. There would be more contact. There would be more of the freedom contacting the non freedom that the freedom would win out. Of course, the USSR did not want that freedom. They did not want their influence, the people influenced by free invest you saw this iron curtain is Churchill. So poetically put, crossing the continent of Europe and taking what was free on one side as he talks about and then what was not free on the other. If you look at this today, the concern that is out there among many. Is that we are seeing communist states. Our totalitarian states who are seeing more and more of an opportunity to expand their sphere of influence and expand opportunities. We're seeing them become more closed in. You see North Korea that is one of the most backward, small countries in the world that terrorizes all people for it's living. And a very existence. You have China who's spreading more and more and putting pressure on its neighbors. You see Russia who is taking armed aggression into those to provide a quote buffer, real or imagined in Putin's head to keep the Soviet Union or the Russia and protection. This is seems in 1945 or 1946 in this speech but I believe Winston Churchill laying out the facts. That in a world in which you have divisions of beliefs in freedom and expansion for people that the governments of the world are going to have to be able to cooperate with each other and experience the benefits of freedom, the benefits of a government in which you have a legislative executive you have a judiciary that is on its own and not try to keep people in the dark or behind the curtain of freedom. This is going to be the battle as we go forward. It was the battle then. And it's something now that you hear a great deal of spoken of whether it's in the Ukrainian president zelensky, you hear it with the other country surrounding them, is that if this happens in Ukraine, what is next? Is it simply going to stop here?

Soviet Union Churchill Russia North Korea Europe Putin Winston Churchill China Ukraine
BLM's Patrisse Cullors Admits the Movement Is Founded in Marxism

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:46 min | 2 months ago

BLM's Patrisse Cullors Admits the Movement Is Founded in Marxism

"We are trained marxists that are, quote, super versed in the ideology of Marxism, which is quite a thing to admit, yes, she's not doing that on keyboard television. She's doing it at some left wing oriented meeting or blog. But the fact is, she's admitting admitting to what that she is a disciple of Karl Marx, of the ideology of Marxism, which is responsible for the death of more than a 100 million people in just the 20th century alone that is right now, persecuting Chinese people in China, the largest communist dictatorship in the world today before our very eyes. And also a ideology which, as a pillar, states what of our system, the American system, the western system, that it can not live peacefully. It can not coexist with Marxism. This is the challenge that we will be discussing. It goes straight to the heart of the paper co authored by Mike and my wife, Katie. The Cold War was relatively simple. Why? Because the enemy was so less of great extent, was external. It was the Soviet Union, it was the Warsaw Pact. It was communist Cuba. It was North Korea. It could be pointed at as over there. And the way to deal with it was to defeat it militarily or to undermine ideologically. When the marxists, when the communists are quote unquote, inside the wire, when they're not Soviet tank regiments arrayed across the iron curtain, but they're actually U.S. citizens on U.S. soil with all the rights endowed them by the U.S. Constitution. It's a very, very different challenge.

Karl Marx China Katie Warsaw Soviet Union Mike North Korea Cuba U.S.
Paul Kengor on Bella Dodd's Struggle Against Communism

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:49 min | 2 months ago

Paul Kengor on Bella Dodd's Struggle Against Communism

"In the 1930s, many, many people thought communism was the wave of the future. It was a good thing. It made tremendous inroads. People were we have apologists for Stalin, you know, getting Pulitzer prizes in The New York Times. It was a time before much of the world knew the satanic evil of the Soviet Union. And so you had a lot of these folks that were, they really believed somehow that communism was a good thing. Obviously, bellad was one. So what was it that they saw or that they believed communism could bring about? And when did they, when did she begin to see that this wasn't the case that this crusade that she was on had not been a good thing? Well, kind of the final thing, I'll hit that first that pulled her in was fascism. And there's a quote from her in the book. She said, I joined the devil himself, but that's what it took to fight fascism. Now, of course, you don't have to be a communist to fight to fight fascism, right? But the party was really good at creating groups with front groups with names like the American League against Warren fascism. But in her case, she came to America, she was born in Italy in 1904. So Eric she had this beautiful Italian Catholic name, right? Mary asante Isabella of the stono, which means like the assumption of the blessed mother, right? And she comes to America and she came to New York, her family brought her here for a better life. And she immediately fell in with radical elements in her grade school in her high school at hunter college in New York. College was a hotbed of the dish. That's a fact.

Bellad Stalin Soviet Union The New York Times Warren Fascism Mary Asante Isabella American League America Italy Eric New York Hunter College
Katie Gorka Describes the Threat of the 'Next-Gen Marxist'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:34 min | 2 months ago

Katie Gorka Describes the Threat of the 'Next-Gen Marxist'

"Start at the beginning. You have to identify a threat you have to be able to accurately label an enemy. We learned this with the long telegram with NSC 68. We've had this discussion at home for at least a year now. What do we call it? It's not the Soviet Union on the outside. It's now an internal threat that is challenging in and of itself that it's inside America, but you have in the title here, the phrase cultural Marxist. I know you popularized the phrase next gen marxists. Tell us why you're using this terminology and not just the left or something like that. Yeah, this is a super important question. So I think one of the reasons that the left has been able to get away with what it has is because it uses really nice benign terms, like political correctness or even wokeness. Those things just don't really sound all that threatening. No equity. Yeah. And we may disparage something as being woke, but does woke really sound all that threatening, not really. But you know what Mike and I found is if you really dig into it. And if you really look at the ideology that's driving the left, it is Marxism. Why does that matter? That matters because Marxism wants to take down our system. It doesn't want to just change the language we use. It doesn't just want to improve the environment. It actually wants to completely eradicate the free market and put control in the hands of the government and to take it out of the way from people. But I

