40 Burst results for "Soviet Union"

Fresh update on "soviet union" discussed on Glenn Beck

Glenn Beck

01:15 min | 29 min ago

Fresh update on "soviet union" discussed on Glenn Beck

"Side. Thiss is the Sean Hannity. Morning minute. It's been more time on this one chapter on the lam listening watching last night. I'm like, wow. I spent a whole chapter and everything bars talking about and he's right. Socialism, The Bolsheviks 1917 a transformation and brush into the Soviet Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, It became an unmitigated disaster. Bolsheviks seized communication hubs post office. Means of production in prison. The ruling authorities steal their property promising everything is free. And then guess what happens. Misery poverty in a loss of freedom? That's the one thing every experiment. Whatever name it's given. It always ends the same way. Loss of freedom's well, that's all on the ballot in 85 days from coast to coast from sea to Shining Sea, Issa Sean Hannity show. Are you survivor sexual abuse while in the Boy Scouts, you may be entitled to compensation no matter how long ago the abuse happened, but your time to file a claim is limited. Call 806 97 77 69. That's 806 97 77 69 for more information as a result of thousands of victims filing sexual abuse claims the Boy Scouts have filed for bankruptcy protection and the bankruptcy court has said November 16th 2020 as the deadline for abuse survivors to file a claim. As a result of this bankruptcy of victim's compensation fund is being set up that may be worth over $1.5 billion. Childhood sexual abuse takes numerous forms, including forcible.

Sean Hannity Soviet Union Of Soviet Sociali Boy Scouts Thiss Shining Sea
COVID-19 Vaccine Ethics: Who Gets It First and Other Issues

Science Talk

04:27 min | 4 d ago

COVID-19 Vaccine Ethics: Who Gets It First and Other Issues

"US government's. Warp speed is ambitiously trying to create test and licensed vaccine for covid nineteen in less than a year compared to the five to ten years typically needed for a new vaccine. The program is borrowing strategies from a crash effort undertaken in the nineteen fifties against polio. Arthur caplan was seven years old when that paralytic disease which had been terrifying parents nationwide came to his town. Last. People. In America. Get. Polio in the Boston outbreak of nineteen, fifty seven, that's where I'm from. Saw Kids in our loans on kids die in the floor. It's one of the reasons I got interested in medical ethics. The Polio vaccine developed in the fifties it saved millions of lives and brought us tantalizingly close to eradicating the disease altogether. But in the haste to produce them researchers and manufacturers occasionally made mistakes and crossed ethical boundaries. Experimental vaccines were tested on intellectually disabled children, for example, as well as millions of people in the Belgian Congo and the Soviet Union who were not given the option for informed consent that today we consider indispensable. Medical ethics come a long way in the past sixty, five years. The World Health Organization has already set up a working group on ethics and Kobe Nineteen of which Kaplan is a member. They have started thinking through many of the tough questions ahead as companies race to test experimental vaccines, and we hope eventually ramp up manufacturing of those who succeed to billions of doses. Worldwide these questions include how can we make sure vaccine trials don't exploit people or enroll too few participants from black native Latino communities who are disproportionately sickened been killed by this disease who will get approved vaccines I and who will pay for them and what if anything should we do about vaccines being sold on the black market? The most immediate questions involve large-scale clinical trials those trials will take months to produce results. Can says, one reason is if I give you the experimental vaccine. Then, I have to wait for the. Virus in nature to infect me to see whether I'm going to do better than a group that didn't get vaccine usually have a placebo control group were you don't give them an active agent and you sort of monitor one against the other. If, you're waiting for natural infectivity with Kobe we have a problem because the Degree to which the becoming infect is very slow. So you'll notice that people are starting to recruit subjects for trials right now in hot spots, they may be looking at Brazil. They may be looking at Atlanta it could be looking at a region of the country that has. A A big outbreak. But at the same time, morally we have to try and tell people who sign up for vaccination studies they should not get themselves infected. So it's a sort of moral catch twenty two, you can't really. Encourage people to be reckless and get themselves. In fact, an the problem is you're probably not going to take sicker people because it makes it difficult to assess whether a vaccine is causing an adverse event or an underlying illnesses causing events. Most of the people who come into these big vaccine trials are healthy volunteer still they're younger. Is An effort underway. In the NIH sponsor trials to try and get more diversity ethnicity and race but a lack of transparency in who is being selected for the vaccine trials has raised concerns that historically underrepresented communities may once again be overlooked. Kaplan says that the preference for healthy volunteers is also one of the reasons that vaccine testers probably won't turn to one otherwise logical place to recruit participants prisons where corona virus has been running rampant, you can't use a vulnerable population because you worry that they can't consent. They're gonNA try and say I'll do it because they want to get out of jail or get parole the other main reason why Is prison populations usually have two or three underlying diseases. I know MTV everybody's at the gym looks such Arnold Schwarzenegger. But in fact, hepatitis HIV drug abuse is a bunch of reasons why they're not a best subjects for for any beginning studies

Polio Vaccine Kaplan Polio Kobe Arthur Caplan Belgian Congo United States NIH MTV Arnold Schwarzenegger Soviet Union America Boston World Health Organization Brazil Atlanta
Fresh update on "soviet union" discussed on Mark Levin

Mark Levin

02:51 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "soviet union" discussed on Mark Levin

"You've heard me talk about the service for 10 years, and many of you don't have it now is the time to get it. A lot of nice people. The post office You really wanna hang out at the post office. I don't think so. You could do right at your desk, but it right in your mailbox and you're done. In all those discounts and special waters, too, all right? Nancy Pelosi confesses. No, Not too that She confesses. Cut eight. Mr Producer Go. I have no take no percentage. But the Chinese. What they said is China would prefer Joe Biden. Whether they do, that's their conclusion that they would prefer What is it with that? I can't talk. They all dentures. They're old. I don't get it. What she's trying to say. I can interpret liberal gibberish pretty well say they have a bead on Trump with Russia again. They're obsessed with Russia. The Democrats aren't spies for Russia, like Alger Hiss, among others. Sorry. Conrad Black read your history. Ah, when they're not spies when they are spies. You keep bringing up Russia. They were soft on Russia. Until Ronald Reagan came in and defeated the Soviet Union there soft on Russia today. Trump's been very, very tough on puny has been tougher on the Russians since any president since Reagan period. Not even close. The Democrat Party has been weak. They've been weak on Iran with the Iran deal. He wanted to subsidize around. They've been weak with China. So the Democrat Party has been weak with Russia Week with China weak with Iran, But we have new intelligence reports. Ladies and gentlemen, Let's say Putin wants to interfere to help. Trump now. Haven't we sung this song before? Haven't we sung this song? Don't think about this logically. Why would any enemy of America want Donald Trump to win and buying to lose? Mine's a sellout finds a pushover family has their fingers in the till in one country after another. But even putting that aside Mine has never believed in a strong foreign policy. Visa VI are enemies. He views Israel as our enemy. Now he views America is our enemy. What you talk about? He's a model. I'm sorry. Well. War on the suburbs were on the private sector Want healthcare open borders benefits for illegal aliens. Have. You also noticed that Biden hasn't said anything about opening our schools because he doesn't want to go sideways with the teachers union? No way. I heard a report. It was very breathless at the top of the hour of Of a number of Children who got the virus in a school system that's open. I think it was 70 Children, Mr Producer. What happened to those Children? I have no idea. They didn't tell what happened to them. I don't know. Children get the flu to have what happened to them. It's so bizarre. It's so crazy the way this is all covered. Outrageous, actually. All right, let's go to Mike Neptune, New Jersey The great W A. B C go right ahead, Mike. I read all your books. My concern. You know, I'm a history buff a little bit and thank you. Thank you. I'm sure I'm sure that you remember Churchill. Probably nobody in the world could have Churchill. Wasn't that a fast food? That's churches Go ahead. No, no. And nobody could have nobody in the world could have done what he did. I'm just joking. I like an answer. Trump. Come. Nobody could done what Trump did and I mourn about people are fickle, involves more circles. I think we're going to be Even from a historic perspective, extremely, Ah upset if Donald Trump loses, and I think history is going to judge is quite badly. I think also the rise of the Marxist Democrats with the rise of the Marxist China right now, all this is coming to a head..

Donald Trump Russia China Nancy Pelosi Joe Biden Ronald Reagan Democrat Party America Churchill Iran Alger Hiss Conrad Black FLU Soviet Union Producer Mr Producer Putin Mike Neptune
75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

Between The Lines

09:42 min | 5 d ago

75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

"This bomb has this frank for twenty thousand tons of TNT. Harnessing, the basic power of the universe. What I fifteen I am on August six, nine, hundred, forty, five, the US Air Force dropped the little boy uranium fission bomb on central hero. Shema. Making it the first city ever to be destroyed by a nuclear bomb. On August nine Nagy became the second when the bomb exploded around thirty percent of Hiroshima's population that were killed instantly many more died in the months and years to come. Now, the bombs brought to an end to world war two but the wool was horrified at the human cost. Russia has since become a byword for nuclear holocaust forever linked to the words never again. Now, this week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki joining me to reflect on the legacy of those events. Tashi. Tauch. She is assistant professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and the author of political fallout, nuclear weapons testing, and the making of Global Environmental Crosses. Welcome. Tasha. Thanks for having me and Michael Gordon Professor of history at Princeton University and Co. it is a of a new book called the age of Russia. Welcome. Welcome. It's very good to be here. Now, Michael the fear of the nuclear age is the period after World War Two when the US dropped the bomb. The fee was that the nuclear weapons would become a common part of conventional warfare but in the seventy five years since he Russia and Nagasaki, there's not been a single bomb dropped in a conflict. Question is this because deterrence works or have we just been lucky I would say we've mostly been lucky It's quite rare that there are conflicts between nuclear-armed nations. The major example is the nineteen sixty, nine border conflict between the People's Republic of China and the Soviet Union. So there haven't been many occasions for things to escalate, and there's a strong incentive in those cases to de-escalate. There have however been very close near accidents whether missile just that needing on its own or people launching almost launching in fear of an attack and there. Have Been Plenty of conventional wars that could have escalated that way. So by and large, we've been lucky but we've been abetted by the fact that there has been an ambient taboo that has grown over the years against nuclear first use although that is rarely the policy of any nuclear power. Okay. Now from an Australian perspective, Tic- Japan was seen as an aggressor in the war, the war crimes but also as a victim because of the destruction wrought by the nuclear bombs have is the wool remit in Japan now aggressor and victim. Tarshi. Many pass through consider themselves as victims thinking that Japanese were misled by the government inter- Disastrous Wall Conquest. In this view here stands at the as the ultimate symbol of Japanese victim. But today is victim narrative faces two competing accounts. One is to recognize Japan's acts of wartime aggression, including tweeting massacres, forced labor, and sexual violence. If we see hero Shimmer from this perspective, it takes on a whole different meaning not. Not as a national tragedy, but rather as international event. killed not only the Japanese residents but also many colonial subjects and allied. POW's who are present in the city at the time of the Tom Bombing. The other interpretation that has also gained for Japan is to see the wartime conduct Japan as an act of self defense. This This lesion is narrative recaps here. As the ultimate proof of Western aggression. So fitting the predation of Japan's Joel Roles as. Aggressor and victim during the war will gain the upper hand in the future will depend on how sweet society around the world comes together and develops a shared understanding of the complex legacies or Corna reason on the war in the Asia Pacific region and back to the United States markle. There's a popular conception that Washington had to drop the bomb that it was the only way. To win the war, of course, the war in Europe come to an end in May of forty five. This is early August two, forty five is that true I mean what? What President Truman's options? So. This is a great question and it's one with a lot of confusion around it. Functionally. The only way the only government that had any power to end the war was the Japanese government which was in a position to surrender and the question was when would that happen would have happened later or earlier by summer nineteen, forty, five, it was already clear that the war was militarily lost. President Truman and the US government in general had basically fixed options of what they could do to try and encourage the Japanese government to take that move. There's only two that people usually talk about dropping the atomic bomb or invading the home islands of Japan. Both of those were on the table also having the Soviet Union inducing them to enter the wars of belligerent which happened on August eighth increasing the intensity of firebombing tightening the blockade of foodstuffs into the home islands. and modifying the terms of unconditional surrender to allow Japan to keep the emperor. The interesting thing is all six of those happen Truman pursued all sex and the war ended. It's unclear which ones were determinative. But the point is there wasn't like we had one option or nothing else. The US had plenty of options and exercised actually all of them. On the one level target for the bombs was obviously Japan on another level. Real target was the Soviet Union. How did the Kremlin of you? He Russia Mirror Negga? Second Markle. So. Really, the question here is a small set of people within the Kremlin stolen and his closest advisers and you that there was an atomic bomb project going on in the United States for years they've found that out from spies from Britain from spies in the United States, and they had their own uranium enrichment and bomb development program that was going on at I would say a medium scale What happens after the destruction of Hiroshima is I in absented himself for a few days he went into a depression and didn't. React to any of his advisors and then immediately massively escalated the Soviet development of their own atomic bomb. So they were both caught by surprise and not caught by surprise. It's true that the Americans didn't always think about the Soviet Union as a factor in any decision related to how the war was going to end but they also very strongly, we understood that the key issue was trying to get this the Japanese government to surrender faster because the faster they surrendered the less impact. The Soviet entry in the war would have to how the end game would play out in Asia, my guest, Michael Gordon, and Tashi Hitachi, and we're reflecting on the seventy fifth anniversary of Hiroshima. Tashi. One, hundred fifty thousand atomic bomb survivors still living in Japan. In fact, as a guest of Japan's Ministry of Foreign. Affairs this would have been in September twenty, sixteen I met one of one of the survivors now they're all in education and public law has plied an important part in shaping Japan's post-war Pacifism. Now, as generation dies out, is the role of pessimism in Japanese politics is that diminishing especially in the face of Rausing China Toshi? I don't think the passing of the atomic bomb survivors will diminish the strengths of pacifism in any short-term. The correctly memory of human magazine Japan has been fairly robust and the taken deep roots in popular culture. I can think of a good example that is Japanese animated wartime drama film released just four years ago in two thousand, sixteen cold in this corner of the world. This picture accounts of the wartime life in here she was a smash hit in the box office. Be, atomic bomb survivors will also active in passing down lessons from the world's first nuclear war to the next generation. The city's over here streaming nagy training. Many Japanese Ron Tears as storytellers who share the testimonies are waging victims and a second generation survivors are spearheading efforts for peace unjustice. Well, that brings me to today and really in the last that he is the end of the call was thirty years ago the US. And the Soviets on Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty non stop this was President Bush senior and Gorbachev in Russia in the inside at Union. Then just as it was collapsing now, both agree to significantly reduce their nuclear stockpiles and of course, the updated treaty between Moscow and Washington that expose I. Think it's February Knicks Jeez. So that's just a few days after the next president is warning Michael Do you think it will be resigned. I think that's entirely dependent on the results of the election. Joe. Biden has indicated that he would refine the treaty The trump administration has had many opportunities to re-sign the treaty, but they have not taken advantage of those opportunities yet. Russia's indicated that they're very interested in extending

Japan United States Soviet Union Hiroshima Michael Gordon Russia Japanese Government President Truman Nagasaki Us Air Force Tic- Japan Washington Nagy President Bush
Fresh update on "soviet union" discussed on The Sean Hannity Show

The Sean Hannity Show

01:14 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "soviet union" discussed on The Sean Hannity Show

"He answered while it's your assumption that I supported or believed in authority -tarian communism that existed in the Soviet Union I don't ever have well why the hell did you vacation there? Why does so many of these people praised Castro even though he's a murder was murdering dictator, the Castro's brothers. He says, I never have. Yeah. Well, why were you there for your honeymoon? Not many people that time we're going to? The Soviet Union for their honeymoon. You know he says, what do I mean when I talk about Democratic Socialism and it's certainly not the authoritarian communism that existed in the Soviet Union and other Communist countries. Well he's praised the actions of the communist regimes. You know even traveling to Nicaragua. With Danielle nor Tiga and the Sandinistas celebrations commemorating the anniversary of the Communist. Sandinista. Regime. I quoted The New York Times at the anniversary celebration wire report described the chant of you know here there everywhere, the Yankee will die. What part of that that he missed that was happening all around him or his letter to Daniel Ortega inviting him to Burlington be moaning the mob and the media's bias against his regime. Pretty sick stuff. Same thing Bernie went to Cuba. Bernie, I didn't see a single hungry child. He said I didn't see any homeless people he said. Admitted the Cuba was not the perfect society but said the communist nation quote not only as free healthcare but very high quality healthcare we'll Michael Moore made that stupid statement. You know he's asked by sixty minutes. You know what? About this praise of Catch Castro we're very opposed to the authoritarian nature of Cuba. When. Everything goes south and he they distance themselves from the very places that he went to visit and support it. That's what's at stake in eighty five days. And none of this is good. And I know the media is nothing but state run. Propaganda. Conspiracy. News television. That's it. Portland can riot for seventy three days. They turn the the the liberal mayor until law and order disciple at this point. Why then all they do now they all all they care about restoring law and order they care about. You know yelling at Donald Trump to stay the hell out and don't even don't whatever you do. Don't help us. Colorado, we saw demonstrations over the weekend. With black lives matter matter demonstrators. How many more cops have to get hurt and all of this. New York gun background checks guess what spiked one hundred and twenty one percent in June. Wow Pretty. Amazing. No. There was an interesting question and politico in an article today how San Francisco Democrats took over the country. It's a hell of a good question that they asked. Bar is saying is dead on accurate to you understands the history of these radical regimes, the lofty promises, and then the the eventual, a power grab and the resulting in the end of freedom and liberty. which has made this country the greatest country God gave man. To advance the human condition unlike any other society and it's all because a liberty freedom capitalism risk reward initiative of the individual based on natural rights given by God and not by the state. And the left wants to tear the system down. They don't like it because they don't get the power under this system of governance. What's happening in New York none of it's good. Chicago well. Up Fifty, percent one, hundred and thirty, nine percent July alone. Well. What are they doing? That's that's governments number one job. Now, we can't do that. They're not educating our kids..

