35 Burst results for "Soviet Union"

Paul Kengor on Bella Dodd's Struggle Against Communism

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:49 min | 6 d ago

Paul Kengor on Bella Dodd's Struggle Against Communism

"In the 1930s, many, many people thought communism was the wave of the future. It was a good thing. It made tremendous inroads. People were we have apologists for Stalin, you know, getting Pulitzer prizes in The New York Times. It was a time before much of the world knew the satanic evil of the Soviet Union. And so you had a lot of these folks that were, they really believed somehow that communism was a good thing. Obviously, bellad was one. So what was it that they saw or that they believed communism could bring about? And when did they, when did she begin to see that this wasn't the case that this crusade that she was on had not been a good thing? Well, kind of the final thing, I'll hit that first that pulled her in was fascism. And there's a quote from her in the book. She said, I joined the devil himself, but that's what it took to fight fascism. Now, of course, you don't have to be a communist to fight to fight fascism, right? But the party was really good at creating groups with front groups with names like the American League against Warren fascism. But in her case, she came to America, she was born in Italy in 1904. So Eric she had this beautiful Italian Catholic name, right? Mary asante Isabella of the stono, which means like the assumption of the blessed mother, right? And she comes to America and she came to New York, her family brought her here for a better life. And she immediately fell in with radical elements in her grade school in her high school at hunter college in New York. College was a hotbed of the dish. That's a fact.

Bellad Stalin Soviet Union The New York Times Warren Fascism Mary Asante Isabella American League America Italy Eric New York Hunter College
Katie Gorka Describes the Threat of the 'Next-Gen Marxist'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:34 min | Last week

Katie Gorka Describes the Threat of the 'Next-Gen Marxist'

"Start at the beginning. You have to identify a threat you have to be able to accurately label an enemy. We learned this with the long telegram with NSC 68. We've had this discussion at home for at least a year now. What do we call it? It's not the Soviet Union on the outside. It's now an internal threat that is challenging in and of itself that it's inside America, but you have in the title here, the phrase cultural Marxist. I know you popularized the phrase next gen marxists. Tell us why you're using this terminology and not just the left or something like that. Yeah, this is a super important question. So I think one of the reasons that the left has been able to get away with what it has is because it uses really nice benign terms, like political correctness or even wokeness. Those things just don't really sound all that threatening. No equity. Yeah. And we may disparage something as being woke, but does woke really sound all that threatening, not really. But you know what Mike and I found is if you really dig into it. And if you really look at the ideology that's driving the left, it is Marxism. Why does that matter? That matters because Marxism wants to take down our system. It doesn't want to just change the language we use. It doesn't just want to improve the environment. It actually wants to completely eradicate the free market and put control in the hands of the government and to take it out of the way from people. But I

NSC Soviet Union America Mike
Caller Richard Addresses U.S. Involvement in Ukraine

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:36 min | 3 weeks ago

Caller Richard Addresses U.S. Involvement in Ukraine

"Let's go to your calls. Let's go to Atlanta, Richard. Welcome to America first. Hello, doctor gorka, pleasure to talk to you. Welcome. To address our involvement in Ukraine, I am in favor of supporting Ukraine, certainly. But you were comparing our involvement in Ukraine with the Reagan era of engagement with Soviet Union. Yes. And I would like to point out that at no time during our engagement with the Soviet Union lost their a hot war going on. And we were not spending. What do you think was happening in Afghanistan? What do you think dropping plastic mines in the shape of toys for Afghan children to be mutilated? What do you think the rocketing of villages in Afghanistan was by Soviet forces? Do you think that was a Cold War? We weren't we weren't helping to we weren't lending the support to Afghanistan that we are to the Ukraine. Of course we were. Do you think the Afghans made the stinger missiles they used against the do you think they made them out of rocks and stones? Where do you think they got the stinger missiles from Richard? Hey, gassing from us. Yes, bingo. So what's the difference? Go ahead. We had stock we, the United States, had sufficient stockpiles of arms to do that

Ukraine Gorka Soviet Union Afghanistan Richard Atlanta Reagan United States
The Censorship Game Is Changing... For the Better