NSC Soviet Union America Mike
"soviet union." Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:46 min | 5 months ago

"soviet union." Discussed on WTOP

"Gorbachev, the last leader of the Soviet Union, died yesterday in a hospital in Russia. As WTO national security correspondent JJ green tells us he left an indelible mark on the world. Mister Gorbachev tear down this wall. The famous words of the Lake U.S. president Ronald Reagan, on June 12th, 1987 at the Brandenburg gate and then West Berlin, Germany. Gorbachev acted on that over the next few years. He enacted changes inside the Soviet Union and later Russia that led to the crumbling of the Soviet Union and communism across the region. His actions eventually led to freedom for 15 countries that had been absorbed as Soviet republics and perhaps the most important thing at the time, his actions ended the likelihood of a nuclear war. JJ green. News. In Ukraine, UN inspectors are making their way toward the zapper Asia nuclear power plant. It's a long anticipated mission that the world hopes will help secure the Russian held facility in the middle of a war zone and avoid catastrophe underscoring the danger kief and Moscow again accusing each other today of attacking the area around Europe's biggest nuclear plant. In recent days, the plant was temporarily knocked offline because of fire damage to the transmission line there. The risks are so severe officials have started distributing anti radiation iodine tablets to nearby residents. Today marks 25 years since Princess Diana was tragically killed in a car crash in Paris. CBS correspondent Holly Williams now looks back at her enduring legacy. On paper, she was a perfect fit for the royal family. Aristocratic, beautiful and demure. And I

JJ green Soviet Union Gorbachev Mister Gorbachev Lake U.S. Russia West Berlin WTO Ronald Reagan Germany Ukraine UN Moscow Europe Holly Williams Princess Diana CBS Paris
"soviet union." Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

04:16 min | 5 months ago

"soviet union." Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"His death is because and this happened at the time. They don't want to give credit to the actual heroes of the anti communist movement. People like Margaret Thatcher, people like Ronald Reagan, people like Pope John Paul the second, they don't want to give credit to the actual anti communists who fought communism each and every day. Instead, they would prefer to believe that the Soviet Union was always quasi good hearted and at the very end their heart showed through when they saw that the empire could not survive. They simply allowed us to collapse out of the decency and warmth of their own heart. And you can see that in the coverage from CNN and The New York Times, here's a CNN's obituary for Mikhail Gorbachev. And Mikhail Gorbachev, the last leader of the former Soviet Union from 1985 until 1991, has died at the age of 91, Gorbachev died after a long illness, Russian state news agencies reported. Apparently, the man credited with introducing key political and economic reforms to the USSR in helping to end the Cold War had been in failing health for some time. Again, when we say that he helped end the Cold War, what we mean is that he read the writing on the wall, and then he made the mistake of allowing cracks to appear in a very, very weak facade, and the entire thing fell away. The lesson, by the way, that was learned by the Chinese from watching the Kyle Gorbachev is never, ever, allow political liberalization before economic liberalization. So what the Chinese have done is they'd strengthen their state apparatus, while also getting involved in mercantilism via the free market. Gorbachev sort of did the reverse. He allowed for political liberalization, at least in very, very small part in the ring of states that surrounded the actual Russian Empire, and then after that, economic liberalization took place. So allowing any sort of political break is what led to the fall of the Soviet Union, the only way however he could have held that up would have been on the base of a stronger economy in the economy simply did not exist in the Soviet Union. The Soviet Union was always a bit of a paper Tiger, not in the sense that they weren't militarily powerful. They were. But in the sense that they were retrograde economically. And if you actually wish to have a powerful and durable empire for a long period of time, meaning more than 70 years, then what you're going to need to do is actually build up the economy communism actually forbids that, which is why China has been able to strengthen itself on the basis of capitalism and now I think China actually is going to enter a period of economic stagnation that's going to weaken them over the course of the next couple of generations. In any case, the obituaries have been absolutely fawning about Mikhail Gorbachev. According to the according to CNN, with his outgoing charismatic nature, Gorbachev broke the mold for Soviet leaders who until then had been mostly remote icy figures, almost from the start of his leadership he strove for significant reforms. So the system would work more efficiently and more democratically. Hence the two key phrases of the Gorbachev era glasnost openness and perestroika restructuring. Well, I mean, he really did not have much of a choice, given the fact that the Soviet Union was already on its heels in Afghanistan, given the fact that Soviet Union was being dramatically outpaced by the United States, both militarily and economically speaking. He later said I began these reforms and my guiding stars were freedom and democracy with that bloodshed. So the people ceased to be a herd led by a shepherd, it would become citizens. That's a bit of revisionist history, but CNN goes right along with it. According to CNN, Gorbachev had humble beginnings he was born into a peasant family march 2nd, 1931 near the stavropol, and as a boy, he did farm labor along with his studies working with his father, who was a combine harvest operator in later life, Gorbachev said he was particularly proud of my ability to detect a fault in the combine instantly just by the sound of it. He became a member of the Communist Party in 1952. He completed a law degree at Moscow university in 1955, and that's when he got married. During the early 1960s, he became head of the agriculture department for the stavropol region by the end of the decade he had reasons to the top of the party hierarchy in the region. And by the way, I should mention here that if you became the top of the party hierarchy in the 1960s and the Soviet Union, this is not because you were a wonderful person. This is because you are a both political Brown noser and you had the capacity for absolute brutality because the Communist Party in the Soviet Union is one of the worst institutions in the history of humanity. So if you rise to the top of that, it's not because you are a wonderful open minded fellow as a general rule. He came to the attention of a Mikhail sussman Yuri andropov members of the Politburo, the principal policy setting body of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, according to CNN, who got him elected to the central committee in 1971 and arranged foreign trips for their rising star in 1978. He was back in Moscow the next year he was chosen as a candidate member of the Politburo, his stewardship of Soviet agriculture was not a success. I mean, no one's was, because as it turns out, collectivization is a horrible way since you agriculture.