Castro Soviet Union Cuba New York Michael Moore Bernie Nicaragua The New York Times Daniel Ortega Donald Trump San Francisco Danielle Colorado Chicago Portland Burlington Tiga BAR
Has China Won? With Prof. Kishore Mahbubani

Model Majority Podcast

05:30 min | 5 d ago

Has China Won? With Prof. Kishore Mahbubani

"Professor Shore Mahbubani welcome to the Model Majority podcast today my pleasure rejoin you. All right. So to get a conversation started, you know the focus of our interview today is your New Book Has China one, and there are a lot of things over to dive deep into with you on this book. The first thing I wanNA chat about is this notion of the Chinese civilization party as you know, very well, the as an acronym is sort around quite. Casually, in the media in foreign policy circle to describe China as a whole right the Chinese Communist Party and you believe that this is actually quite an inadequate framing to understand China as a country as a people and you believe that by thinking of the CCP as the Chinese civilization party is perhaps a better way to think about it. Why do you think this kind of change in terminology is helpful in helping the United States in particular understand China. I think it would make a huge difference. If the American people came to realize the truth. which is the main mission of the Chinese Communist Party. Is Not export communism to the rest of the world. which was the mission of the Soviet Union's Communist Party. But to try and reform I've and strengthen China's civilization. I what I told you is is a basic of. But most Americans, do not know this basic truth. Because, when they hear the what Chinese Communist, party. The what communists in the American imagination. is by definition somebody WHO's evil and doing bad things. That good a good communist continent, an oxymoron. In America, in American linguistic discourse. So when you when you tell them that they're dealing with the Chinese Communist, party the by definition, they believe they dealing with an evil party that is out to undermine America out to oppose the American values out to diminish. America's standing in the world without realizing. That the core mission of the Chinese Communist, party is is to make China's strong and what's interesting. And to understand how deeply rooted this mission is remember remember the send the words that Chairman Mao us. When the People's Republic of China was established in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty, nine, he did not say, Hey, today we celebrate the victory of communism over capitalism and said that he said that she that the keyboards used that China has stood up he said it twice. China has to. So, even chairman mouse goal and he was much more of a communist clearly than the current leaders are in many ways was still China's strong. Too. That's why I think that the communist is. Creates a form of intellectual. Laziness in American minds because they cannot look behind that what the see what is really the purpose and mission. Of the Chinese Communist Party that's why I think that thinking of it as a Chinese civilization party, then they'll begin to realize the most important thing that America in China and live in peace because Chinese civilization is not opposed to American civilization American civilization and not oppose the Chinese civilization and both can live together in peace. Right right. What do you think the US not just a public but really even the foreign policy circle. Right. The folks in DC. The people who are supposed to understand the stuff for living because it's their job. To kind of display, this laziness intellectually speaking, is it just because the Cold War was still such a recent memory I guess for the United States generally positive memory. 'cause we won that we just kind of put the Communist label back to where it was just because it was something that we think we understand. You ask them very difficult question because this is the great. Paradox. About the United States in the United States spent more money. On strategic, think-tanks than any other country in the world I think he spends hundreds of millions of dollars. You not billions of dollars on tragic thing. And yet America the America is the best digit think-tank were. America has the worst thinking in the. And and is shocking for example, though any comes to understanding China? More strategic think tanks very Lisi and using all the conception tariff Nelia the Cold War in the Soviet Union. And then applying it to China, when is clearly not relevant? China. So. The inability. Of the strategic think tanks in in the United States to understand the real nature. Of China. Is actually quite a frightening. Thing to watch today,

Chinese Communist Party China United States America Chairman Soviet Union Professor Shore Mahbubani DC Lisi
Fresh update on "soviet union" discussed on The Sean Hannity Show

The Sean Hannity Show

02:17 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "soviet union" discussed on The Sean Hannity Show

"In this election. And then you have spread throughout the entire twentieth century based on that. Soviet model. When you when you add in just collectively. You add in you know, China, the revolution, the Bolsheviks their revolution they're expanding socialist empire state. You know then you add in East Germany versus West Germany the Nazi Ism then fascism. Over one, hundred, million people die. In the last century alone those to those who called human beings. Member I remember growing up and just all you saw in the Soviet Union lines upon lines upon lines just for milk and bread. And Bare. Necessities. Examples of kids not being able to get milk without a prescription. That's that was not the problem. The promise if they got rid of those evil rich people in in the former Soviet Union. Whatever manifestation it is, and now we have it in the form of Bernie Sanders Socialism Sanders, an outlier. In the Democratic Party. Total outlier. He was not considered mainstream. He was laughed at he was just basically tolerated. An annoyance when he was running against Hillary Clinton. Now, he's become the mainstream. Of this radical new democratic socialist. Party, it's become so powerful that now. Joe Biden, in his state, of weakness has to adopt Bernie as his economics are. And literally plagiarize his economic agenda. Dislike he literally has to cater to Ao see in the squad and the new green deal madness and promised trillions of dollars if he's president. Because he needs their support desperately. There's no moderates in the Democratic Party, today I don't see one of them. That's why they couldn't get a deal with the president this weekend. Know. Who would go honeymoon in the former Soviet Union that was Bernie Sanders Jeez? It was a CNN townhall light I recount this in Chapter Four Socialists in the history of failure. As it relates to Bernie Sanders Sanders how do you rectify your notion of Democratic Socialism with the failures of socialism in nearly every country that's tried it..

Bernie Sanders Socialism Sande Soviet Union Democratic Party Bernie Sanders Joe Biden Bernie East Germany CNN China West Germany Hillary Clinton
US, UAE and China All Launched Missions to Mars This Month

WSJ Tech News Briefing

02:29 min | Last week

US, UAE and China All Launched Missions to Mars This Month

"We've also seen recent Mars missions from the United Arab Emirates and from China. There are others coming up. So why is there so much activity around this kind of mission lately? Well a some of it is just a function of orbital mechanics. It's of course extraordinarily difficult to traverse the distance between Earth and Mars and depending on where each planet is in this elliptical orbit. We can be as close as sixty one million miles or as far away as one hundred and thirty some million miles each one of those miles represents of course a pound of fuel that you'll have to cart along with you in order to actually make this journey. Every twenty six months or so earth and Mars are very closely aligned than it is possible that that moment to make the most economical journey across the void. That's what we're seeing right now this summer. This July and August is that moment of alignment between Mars and earth. And I'm sure there are geopolitical reasons for doing this right now as well right. It's very hard to separate space exploration from national EGO international diplomacy and the search for prestige. Which really we're talking bragging rights. It is a fact. That for the first fifty years of interplanetary exploration it has by and large been an American show the Soviet Union early on also send some things tomorrow but of course. That's a confederation. There's no longer with us. This has been an integral part American prestige. I think our ability to land on another planet to effectively plant our flag. We have encourage international cooperation with this sort of thing. But it's very different being a partner from being the lead sled dog and I do think the efforts we're seeing with both China the United Arab Emirates and then the European Space Agency which is partnered with Russia for a launch. That will now take place in twenty twenty two. These are moments of the kind of coming of age. Not all countries have been exploration countries. But more now are and more are now willing to put big money on the effort

United Arab Emirates China Soviet Union European Space Agency Partner Russia
Fresh update on "soviet union" discussed on The Sean Hannity Show

The Sean Hannity Show

01:28 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "soviet union" discussed on The Sean Hannity Show

"Well, that's why we have over two thousand police officers injured with bricks and now canes and bats and knives and hockey sticks and Molotov cocktails. Everything in between. Various Tiers of of people from the from the sort of top provocateurs through people over their minions that sorta run the violent minions. Really, say Democrats you know this is now the Revolutionary Party believing in tearing down the system. that. That's what's wrong about America you know all its institutions that's why we see you know th, there's no democratic process people voting in democratic as the Democratic Republic representatives that would decide whether or not the statue stays or goes why do it the legal way? Why do it the right way? The left has pulled away from the umbrella of classical liberal values. Yeah. They're all leftist radical extremists at this point. That's another point I've been making. And policing is now very difficult. It's a dangerous job demonizing them won't help bring in good cops. And the cops that are there are going to you know make a right turn when they know damn well, they they're needed if they go left. The American people see this. But they don't see it in the news media in this country. That's also true. And the media the left they use the same talking points well, because that's state run TV of all things radical. I go over all of this. You know if you think back and I talk about it in chapter for socialism, a history of failure. You know managed to turn the Soviet Union and write all about this from the world's largest grain. Into a major importer in other words. They were humiliated by us, they had to then turn to us. Their chief geostrategic rival, the US to feed their own people. Venezuela should be the richest country on the face of the earth. I talk about that example, the East Germany thanks to socialism. They stopped producing anything extraordinary. I use the example step steroid infused athletes I mean a wall to keep people in not out you know we're building a wall, but there's so many people want to come here. and. Then you talk about the Bolshevik revolution I go into great detail about exactly what he's talking about here. You know as if it's the. Karl Marx the word of God Mount Sinai the Godfather of the Soviet Union Lenin. Drawing marks the whole economy organized along the lines of what the Post. Office. I keep saying an interview after interview. Had It obamacare workout? We know the answer how Social Security and Medicare working out. All the cities run by leftist for decades, house, law and order working out. House how you know basic fund their most fundamental job they're filling how is the educational? Opportunities for children in these big cities..

Soviet Union Democratic Republic Revolutionary Party United States Soviet Union Lenin Karl Marx East Germany America Venezuela God Mount Sinai Medicare
Russia Bounty Reports, U.S. Troop Movements Put Trump-Putin Relationship in Spotlight

KNX Evening News

06:02 min | Last week

Russia Bounty Reports, U.S. Troop Movements Put Trump-Putin Relationship in Spotlight

"That he has never once broach the issue of Russia, placing bounties on the heads of American troops in Afghanistan with his counterpart Vladimir Putin. Then just hours later, he announces the complete withdrawal of U. S forces from Germany. And Hodges is a retired lieutenant general in the U. S Army and former commanding general for United States Army Europe based in Germany. Currently he is an analyst and scholar at the centre for European Policy Analysis. General. Thank you for joining us. Thanks for the privilege. So let's start with the last thing first. Which was the announcement from the White House about us troops out of Germany. Did that shock you? Well, it was a surprise when I heard it two months ago when it came out in a Wall Street Journal report that about 10,000 we're going to come out on days. Of course, it was also a shock to all of the U. S headquarters in Europe at the time, as well as our allies. On today. Of course, the number that we heard was closer to 12 hours. So they're apparently going to moves to other regions. What is the basis for having troops in these numbers in Germany in the first place? Once the original idea, and then how are the other countries there now reacting to this Well, keep in mind that the total number of Americans that are based in Germany's 34,000 That's about 12,000 Air Force in 22,000 army so That's probably about 1/3 of what could be seated in the Coliseum there in Los Angeles or some other major university stadium. It's not a lot of people, the primary function that they perform. Ah, commanding control, logistics, intelligence communications. Things that help the United States carry out our national security strategy in our defensive strategy in Europe, Africa in the Middle East, so anything, they're not. They're providing protection for Germany at all. They're there to give us Forward, basing that makes it easier for us to carry out our strategy. But am I correct general that the Russians were never exactly to put it mildly pleased that these air troops were in Germany and would be not at all disappointed that they're leaving. Well, no, This is just to the Kremlin because they've done nothing to change their behavior in a positive way. They still occupy Crimea illegally. They still are killing Ukrainian soldiers and done passed done Mass every week. Still occupied 20% of Georgia. They still support the Assad regime, which has generated millions of refugees and killed hundreds of thousands of their own people and their supporting general Haftar in Libya, which is going to generate another 1,000,000 refugees. Into Europe, so they've done nothing to change their behavior. And yet we reduce our capability and Germany by about 1/3 so to me that that again now We've had US troops in Germany since the end of World War two on some people have said. Well, why are they still there? The Cold War's over and I would say well because of US leadership and because of NATO. We've had no war in Europe for 71 years. I mean, that's actually since 1945. Don't do math in public 75 years. That's an incredible accomplishment. When you think of the history of Europe so Well, with the exception of the break up in Yugoslavia, all the nations of Europe that have found each other for centuries. Now, basically all of the same team in NATO What a huge benefit to the United States that are most important trading partner partner. The European Union is stable and secure, so this is for our benefit. Move on to the other part of this discussion. The time we have left the president not confronting Vladimir Putin about the bounties in the most recent phone call, they have, and then reportedly also other phone calls that they've had Knowing that everyone would be watching for this that people wanted something to be said. Yeah, I don't understand. Um, while the president is not more forceful and clear, because actually the acts of the department offense up until this terrible announcement today of the action Of this administration have actually increased in Europe. We have more troops in Germany today than we did under President Obama and everything that President Obama promised. Has been carried out by this administration. So there's a disconnect between what Is happening on the ground in Europe and in what the president says to be candid. I can't explain that when it comes to the reports of bounces, own troops head in Afghanistan. I was there for 15 months back in 2009 and 2010. As a brigadier general, I always assumed that the Russians wanted to see us fail to see us bleed because of our support for the mujahideen with the Soviet Union was in Afghanistan. But, um Wouldn't when the domain of Thailand from Pakistan into Afghanistan was cut off. The Russian's still allowed us to move supplies What we call the northern Supply line moving supply around. We were still able to move through Russia to get stuff in and out so they could have really hurt us if they want to. I suspect that this business about the bounty is probably at some local level some overeager person. I never thought the Taliban needed any motivation to kill Americans. The president could make this go away if he was much more clear about how he opposes the criminals. Technologists. Retired Lieutenant general US Army Former Commanding general for United States Army Europe Thanks the K Index in depth podcast you're going Get that for free

Europe Germany United States United States Army President Trump Vladimir Putin Afghanistan Russia Nato President Obama U. S Army Wall Street Journal U. S Analyst European Policy Analysis Taliban Hodges European Union
The History Of Jazz in Classical Music

Classics for Kids

03:58 min | 2 weeks ago

The History Of Jazz in Classical Music

"Welcome to classics for Kids I'm Naomi Lewin. RHAPSODY in blue. The name that IRA Gershwin suggested to his brother. George is perfect for a piece of classical music. That uses Jazz George. Gershwin wrote a lot of classical music that uses jazz. Jazz the word blue refers to changing some of the notes of musical scale to blur the lines between major. And Minor. George Gershwin wasn't the only classical composer to put jazz his music. He wasn't even the first. French composer Darius Milhaud Love Jazz. He used different kinds of in different pieces. Neo wrote leboeuf's your Twat French. For the Hawks on the roof under the influence of a trip to Brazil then he studied American jazz and started using it to a lot of European composers were intrigued by American jazz, Maurice rebel, but composer who wouldn't let Gershwin study with him because he didn't want to corrupt, his music wrote a piano concerto. That sounded a lot like Gershwin. Russian composers got into the to when the Soviet Union held an official competition to raise the level of jazz in the country. Dmitri Shostakovich wrote his first jazz. After they organized an official. Soviet state jazz orchestra. Shostakovich wrote another jazz suite Russian composer eager. Stravinsky love jazz to his Ebony. Concerto is for clarinet and jazz band. Stravinsky wrote it for Woody Herman and his thundering herd. The clarinet soloist on that recording is Benny. Goodman and American musician, who back and forth between popular and classical music, just like George Gershwin another American. Who did that was Leonard Bernstein. This is from his ballet fancy free. In addition to classical composers who put jazz into their music, there are jazz composers who wrote for the Symphony Orchestra one of the greatest jazz musicians ever was Edward Kennedy Ellington better known as Duke.