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:36 min | Last month

The Censorship Game Is Changing... For the Better

"The whole game in terms of censorship is changing in America and changing for the better and the landmark event here has been Elon Musk's takeover. Not just his offer to buy, but his purchase and then his hit the ground running approach. To this very important platform. Let's remember there has been for the past year and a half huge censorship going on. And huge manipulation of results manipulation of the exposure going on on the three biggest platforms, namely Twitter and Facebook and YouTube. Now, Facebook and YouTube are unrepentant. They are the same. Debbie thinks that they're actually going to get worse now that Twitter has become a free speech platform, although it could go the opposite way. It could be that when you have censorship, you need a coordinated regime of censorship, a kind of censorship across all major platforms for the censorship to really work, and that once one platform breaks loose, you have a sort of, let's call it the glass nose effect. Using the phrase that was used by used by Gorbachev to describe the kind of opening up of the old Soviet Union glasnost and perestroika were Gorbachev's two terms. So it could be the glasnost will extend from Twitter to YouTube and we'll see a kind of thaw occur even there. We will see.

Elon Musk Youtube Facebook Twitter America Debbie Gorbachev
Russian threats revive old nuclear fears in central Europe

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | Last month

Russian threats revive old nuclear fears in central Europe

"Russia's threatening to revive old nuclear fears in Central Europe Fighting around Ukraine's nuclear power installations and Russia's threats to use nuclear weapons who have reawakened nuclear fears in Europe This is especially felt in countries like Poland and Romania which border Ukraine and would be particularly vulnerable in case of a radiological disaster Bonin recently drew up a plan to distribute tablets offering some protection from radiation exposure and is carrying out an inventory of the shelters it has to protect its civilian population the period of peace that followed the collapse of the Soviet Union has lull governments into neglecting their civil protection plans I'm Charles De Ledesma

Ukraine Central Europe Bonin Romania Poland Europe Soviet Union Charles De Ledesma
Gordon Chang Discusses Xi Jinping's Political Evolution

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:31 min | Last month

Gordon Chang Discusses Xi Jinping's Political Evolution

"Let's unpack because really it seems like we just have an emperor of the CCP, a Communist Party that is run by a guy that's changed their quote unquote constitution to give him power for life. Who is Xi Jinping? What is important to know about his prior political evolution, what he's done in the party and his style of leadership. This isn't a male who is this. He's someone who reveres mal, someone as a teenager, actually studied Mao. And he believes that China should rule the world. He's been very clear about this during his term as general secretary of the Communist Party. So he's not just a careerist. He believes that this is the civilization that should run everything. Absolutely. The first thing or one of the first things he did when he became general secretary was he went down to Guangdong province, which is the province that surrounds Hong Kong. He gave a secret speech to cadres and said, why did the Soviet Union fall? He said, the Soviet Union fell because Gorbachev was not a quote unquote real man, that the Soviet leaders failed to adhere to their ideology. So he's very ideological. And during his ten years, we have seen him reimpose totalitarian controls, and we have seen him bring the state back into the economy. So this has been a reversal of all those policies that made China extremely successful.

Communist Party Xi Jinping CCP MAL MAO Soviet Union Guangdong Province China Gorbachev Hong Kong
Former DNI John Ratcliffe on Putin's Potential Use of Nuclear Weapons

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:57 min | Last month

Former DNI John Ratcliffe on Putin's Potential Use of Nuclear Weapons

"Say this, Charlie, because I get this question a lot. And I know you're concerned about escalation, all Americans are. We talk about nuclear weapons and would Putin use a tactical nuclear weapon and there's been a lot of speculation about that. One thing I've been disappointed in folks out of The Pentagon, you know, not sort of spokespeople not talking about this issue is, look, when it comes to nuclear weapons and nuclear protocols, you know, Vladimir Putin has wide latitude to use certain weapons of mass destruction and he has to the detriment of populations around the world. And that would include chemical and biological. But I will say this when it comes to the use of nuclear weapons ever since, you know, the Cuban missile crisis in the old Soviet Union and Nikita Khrushchev, the old pilot bureau stepped in and said, when it comes to nuclear weapons, we don't want a crazy person, you know, making one off decision. And so they've got some pretty rigid protocols when it comes to the use of actual nuclear weapons that Vladimir Putin wouldn't be making those decisions by himself. And that's something that I think could give should give everyone some comfort as this thing. To be honest, that's one factor. I don't trust the fools that pulled off Afghanistan right now in our own government. I mean, Lloyd Austin and Mark milley, they gave us the Afghanistan debacle, and I'm supposed to, I mean, I want the checks and balances on our guys, not to say they're going to use nuclear weapons, but to your point. I mean, the world is on fire. I mean, like we talked about, Russia's doing things they weren't doing. China's doing things with Taiwan that they weren't doing. North Korea is doing things that they haven't done since 2017, the first year of the Trump administration. I mean, all of these things are because of what you said, Charlie, who's in charge, who's making the decisions where the deterrent factor is or the lack thereof. So should you have confidence? Absolutely not.