Soviet Union Gorbachev Mikhail Gorbachev CNN Kyle Gorbachev Margaret Thatcher Pope John Paul Ronald Reagan Cold War The New York Times China Moscow university Communist Party Brown noser Afghanistan United States Mikhail sussman Yuri andropov Politburo Communist Party of the Soviet central committee
"soviet union." Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:39 min | 5 months ago

"soviet union." Discussed on WTOP

"Croft and now at 70 of Tyson's corner and we have 70° of lamp on Plaza. At 9 41, Mikkel and Mikhail Gorbachev, the last leader of the Soviet Union, died yesterday in a hospital in Russia. He left an indelible mark on the world Mister Gorbachev tear down this wall. The famous words of the Lake U.S. president Ronald Reagan on June 12th, 1987 at the Brandenburg gate and then West Berlin, Germany. Gorbachev acted on that over the next few years. He enacted changes inside the Soviet Union and later Russia that led to the crumbling of the Soviet Union and communism across the region. His actions eventually led to freedom for 15 countries that had been absorbed as Soviet republics, and perhaps the most important thing at the time, his actions ended the likelihood of a nuclear war. JJ green, WTO news. A gang member is facing several years behind bars after admitting to shaking down some area businesses. What he called quote unquote rent money was really extortion. And that's what 27 year old hilmer Hernandez alvarado has pleaded guilty to. Hernandez alvarado most recently of hyattsville is a member of MS 13. He admits that he extorted money from businesses in parts of Langley park under MS 13 control. The extortion lasted at least between February of 2018 and December 2020, some of those businesses were unlicensed in owners who didn't pay up on a weekly basis, were threatened with violence. Hernandez alvarado faces up to 20 years in prison when he sentenced later this year. John dome in WTO P news

Soviet Union Mister Gorbachev Lake U.S. Mikkel Mikhail Gorbachev Russia Croft JJ green Tyson West Berlin Gorbachev Ronald Reagan Hernandez alvarado hilmer Hernandez alvarado Germany WTO hyattsville Langley park John dome
"soviet union." Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

03:00 min | 10 months ago

"soviet union." Discussed on WBUR

"Had come to bury the Soviet Union and to build the new Commonwealth Much to his pleasure 11 republics turned up in all The 11 took part in a signing ceremony that makes them all cofounders of the Commonwealth First devised a fortnight ago by Russia by Russia and Ukraine This will not be a single state rather a collection of individual independent countries which hope they'll now get international recognition perhaps within a few days At an extraordinary moment at the end of 1991 the leaders of Russia Belarus and Ukraine and here we are right back with the areas and territories that made up the Kievan Rus' in the Middle Ages It's the leaders of those three Soviet republics who get together in a forest meeting house in Belarus in the countryside and they decide that the Soviet Union is dissolved And from that point in December 1991 those plates which had been union republics of the Soviet Union like Belarus like Ukraine all of a sudden become nation states and Ukraine is born not just as a nation but as a really big nation fungal bigger than France for example After the dissolution of the Soviet Union many Russian politicians including Vladimir Putin who became president in 2000 viewed the loss of Ukraine as a threat to Russia's theaters as one of the great global powers This fear was heightened further by the defeat of Victor Yanukovych in the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election by the pro Nieto and European integration candidacy of Victor Yushchenko During the presidential campaign Yushchenko became seriously ill in an apparent assassination attempt by poisoning Mass protests which became known as the orange revolution followed a second contest in which Yanukovych was declared the winner The Supreme Court invalidated the results and ordered a runoff after which Yushchenko was officially confirmed as president Putin's real fear is that Ukrainians are gravitating towards the European Union towards NATO towards democracy to put it in its most simple terms to look westwards and not to look northwards or eastwards and Putin can't really take the risk that it will be obvious to his own people that Ukrainians are making another and better choice turning their back on that sense of russianness and shared identity and saying no we want that European Union version of life that NATO version of life that western democracy version of life as an independent nation we are free to make that choice Vladimir Putin is saying they're not free to make that choice.

Soviet Union Russia Belarus Victor Yanukovych Vladimir Putin Victor Yushchenko Yushchenko Yanukovych France European Union NATO Supreme Court Putin
"soviet union." Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:50 min | 11 months ago