George Gershwin Dmitri Shostakovich Naomi Lewin Darius Milhaud Soviet Union Edward Kennedy Ellington Leonard Bernstein Official Stravinsky Symphony Orchestra Ebony Goodman Maurice Rebel Woody Herman Benny NEO Hawks Brazil Leboeuf
Newt Gingrich and the Start of an Era

The Book Review

05:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Newt Gingrich and the Start of an Era

"This feels like an episode out of like not just a recent. It's not the recent past. Past the distant past I mean newt is still with us, but this is a very different time for newt, and I think that for many people he started to really appear on People's radars outside of Georgia in the early ninety s with a contract for America, but your book predates that so the book starts in the Nineteen Eighties when you Gingrich. Is this young? Young Congressman who comes from Georgia. He's elected in Nineteen, seventy eight, and any comes to Washington ready to just tear everything down to shake things up to do whatever necessary to help. Republicans become a majority in the House of Representatives which they had not been since nineteen fifty four, and he's intent on a not listening to senior members of the Party and to really. Really taking on the Democrats in ways that they had not been comfortable with, and so he makes a name for himself very quickly, even though he's not part of the leadership in the early eighties. Okay, so you're a history. Professor Newt Gingrich Thought of himself as a history professor and was a history professor, but what exactly did he teach? How did his academic career? Career fit in with his political career well, he received his PhD until Lane. After attending undergraduate school in Emory and Gingrich wrote his dissertation on Belgian colonialism, and he wrote about how and why colonial government had failed to modernize local education and nurture an elite that was capable of sustaining economic growth, and what was remarkable about the dissertation in retrospect, which is what he spent. Spent his academic time on was that he was critical of the design of Belgian policies, rather than on the merits of colonialism, which were much less interest to him, but but that wasn't really his his main focus. I mean as soon as he gets to West Georgia College. That's his first job as a professor. He's deeply uninterested in the academic life I think in. In his first year as a professor, he applies to be the president of the university. He then wants to be share the department and he's impatient with the slowness of academia He quickly gains a thirst for the life of politics, and that's really what engages him, and in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy four. He decides to run against the incumbent in his district. District John Flint who's an old southern Democrat. What are nudes politics like growing up? Because he conservative early on, and did his conservative ideology remained consistent throughout his life. Yeah, he comes from a working class family. The family's originally from Harrisburg. His father left his mother while she was pregnant with him, so he didn't have much of a relationship with him. He is raised. primarily by his stepfather, who's in the military, so Gingrich spends a lot of his youth travelling around. He's what we call an Army Brat, and lives in different places in Europe before the family finally settles in Georgia, which is the final stop? He's a Rockefeller Republican during the nineteen sixties. He he is conservative, but he is interested in Republicans like Nelson Rockefeller and then Richard Nixon who had ambitions of building a big Republican coalition as FDR had done for Democrats in the Nineteen Thirties. He doesn't really make a hard right. Right, turn until about nineteen seventy five I'm what prompts that well. He ran for the first time unsuccessfully in nineteen, seventy, four against flint. Then he's getting ready to run against Flint again in nineteen seventy six, and he meets some people associated with the conservative movement like Paul Way Rick. Who's running these camps for up and coming Republicans and he like many young Republicans starts to become enamored with what's this conservative movement that's bubbling up in America and talking about the need to dismantle government to be much more aggressive on national. National Security and this is when he starts to shift to what will eventually be the Reagan Revolution? Would you say that his guiding principles were firmly aligned with Reagan conservatism, or were there differences there? There were differences. Gingrich for example is much more concerned about environmental issues even in the early nineteen eighties than a lot of Reagan Nights, are he? He actually takes those kinds of policies much more seriously, but generally he lines up by the time he's in the house. He believes in tax cuts. He believes in deregulation. Deregulation, he believes importantly in a very muscular approach to fighting the Soviet Union and to fighting allies in places like Central America so though there are differences between him, and and some of the hard core inner circle of the Reagan administration. Generally they line up pretty well

Professor Newt Gingrich Nineteen Eighties Professor Georgia President Trump Nineteen Thirties America Rick Richard Nixon Nelson Rockefeller John Flint Congressman West Georgia College House Of Representatives Reagan Reagan Administration Harrisburg Washington Soviet Union Flint
"soviet union" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

05:19 min | Last month

"soviet union" Discussed on Bookworm

"Think one the things that fascinates me about your book young. Heroes of the Soviet Union it's an memo R- and reckoning the subtitles The You Come. To consciousness. After the death of what I was taught growing up was the great solve fullness of Russia. The Soviet Union. With the secret police and the thongs. parentally, your grandfather was a murderous thug. he certainly was. Who was himself. Murdering Jews and the other so headed your family. Your mother's side was Jewish. Yes, yes, so what happens then to the Russians so? The Russian soul. Well, you know it's funny. A part of writing this book was kind of trying to reckon a I think it's subtitled reckoning because. It was an attempt to reckon with what that country means. WHOA, how Howard was formed, and it's also a nation of readers, a nation of people who? Love jokes anecdotes, and you know they are indeed a very soulful. People, but also simultaneously it is a country that has an uninterrupted history of despotism of cruelty of. Secret Police of. The government that treats its people essentially as vassals, and you know so it is, it is a very. Confusing and ambivalent legacy, you know it is at once a place I. Really Love to visit a place. That also makes me continually very sad. I'm talking to Alex Halberstadt. He's the author of young. Of the Soviet Union. It's published by random. House. I founded a fascinating book If you have. Any interest in how? A. Very young person was stands the separations and the recurrences that involve leaving the Soviet Union and wishing to revisited. Because you've barely senior father except in phonecalls, you've only heard him. You've never seen your grandfather..

Soviet Union Secret Police Alex Halberstadt Russia Howard
"soviet union" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

06:31 min | Last month

"soviet union" Discussed on Bookworm

"In the course of my reading. I found a recently published book by a writer who frequently appears in The New Yorker New York magazine in many of the glossies. He's a wonderful writer. His name is Alex. how number stat? He was born in the Soviet Union when it was the Soviet Union and he's written. A cross between memoir and history called Young Heroes of the Soviet Union. Since I, am myself of Russian descent and I know some little about what it was like to grow. Walk in the Soviet Union. I found the book. Fascinating. When learned. In its first stone ten pages. Than Alex Humber stance grandfather was one of Stalin's personal bodyguards. That he in this book would travel to the Soviet Union. To meet this previously, UNMET! This grandfather once combed his hair and gave him a bath. How old were you? Then I was three months old Michael. and. You had barely spent time with your biological father because he stayed in the Soviet Union while you and your mother and your mother's parents came to America. Yes, that's right, Michael? How old were you then? I was nine years old. And where did you lands? How did it go? Well we left Moscow in the fall of nineteen, seventy nine, and after about six months Austria in Italy. We ended up in Queens County New York. In addition to all the other things. I have in common with the writer of the spoke Alex. Halberstadt I grew up in Queens to not the same part of Queens and you grew up in the projects. Yes, I did I grew up in the ravens, wood houses, which were part of New York City public housing. Your family was helped to America by an agency. Whose what would you call it? Specialties central issue was helping Russian Jews to leave Russia. Yes, that's correct. It was called highest the Hebrew International Aid Society, and it's still it's still going strong and actually doing a lot of activism right now, behalf of immigrants and refugees now. Wake my audience up. What is it like for? Alex Halberstadt to wake up and find himself in America having grown up near to Moscow. was. It was wonderful. I'M NOT GONNA lie, you know as as a nine and ten year old I thought America was amazing. It was every every kid's dream. You know unlimited consumer goods <hes> based. Professional wrestling on television now it was really it was. It was a wonderland. You grew up. In Russia what did the Russian novel mean to you control? It was a huge. Influence on my life does go ski in particular but Tolstoy, so tell me about your relation to the Great Russian literature. I think my relationship was a little ambivalent <hes> I tried to read. And I think, I have read most of tolstoy industy upscale entered. In, Russia which took. Eventually started to take a lot longer than it did in English and I loved reading those books. But it kind of you know. I found that also a little confusing because it kind of. I think in some ways overlapped with my experience of having grown up in Russia and kind of taught me about kind of the version of Russia that I was that I only got to know through books. I lived there in the nineteen seventies during the heyday of Soviet Union. You know surrounded by. Socialist realism and this was kind of a rush that I was only getting to know through books innocent I? Think one the things that fascinates me about your book young. Heroes of the Soviet Union it's an memo R- and reckoning the subtitles <hes>. The You Come. To consciousness. After the death of what I was taught growing up was the great solve fullness of Russia. The Soviet Union. With the secret police and the thongs. parentally, your grandfather was a murderous thug. <hes> he certainly was. Who was himself. Murdering Jews and the other so headed your family. Your mother's side was Jewish. Yes, yes, so what happens then to the Russians so? The Russian soul. Well, you know it's funny. A part of writing this book was kind of trying to reckon a I think it's subtitled reckoning because. It was an attempt to reckon with what that country means. WHOA, how Howard was formed, and it's also a nation of readers, a nation of people who? Love jokes anecdotes, and you know they are indeed a very soulful. People, but also simultaneously it is a country that has an uninterrupted history of despotism of cruelty of. Secret Police of. The government that treats its people essentially as vassals, and you know <hes>, so it is, it is a very. Confusing and ambivalent legacy, you

Soviet Union Russia writer America Michael Silver Blat Alex Halberstadt Tolstoy The New Yorker New York magazi KCRW Queens Queens County New York Alex Humber Moscow Stalin Alex New York City Land Foundation Alex. wrestling Hebrew International Aid Socie
Alex Halberstadt: "Young Heroes of the Soviet Union: A Memoir and a Reckoning"

Bookworm

06:31 min | Last month

Alex Halberstadt: "Young Heroes of the Soviet Union: A Memoir and a Reckoning"

"In the course of my reading. I found a recently published book by a writer who frequently appears in The New Yorker New York magazine in many of the glossies. He's a wonderful writer. His name is Alex. how number stat? He was born in the Soviet Union when it was the Soviet Union and he's written. A cross between memoir and history called Young Heroes of the Soviet Union. Since I, am myself of Russian descent and I know some little about what it was like to grow. Walk in the Soviet Union. I found the book. Fascinating. When learned. In its first stone ten pages. Than Alex Humber stance grandfather was one of Stalin's personal bodyguards. That he in this book would travel to the Soviet Union. To meet this previously, UNMET! This grandfather once combed his hair and gave him a bath. How old were you? Then I was three months old Michael. and. You had barely spent time with your biological father because he stayed in the Soviet Union while you and your mother and your mother's parents came to America. Yes, that's right, Michael? How old were you then? I was nine years old. And where did you lands? How did it go? Well we left Moscow in the fall of nineteen, seventy nine, and after about six months Austria in Italy. We ended up in Queens County New York. In addition to all the other things. I have in common with the writer of the spoke Alex. Halberstadt I grew up in Queens to not the same part of Queens and you grew up in the projects. Yes, I did I grew up in the ravens, wood houses, which were part of New York City public housing. Your family was helped to America by an agency. Whose what would you call it? Specialties central issue was helping Russian Jews to leave Russia. Yes, that's correct. It was called highest the Hebrew International Aid Society, and it's still it's still going strong and actually doing a lot of activism right now, behalf of immigrants and refugees now. Wake my audience up. What is it like for? Alex Halberstadt to wake up and find himself in America having grown up near to Moscow. was. It was wonderful. I'M NOT GONNA lie, you know as as a nine and ten year old I thought America was amazing. It was every every kid's dream. You know unlimited consumer goods based. Professional wrestling on television now it was really it was. It was a wonderland. You grew up. In Russia what did the Russian novel mean to you control? It was a huge. Influence on my life does go ski in particular but Tolstoy, so tell me about your relation to the Great Russian literature. I think my relationship was a little ambivalent I tried to read. And I think, I have read most of tolstoy industy upscale entered. In, Russia which took. Eventually started to take a lot longer than it did in English and I loved reading those books. But it kind of you know. I found that also a little confusing because it kind of. I think in some ways overlapped with my experience of having grown up in Russia and kind of taught me about kind of the version of Russia that I was that I only got to know through books. I lived there in the nineteen seventies during the heyday of Soviet Union. You know surrounded by. Socialist realism and this was kind of a rush that I was only getting to know through books innocent I? Think one the things that fascinates me about your book young. Heroes of the Soviet Union it's an memo R- and reckoning the subtitles The You Come. To consciousness. After the death of what I was taught growing up was the great solve fullness of Russia. The Soviet Union. With the secret police and the thongs. parentally, your grandfather was a murderous thug. he certainly was. Who was himself. Murdering Jews and the other so headed your family. Your mother's side was Jewish. Yes, yes, so what happens then to the Russians so? The Russian soul. Well, you know it's funny. A part of writing this book was kind of trying to reckon a I think it's subtitled reckoning because. It was an attempt to reckon with what that country means. WHOA, how Howard was formed, and it's also a nation of readers, a nation of people who? Love jokes anecdotes, and you know they are indeed a very soulful. People, but also simultaneously it is a country that has an uninterrupted history of despotism of cruelty of. Secret Police of. The government that treats its people essentially as vassals, and you know so it is, it is a very. Confusing and ambivalent legacy, you

Soviet Union Russia America Writer Alex Halberstadt Tolstoy Queens Alex Humber Queens County New York Secret Police Alex. The New Yorker New York Magazi Moscow Stalin Wrestling New York City Michael. Alex Hebrew International Aid Socie Ravens
The Chess Grandmasters Extreme Workout