Vladimir Putin Putin Charlie Nikita Khrushchev Pentagon Lloyd Austin Mark Milley Soviet Union Afghanistan Trump Administration Russia Taiwan North Korea China
Putin's Latest Tirade Offers a Valuable Clue to a New Strategy

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:10 min | 2 months ago

Putin's Latest Tirade Offers a Valuable Clue to a New Strategy

"The war continues to rage in Ukraine Ukraine between between Russia Russia and and Ukraine. Ukraine. And And it it seems seems that that the the Ukrainians Ukrainians are are making making some some advances. advances. They have liberated some territory that was under Russian under Putin's control, Putin has I read called upon a kind of draft reserve of Russians, which means he needs more troops. But it's not easy to say what's really going on because the western media accounts are typically propagandistic. They reflect a party line. They reflect leaks that are coming out of the deep state in this country. And so they are not wholly to be trusted. Nevertheless, Putin recently gave a speech and from what this was a speech that was far more apocalyptic and anti American than what we've heard from Putin Putin has had and anti American thrust, no question about it. But this escalates things and gives us a window into how Putin is thinking. And so I'd like to go through a few key points in Putin's speech and kind of comment on them. So the first point that Putin makes is that after the fall of the Soviet Union, he says, a whole bunch of Russians or people of Russian heritage were separated from their Russian roots. And I think what he's talking about here are the breakaway republics, places like Ukraine, which do have people of Russian origin, and obviously Russian people who are part of Russia of historically people who are part of Russia culturally. And in some cases, people who think of themselves as Russian, but are nevertheless physically in Ukraine. And Putin's point is that these breakaway republics, he says quote that these people have never voted for this breakup. They never voted in other words to be separated from Russia. He says they are, they have expressed their will. They are now our citizens forever.

Putin Ukraine Russia Putin Putin Soviet Union
How the Left Supresses Descent

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:15 min | 2 months ago

How the Left Supresses Descent

"Hi everybody, Dennis prager here, as I have been explaining all of my life. The there is no example of the left in power. Since 1917, when they left first took power in a country called Russia, which became the Soviet Union, there's no example of the left not suppressing dissent. Because the left knows that it can not win by the morality or intellectuality of its arguments, it must suppress the scent. And it begins with the suppression of religion. Because people who have a God, that is not the state or a threat to the state. So we have more and more attacks by the left taking over the American government. A thug named Merrick Garland is in charge of the Department of Justice. He will go down in history as a thug. I have no doubt about that. I am shocked that he turned out that way. I had no sense of his being such a bad human being.

Dennis Prager Soviet Union Russia Merrick Garland American Government Department Of Justice
Sebastian Talks to Russian-Born U.S. Intel Expert Rebekah Koffler

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:44 min | 2 months ago

Sebastian Talks to Russian-Born U.S. Intel Expert Rebekah Koffler

"Back with Rebecca cough. She is the author of a former senior DIA expert on Russia. Jim carfano of heritage tweeted out early today and I retweeted it. If you look at what is it, the 27 28 members of NATO, the highest commitment of aid to Ukraine by members of NATO as a percentage of GDP are the Baltic states and Poland. Isn't that interesting? The states that were under the boot of the Soviet Union are invaded themselves. They're the ones helping out the Ukraine the most. Isn't that telling? Absolutely, and it's always been that way. Sebastian, I even when I was in the community, you know, the people who are very responsive and helpful, they assist us tremendously because they are right there in the theater. They gathered and not Germany. Germany's in bed with Moscow with the Gerhard shredder being one of the CEOs of Gazprom. Exactly. You're going to leave our studio. You've been doing media all day. You said you're going to go if you're going to write an analytic piece, talking about scenarios. So people need to read your article, but first, not nuking America because he's not insane. He's not suicidal. But what's scenarios under which could Putin consider using the low threshold low yield tactical nukes. Give us some examples. So we're exactly right now in this scenario Sebastian for which, on Putin's orders, this doctrine was developed in the first place, escalated to deescalate and scenarios this Putin is losing on the battlefield. And he is cornered.