"soviet union." Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Knowledge someone who I guess has lived a life that has seen I guess the depths of the Cold War you've obviously had a career that of course spanned the collapse of the Soviet Union now to where we are today When you look at the economic pushback that Putin is seen right now from pretty much every major nation out there here Do you think that those tactics are effective in and of themselves With Putin himself I doubt it he's happy with autarky I think He very much I think wants to close the close the doors of the outside world to Russia certainly behaving that way And he's never been great in the field of economics So I think he would be just as happy If Russia were totally cut off from the outside world and forced to be self sufficient that's certainly how he reacted after 2014 And the Russian invasion of Crimea So I can see him not personally being very concerned about this but the pressure on him is growing from his business community And I also think from the public seeing their access to the Internet for example shut off now That has really become something the Russians depend on for communications not only among themselves but also with family abroad So this is a tough moment There's a lot of talk about whether the economic sanctions will be enough to I guess reverse some of what Putin is doing here But there's been a lot of calls now for some degree of a military response particularly from NATO Do you think that that is a position that NATO can stand by I think the secretary general secretary general stolberg was right when he spoke after the foreign ministers meeting today NATO's biggest responsibility right now is to stop this invasion in Ukraine from becoming a general war in Europe from becoming World War three Nobody wants to see that It's in nobody's interest to do so And so I think it is extraordinarily important for NATO to help the Ukrainians in every way can both on the military front and also on the humanitarian front But not to put boots on the ground and not to not to implement a no fly zone So I do think that is the has to be the top strategic objective for NATO right now to avoid World War three There's also a course concerns about the nuclear issue here We saw of course footage of what appeared to be an attack by Russian forces on a nuclear facility in Ukraine that of course alarmed a lot of folks about the security of some of those facilities What can be done if anything to ensure the security of those facilities Well the Russians certainly know nuclear power plants They built those vvs along with Ukrainians during the Soviet era So they know them well They understand them well What worries me is that they're not taking a very responsible stance now toward attacking civilian targets of all kinds especially a nuclear power plant But it is I think nevertheless important to not only pay attention at an international level Rafael grossi the secretary general of the IAEA excuse me director general speaking to the UN Security Council this morning keeping those controls in place at an international level to the degree possible and certainly the intention of the world at an international level But then second I think to remind the Russians that in fact you know if there were a nuclear accident at that plant it could impact Russian territory It could result in radiation contamination of Russian territory Do they really want to see that in their most fertile farmland down there in the south of Russia I don't think so So it's in their interest to ensure also that this plant remains safe and secure and does not get attacked All right rose really appreciate getting your insights Rose got a Mueller a lecturer over at the Stanford institute and the former deputy secretary general over at NATO Of course we are focused on the humanitarian toll We are also focused on the economic impact of financial ramifications here the ripple effects that we saw in markets this week We'll discuss that when we come back This is Wall Street.

NATO Putin Russia stolberg Crimea Soviet Union Ukraine Rafael grossi Europe IAEA UN Security Council Stanford institute Mueller Rose
"soviet union." Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union." Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"But there are actually have invested interest in as it were going back to the period of autarky that we saw under the Soviet Union where Russia was not exposed and engaged in integrated in the large European or global economy One point that President Biden made yesterday was where did Putin get the gumption to do this I mean he is flouting international law On an international stage making up history revised history of Ukraine pretending it doesn't have its own government language sovereignty how did he end up spinning this narrative and so far getting away with it I think Putin believes this narrative to be honest that's his reading of Russian history And he also has this sort of sense of what we call whataboutism I'm sure that he feels fully justified in doing this because he looks at the kind of larger sweep of events over the last 30 years or maybe since World War II he sees the United States and other countries intervening doing things that he would say well what's the difference now The United States has not annexed anyway We've certainly intervened in all kinds of places over the last decade and many of them have been completely and advisable and wrong But again multiple wrongs don't make a right But I'm sure that this is what Putin is justifying for himself Mike Meg's right Well actually this is going to be the biggest violation on top of other violations which is already made of annexing Crimea and now recognizing the independence of Donetsk and lorcan's perhaps as a prelude to an exertion as well To understand what that policy and self asset here in Georgia But the major biggest violation of another country's independence sovereignty since World War II And he's now moved into the realm of Adolf Hitler with Sudan London the invasion of Poland So you're comparing him to Italy Yes and that comes absolutely I am And if you take away you know convolve the things that we kind of know just look at the facts of what Hitler did Going back to on exertion of the Sudan London Angeles with Austria on the same premise that Austria was part of Germany because of language and culture and history and Adolf Hitler's own Personal and family history there is not much difference at this particular point Everybody always shies away from the comparisons because of the Holocaust and everything else that flood from that But in a Hitler's own version of mein kampf the idea of lebensraum when I was listening to some of the comments that Putin made I felt rather children thought where is the difference here Between some of the things we're seeing in 1930s And he was always much more careful himself If Putin doesn't seem to be answerable to anybody in the national community at least not at this moment How about a domestic community I mean when we look the United States has a presidential election in two years Vladimir Putin is up for reelection in two years The vote matters in the United States Does the vote matter do what people think about their president going to war in Ukraine matter in Russia It does matter Putin has to prove himself to be legitimate within the system Now will said there wasn't any opposition Alexander Navalny who was credible opposition figures sitting in jail having been poisoned and somehow miraculously survived But people can basically show that his pleasure by not voting The best advice you have if you are still advising the administration would be what Well we have to hang tight I mean basically we have to do our utmost to keep all of our allies on the same page But what we do have to be very careful about is not imposing anything that we can't take off again later because we have to be able to show that there is a cause and effect And that there is some space for a different outcome We hope to be talking to you again I'm sure we will Fiona hill was a member of the National Security Council specializing.

Putin President Biden Mike Meg lorcan United States Adolf Hitler London Angeles Ukraine Sudan Soviet Union Russia Austria Hitler Donetsk Crimea Poland Georgia Alexander Navalny Italy London
"soviet union." Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union." Discussed on Between The Lines