ESPN Daily

05:32 min | Last month

The Chess Grandmasters Extreme Workout

"I. How did you get on the chess? Beat in the first place? So I get really interested in these really need sports that. People are super invested in Ashwari. Kumar is an international features writer for Espn Lake if you're going to which. Of People Are Watching these chess tournaments that you wouldn't even know where that's happening in. Iceland. Or Finland, and so I had this curiosity so I was thinking so Bobby Fisher was such a huge part of chests in the US what Ron Labor is tennis. What Jack Nicklaus's to golf? That's what Bobby Fischer is to chess. Bobby Fisher of the United States will finally meet Boris Spassky of the Soviet Union in Belgrade Yugoslavia, but the chess championship of the world plus a purse of one, hundred, thirty, eight, thousand five hundred dollars, the richest prize for a head-to-head confrontation in any sport, but boxing. So who is the next Bobby Fisher? So I went to Saint Louis last year to sort of figure out what is going on in the chess world, so saint Louis has sort of become this chess capital of the country. Let's start with the basics here. What is a chess grandmaster? And what does it take to become one? Usually what happens? Is this International Chess Federation F. And they have this point systems so chessplayers. Lead different tournaments in accumulate these spines that. Gets them to a certain level of expertise, and they are then title the grandmaster, which is in fact, the highest I do that. A chess player can be awarded by International Chess Federation usually these. Players between the age of ten and fourteen, and so they go through these rigorous tournaments one after the other parents take them all over the world. And the get the title by around thirteen fourteen, and then they start to perfect the art of being perfect, just player. So you mentioned Bobby Fisher. Who is probably the most famous chess player all time? Actually is definitely the most famous chess player of all time. Who are the stars of the field today? The poster by of chess is at the moment Magnus Carlsen. Calzon is the best in the world. The youngest number one ever and no one can explain to you how he does what he does. It seems to come from another world, which is why he's become known as the Mozart of chess. He's from Norway. He sort of had this. Has this bad boy live to him? He's like interesting. He'll drop these nuggets about other players. You make jokes about his opponents. He talks trash social chicken. How do you not? He's GonNa do the same. Yeah the lack of comas is astounding. And quite disappointing. He talks acts. Yeah for sure sorta like that kind of Worcester wise. He's called the golden boy of chess. And then this. Is. Bobby Ana crew art, there's this Chinese grandmaster Ding Laren and then USA's Wesley so and Kara Nakimora. Really Good Armenia has live on Romanian so these are some of like the famous players at the moment that go up against each other all the time. So I the grandmaster that you decided to focus on with your story, the one who lives in Saint Louis is actually Italian. His name is Fabiano Caruana. Who is in? How did he get here? Fabiano Caruana is the number two seed in the world. He's an Italian American chess grandmaster. He became a grandmaster at fourteen years of age, fourteen years, eleven, months, and twenty eight to be exact, and he at that time was the youngest grandmaster in the history of Italy in the United States. E was sort of beg to be the next big thing in in US chess and he came back now. He has an apartment in Saint Louis. He lives there and he sort of boot. BOOT his life from scratch, and he was never like the big personality like Norris Magnus columnist. He's the guy that will is very chill loves video games and let us work to the talk to his justice stories about that call in the next Bobby Fisher like the next big thing. He's the one person that can actually dig down. Magnus, Carlsen in the world championship and become the next world champion. So what does? Chess match in a grand masters tournament. Actually look like. How does it play out? Okay so two grandmasters shake each other's hands. sit down across from each other is chessboard. This o'clock next to them that the are constantly looking at. This goes on for at least six hours right every day, and so during these six hours, the brain has to have most oxygen supply. Which means your heart is functioning three times faster than on any given. And because of that sustained higher blood pressure, and sustained higher level of activity by the heart and the rain, the body goes through intense physical. Energy lost during. A chess game that lasts six to seven to sometimes eat hours said.

Bobby Fisher International Chess Federation Chess Fabiano Caruana United States Magnus Carlsen Saint Louis Bobby Ana Tennis Jack Nicklaus Ashwari Finland Iceland Espn Lake Kumar Boris Spassky Features Writer Norris Magnus Worcester
Vincent Brown discusses his new book, ‘Tacky’s Revolt’

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

05:58 min | Last month

Vincent Brown discusses his new book, ‘Tacky’s Revolt’

"Vincent Brown welcome to meet the rices. Slavery is war. Tell me what that means. Well. In the book. I tend to think of slavery itself as a state of war, and in that I'm following the enslaved themselves who often discuss slavery as a state of warfare amongst themselves, most famously allowed Equiano who we know as one of the most famous formerly enslaved abolitionists of the late eighteenth century British Atlantic. said in his autobiography that when you make people slaves. Them to live with you in a state of war. Now in that he was echoing the philosopher John Locke. Who said that what is slavery? But the state of war continued between what he thought was a lawful conqueror and the concord now John Locke was trying to legitimate slavery. He was an investor in the Royal African company, and he actually helped to write the constitution for the colony of south. Carolina, which became a slave state. State, but equiano was doing something a little bit different than John Locke. He was actually commenting upon the conditions of slavery, the violence that was required to maintain people in slavery and the kind of response that was bound to come by those people who had been subjected so violently so for him, slavery was a state of war, and there were other enslaved people who echoed. Seeing slavery that way helped me frame the slave revolt in Jamaica. In seventeen, sixty, seven, sixty, one, which was the largest in the eighteenth century, British Empire as a war itself right as one of a series of wars, all around the Atlantic world that then ed up in this conflict in seventeen sixty Jamaica I'd like to look at your own life, and where that intersects with war, because you grew up in San Diego, and in fact, it was very early on that. You became aware of conflicts. I did well. I'm an American citizen. I grew up in the United States. I was born in the late sixties at the height of the Vietnam War and I I'm sorry to say that I can't name a five year period when the US military hasn't been abroad somewhere engaged in conflict with somebody over the course of my entire life, which seems to me like a half century of war having. Having grown up in San Diego I grew up in one of the largest terry garrison towns really in the history of the world the US Navy is as a major base in San Diego. The US Marines just north of San Diego have a major base and so coming through high school. A lot of my friends would join the military because it was the big industry in town, right. And of course, you know, my family had been had served in the army. My father served in the army. My Uncle A. Brother had done three combat tours I. Believe one in Korea and two in Vietnam, so the history of the military, the engagement overseas abroad in military campaigns was very much a part of my thinking growing up, and so when I thought about the history of slavery. It just jumped out at me that this history was itself a history that was embroiled embedded in a world of warfare, especially in the eighteenth century win. You have got Great Britain struggling in a century long campaign against its its greatest global enemy France, and all of those European wars then topped onto. The wars of enslavement that sent people out across the Atlantic into the European colonies in America, and what you have is a world of wars within wars, which looked very familiar to me like the campaigns at the US was fighting within the larger ambit- of the Cold War so by the time I grew to adulthood in the late eighty S. I was seeing these these late cold war campaigns in these post colonial states as as part of the larger Cold War, and then you see these proxy wars between the US and the Soviet Union fought out in places like Afghanistan right, and then of course by two thousand one, you see those kind of proxy campaigns between the US and Soviet Union growing into something else what we now call the terror wars, the war on. On Terror in Afghanistan and elsewhere I didn't see those things as continuous. I didn't see the terror war something uniquely different from most proxy wars of the late. Cold War period and my thinking historically has been to ask the question. How is it that one connects these longer histories of warfare together? And I do think that I was inspired to think that partly by having grown up in San Diego in a military town. And what about your, your family's personal history with war and with slavery? Well an african-american! My parents grew up in Virginia, and so they are descended from people who are enslaved probably as far back as the eighteenth century the Chesapeake Bay area. What's now? Virginia and Maryland was one of the largest importers of slaves in North America now I say north. America because the British empire imported the vast majority of its enslaved peoples into the Caribbean but for North America the territories that became the United States, the Chesapeake and South Carolina with a major importers of enslaved African peoples, and my family is descended from. Those people probably brought to North America in the eighteenth century. History was big in your life obviously, but also the arch. Yeah well. When I was in high school I I became very involved in theater and went to college thinking that I was actually going to do a theater degree. But at some point I thought well, you know I could probably do theater without a theater degree, but maybe I should have a backup plan and my second love in college was history, and that ended up being my career.

United States San Diego John Locke Equiano North America America Vincent Brown Soviet Union Afghanistan Jamaica Atlantic Virginia Carolina Chesapeake South Carolina Chesapeake Bay Caribbean
Russia stages grand WWII parade ahead of vote on Putin Reforms

Ron St. Pierre

02:26 min | Last month

Russia stages grand WWII parade ahead of vote on Putin Reforms

"Russia stages a grand World War two parade and it comes ahead of a vote on a Vladimir Putin that could extend his rule for quite a long time and joining us now with details to some unknown fox news morning salmon morning run yes a baby a few days for about a minute to ten at the moment these are two really big events in the Russian calendar that would pose a spoon from as early as this year because of the corona virus outbreak first that parade yesterday which took place on the same day Russia's coronavirus case numbers past the six hundred thousand mark that imitated insisted that it was still the right time to host this parade there's barely a facemask insight is fourteen thousand soldiers troops across at red square in Moscow a spectacular at parade but striking for seemingly a lack of social distancing and coronavirus proportions taking place at this parade he didn't hailed the state union victory over the **** in nineteen forty five this is something that is celebrated every year in Russia the huge national holiday and this is the seventy fifth anniversary date a big round number the market and Putin told about how the Red Army stepped up and came to the world's defense in World War two he said it's impossible to imagine what would happen to the world if the Soviet Union hadn't been back to defend it that is something essential at the pigeon has tried to restate hi many game during his time in office yesterday said we must pass this on to our children grandchildren and great grandchildren so I shot of national pride one day before voting began this morning in the national referendum on reforming the constitution that the package of measures that Russians are being asked to vote on that taking the mole in one on one of these measures is to reset the clock on president Putin's time in office he's currently required to step down in twenty twenty four well this would mean if this passes in the next week or so he'll be allowed to stand and run for the two tabs and if he wins and didn't think anyone would will ask he would have ruled Russia thirty six years the time twenty thirty six comes and then the next step is to ten X. by the voting starts today spread over seven days to try and avoid crowds at the polling center the game because of the pandemic the main banking days next says that and can expect results shortly after that

Russia Vladimir Putin Moscow Red Army Soviet Union
Media, power, and political communication

Pat McDonough

04:16 min | Last month

Media, power, and political communication

"Let's talk about the media yeah the media is a powerful Trojan horse seven mereka if it's not a and I mean they have attacked president trump relentlessly yeah and the problem we have is we have fox okay yeah now fox is okay but Rupert Murdoch is ninety years old right and his two sons are liberals okay we have newsmax rage has been growing and that's a good thing yeah we have one America right which is a good thing but these are national programs they don't get into Vince's crab house they don't get in the fells point being close they don't get into those things go and they don't get into helping our people who need help to fight against the beast and as you pointed out the Baltimore sun doesn't report on any of these issues involving her son is one of them yeah right exactly the Baltimore sun is part of the super shadow government yeah they protect them yeah people say that the media has fallen in the tank for the left they fell in the tank for the Obama no the media never found the check for anybody the media are leaders in this offensive they are legally are part of the natural America they were and and they were targeted specifically for that purpose because of the vast influence they have they were targeted for subversion and infiltration by the Soviet Union in the nineteen thirties and we could go on for hours about how that happened and who infiltrated but just for example one person remember Edward R. Murrow of CBS Edward R. Murrow is one of the people primarily responsible for bringing communist it's two Columbia teachers college to begin inserting all of these destructive America narratives into our universities he was responsible for bringing those people over and he worked with a guy named Laurence Duggan whose son was an actual Soviet agent and he was friends with his son and he became a news anchor for CBS that's just one example there are many many trusted a man in America yeah right right he he gave the Vietnam War at eight a story that was a hundred and eighty degrees from what the truth was riled tell your doctor about with Walter Cronkite yeah that young people don't know who has what we member we only had three major networks in this country now I can tell you let me say some about yeah because the networks are required by FCC regulation as part of their contract to provide unbiased news nobody has ever called him that if I were in a position to do so I would pull their FCC licenses tomorrow and tell them that they better straighten out their newsrooms and start reporting what's going on because they should be challenged in the courts right absolutely be challenged because they have been really but they have such power and such influence and Americans have to get a constitutional public there operates through elections has to be given the facts at what's happened instead is they've been given the left narrative for sixty eighty years in World War two The New York Times was engaged in treason it was exposing things mark Levin's book yeah I mean it's just stunning it's stunning when CNN first started Ted Turner used to go on a show and he would bring some five Soviet KGB agents on the show with him had a first among them was Georgy Arbatov who is the head of member for US and Canada old KGB agent they would talk down president Reagan they would just sit there and terror attacks president right that was C. N. N. the communist news

The World is Watching Us

Why It Matters

03:46 min | Last month

The World is Watching Us

"Why it matters spends a lot of time discussing how things that happen around the world of us at home. It's kind of our thing. But today we're GONNA flip that around because the killing of George Floyd, the protests against police, brutality and systemic racism, and the administration's response are not only unfolding here in the united. States the world is listening to and depending on where you are, the echoes can sound different. To better understand how this is playing out, we turn to two American journalists who've spent their careers. Reporting abroad will ask them to give us their own thoughts and experiences, and to describe what America looks like right now through the eyes of those who are watching from afar. They told us to places Africa and Hong Kong. I'm Gabrielle Sierra and this is why it matters today. Diplomacy starts at home. This kind of reminds me how throughout history and on I've studied history and political science, and throughout history, America's goal and mission of trying to go around and promote democracy and human rights around the world has constantly been undercut by how they treat minorities and particularly African Americans at home. I'm Keith Rich Berg I'm currently the director of the journalism and Media Studies Center at the University of Hong Kong, but I spent most of my career about thirty four years as a reporter and correspondent for the Washington Post. During the Cold War The old Soviet Union. Propagandists used to take great pleasure in pointing out. How Black Americans were treated in the American south during the Jim. Crow, era. Know the propagandists during the Vietnam War would like to point out how American blacks were being treated that we were not able to really as strongly as we wanted to stand up against the apartheid regime in South Africa in its early days, because the apartheid regime in South Africa was in many ways modeled on the Jim Crow segregation laws of the American south, so I think throughout history, America's stated mission and goal of promoting democracy and Human Rights and Roosevelt's four freedoms around the world have constantly been undercut by enemies who are willing to point out the hypocrisy of America's positions in America's promotion of human rights by saying before You Cup lecture US wanted you deal with their own problems at home. It's quite painful for me because I do have both experiences you know living in, America when Nigeria I do have both us. I've experienced racism in America. My name is Chico Odwalla. I am an independent multimedia journalist I am based in West Africa and I cover the entire continent for various international media outlets. Killing of George Floyd was very jarring. It was a wakeup. It was a brutal awakening for people who actually don't quite believe. Racism is as real as African Americans say that it is. You still got people who don't believe. It's that strong. Who believe that it's from the past that there have been many moves towards overcoming you know some people still believe that. America is a post racial society so for this incident. This killing of George Florida's like Oh. Actually it's still there and we saw it on TV we saw this guy breathing for his life for nearly nine minutes. So that aspect it is a rude awakening. It's really provoking some nations to look inward. Look at their own injustice for example in France. A people they're calling for an end to the chokehold that some police officers us, and so they're having debates on how to handle people

America George Floyd Jim Crow Gabrielle Sierra Hong Kong Africa South Africa Washington Post West Africa Soviet Union France Keith Rich Berg University Of Hong Kong George Florida Chico Odwalla Nigeria Roosevelt
Surveyor 1 landed on moon - June 2, 1966

This Day in History Class

03:18 min | 2 months ago

Surveyor 1 landed on moon - June 2, 1966

"The Day was June second nineteen, sixty six. Nastase Lunar Lander Surveyor wine landed on the moon. The event marks the first time an American. Space probe made a successful soft landing on the moon. On February third nineteen, sixty six, the Soviet Union's Luna Nine, became the first spacecraft to make a soft landing on the moon. By this time, the Soviets and the Americans successfully crash-landed probes on the surface of the moon, but landing required something to cushion the landing like rockets as well as a way to send the information back to Earth. For Luna Nine, the entire spacecraft descended to the surface, but a landing capsule was ejected just before impact. NASA launched the Surveyor Program to demonstrate the feasibility of lunar surface landings. The program was also designed to get data and preparation for Nastase Apollo space, missions. Surveyor one was the first of the series of seven robotic spacecraft sent to the moon. As part of the program, it was designed as an engineering test flight for demonstration of its launch vehicle the Atlas-centaur, it also served to demonstrate the spacecraft's mid course and terminal maneuvers as well as radar in rocket controlled soft landing. Another one of the mission's objectives was to demonstrate the ability of the survey or communication system and deep space network to maintain communications with the spacecraft during its flight after a soft landing. The planning site for Surveyor. One was the southwest part of. The Laura Avast, dark plain on the western edge of the near side of the moon. surveyor-1 lifted off from Cape Kennedy on May Thirtieth Nineteen Sixty six. On June, second

Surveyor Program Lunar Lander Surveyor Luna Nine Soviet Union Nastase Apollo Cape Kennedy Nasa
Alligator rumored to have been Hitler's dies in Moscow

Orlando's Morning News

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

Alligator rumored to have been Hitler's dies in Moscow

"One alligator that many people believe once belonged to Adolf Hitler has died at the Moscow zoo the zoo said the alligator was about eighty four years old when he died on Friday its name was Saturday the zoo says Saddam was born in the U. S. and later sent to the Berlin zoo he later escaped when the zoo was bombed in nineteen forty three his whereabouts were unknown until three years later in nineteen forty six when British soldiers found him and gave him to the Soviet Union is it okay to be a fan of that Gator I mean if you survive a bombing and then you live into your eighties in your Gator I think that's an accomplishment you know it's an innocent animal I mean come complicit in any of this right just being a Gator right he didn't want to be Hitler's Hitler's Gator Gator you you just just want want to to be be a a catering catering live live long long time time we we should should put put up up a a plaque plaque for for him him over over lake lake Jesup Jesup why why because because there's there's thirteen thirteen thousand thousand other other Gators Gators lake lake Jesup Jesup that's that's why why

Adolf Hitler Saddam Soviet Union Jesup Jesup Moscow Berlin Lake Lake Jesup Jesup
Alligator Rumored To Have Been Hitler’s Dies in Moscow

Jay Talking

00:38 sec | 2 months ago

Alligator Rumored To Have Been Hitler’s Dies in Moscow

"An alligator rumored to have belonged to Adolf Hitler has died in Moscow Saturn was eighty four years old when he died at the Moscow zoo on Friday but the legend of the alligators past is still very much alive among Russians the reptiles said by the zoo to have been born in the United States and said to the Berlin zoo from which he escaped when the city was bombed in nineteen forty three Saturn turning up after the war founded nineteen forty six by British soldiers and given to the Soviet Union were a myth was born but the Gator was in the private election of Adolf Hitler zero giving the past alligator of past noting of animals it's absurd to blame them for humans

Adolf Hitler Moscow Zoo United States Berlin Zoo Soviet Union Moscow
Alligator rumored to have belonged to Hitler dies in Moscow

WBZ Afternoon News

00:38 sec | 2 months ago

Alligator rumored to have belonged to Hitler dies in Moscow

"An alligator rumored to have belonged to Adolf Hitler has died in Moscow Saturn was eighty four years old when he died at the Moscow zoo on Friday but the legend of the alligators past is still very much alive among Russians the reptiles said by the zoo's who have been born in the United States and sent to the Berlin zoo from which he escaped when the city was bombed in nineteen forty three Saturn turning up after the war fell to nineteen forty six by British soldiers and given to the Soviet Union were a myth was born but the Gator was in a private collection of Adolf Hitler zero giving the past alligator a pass noting of animals it's absurd to blame them for humans

Adolf Hitler Moscow Zoo United States Berlin Zoo Soviet Union Moscow
Leon Trotsky assassination attempt - May 24, 1940

This Day in History Class

03:45 min | 2 months ago

Leon Trotsky assassination attempt - May 24, 1940

"APP on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast. This Day in history class is a production of iheartradio. Hey y'all I'm eaves and welcome to this day in History Class. A podcast for people who could never know enough about history today is may twenty fourth twenty twenty. The Day was may twenty fourth nineteen forty Mexican artists. W fosse GAYDOS and Stalinist agent. Gula Vich along with a crew of hitmen attempted to donate Leon Trotsky Trotsky was a Soviet revolutionary and Marxist threats who was a leading figure in the Bolshevik movement under Vladimir Lenin after Lennon died in nineteen twenty four and Joseph. Stalin rose to power in the Communist Party in Soviet Union Chomsky emerged. As one of Stalin's main critics and opponents Trotsky was against the increasingly bureaucratic Soviet state and called for more democracy in the Communist Party. He thought that the Stalinist policy of socialism and one country would hinder efforts for World Revolution in Nineteen Twenty Five. Trotsky was removed from his post in the war commissariat. The next year he was dropped from the Polit Bureau and in nineteen twenty seven he and his supporters were expelled from the Communist Party. In January of Nineteen Twenty eight Trotsky was exiled to a tie and Soviet Central Asia. He lived there for a year before he his wife and their son were expelled from the Soviet Union and sent to Turkey but he continued to write and criticize Stalin as well as people who had opposed Stalin but has settled for the regime. Trotsky settled on the Turkey island of principle where he stayed for four years. He completed his autobiography and his three volume history of the Russian revolution some of his supporters volunteer to serve as his bodyguards but in nineteen three Chomsky and his family were offered asylum in France soon enough. He was no longer welcome in France either and he moved to Norway then Mexico where he had been granted asylum skis settled in Koya con area of Mexico City at the Blue House the home of painter Diego Rivera and free to Carlo and he continued to write completing the revolution betrayed in one thousand nine hundred eighty six but in a series of trials in the late. Nineteen thirties many so-called old bolsheviks were found guilty of treason and imprisoned or executed many of the defendants confessed to having plotted with Trotsky to kill Stalin and other Soviet leaders Trotsky was found guilty of treason in absentia and sentenced to death on May twenty fourth. Nineteen forty Stalinist agent. Iosif Grigorovich

Leon Trotsky Trotsky Stalin Communist Party Soviet Union Soviet Central Asia History Class Apple Gula Vich Chomsky Iosif Grigorovich Vladimir Lenin Turkey Island Turkey France Polit Bureau Diego Rivera Joseph Mexico City Mexico Koya
"soviet union" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

01:32 min | 6 months ago

"soviet union" Discussed on Dictators

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> for listening to dictators <Speech_Music_Male> next <Speech_Male> week. We'll turn <Speech_Male> our focus to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our third and final <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> world war a <Speech_Music_Male> two dictator <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Adolf Hitler. <Speech_Female> You can find <Speech_Female> all episodes of <Speech_Female> dictators <Speech_Female> other podcast <Speech_Female> originals <SpeakerChange> for free <Speech_Female> on spotify <Speech_Music_Male> mentally to <Speech_Male> spotify already. We <Speech_Male> have all of your favorite <Speech_Male> music but <Speech_Male> now spotify is <Speech_Male> making it easy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for you to enjoy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> all of your favorite <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> artist. Originals <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> like dictators <Speech_Music_Male> for free <Speech_Male> from your phone <Speech_Male> desktop <SpeakerChange> or <Speech_Female> smart speaker to <Speech_Female> stream dictators <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> on spotify. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Just open the APP <Speech_Music_Female> and type <SpeakerChange> dictators <Speech_Music_Male> in the search bar <Speech_Music_Male> and don't forget <Speech_Male> to follow us on facebook <Speech_Male> and Instagram Ram <Speech_Music_Male> at park asked <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and twitter <Speech_Male> at podcast network. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> We'll <Speech_Female> see you next time. <Speech_Female> Dictators <Speech_Female> was created by Max <Speech_Female> Cutler and is <Speech_Female> a podcast studios <Speech_Female> original <Speech_Female> it executive <Speech_Female> produced by Max <Speech_Female> Cutler sound <Speech_Female> design by Russell <Speech_Female> Nash With <Speech_Female> Production Assistance <Speech_Female> by Ron Shapiro <Speech_Female> Carly Madden <Speech_Music_Female> and Travis Clark <Speech_Music_Female> this. This <Speech_Female> episode of dictators <Speech_Female> was written by Joe <Speech_Female> Gara- with writing <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> assistance by <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Kate. Gallagher <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and stars <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Kate Leonard <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Richard Rosner <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thanks <Speech_Music_Male> to our sponsor better <Speech_Music_Male> for it a new <Speech_Music_Male> podcast from ADP <Speech_Music_Male> each episode features. <Speech_Male> Visionaries talking <Speech_Male> candidly about mistakes. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> They've made in their businesses businesses. <Speech_Music_Male> How <Speech_Music_Male> they worked their way through them <Speech_Music_Male> and came out <Speech_Music_Male> better for it? <Speech_Music_Male> Listen on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.

"soviet union" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

11:04 min | 6 months ago

"soviet union" Discussed on Dictators

"Welcome to dictators. Apar- cast original. I'm Richard and I'm kate on this show. We're going deep into the minds of some of history's most hated despots. For our our first six episodes were exploring the lives of World War. Two's major dictators Benito Mussolini Joseph Stalin and Adolf Hitler. You can find all episodes of dictators and all other podcast originals for free on spotify to stream dictators for free on spotify. Just open the YEP and type dictators in the search bar at podcast. We are grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at park cast and twitter at podcast network. And if you enjoyed today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review. Wherever you're listening? It really does help. This is our second and final episode. On Joseph Stalin. Last week we explored Lord Stalin's rise from Marxist revolutionary to leader of the Soviet Union. This week we'll explore how he ruthlessly suppressed dissent at home to maintained his control and miraculously emerged from World War. Two as one of the most powerful men in the world by the beginning of nineteen twenty eight forty nine year old Joseph Stalin de facto leader of the Soviet Union at squashed his political political rivals. Common yet Zinoviev and most importantly Trotsky were either exiled from the Soviet Union or had their voices dropped to only a whisper. Spur within the government. The route from Georgia who rose up the ranks within the Bolshevik cause was now ruling with an iron fist. Now that he he was in power. Stalin began crafting. The Soviet political ideology Marxism Leninism. This specific philosophy wasn't technically around. During Ring Lennon's time he simply called himself a Marxist. It was Stalin who shape the notion of marxism-leninism though we could spend hours discussing dissing the particulars. This philosophy can be summed up in four key aspects. I A one party system. In this case the communist Communist Party would be the only political party in Russia second continued class warfare. Stalin believed that bourgeois ideals could seep seep into the cracks of Russian society. At any moment it was important to stamp it out before any problems began third dialectical materialism awesome in essence. This means pudding science logic and materialism above religion. Soviet policy was to enforce state. Atheism Awesome and root out any religion and forth an economy that is entirely run by the state. Stalin knew that the Soviet Union was way behind the times when it came to industrialization as leader. He was determined to catch up with the rest of the world. What he proposed was the first of many five five year plans and it was through these policies that are brutal off? Shoot of Marxism. Leninism would rise Stalinism. A few years before his death Lennon had enacted the new economic policy as a way to jumpstart the Soviet. Economy me it temporarily brought back free trade. In Agriculture and gave peasants private ownership of their farms with Stalin fully at the helm helm. It was time to do away with the N. E. P. in its place was the first five year plan which lasted from nineteen twenty eight to nineteen thirty to the key. Goals were rapid industrialization and agricultural collectivisation the industrialization aspect got off to a slow start art. The Soviet Union barely produced more steel or iron in nineteen twenty nine than it had in the early nineteen ten's but as time progressed first manufacturing in all areas increased exponentially the second area was collectivisation basically farms weren't operated needed by individual farmers but in groups there were two types of collective call who's which were like co-ops and soft who's which were state run like the industrial policies. This move was meant to increase production at the beginning of nineteen thirty. Three Stalin declare that the first five five year plan was a success. Oil production had nearly doubled. Steel output went from four million tons to six million tons a year. Whole cities were erected from nothing? The Turks Siberian railway had been constructed in its entirety and millions flocked walked from the countryside into urban dwellings. It's widely believed that. These numbers were inflated but Stalin had still made good on his promise he was. He's on his way to turning the USSR into a modern nation. But with the good comes the bad one of the effects acts of Lenin's new economic policy was the creation of a new class known as kulaks. These were basically peasants who owned property. The and employed one or two workers in Stalin's eyes they were essentially small. Scale capitalists and an enemy of the Soviets the collectivisation of farms was meant to end the Kulak class. kulaks were violently forced to hand over their land to the government. They weren't even allowed to participate in the new co ops instead they were either executed exiled or forced into gulags Kalinin had originally created the Gulags as labor camps for political enemies during the civil war but under Stalin's reign they were greatly expanded to to include anyone deemed an enemy of the state a term. That was liberally applied. Thanks to Stalin's collectivisation. Millions of farmers were killed in the gulags or by execution and millions more died in one of the worst famines in Russian history nineteen thirty two and one thousand nine hundred thirty three the Russian countryside of Ukraine Kazakhstan the Volga region and northern caucuses saw tidal wave of food food shortages as flocks of people made their way into the newly industrialized cities. The government demanded a higher quota of food and the remaining farmers had had a difficult time meeting it. The government had also sold off agricultural products like grain to foreign markets to help pay for Stalin's Industrial Austria projects. There was also the fact that many farmers didn't want to join a collective in Ukraine. The farmers revolted others simply drop up there plow and walked away creating a lack of labor. My nineteen thirty to the food supply ran out while grain was being held in guarded silos lows for urban consumption. The countryside was left to fend for themselves. The catastrophic result was the death of an estimated seven Million people some have claimed that Stalin purposely initiated the famine but historians. Stephen Kotkin argues that Stalin simply miscalculated aided the outcome of forced collectivisation he envisioned enormous farms producing an abundance of food. What he didn't count on was the high demand in the cities were the pushback from farmers who didn't want to collectivize Stalin's initial reaction to the famine was to blame the workers? He claimed that farmers immersed ditching their land were lazy and therefore enemies of the people and enemies of the people were either sent to Gulags or found a bullet in the back of their head behind the scenes. Stalin desperately made trade deals with other countries for aid. He returned over five five million tons of grain held in storage back to farmers but the damage was already done however despite the millions of casualties he's Stalin's still saw the first five year plan as a success. He accomplished his goals. The kulaks were virtually no more and the Soviet. LVN Union had made strides toward modernization from his foreign hideouts. Trotsky observes Stalin's rule in horror in his opinion Stalinism. Zimmer wasn't even socialism it was state run capitalism Stalin operated not with the working class but over the working class exploiting employing them like any other bourgeois leader and Trotsky made sure the world knew what he thought drodskie's inflammatory writings angered Stalin. To no end he hated that his old rival was still alive and still good with a pen even if he was in exile Trotsky still well had the power to persuade. It wasn't long before Stalin convinced himself that Trotsky was plotting a coup and that the so-called conspiracy had had members within the ranks of the Russian Communist Party this paranoia culminated in the great purge which began with the assassination of Sergei Kirov on December First Nineteen thirty four cure of was a high ranking member of the Polish bureau. As well as Chairman Woman of the Communist Party in Leningrad formerly known as Petrograd. He was an ally of Stalin's but he was gaining allies of his own on Stalin. Saw Him as a threat. It's widely believed that cure O's death was orchestrated by Stalin however Stalin blamed the opposition in for the murder response instructed the N. K. V. The Soviet secret police to round up all suspected enemies of the state this included his former allies Nikolai Bukharin. Love common you have and Grigory Zinoviev as well as anyone. Anyone who considered themselves a follower of Trotsky in August nineteen thirty six the first of the Moscow show trials began these is trials had predetermined verdicts but gave off the appearance of being fair. The first to be tried were common. You have and Zinoviev along with fourteen in others. Even though there was no actual evidence of the elaborate plot both men confessed to conspiring with Trotsky to kill L. Stalin on August twenty fifth.