"To between the lines on air online or via ABC listen up. This is Tom Switzer and thanks for tuning in. Later on the program. Climate denial is waning on far right fringe movements. What's likely to replace it? It might be just as scary. Essentially, it's lame blame for environmental destruction on people from developing countries largely, those who actually consume far less than those in wealthy countries and blaming them for overpopulation in their own countries and then coming to wealthy countries and cause inclusion there. Stay with us for my chat with the guardians Oliver millman. But first, how the U.S. lost the post Cold War peace. While 30 years ago, this happened. Fellow citizens here. In view of the world's situation that is developing the Commonwealth of Independent States. And terminating my activity as president of the USSR. It was an emotional moment for the man who's been described as a coach without a team. Outside and the chill of Moscow air, the red flag of communism was hauled down and the standard of the rising Russian Federation raised instead. Christmas 90 91, Moscow allowed the Baltic states to separate from the Soviet Union and the USSR flag was lowered at the Kremlin for the last time. Now the disintegration of the USSR marked not just the collapse of Soviet communism. It also marked according to the then president George H. W. Bush, the triumph of America's democratic mission. The biggest thing that has happened in the world and my life in our lives is this. By the grace of God, America won the Cold War. But did America's victory in the Cold War lead to hubris. Encouraging successive administrations to expand NATO, eastwards. Thus upsetting Russia's strategic sensibilities. The NATO enlargement in the late 1990s and beyond. So this is under presidents Clinton Bush junior, Obama, even Trump, denied our expansion represent a betrayal of any agreements to end the Cold War that the U.S. and the old Soviet Union made in the early 1990s. I do that in exchange for a reunified Germany, the west's alliance would not move east. Or has NATO enlargement being a great success locking in hard one democratic gains in central and Eastern Europe. Mary sarati is Professor of historical studies at Johns Hopkins University's school of advanced international studies and a research associate at Harvard University's center for European studies. Mary's new book is called not one inch. America, Russia, and the making of post Cold War style made. That's just been published by Yale University press. Mary, welcome to ABC radio. Thank you so much. Great to be connecting over the airwaves. Now, was the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union three decades ago was all that inevitable. No, it was not. And so it's worth taking some time now on the 30th anniversary to reflect on exactly what did happen, what went right and perhaps more pertinently for today as Putin is threatening Ukraine, what went wrong? Because I think that to understand the problems we have today, we need to go back to when things seem to be going right to the 1990s. At the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union was not inevitable. We can see that by comparison with China. There were popular revolutions in 1989 in both central and Eastern Europe and in China, but we can see how very differently they turned out because of course the regime in China in 1989 imposed violence in Tiananmen Square cracked down on the uprising and maintained a toll on power. So that shows that alternate outcomes were possible. Now, in central and Eastern Europe, the story turned out differently. In large part because of the Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, he decided to gamble that he could reform the Soviet Union and cooperate with the west and stay in power that way rather than by cracking down and using violence. But he underestimated the power of nationalities both in Europe and within the Soviet Union itself. And once he began with some reforms, some limited reforms, it became apparent that the people wanted much, much more. And when the wall came down, when different components of the Soviet Union, republic started clamoring for independence. He was overwhelmed and couldn't really handle all this crises. And then his most important political opponent Boris Yeltsin took advantage of all these crises, realized that he Boris Yeltsin could ride the wave of Russian nationalism and basically become leader of Russia and dismantle the Soviet Union, thereby leaving Mikhail Gorbachev, his hated nemesis as president of nothing. And so that's what yeltsin did. And that plan was daring, but it succeeded brilliantly, 30 years ago in December 1991. So all of these were very contingent events that could have turned out very differently. It also could have turned out much more violently. So I think it's worthwhile to really look at what happened and understand just how contingent those events were. And when empires collapse Mary, you know, brutality violence that they usually coincide. You think of the British departure from Kenya, Malaya, the Indian subcontinent. The French departure from Vietnam, Algeria, the Belgium from Congo, what's happened here with the Soviet Union's collapse was very much the exception. Now take us back to February 1990. When James biker, the U.S. Secretary of State, met with Mikhail Gorbachev. Yes, okay. So the wall comes down and it's clear that along with the wall, the Cold War order is crumbling. So the obvious question is what next? What order is going to follow? And all around the world political leaders like Secretary of State James baker, president George H. W. Bush, Mikhail Gorbachev, Margaret Thatcher. They're all trying to figure out what now. And so James baker goes to Moscow and is part of a hypothetical bargain. He says words to the following effect to Mikhail Gorbachev, the leader of the Soviet Union. How about you let your half of Germany go so it can unite after the fall of the wall and we agree that NATO will not shift one inch eastward. The problem is that baker by saying that is leaning too far forward over his skis. When he gets back to Washington, his boss and old friend George Bush says you know James, that's not actually what I want. What I want is not only to preserve NATO, but also to preserve its ability to expand. So instead, James, what we're going to do is we're going to move NATO across the Cold War line, but we'll just make concessions as we do so. And the net result is actually that the territory of former East Germany to this day is the only part of Europe that is guaranteed by treaty to be nuclear free. That was the concession. The problem is that it took Gorbachev a while to figure out that what baker had said was no longer on offer. And that is the heart of the controversy that lasts to this.

Soviet Union U.S. NATO Tom Switzer Oliver millman rising Russian Federation Mikhail Gorbachev Eastern Europe Moscow Clinton Bush old Soviet Union west's alliance Mary sarati school of advanced internation center for European studies ABC radio Russia Commonwealth of Independent St George Bush
"soviet union." Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union." Discussed on KNST AM 790

"The Soviet Union in the seventies. His name was best Makov, Yuri Best cop, and they asked him. What were the four stages of combination continent communism. And the first thing he said, was demoralization. Meaning take the morals of society away. We have that next thing is, uh, I'm losing my train of thought. Anyway. It was too December, You ate the the society and then the next thing was to to, um You know? Function, manufacture a crisis. And then after that you have control. No, but his name was in the car were in that tug of war right now, And I never thought I'd see the day Tom. I never saw that. See the day in my lifetime. But, boy, am I worried about the country that Mike My kids are inheriting and my grandchildren are going to grow up in and we don't stand up and we don't rise up. If we don't rise up, and we just say enough is enough, And that means showing up at school board meetings of people. I never went through a school board meeting. You know, I haven't gone to a Pima County supervisors. You've got to go that we have to show up. We gotta show up and be heard. And you know they're not nice to us, so why should we be nice to them? Precise and if they're going to tell you as a free citizen as a taxpayer in this county, you can only speak for two minutes or three minutes. Yeah, well, it's the limit. The response..