Benito Mussolini Joseph Stalin Soviet Union Joseph Stalin collectivize Stalin Trotsky Grigory Zinoviev Ring Lennon communist Communist Party spotify Russian Communist Party Apar Richard Communist Party Adolf Hitler Zinoviev facebook twitter Georgia Russia
"soviet union" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

10:46 min | 6 months ago

"soviet union" Discussed on Dictators

"This Scott Lennon's attention. It's believed that during their second meeting in April nineteen six six lennon gave so so his blessing to continue with the bank robberies as historian. Simon Siebert Montefiore notes. This was the first time that linen observed Stalin's value as a ruthless underground operator. It isn't hard to imagine a sense of pride in getting such an order from his political. The hero returning to Georgia so so amped up his bank robberies within a few short months he added piracy on the Black Sea to his roster of activities as he understood it his role was to help fund the Marxist Revolution by whatever means necessary between the violence violence that came with the nineteen o five revolution and dangerous robberies that followed Sosas outlook on human life and death seems to have darkened so when he heard about the death of one of his men he allegedly said what can we do. One can't pick a rose without pricking oneself on a thorn born leaves fall from the tree and autumn but fresh ones grow in spring. When he'd converted to Marxism he knew the proletarian revolution was going going to be bloody as someone who had grown up surrounded by violence? He had no problem being the man to Dole it out. That was just the way it had to be in May one thousand nine hundred seven so attended the fifth. RSD LP Congress in London at one point during the conference he saw a man walking to the podium whom he'd never seen before he had a wild poof of hair and he walked with an arrogance that made so so immediately hate him he turned to a comrade and asked who the man was. It was Lev Bronstein better known as Leon Trotsky and I didn't no time at all he would become so so's sworn enemy. I mean up. So so Lenin. And Trotsky jeep put an end to a three hundred year old dynasty now back to the story in May Nineteen O Seven twenty-eight-year-old eight-year-old Yosef Ju- casually known to his friends as so so was in London for the fifth congress of the Russian Social Democratic Labour Party. For nearly a decade he had dedicated his life to the Russian Marxist cause of taking down the ruling class his modus operandi was was terrorism bank robbery and extortion but the star of the fifth. Congress wasn't so so far from it. That honor belonged to another Leon. Trotsky Comrade Trotsky was at the time as well known as Lenin Markov undoubtedly the most gifted the writer of the 'cause the mensheviks citing Trotsky relished his celebrity during the nineteen o five revolution Trotsky made a name for himself by championing pinning an aspect of Marxism. That would one day bear his name permanent revolution. He didn't just want Marxism in Russia. He wanted it around the globe. Russia was only the first domino for the rest of his life. Trotsky would advocate for constant revolution making enemies among his fellow revolutionaries in the process. Stalin hated him the moment he saw him. The feeling wasn't quite reciprocated. Trotsky claims he doesn't remember meeting Stalin at the conference at all. This may be because even though so so attended the congress. He didn't speak at it. His head was back in Georgia. Planning more robberies from nine hundred ninety eight to nineteen eleven socio so so continued to play the role of Lennon's gangster robbing and extorting oil tycoons around Georgia at one point. He robbed the TIFF Lewis Bank which yielded ended him the equivalent of four million dollars today and the ire of the more moderate mensheviks who vehemently opposed his violent tactics despite eight not being as well known as Lenin. Marta the Trotsky so so was making a name for himself among the Bolsheviks his banditry and his ability to escape escaped police custody gave him a romantic allure more importantly it proved that he was more than just a faceless party member his his work was rewarded in September. Nineteen eleven when he was invited to join the Central Committee the Executive Council of the RSD LP his opportunities wbur -tunities grew at the beginning of nineteen twelve when the Bolsheviks gained control of the entire Party. One of the first things Lennon did was turned the popular periodical Pravda into a mouthpiece for the Bolshevik movement so so was given the job of editor. He quickly took to writing articles news and seemed to enjoy the new role he played for the movement. But historian Simon Seebeck Montefiore notes that in much of his writing so-so reveals his cynical view of diplomacy and his belief in doublespeak long before or will coined the term for example so so wrote when bourgeoisie diplomats. Prepare for war. They shout loudly about peace. A diplomats words must contradict his deeds. Otherwise what sort the diplomat is he. Fine words are a mask to conceal shady deeds. A sincere diplomat is like dry water or wooded iron of course not everyone was enthralled with his writings Trotsky famously called them the language of tiff Lewis Seminary Hamels six but the only audience member he really cared about appeasing was of course Lennon around this time Lennon was struggling. To develop the Bolshevik view on nationalities in a country as diverse as Russia he feared that ethnic divides could undermine class warfare knowing that so so came from a diverse region. Lennon asked if he would be willing to write a treatise on the subject so so instantly said yes a few months later he published one of his most important important works Marxism and the national question. In so SOS view the key word in defining a nation one is territory. Ethnic Russians born and raised in America or Canada weren't rushing by nationality. But American or Canadian they would have much more in common with their neighbors their than with say someone living in Moscow. What this means in practice? It doesn't matter if if you're Georgian Armenian or Jewish if you live in Russia you're a Russian first and foremost while Marxism and the national question would prove moved to be a seminal work in Marxist theory it is most remembered for being the first major publication in which so used his nom diplom- Stalin dolon taken from the Russian word for man of steel. The positive reaction to the pamphlet convinced so-so to take Stalin as his permanent cerny. Unfortunately the success would be short lived on February twenty third nineteen thirteen Stalin attended a Bolshevik masquerade party. An event that he had no desire to attend he was only convinced to go by a friend and fellow. Central Committee member Roman Malinowski at around midnight. The party was suddenly crashed by the Krahn. The Russian secret police. They were looking for Stalin. He attempted to escape wearing women's clothing but he didn't get very far now in custody. Stalin was sentenced to four years of exile in an area of Siberia known says to ask the location was chosen specifically because it was near the Arctic circle the rough tunder like terrain would make it impossible. Oh for even Stalin to escape the whole mess grade party had been a setup. Roman Malinowski was actually a double agent for the Oh chronic. Uh for three years. He not only spied on his comrades but climbed the ranks with the Bolsheviks while doing it he was even elected to the State Duma. According to historian Simon Seabed Monta fury the Malinowski case played its role in making Stalin and his comrades obsessively paranoid paranoid. Like Banquo's ghost. He haunted Soviet history. Stalin would never forget that someone. He trusted a brother in the fight against the bourgeoisie was a traitor. While the other leaders of the revolution continued to work both at home and abroad. Stalin survived vives in Siberia. Ironically these years would provide him with some of his happiest memories later in life he would tell stories of his time as a rugged rugged hunter like a lone gunman in the West or Ronin in the east in time. Almost all of the major revolutionaries were exiled missile during the outbreak of World War. One Stalin was in the north. Lenin was in Switzerland and Trotsky bounced around Europe World War One was wildly unpopular with the Russian people for three years. They suffered heavily against the Germans. Antiwar Fervor was growing and in one thousand nine hundred seventeen the powder keg was let on March second. A telegram arrived declaring that all exiles were to be freed need a few hours later. Stalin found out why after mass protests in Petrograd czar nicholas the second had abdicated the throne thrown Romanov dynasty was over the revolution. Nineteen seventeen was arguably the most chaotic year in Russian history. From February to October confusion reigned about the future of the country's leadership tip a provisional government was established but it was immediately doomed because of the various political factions vying for power the Bolsheviks always. He's had an uphill battle because they were in the minority they not only had to contend with the mensheviks but also various other liberal conservative and less radical socialist groups..

Stalin Comrade Trotsky Scott Lennon Lenin Markov Russia Congress Georgia Simon Siebert Montefiore Central Committee Russian Social Democratic Labo Roman Malinowski Black Sea Lev Bronstein Simon Seebeck Montefiore Dole Moscow entire Party London robbery
"soviet union" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

03:05 min | 6 months ago

"soviet union" Discussed on Dictators

"January Twenty First Nineteen twenty four Moscow at the Grand Bolshoi theatre the eleventh all. Russia congress of Soviets was well underway. All the most important government leaders were in attendance Gregori Zinoviev live Kanye of Nikolai Bukharin. And the imposing man from Georgia General Secretary Joseph Stalin Ellen. The conference was in the thick of discussion when they were interrupted by an urgent phone. Call it was for Stalin. He took the receiver and spoke quietly. The other leaders didn't know what the call was about but from the look on his face. It was serious when he hung up he turn to the theater of over sixteen hundred men and announced Ladimir. Lenin was dead. The crowd broke into tears and shock. Doc Stalin was STOIC but his mind was racing in the last few years. He'd made sure to position himself as Lennon's natural successor assessor. He was already the leader of the Soviet Union in all but name and soon it would be official. No one was going to stand hand in his way and if they tried. Welcome to dictators apar- cast original. I'm Richard and I'm kate on this show. Were going deep into the minds. Of some of history's freeze most hated despots. For our first six episodes were exploring the lives of World War. Two's major dictators Benito Mussolini Joseph Assists Stalin and Adolf Hitler. You can find all episodes of dictators and all other podcast originals for free on spotify to stream dictators as for free on spotify. Just open the APP and type dictators in the search bar at park cast. We are grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at par cast and twitter at podcast network. And if you enjoyed today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review. Wherever you're listening? It really does help today. Were diving into the rise of Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin from his humble yet consequential beginnings in Georgia to his rise in the ranks of the Bolshevik party. Finally we'll explore his feud with Leon Trotsky Trotsky the rival who stood between him and total power next week. We'll explore Stalin's time incomplete control how his policies led to the deaths of millions how his paranoia resulted in the murder of any and all political enemies and how victory in World War Two who established a decades long Cold War with the United States.

Benito Mussolini Joseph Assist General Secretary Joseph Stali Leon Trotsky Trotsky Nikolai Bukharin Georgia Grand Bolshoi theatre Gregori Zinoviev Moscow Soviet Union Russia Kanye Bolshevik party spotify Lenin Adolf Hitler facebook twitter Richard
"soviet union" Discussed on The Classicist

The Classicist

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union" Discussed on The Classicist

"The courts and so there was a very small a number of decision makers and when you look at operation barbarossa the idea that the soviet union could be invaded on a sixteen hundred mile front even though it was the largest invasion in history three and a half million people but the soviet union was so vast and there were no german reserves and there were been there had been voices cases of dissent gentle dairy and said you know they have something called the t thirty four tank. That's better than anything that we have anything that we have on the drawing boards and he he was dismissed as sort of a wigner alarmist and so there was an by the same token people had gone to stalin and said richard sergey our plant plant in the tokyo embassy has has outlined this whole invasion and we know what hitler's doing he's going to invade us along this huge european front and stolen had people shot because he thought that they were agents from britain or the united states trying to stir up oh civil war but of what he would call internet's in war between two authoritarian powers first and then more importantly they sort of mirror image themselves because they were not only both suspicious of one another but they both employed the same means earnings and by that i mean it was once asked what would he do stall on if he won and he said well i'll give i'd give them a nice retirement doc under lock and key but of when i get a hold of roosevelt and churchill i'll hang both of them because stolen as a genius. He was not afraid to kill twenty million people so they had a very very sick admiration for one another because they were although their ideologies were dissimilar. Their methodologies were almost identical in the final question that i'll put you world war two occupies a fundamentally different place in the american psyche other modern wars it still valorize in popular culture. It's really the only war within living memory that is almost always thought of as a source of national pride in a lot of that probably goes to the extremity. How many of the war how sharp the moral contract was between the combatants how dramatic the stakes were the holocaust how implausible any of the alternatives to war really seem but moose wars. Don't come quite to that level of clarity. I mean if you think of almost everything that followed korea vietnam. The first gulf war was maybe a little less ambiguous but it almost most kind of seems forgotten now <hes> afghanistan iraq so my question for you. Is it a mistake for americans to judge edged the value of a war by how it compares to world war two given that it was such an outlier. Is that setting the bar too high or is that sort of precisely why it's valuable well. It's a war that played uniquely american strengths of industrial production firepower <hes> logistics and so there there were no restraints on it once we were attacked then we've had the moral high ground hitler declared war against us. We didn't claire war against hitler. Same is true against against mussalini so we had moral clarity as you point out but then there was no idea that anybody had nuclear weapons except eventually aas and there was going to be the this was a nation that was butchering thousands and tens of thousands and millions of people that were innocent. Civilians of the sixty five million dead world war two seventy percent of them rant civilians so this chang was true of japan that was butchering fifteen million in china so the american public thought thought we were attacked there are no restraints on our response and our response even if it turns out to be quite punitive and quite deadly is is going to be a moral act because it's going to prevent these awful regimes from killing more people so the more germans japanese that we kill the more innocence live live and that was unique because we've never had a war before where the united states was attacked <hes> first and then second where where there was no nuclear restraint on the logical expression of american firepower and then three this isn't a war to be fought in the jungles tells of yet nam or right along the chinese border <hes> korea or out in afghanistan. It was a conventional war where we had easily easily. <hes> supplied areas north africa or the solomons are the philippines or europe and we could use conventional firepower so it wasn't a war where you know we saw iraq or as what donald trump said the other day about afghanistan i could i could blow up and kill ten million people but we can't do that. So then we fight these wars on the terms of our enemies in that usually means it's asymmetrical uninvolved civilians and press coverage and the entire masks asks that we've seen in the last seventy five years afterward to you've been listening to the classes this podcast with victor davis hanson remember you can read victor's work get defining ideas at hoover dot org as well as victor hansen dot com and if you enjoy classes is please.

soviet union hitler afghanistan richard sergey korea united states victor davis hanson victor hansen tokyo stalin donald trump roosevelt hoover dot europe philippines britain victor
"soviet union" Discussed on The Classicist

The Classicist

12:07 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union" Discussed on The Classicist

"Victor. We are recording this on the eve of the eightieth anniversary of the molotovribbentrop pack. This was the nonaggression shen treaty between germany and the soviet union in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine which huge influence on the eventual shape of world war two both because of what it allowed hitler to to accomplish in the short run as he swept through western europe and then of course later on for how it came back to bite stalin and the soviets a couple years later <hes>. You wrote a column about this recently gently. It's also discussed a bid a new or recent book the second world wars ab. There's a lot here. I i want to start with the context around this packed at at the time. This agreement was almost incomprehensible to shock the rest of the world. This was a thing that people thought could not happen. Why was that well because the international communist movement the comintern had assured the world that the soviet union was <hes> the the moral and and legal opponent or impediment to fascism in italy and japan and germany and then suddenly in august twenty third nineteen thirty nine and it cut a deal a non-aggression track that said that neither side would join in a war against each other or aid other <hes> their own allies to attack one another and it just it just made everybody in the communist movement worldwide panicked because they had bragged so much about stalling the resistance a hitler and now he was a partner of hitler and then the same token british and french foreign policy had been sort of reliant on the soviet union sometimes in a cynical way. They thought you know what's really protecting us. From hitler is not so much the democracies on the continent belgium denmark <hes> the netherlands france etc but the fear of this huge soviet union to the rich of germany and the memories of world war one in which germany fought at two funt worn exhausted itself once that was that that assurance was dissipated there. It was just a panic throughout the western world as well as the communist world. Joe stalin is no babe in the woods. This is a man who is totally at home with with conning with deception within humanity. How is it that he so badly misreads hitler well he. He wasn't so much misreading this reading hitler as he understood what hitler was about but he thought that hitler could a massage and other words once they sign that pat he rightly expected that when he invaded poland on the seventeenth of september and they carved up poland then hitler would turn west and he had remembered world war one on with four years of just awful trench warfare that had taken over two million <hes> casualties on infringement and britain and in france and britain so he was thinking that <hes> these capitalist democracies will fight this fascist germany and italy will join in and they'll be a total bloodbath and it will destroy both the axis and the democracies and then i can come in and clean up in the west or at least i won't be threatened and then of course he had <hes> grievances against poland since the nineteen twenties war in which poland did pretty well to establish its independence. That's from the new soviet union so he wanted to get territory back from poland. He wanted hitler to turn west he wanted france and britain and the continental democracies to be exhausted and he wanted them also to weaken germany and then there was one other <hes> consideration consideration that was just as important at that time he was had been fighting a pretty bloody war along the maturity and mongolian border with japan and japan pan was sort of not doing all that well because they were very good with air power naval but not so good with traditional armor and artillery and where the russians nations were pretty strong but the japanese had figured that the soviet union would never be able to bring troops across the siberian railroad railroad and reinforce martial sukhov because they were worried about germany suddenly when japan's erstwhile partner in the pack act which was the pact of steel when they betrayed japan then japan just collapsed and said you know what i'm not gonna fight here anymore. In withdrew russo stalin for stalin it was a win win situation he he got rid of japanese war and got part of poland and then he got the assurance that germany would waste itself destroying his enemies in the capital's world and western europe to the point that you just made especially as regards ars japan you say in the piece you wrote that you can draw a line from molotovribbentrop and in subsequent violation almost all the way through the war that a tremendous mendes amount of how world war two eventually played out owed to this agreement and what happened afterwards including the fact that it became a global war rather rather than something that was limited to europe so explain how these decisions ended up shaping so much of what came afterwards were once they've made that partnership there was no longer any naive idealism among socialists and communists in the west they had tried to tell these elected governments in europe and great britain that the soviet union was a friend and now they knew that it was not a friend so when hitler when thought that he had got a stalin's guard down through this year and a half of nonaggression pacts he would eventually of invade and when he invaded although the allies would supply about a quarter of the military needs of the soviet union they were perfectly happy for germany and russia to exhaust themselves on the eastern front run in the way that stalin had assumed would happen to them and when stolen kept complaining. We want a second front. We want a second front churchill on more than one occasion occasions had looked when we were being bombed. You were supplying wheat and oil and coal and steel to the country that was using those materials to destroy us us and so we're going to help you but we don't have any sympathy and you have no position to fall off because you were an ally of our enemy and so it kind you've made the allies cynical but more mmediately wants. His pact was signed than hitler saw. There was no impediment at all going to war. There was no downside onside so he invaded seven days later. Poland was attacked within three weeks by russia and it was easily carved served up hungary romania capitulated or capitulate in the sense that they're fascist governments now joined hitler and everybody the assumed that he would turn west and when he did turn west he had no worries about an eastern front so we could do so with three invaded france with nearly only two million people and there was nothing stopping him and the same token <hes> it it sort of preempted wanted <hes> explains the preemption edge at pearl harbor because the japanese army was sort of discredited now and there was a big argument among the japanese foreign minister and <hes> what would become the japanese military government and eventually under tow joe and the argument was you said that you would be successful in <hes> attacking the soviet union from the west with the expectation that germany would join you and we we could carve it up but look what's happened to betrayed you and so there was a radical shift in the early nineteen forty. One with japanese signed their own nonaggression pact. I think it was on april thirteenth of nineteen forty one at that moment two things happen. There would never be an attack on russia from two sides or hitler. I i thought that that was okay. He didn't want to share the spoils of an easy victory but he would come to rule that very quickly and thought my gosh had we had not had the molotovribbentrop packed. Act japan might have stayed on the manchurian border. Now we would be squeezing them that didn't happen but it also had deleterious effect on britain and the united states spike turning <hes> the attention to a naval and air war and in this case adam modo said look in terms of tanks and trucks and artillery are vastly outclass by western powers in terms of aircraft carriers fighter aircraft battleships ups we are <hes> we have achieved parody so we're going to shift over from <hes> fighting the soviet union and we're gonna fight the united states and britain and it's going to be easier because in ironic way there is no more colonial presence by april nineteen forty one in the pacific. The japanese were i in the results of the molotovribbentrop. Pacman said you know what colonial france doesn't exist. Colonial denmark does not exist post colonial. <hes> belgium does not exist at the colonial dutch do not exist so all of a sudden indonesia was wide open and they thought ought french indochina especially cambodia vietnam rich and erase indochina the dutch indies were rich and oil and they looked at britain being under the blitz and they thought you know what singapore and burma's open and they only made one mistake in that was instead of tiptoeing around pearl harbor and the philippines they got greedy and tried to you get it all at once whereas they just taken the oil in the duchy cindy's and the rice and south east asia and the rubber and burma they could have handled without getting the war with the united states there was one other weird oddity about this pact and that was for the next four years you would see liberty indian freedom ships leaving west coast ports and portland seattle and checkland and they would be loaded with lend lease materials deteriorate to russia and when they got out in the pacific they would fly russian flags or they'd have russian crews sometimes and they would go right by areas where the japanese not only controlled <hes> territorial waters but they were fighting the americans and they were unharmed so think about that the japanese opne submarines and carriers were attacking u._s. <hes> transport vessels in the pacific and yet when a russian flag vessel went by they had a free hand all the way to vladislav iq in the western port of russia so eastern puerto russia so it was it was surreal how this pact packed led to a lot of other quirky taxes well when we're thinking of these two leaders of of hitler and stalin that to what degree did ideology eiji play a role in their decision making i'm thinking here of your book carnage and culture where you talk about how cultural values can feed military success or failure as the case may be so apart apart from the nefarious of their ends are there ways in which nazi ideology in germany or communist ideology in the soviet union actually impeded their ability to effectively. If we prosecute the war there was in both cases because <hes> they were not part of a constitutional consensual consensual dialectic and by that i mean there wasn't a joint chiefs that argued with an elected senate or had an oversight committee looking at corruption are are there was a there wasn't a pentagon where it was intern funded by a legislative branch overlooked by.

hitler soviet union germany russo stalin poland japan europe britain russia belgium italy partner Victor. comintern burma east asia denmark dutch indies
"soviet union" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Had in the Soviet Union but I think all well I think that's where we get if memory serves me right the concept of the memory hole from nineteen eighty four this is hold inconvenient facts it just dropped in to to be forgotten including inconvenient people that practice they had in the Soviet Union there was a whole specialization there were people who were trained in how to airbrush people out of photographs how to remove remove them when when Trotsky became de classe when he became an enemy of the regime he has to be brushed out he had to be removed from all those photographs next to Stalin next to land in the why am I not surprised Elizabeth Warren is clearly very adept at deep six sing things into the memory hole this is a report from shop cross we like Chuck Rossi's at the daily Cola Elizabeth Warren has scrubbed her website of her native American DNA results why would that be if you go to her campaign website now they've all been removed as if they never could now let's just remind ourselves who this woman is in nineteen eighty six Elizabeth Warren listed herself on the Texas state bar registration form as native American Harvard Law School referred to her as the schools only native American professor as recently as nineteen ninety six Elizabeth Warren also listed herself in the association of American law schools directory as a minority member from nineteen eighty six to nineteen ninety four then she took a test and actually filled this is the stunning thing she filmed the conversation she had with the company with the person who did the test which revealed that she was zero point one percent of native American ancestry which led the Cherokee Nation to issue a statement last year that said her claim this for being native American were quote on quote in the appropriate all of the sections that referred to this heritage of Elizabeth Warren's have disappeared from her website as of this weekend how does she get away with it she gets away with it with a compliant media collaborates is in the fake news industrial complex let's look let's look at her colleagues and what they said recently to turning point U. S. Hey turning point USA was at the I will fare it took a camera in the US given the recent violent events in Portland given the attack on and the note given the and T. for of tack on an ice facility by a man who was trying to blow it up with an industrial sized propane tank who was killed as he tried to initiate that explosion a reasonable question was asked by turning point USA what do you think of and T. for and are you prepared to disavow them as a left wing organization that the audio isn't the best because it is the Iowa fan but it's important to listen to the reactions about a lease to the names in order the reactions are from Jenna brand the blouse CEO who will we will mention momentarily Bernie Saunders who then Castro he's the one who laughs at the question Cory Booker crystal magic crystal Williamson and then in sleep by the Yang and delaying the whole refused to denounce anti for but just listen to the audio yourself Cup for I was wondering if you could take.

Soviet Union one percent
"soviet union" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

13:55 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The paranormal desk at the FBI in his investigations helped inspire the very successful television show, the x files and this led to his nickname, the X man, of course, Jon desouza back on coast to coast. John. Welcome back. My friend. George. Thank you so much merry Christmas YouTube here with how was your Christmas. It was terrific traveling around on these conferences trying to spread the word people on Wala JI and paranormal Exo politics things of that sort. Tell me you were in China. John, george. Yeah. What's going on out there? I'll tell you a lot going on. Apparently, this is like for those who are who are more mature this is like a purse troika during the Soviet Union Soviet Union when Gorbachev decided to open up the new openness is what I recommend during the I think it eighty late eighties. When she did that. And apparently, the Chinese government has decided to approve these follow and consciousness conferences to go forward everywhere in China, and it is an amazing opening that is going on. I mean, this is the first time that I know of that we've had a general conference on policy and consciousness topics in China from Beijing Shanghai. And it is opening up a whole new world for these people in China over a billion people, and they are. Are starving and hungry for this sort of thing, and it is going to be opening up many. More conferences, like the one that I was able to do just recently for a few weeks with Dr Michael Saleh had Laura Eisenhower, which was called the galactic exploration conference. And it was amazing time. It was an amazing opening of these topics for the Chinese are locals, and they were astounded they were astounded, and they were so receptive. The population they're in China, and the and the government was very very open very open to letting us go through these topics and share these topics with the highest levels of Chinese society. It was amazing John isn't that unusual for a country that is shrouded in secrecy, a communist nation to be so open about the cases. Yes. It is something completely new and astounding because they because they remain a very secure. I'll just say the word secure in many ways society, they're very protected in many, ways and political ways. So for the decision to have gone forward at the highest levels to allow these channel followed conferences is really a huge huge development for China. And it is something that is going to be paying for the Chinese populace for many many years to come. And it's just getting started. It was a very exciting news for all of us in the consciousness in the UFO studies community because it will continue to open up new worlds of people to awaken in these areas. I wanna talk more about this, John. But for a lot of new people who are joining the program. Tell us a little bit more about you. And this FBI desk that you man. And how that all came about. Oh, well, it was the paranormal desk at the FBI was basically just me, and my partner just answering police cooperation requests from different places that were at their wit's end with what to do on some of these paranormal cases and that went on for many years. And it was it was something that was very intensive for us. And it was something that was very that's a very. Meal. Unknown territory for us at the time and covered the spectrum of topics from UFO's to wanted taunted facilities, too, many others to missing persons that were missing in ways that could not be explained in the physical world. So that was something that was really came about very gradually when I first entered the FBI many many years ago were you surprised to begin that assignment? I mean, you entered the FBI your crimefighter at all that. And all of a sudden, they give you, hey, you're gonna handle our paranormal desk, we was it. Something you welcomed or did you did you resist it for a while? Well, tell you what it came about soon as I went into the FBI, and I can tell you exactly exactly what happened because when I was actually recruited to go into the FBI way back way back in the late eighties. It was what occurred was I went through FBI academy. And we had a case we had a very famous case that went on right about that time. It was cold case of Madison plot these were two Bank robbers that were that showed up at a Bank robbery site where they were about to go forward with another Bank robbery was serial Bank robbers, and they were met there by a squad of FBI and police officers who knew exactly what they were doing and proceeded to gunned them down 'cause they wouldn't they wouldn't they didn't give up when they were told to give up and so they. Basically they gunned them down. However, it was like a Terminator movie day simply got up and kept going and like nothing had happened. They had both severe gunshot wounds to the point that they had a couple of them had several fatal wounds. One of them had a separate in order to the heart and they had several other fatal won't harbor. They just got up and started and got their own guns and just started shooting, and he did a circuit around this. This happened to Miami Florida, and they did a circuit around this parking lot. We're all the police that setup waiting for them. And they executed several police officers and FBI agents, and they simply got into their car. And this this occurred in nineteen eighty-five, actually, and they got into their car and they were starting to drive away. And one of the FBI agents actually been shot a couple of times actually popped up with a shotgun. And finally was able to shoot them through the connection from the from the skull to the spinal cord just separate that that connection right there with a shotgun. And that was the way that was the only way they were both finally stopped killed. So it became it became a huge scandal in the FBI after that. Wow. These guys did what they did. There were several searches were done on their apartments. To find the number. One theory was at the time popular drug was. It's supposedly gave people superhuman strength and power to do crazy things. And so they're toxicology things because people are demanding to know how these guys were shot full of holes and still Waigel to execute several FBI agents and police officers was huge push on the toxicology of their blood, examinations of all kinds and searches on their partners. And what was found was that? They had not even. They had not even drunk beer or smoked a cigarette there, they were completely clean of any sorts of substances. And there was no explanation for that. So the case was basically used by the FBI for several years as an example of, you know, never giving up and and the importance of fighting criminals who are determined and what they're doing and so forth. So they try to kind of use it as a positive in later years. However, when I was going through the academy, I was able to get together with a couple of the deputies that had done the searches on their apartment, and I asked him several questions question on several things they said they were under instructions to find any sorts of drugs, and they found nothing nothing at all all they found. And this was the interesting part the all that they found was a little altar to the north Scott's a little sort of. Apparently, they were openness. And just before they went out preach Bank property. They did a little sacrifice incense thing to the God LOKI is. Okay. And when they told me that I said, that's it. That's how they did what they did. Because I knew that loci was the trickster trickster God, the Norse pantheon. And I said this was what it was. And I told the deputy says that this was the only explanation that there was even though it was a paranormal explanation because it was no other physical explanation for what how they did what they did. Anyway, I graduated from the academy. Got assigned to my well, even well before I graduated from the academy. The brass bosses. They're found out. I had been asking questions about case. Okay. They were very upset. And they accused me of being a New York Times reporter undercover in their great way to start your FBI career. They were very very touchy about these sorts of things, especially these cases that they kind of have up on the mantle has sacred sort of things. And so I was giving a severe dressing-down. I was told that I would never graduate the academy, which I still graduated. I was given a lot of difficulties in the academy. But then when I did graduate and go to my first office, the the bosses at my new office were alerted that and the conversation. I was told was they were told this guy likes to do paranormal cases. So let's get them. A lotta those too busy with those. And that was how it first occurred that I got assigned paranormal cases when it went to me. And I bet you saw all kinds of things John when they crossed your desk. Just signed all kinds of things, and I was a science even what's called old control. What we call it old control files, which are kinda like administrative cases that you just have to keep an eye on that has paranormal instances in them. And one of those one of those cases what's from nineteen forty seven. And it's available to one that I always show people wherever I go because now declassified at least one document from it is declassified the smoking gun document that is dated July eighth nineteen forty seven. That is the document that shows on. FBI at fault FBI tough to win that shows the FBI agent who had informant that he said was alien visitor who told him all the different truths about alien visitors who they are and what they're doing here. Now back in one thousand nine hundred three Chris Carter developed a X files a lot of that based on these files. How did he find out about it? I mean, did the FBI called somebody at Hollywood and say, you're not gonna believe this stuff. I mean what happened? How did how did this actually after I did actually do that they called Chris Carter directly? And that happens more often than people think what happened was the first out in nineteen ninety three the first season of a new show called the X files was put out and several of my bosses found out. They they saw several similarities in my cases to that first season of the x files in several of the episodes. And so they actually ended up calling. Chris Carter, the creator of the x halls and the question on the source for some of the information for some of the cases that he was able to put up there on his on. His show, and he was questioned what he didn't. I was I was also at the other end of that conference. Call also being questioned and being targeted as to whether I provided information Chris Carter. And of course, I was able for my part. I was able to say that I did not at all provide information directly to Chris Carter. However, I did have a book we call it the TV book the off the books notebook where we keep details of cases and things are we don't put in regular FBI files. Mike OT book was taken from me. Previously. And I believe it was taken by FBI agents who became consultants to TV shows. And I believe they provided my my al-tv book to Chris Carter. But that was just my opinion. That's what I believe happened. But Chris Carter for his part. He just told our bosses our bosses at the FBI that he had talked with retired FBI agents about procedures and had consultants that's perfectly fine..