Tom two minutes Mike three minutes Makov December Yuri Best cop seventies four stages first thing Pima County Union Soviet
"soviet union." Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

06:29 min | 2 years ago

"soviet union." Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Com 5 36, and then you'd be a peacemaker to football. How did she were Brett Farve camp came out and said the kid should not play youth football. I saw that grabbed my attention, But in the story I read I'm sure there's different right up something right? Did you? Did you find an age Does it say what age is? He says he has three grandkids 10 6 and three and I wouldn't encourage them to play tackle football at all right. But how about the 13 year old? They're on the cusp of middle school and bright And is it OK there Because that's you know, that's what we would buy. I've been Josh played. On Carter both played before the sixth grade. But we shouldn't let him but you know when they get the middle school, I think is the benchmark for people. But he didn't mention an age. I guess he's talking about his grandkids age. Yeah, I think that's what it is. It's probably you know, he's probably is a I'm not a doctor. I can't tell you exactly right. But he but he said, Hey, you know, he said Kid should be warned about playing tackle football due to concussion fears and the lack of treatment for Mild traumatic brain injuries, he said. I love tackle football, but I just don't think it's a very smart thing to do for kids. I understand that sentiment, but men when you start if tackling for the first time Is when they've got some speed and some wait. Tell him That seems kind of scary. Yeah. You wanted to be coached up right to Yeah, That's the other thing. Yeah, that's the deal. That's half the battle. We lost a couple of greats over the weekend. How In in in in all different sectors, really of our culture. George Shultz died. The former secretary of state under Ronald Reagan Solve was 100. Yeah. You know, it was 100 years old. Wow. Wow. Well, that's a lot of history passing on it. Yes, yes, served his country in the military wore the uniform. But in fact it was read One quote to call him one of the most consequential policy policy makers of all time. Well, you know, he got there. I'm sure you had a big role in the the Mr Gorbachev, tear down this wall speech of the Cold War. Yeah, s Oh, yeah. Wow, To think about that to bring down Russia. Yeah, I mean, that's that's truly amazing. It is amazing. Guess the Soviet Union rather not Russian, but hey, was teaching at Stanford, by the way. Still a bit Well, A pinto. What age? Well, he had a professor emeritus title there. But he died of this home on Stanford's campus Saturday, where he spent his later years teaching economics. I'll be done. Yeah, one of two people In history to have held four different federal Cabinet posts. Uh, I don't I could name the other three He was Treasury secretary director Management budget ended his labor secretary under Nixon, secretary of state under Ronald Reagan. So I had no idea. Yeah, I just do. Secretary of State. How about that? Okay. George Shultz died. We also wants Leon Spinks. Former heavyweight champion of the world. That's a heck of a fight. If I remember it was it was it was a full fight. 15 rounder. And he didn't Did he not. Where do these dark Muhammed Ali out? Yeah, yeah. How do you beat Muhammad on leave? Yeah. Leon said it without any front teeth exact in that amazing, Yes. Yeah, that was only Leon Spinks at the time that it was only is eighth professional fight. How did he go from zero to fighting? Mohammed Ali just well. He was in the Olympics. He's young. He was in the Olympics, and 76 he fought is a light heavyweight. He won a gold medal there. People. You know, people always talk about all the woman upset. That was, but Leon Spinks was a good fighter. Yeah, yeah. They met again seven months later at the Superdome in New Orleans, and only one Okay, that time. Hey, fought again and 81 against Larry Holmes and lost. Where? What? What has happened. What has happened to boxing? I can't. Maybe your boxer. I know in an amazing where I could remember is a kid. My dad was into it, And it was Ernie Shavers and George Foreman and used to Mohammad Ali and Ken Norton. And I can remember those guys start parsing Friday night boxing with my grandpa. Yeah. Every Friday night. Jill Ip Had box I think was Gillette had boxing on And why would you box with your grandpa? A little prayer fellows like that. You know how it was great. My dad was in the box into his great memories. Yeah, but managed when it went away. It went away. It's all street fighting now. It well, I don't know that you talk about the M m Make stuff. Yeah, Yeah, that Zamora popular thing. Yeah, okay. I mean, you think about for me? I mean, who was the last Shawn? Who you have is the last great heavyweight. Uh, This guy. Got it? Yeah, it's possible. Say, yeah, I can't remember his name. Great fighter. For me. It was kind of after Larry Holmes. We had a vander Holyfield. Yeah, I guess you didn't. And then, uh, yeah. Mike Tyson, obviously. Yeah, it was after those guys. I remember watching the Michael Spinks. Yes, Brother, Tyson Fight, right and friend of my dad's had Pay per view, so he invited us over. And it was a big, huge build up. Lasted 91 2nd, right. Exactly, Yeah. This guy just remember me paid like 70 75 bucks from to the paper view. You know 91. Yeah. You paid a dollar of second. Wow, I'm coming up here and find 45. Now the President Trump is gone. That's what the Washington Post is looking into. They talk about right. I think they aren't They great. If there really are there on top of things, we'll get into that. And then the six o'clock I We'll talk about some of the commercials from the Super Bowl, plus stupid jokes. Review of the half time show, Okay, we'll get into that. But right now it's traffic.