FBI China Chris Carter John Wala JI Soviet Union Soviet Union partner UFO Jon desouza George Gorbachev Chinese government New York Times Miami Beijing Shanghai robbery Dr Michael Saleh Mike OT
"soviet union" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"soviet union" Discussed on EconTalk

"Knocks doctors Vago was not permitted to be published in the Soviet Union. Everyone virtually head read that novel as well along with many, many other officially unpublished Russian writers, the Russian novel, Russian writing is something very, very different than what it is in the west and certainly very different than what we perceived to be say, fictional literature here in the United States. I would say I would say that. Social needs since the nature social needs. Since writings have become for what? Twenty five and thirty five year old Russian people to ethical to moral too deep. Fickle to philosophical, they're much more interested in. Getting the kinds or beginning the kinds of careers that are going to make them money. Rushing people were very, very unprepared for this new world of capitalism, which was opened up to them in nineteen Ninety-one throughout the nineteen nineties. While the Russians never really came to practice capitalism as we understand it in the west, it did nonetheless enable them to essentially establish a real different kind of life for themselves life different from what they had in the Soviet Union. I'm not sure that I'm not sure American raiders that different in terms of wanting to grapple with ethical and pulse. Officle big picture questions. I think without a doubt, particularly, let's say young and whatever that me in the United States today, younger readers today. Are not into what we would call deep literature anymore either they want to read the kinds of things, of course that are most popular with young readers. But the same thing is definitely going on in in the in Russia after the collapse of the Soviet Union. And so we have a an irony here while in two thousand six time magazine proclaims social needs in the most important writer of the twentieth century while Russian citizens throughout to the end of the twentieth century, and now to the I v of the twenty first century in their minds, social needs in was the single most important individual leading to the collapse of the Soviet Union. Now whether or not this is accurate. One can. I would certainly say that he was an important factor. And the irony is finally is that it's Putin who in two thousand nine dictates rules that all Soviet high school students have to read social needs in in their schools. So in the seventies and for that matter, yeah, in the late sixties and the seventies and eighties when I would be strip searched when I would go into the Soviet Union people that is the thirties, looking either for a copy of the bible or of playboy or anything written by Solta needs by two thousand and nine and to the present day. By the way people have that is Soviet high school. Students have to read social, its considerable irony there. So I just want to make a couple reactions to that. I, I recently read for the first time the brothers karamazov. And breaded about. Maybe a month or two. Before I read in the for circle, I was struck by their similarities in the sense that both books essentially grapple with the biggest philosophical questions that there are y y, they're suffering. What is the good life? What? What? What should a person do faced with ethical dilemmas? And I would just encourage besides occur to readers to read the brother's car mounts up a beer, nine hundred page book to to ring. I would also just mention that there's just also happened to read David foster Wallace's essay, reviewing biography of dossier Eski by Frank, Frank, and David foster Wallace says, Americans can't write books like this, like Dostiev skis and if they do, they have to do it in in sort of cutesy ways with iron.

Soviet Union Soviet high school United States Russia David foster Wallace Vago Putin writer Frank Dostiev Solta thirty five year
"soviet union" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

05:31 min | 2 years ago

"soviet union" Discussed on EconTalk

"So to need some who is sending them out, he was very much opposed to these works being published. Broad before they could be published within the Soviet Union. But at any rate, copies did manage to get out and indeed a publishing house in Italy, and then in the United States were translating and then publishing these Russian novels. And so works like the first circle cancer word were becoming wilder both published a say in the west as early as nineteen sixty eight. And so social needs receives the Nobel prize for literature, not only on the merits of one day in the life of Yvonne Denisa vich, but his non published in the Soviet Union novels works publish only in the west cancer ward an end for circle. And he's afraid committed the timing on this. He's afraid to leave the country to accept the prize at first because he's afraid is it hard to believe for most of us? But he won't be let back in. He's he's certain heat, learned the experience of bodies pus to knock the author of doctors Vago who received the Nobel prize for literature in nineteen fifty eight. And there are many who feel that the hell that pasta knock was put through by the Soviet authorities, how he was ripped apart by Pravda and other Soviet news media eventually led to pasta knocks, death source needs and didn't want to to repeat pasta knocks experience. And so he knew that we're, he deleted Soviet Union. He definitely would not be permitted to return to the Soviet Union. Russian writers have learned over the centuries for. Nineteenth and twentieth centuries that they can only write or at least rightly or wrongly. They hold opinion that they need to write in Russia in the country of Russia with Russian people, not abroad and the the irony is that with social, these since receiving the Nobel prize for literature, he now becomes too dangerous for the Soviet authorities to arrest or to execute because he's become basically a martyr in the west. And so the Soviets find themselves in grave, deep problems about what to do with social needs. He was too much thorn in the side of the Soviet authorities. They couldn't manage to send him to an insane asylum which they had been doing by the thousands or to execute him or to arrest him. And it's only going to be. Of course in nineteen seventy three were indeed they expelled him from the Soviet Union, something that he's Trung -ly resists and he leaves. He leaves against his will and minor stand is he? He additionally comes to institution at Stanford where I work. And is in somebody told me slept on a couch there for a while. I don't know if that's true, but you know, he's he doesn't have any money. Obviously, it doesn't have a job. He's just he's a loan as by the way, remarries his wife at some point. Well, that's another question. Let's correct something Soviet Union. So the genie social needs. Some excuse me was well on the way to becoming a multimillionaire by this time, in other words, to get us money out when he was expelled. Could he get access to had royalties in the west, maybe in the west, he was not making money in the in the Soviet Union. Writer? Well, all kinds of problems with that money at that time didn't mean anything in Soviet Union. One could only really purchase things through connections. The source of social since money of course, were the publications in western publishing houses. But he anyway, he comes here and he starts off in California, and then he ends up in Vermont because I assume he liked the climate. It reminded him of home and something credibly pointed about that. And he eventually of goes back to Russia after the falls aren't curtain, correct. Yes. A bit misleading eventually would be eighteen years later. Yeah, he lives here in Vermont for for that eighteen year period. And what he had declared very early on is that he refused to return to his homeland to his home country, the Soviet Union, unless and or until the Soviet Union would publish all social needs since writings within within the country. And that looked as though certainly in the seventies and most of the eighties as though would never ever have was even a question, but with the arrival of gutter chills, we have in the latter part of the nineteen eighties eventually by nineteen eighty eight..

Soviet Union Nobel prize Yvonne Denisa vich Vermont Russia United States Italy Pravda Trung -ly Writer California eighteen years eighteen year one day
"soviet union" Discussed on Fake the Nation

Fake the Nation

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"soviet union" Discussed on Fake the Nation

"A generation that grew up looking at the depredations of soviet union that is and socialism in my mind that's failed to communism communism cherian communists got a lot of dirty dark money sloshing around our system not just the cokes but you lines and others mercer's who could have taken that term and i think just what bernie sanders i hate to say that because i think he ran a brilliant campaign he didn't even know what was going to hit him but he touched a nerve and he was brave enough a lot of these candidates were talking about are independent but come out of that surge and that soldiers are going away i remember there was a time i just wonder if like you know the term it seems sort of like medic because medicare for all so many democrats are in that's very mainstream democratic position like it is now right a was support you know supporting unions maintaining union's a living wage again a very popular position for mainstream democrats so a lot of the positions of democratic special just completely overlap with mainstream democrats just is just a term many more popular than the two party system i mean i i like socialism because i like the us armed forces and roads and libraries and sanitation collection and cops and firemen and that's all socialism the thing that no one on the capitalism or the socialist sign over one with mitt is that we're blended economy we're both were already both and we thrived in the fifties because both of those beasts were well fed the socialism under eisenhower is what made america great at it built the middle class whether it was the gi bill the interstate highway plan progressive taxation or massive union support from both political parties that's what built the middle class we now lament i don't like the term to democratic socialism for the same reasons as katrina i prefer to say capitalism with empathy because you know what's good for capitalism a living wage workforce that can afford to buy shit it's really i mean when bernie sanders ran i thought of him as an unreconstructed new dealer yes the twentyfirst century he added the climate catastrophe right but so he was campaigning a lot talking about denmark and kind of social democracy of democratic socialism and denmark and one of our great contributors editorial board members eric phone are wonderful historian of reconstruction civil war called me one night and said nation have some context to the bernie campaign sidya so he's writes an open letter to bernie sanders which we get to sanders and it's about hey senator retrieve america's own radical history because we have this great the brian we've actually been there too yeah the heartland populace abolitionists the feminists of seneca falls i mean there's such a great tradition in our country that you know these model radical democrat democracy and the history of this country sadly in the thirties forties and fifties you know the communist party did play a role in civil rights and labor rights but it got smeared because it was of foreign power central i mean it had you know so the red baiting which doesn't mean anything to a new generation i sat with my intern the other day they said read what yeah read them dead i can't just mentioned something that i think is interesting about the idea of that this could form a rift and you know we've we've done some reading on people that are just like this term is just.

soviet union
"soviet union" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"soviet union" Discussed on The Daily

"To nato after the soviet union falls rather than disband michael it actually expanded many of the former soviet republics who were suddenly finding themselves independent poland hungary the czech republic all the countries that made up or many of the countries that made up the old warsaw pact or suddenly thinking themselves they didn't wanna be alone they wanted to be part of the west and so they applied for membership nato and the big question was should nato let them in even if that risked making russia paranoid and how does nato and the us it's lead sponsor respond to their desire to join there were debates about individual countries and there were some debates with basically said if the russians came and knocked off this tiny little country like estonia or lafayette or with the wanian would we really go to war would we really invoke article five to come to their defense but in the end people decided that the symbolism of having old members of the warsaw pact changed teams and come over to nato was worth it even if they're military contribution was pretty tiny and what does russia do in response to this expansion of nato a group that existed originally to rebuff the old sova at union will initially not much intil what putin became president and he viewed it as a humiliation he viewed it as an effort to go steal from russia the core of the old soviet union and he was looking for an opportunity to get even putin realized that article five was something that would get invoked if he did a full military attack but he's not the money or really the forces to sustain such an attack so he had to come up with a really targeted kind of disruption some way of harassing these countries some way of undercutting their institutions some way of making people no longer confident in their governments without actually bringing about an invocation of article five i he started rebuilding his nuclear forces and then he started in with the cyber attacks a very big one against estonia stony faced a major crisis in two thousand seven when it became the first country to experience a massive cyber attack which took down estonia's email bank and newspaper servers another very big one against georgia in two thousand eight paving the way for military action russia attack georgia's computer infrastructure crippling the country to countries that of course have been all part of the soviet union he did a series of attacks on ukraine not a nato member but he realized that the fact that they weren't in nato member meant that nato was not going to be tempted to come to their defense and he used it as his petri dish the place where he could test out a number of ways of disrupting society the russians are fully aware that microsoft products like all software can be used as weapons in cyber warfare he brought down the electric power grid in ukraine twice and of course he meddled a bit in their elections as well look at what russia has done so far there accused of having interfered or having tried to interfere in german french british and us elections there's some evidence that he tried to meddle in the brexit vote in britain he attempted and failed to medal in the last french election he's been trying this in germany and of course michael he made his strongest effort to meddle in elections here in the united states in twenty sixteen using many of the techniques that he had perfected against nato and other eastern european countries and former soviet states.

soviet union michael nato
"soviet union" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"soviet union" Discussed on The Daily

"To nato after the soviet union falls rather than disband michael it actually expanded many of the former soviet republics who were suddenly finding themselves independent poland hungary the czech republic all the countries that made up or many of the countries that made up the old warsaw pact or suddenly thinking themselves they didn't wanna be alone they wanted to be part of the west and so they applied for membership nato and the big question was should nato let them in even if that risked making russia paranoid and how does nato and the us it's lead sponsor respond to their desire to join there were debates about individual countries and there were some debates with basically said if the russians came and knocked off this tiny little country like estonia or lafayette or with the wanian would we really go to war would we really invoke article five to come to their defense but in the end people decided that the symbolism of having old members of the warsaw pact changed teams and come over to nato was worth it even if they're military contribution was pretty tiny and what does russia do in response to this expansion of nato a group that existed originally to rebuff the old sova at union will initially not much intil what putin became president and he viewed it as a humiliation he viewed it as an effort to go steal from russia the core of the old soviet union and he was looking for an opportunity to get even putin realized that article five was something that would get invoked if he did a full military attack but he's not the money or really the forces to sustain such an attack so he had to come up with a really targeted kind of disruption some way of harassing these countries some way of undercutting their institutions some way of making people no longer confident in their governments without actually bringing about an invocation of article five i he started rebuilding his nuclear forces and then he started in with the cyber attacks a very big one against estonia stony faced a major crisis in two thousand seven when it became the first country to experience a massive cyber attack which took down estonia's email bank and newspaper servers another very big one against georgia in two thousand eight paving the way for military action russia attack georgia's computer infrastructure crippling the country to countries that of course have been all part of the soviet union he did a series of attacks on ukraine not a nato member but he realized that the fact that they weren't in nato member meant that nato was not going to be tempted to come to their defense and he used it as his petri dish the place where he could test out a number of ways of disrupting society the russians are fully aware that microsoft products like all software can be used as weapons in cyber warfare he brought down the electric power grid in ukraine twice and of course he meddled a bit in their elections as well look at what russia has done so far there accused of having interfered or having tried to interfere in german french british and us elections there's some evidence that he tried to meddle in the brexit vote in britain he attempted and failed to medal in the last french election he's been trying this in germany and of course michael he made his strongest effort to meddle in elections here in the united states in twenty sixteen using many of the techniques that he had perfected against nato and other eastern european countries and former soviet states.

soviet union michael nato
"soviet union" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"soviet union" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"That all men were brothers and yet that that whole wave came apart fairly quickly and we see all universalistic movements becoming either corrupted or returning to their parochial roots fairly quickly and nowhere was that more true than in the young soviet union and if you look at the young soviet union right after the revolution under lenin it had a vision of letting revolution sweep over the falling empires of europe after the first world war and you know what countries stopped the soviet union from achieving and he was right here in poland and the poles remember it and they remember it very well because although the russians meaning the soviets who were mostly russian at that time were fully engaged in bringing the fruits of communist liberation to the rest of humanity that that that altruism did not extend to the poll in the polls knew it and they fought tenaciously and beat back the bolsheviks and the big problem here is that you know when the soviet union was led by men like trotsky who is jewish and there was this more globalist vision in the soviet union it could appeal to the rest of the world but with stalin who is an old style worth the docs parochial man everything devolved ultimately into narrower a russian interests and as a result the this much more hard edged us versus them vision took over the soviet union and and so by nineteen forty five in a landscape dominated by stalin the soviet union was a mockery of everything that it's rhetoric pretended to be and this doomed the soviet union in other words stalin who brought the soviet union such success by conquering half of europe also ensured the soviet union would fall very quickly because he.

young soviet union lenin soviet union poland trotsky stalin europe
"soviet union" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"soviet union" Discussed on KGO 810

"Invest which is why the stock market is worth about six trillion dollars more than it was when donald trump became president i like the fact that we may get a comprehensive immigration reform uh i like the fact that uh donald trump recognize jerusalem as israel's capital today and by the way i thought i mentioned earlier i think a lot of that is also aimed at china and north korea when you have an american president who is willing to lead and do the right thing erase backed ib of what some of the other leaders in the world thank that's good for peace in the world so makes sense to antagonize in genuine even more well you know we're not antagonizing look the fact of the matter is bill clinton cut a deal with north korea we gave a lot of aid for their promise that they wouldn't build nuclear weapons they broke they broke it um talk is cheap um and you know we this is a regime where we definitely cannot allow to have nuclear weapons it's it's a rogue regime uh it's a risk to people not only in the region but now people across the world and um you know at some point hopefully uh we'll be able to put more pressure on it the president is leading on that i would love that the happened but i have my doubts and they've they've with they've got nuclear capability they're not gonna give it up the the best you can hope for my world is virtually assured destruction like we had with the with the former soviet union while we won't have mutually assured destruction with north korea um they'll be b is potential for destruction but they'll be destroyed we may have a little bit of a problem not to underestimate what that problem would be but this is not this is not the soviet union in the soviet union leadership seemed to be a lot more rational than kim jongun they i can't disagree uh the other thing is now the president of the united states is emphatically back for more in alabama does that embarrass you look i think the people of alabama have to elect i'm whoever they want and uh i have to tell you no political party has a monopoly on virtue nobody i made the end and you know the people of alabama are going to have to uh.

stock market donald trump president comprehensive immigration refo jerusalem israel china north korea nuclear weapons soviet union kim jongun united states alabama bill clinton six trillion dollars