Leon Spinks football George Shultz Ronald Reagan Larry Holmes Brett Farve Michael Spinks Stanford Muhammed Ali Olympics Josh Carter Treasury secretary director Ma Russia gold medal Washington Post boxing New Orleans Soviet Union
"soviet union." Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"soviet union." Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mm. Go ahead and sign up. I was actually born in in the Soviet Union. So you were Michaelis. Yeah. So you have training. You're ready. I'm ready. Um, e talk to somebody on the New York State Vaccine Distribution Task Force, which is supposed to be advising the stamina to do of this name's Rose Do him. Justice runs a Community Health Care Association of New York State. She says she is spending all day every day trying to distribute vaccine. Have to say she made a pretty convincing case for why Dennis are not being vaccinated till week for even though the designated one, eh? In New York state. The state estimated that there are two million health care workers two million people who fall into that One a priority, so that's a lot of people and it's just not feasible to vaccinate everybody the first day. So the state decided the first dibs should go to people who were in more immediate danger, like medical personnel who care directly for covert patients and nursing home staffs and residents. When I ran that by Dr Naimark. She agreed. It seems sensible. Nobody had told this to her. Nobody is pretending. Vaccine distribution is going well in New York. Right now, The state is only managed to administer about 40% of the vaccine that's been given which is actually better than the country as a whole, which is used about 1/4 of the vaccine that's out there. Still Crazy rose to hand used to describe her own feeling about how it's going with this. And what panicked. I'm e ticked off some of the many, many logistical challenges they faced figure out which facilities could look over the most shots and had a staff and schedule in track Hundreds of thousands of people getting vaccine they had to create scheduling software and figure out what to do in smaller health centers of people don't show up for appointments. Which is an issue because once you have opened up a violent vaccine, you have to use all the 10 doses inside of it in a few hours, or they go bad. Their health centers have been told to vaccinate people from other kinds of facilities like mental health providers. And the health centers are trying to figure out okay. How much allocation do they have? How much of the other providers staff can they accommodate? How can they get those people either to come to the health center or Is there a way to get some of the vaccine to those residential settings? Right? It's so Don't know the details. They're so kind of mind numbing when he described it there. Yes, This process begins in the front end with he's like super genius is using this incredibly advanced science to like, Invent the thing that was the hard part And then just literally like, how do we schedule people from this facility into like a time when we can get enough of them to use all the dose in the vial? You know, That's what we're getting stuck. Yes, And I think that's really.

New York Community Health Care Associat Dr Naimark Michaelis Soviet Union Dennis
"soviet union." Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"soviet union." Discussed on KQED Radio

"Was actually born in in the Soviet Union. So you were Michaelis. Yeah. So you have training. You're ready. I'm ready. Uh, e talk to somebody on the New York State Vaccine Distribution Task Force, which is supposed to be advising the statement. To do of this name's Rose Do him. Justice runs a Community Health Care Association of New York State. She says she is spending all day every day trying to distribute vaccine. Have to say she made a pretty convincing case for why Dennis are not being vaccinated till week for even though the designated one, eh? In New York state. The state estimated that there are two million health care workers two million people who fall into that One a priority, so that's a lot of people and it's just not feasible to vaccinate everybody the first day. So the state decided the first dibs should go to people who were in more immediate danger, like medical personnel who care directly for covert patients and nursing home staffs and residents. When I ran that by Dr Naimark. She agreed. It seems sensible. Nobody had told this to her. Nobody is pretending. Vaccine distribution is going well in New York. Right now, The state is only managed to administer about 40% of the vaccine that's been given which is actually better than the country as a whole, which is used about 1/4 of the vaccine that's out there. Still Crazy rose to hand used to describe her own feeling about how it's going with this. And what panicked. I'm e ticked off some of the many, many logistical challenges they faced figure out which facilities could look over the most shots on the staff and schedule and track hundreds of thousands of people getting vaccine. They had to create scheduling software and figure out what to do in smaller health centers of people don't show up for appointments. Which is an issue because once you have opened up a violent vaccine, you have to use all the 10 doses inside of it in a few hours, or they go bad. Their health centers have been told to vaccinate people from other kinds of facilities like mental health providers. And the health centers are trying to figure out okay. How much allocation do they have? How much of the other providers staff can they accommodate? How can they get those people either to come to the health center or Is there a way to get some of the vaccine to those residential settings? Right? It's so, um Don't know the details. They're so kind of mind numbing when he described it. Yes, this process begins in the front end with these, like super genius is using this incredibly advanced science. To like, Invent the thing that was the hard part. And then just literally like, how do we schedule people from this facility into like a time when we can get enough of them to use all the dose in the vial? Yeah, That's what we're getting stuck. Yes, And I think that's really where but that people who do that kind of thing don't get enough credit. Exactly. There's no Nobel Prize for.

New York Community Health Care Associat Dr Naimark Michaelis Soviet Union Nobel Prize Dennis
"soviet union." Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:25 min | 2 years ago

"soviet union." Discussed on KQED Radio

"U. S was when the Soviet Union the USSR, what later got called the Evil Empire by Ronald Reagan. Sent up a satellite successfully in the US walk up. To the sweat off something coming from out of space on destroying the U. S. And there was a Moment where people came together. And achieved something that lasted a very long time, which is us superiority in space. I'm hopeful that we're getting closer to despotic moment. Is the building building building and I think the combination of inequality and injustice have come together. But I'm not completely optimistic because I don't expect this to be a top down process. If you're hoping for top part down process, it's not gonna happen. This has got to be bottom up. It really has got to come from the grass roots and develop into a lasting movements. The companies have gotten it. Because the employees care and the employees have put enormous pressure on companies to be more socially responsible. I don't think governments quite get it is yet so it's gonna have to be a sustained movement, but I think we're closer to the Sputnik moment than we've been for a long time. That's a great point of make, and I should say, by the way that if anyone who's watching one starts a question Please do go ahead with a cure a function on the screen and we would love to bring in some of your questions into the discussion of B. Proceed But I should say that I think you made a great point them home because again. When I think about what's happened the last six months and compare it to 2000 and eight there two things that leap out of me. One is that the CEO this time round do appear to be sprouting a social conscience. In a way that they absolutely were not in 2000 and eight for the most part on do you know you could sit there and say, Well, this is just about their own survival, and they're concerned about, you know, sort of pitch books of the gate. But certainly the mood in the C suite changed on the other thing that I'm very struck by is the degree to which millennials on younger people and Mama and I both got teenagers about same age. Um, absolutely engaged. And to my shame my daughter through her social media posts has bean learning about the news on average, about a day or two ahead of me. Because they're all busy talking to each other's teenagers on she is red hot, engaged in a way that I wasn't at her age. And I don't think that really teenagers were back in 2008. Either of you guys got any thoughts about that? Well, what I think one of the things that is the case. I mean, I think this is gonna be one of the big challenges for in the 21st century for companies that I want. I want to lead in the 21st century. They're gonna have to deal with the fact that Consumers and in fact, especially younger consumers care about these issues where there's thies social questions or whether it's the environmental climate change questions they're having to pay attention to these, and in many Cases, these young people whether this till the weather, the teenagers or college or at work, now have a voice. They get to organize the getting engaged to get to speak and and and and they find their ways into working for these companies, and in those companies, they have a voice so quite often, and it's quite intrigued to see what the I suspect part of the response we're seeing from business is in part driven by that, but I think it's also impart driven by the fact that they're starting to see the reality around them. I mean, look at the range of issues whether the social questions the environmental questions But even questions around the 24th century comes gonna have to deal with like, how do we deal with the use of technology in our systems and our economies in our business where there's everything from privacy or the role of platforms and these questions? These have become real questions that companies in the 21st century having to now really think about I think everything's changed said is right. Think companies generally realize you can't be a good house in a bad neighborhood that you've got it care about the neighborhood. But I think there's something else that I know that you very aware of Julian. Is that there's a level of embarrassment because within weeks off this crisis while the unemployment wait was shooting up, while more than 30 million Americans have lost their jobs at that point. Cos We're raising money left right and center at very low rates. Wall Street had disconnected from Main Street. And that's because the policy response was very effective when it came to financial side and it is Cos and which investors that benefit from from these asset markets. It's not the person in the street. So there's also part of an embarrassment that Cos the big companies expect and owners of financial assets are doing so much better than the rest of the world. And there's a fear that comes with that. Which is you know you You said it wants to pitch fork. You know they come. So I think as much of it is that there's a positive has also less charitable and element going on here..

US Ronald Reagan Soviet Union U. S USSR CEO Mama thies Julian
"soviet union." Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"soviet union." Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"The heavily favored Soviet Union 4 to 3. One of the biggest upsets and Olympic history overcame the steroids and everything. I mean, these folks good grief, flipping risky. Do you remember that thing that what was that? Oh, that the movie that you guys used to always watch with Michael Jordan and the space jam based jammer by they get up. It's time to jam out what it was like those. What are those guys from that planet or whatever. Believe they were called the mon star Amon stars. That's what the Russian team looked like. It was good. It was very true. Yeah, and they came out on ice. And we're going one that exactly, But they beat them voice a 43. Yeah. Where they jacked up on steroids. You know they were. Of course they were. They were all made in a lab somewhere in Russia. Yeah, I'm imagining it like the rocky training sequence where it's going back and forth with Dolph Lundgren, right? Yeah. And they're just injecting him with more steroids. Look Like he could pick you up and rip you in. Hell can he see Scaring Jay's away ski? Well, how about some more recent history? Okay, This is also from the scientific community. Oh, here we go. 2017 the discovery of seven earth size planets orbiting the store. Trappist one Trappist one Yet now this raises the possibility of alien life. Of course it does, but seven earth size planets in the habitable zone of a star. Ah, one of the odds I'm curious about it. I know you don't give two rats hats as they say. I could not care less. But there you go. You don't care about alliums? No, I don't care about alliums. Whatever they are, like, Oh, aliens. No, I don't get really aliens. The troll guy here know that guy's just weird, isn't it? Well, I would love to discover some alien life, Would you? Really? Yeah. I would be thrilled. What would you do with this? Like the dog chasing the car? You know when she catch it? What do you wanna go? That's a good point. Well, I'm gonna take you back a little bit. But I mean, way back. Way, Way, Way. Way back. That's going way back then. A little further back. 14 55, Lord, man, it'll be this forward back. Johannes Gutenberg Princes First Bible. Whoa! That's a big one changes everything that does change everything. Now everybody can read the Bible. You see? Yes, you have to read to you by the church elders or the priest or whatever. That's what started kind of people having an individual relationship with religion. Dear Ugo. Interesting, isn't it? But before that they were selling tickets to get into heaven with we're not indulgences and that kind of Yeah, That's really kind of strange. Isn't it? A little shady? Yeah. Look, you can you can cheat on your wife. But if you pay us, and we'll sort of a race that that's just kinda creepy. Yeah. 18 36 Alamo is besieged for 13 days that last until March, 6 this is by the Mexican army. You know what? I had almost forgotten. And you're not supposed to forget the element. Almost let my mind Thanks for and don't forget the main. All right. Remember the man? Yes, but this was General Santa Anna. Yes. And eventually the entire garrison was killed. Good lordy. Yes. And don't forget that. It just was slipping my mind again. Good Lord. We were talking about movie food earlier. Yeah, s so it is interesting that on this date in 18 96 The Tootsie roll was first introduced. Well, Leo Hirschfield introduced that forced the Tootsie roll. I'm actually not that happy about it. Tootsie rolls stink on I You don't like to see role that candy corn. You got something against came to go. The deal with you and Kandy. Cool having a bomb in the studio talking about candy corn, But give me some sardines. Yeah, that's the irony Is that you? Hey, candy, corn and Tootsie rolls, But you love sardines. What is the deal with your taste buds?.

Dolph Lundgren Soviet Union Michael Jordan Leo Hirschfield Russia Kandy General Santa Anna Alamo Lord Mexican army ski Jay