Rebecca Cough Jim Carfano Nato Ukraine DIA Baltic States Russia Germany Soviet Union Poland Sebastian Gazprom Moscow Putin America
Charlie Sits Down With Jack Philip Barsky, Former KGB Sleeper Agent

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:06 min | 2 months ago

Charlie Sits Down With Jack Philip Barsky, Former KGB Sleeper Agent

"With us as Jack barsky, hello. How are you? I'm good. Yourself. This is really strange. You know, I walk around here and I see pictures of you and I know this man I've seen him so many times. That's so funny. Yeah, from afar. Yeah, yeah. Now, you were in the KGB. I wasn't the KGB. Guilty. How did they recruit you? How does that work? Like when you're 12, they just say, no, not at all. For the kinds of jobs that they had me and mine for, they were looking at people who already mature like 23 24. Not yet fully formed and not yet attached to what family in children and so forth. So I was approached and I was 22, I believe. And the recruitment process was a very drawn out, careful process. Because you don't send them over like potatoes. Was this in eastern Germany at the time? Yes. So you grew up in East Germany. Yes, I did. And East Germany was kind of a proxy state of the Soviet. And towards the end, when Gorbachev took. When he became president, the east Germans were further to the left and the Soviet Union. My best friend from college, he worked for the Stasi as a chemist. And when the Gorbachev book came out, the Stasi bought up all the books and pile them up in the hallways of the because they just didn't like the softening that the softening of the hard line.

Jack Barsky KGB East Germany Afar Gorbachev Soviet Union
Biden to discuss Ukraine war with South African President Ramaphosa

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

Biden to discuss Ukraine war with South African President Ramaphosa

"President Biden meets today with the president of South Africa White House press secretary karine Jean Pierre says the bilateral meeting at The White House today will cover a range of issues President Biden looks forward to consulting with president ramaphosa on a range of topics including climate crisis opportunities to increase trade and investment Ramaphosa is a leader among several African nations who have maintained a neutral stance in the aftermath of Russia's invasion of Ukraine largely because of the support the Soviet Union gave to the African National Congress in a fight to end apartheid decades ago During a visit by Secretary of State Antony Blinken last month South Africa's foreign minister accused the west of focusing on the Ukraine conflict to the detriment of other crises around the globe They say the South African president is emphasizing the need for dialog to find an end to the conflict

President Biden Karine Jean Pierre President Ramaphosa Ramaphosa South Africa White House African Nations Secretary Of State Antony Blin Ukraine African National Congress Soviet Union Russia
Grappling With Our Current Situation With Lee Smith

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:49 min | 2 months ago

Grappling With Our Current Situation With Lee Smith

"Thought of the best adjectives to help us grapple with the situation we're in? That's a really interesting question, and I'm very grateful for you asking it. I haven't nailed it down exactly. That maybe you and I speaking about it will be able to come to a closer definition. Basically what I think is this. We've heard people call whatever. Everyone from AOC to Barack Obama to Chuck Schumer or communists, right? And look, it has a feel like the Chinese Communist Party. But as the feel and there are totalitarian, the progressive movement is totalitarian in some ways. But to describe exactly what's going on here, the way that I'm thinking about it right now is that it's an oligarchy, right? We have rule by the few. They've secured power for themselves. It's a combination of political elites and corporate elites as well with a courtier class surrounding them, meaning the press. And what's interesting is it's given me reason to go back and think about what totalitarian regimes really are. Whether we're talking about the Chinese Communist Party, whether we're talking about the Soviet Union, whether we're talking about post Peloponnesian war, Athens, it's always ruled by a few and it depends those oligarchies if we're talking about Athens, those oligarchies had a particular kind of ideology, which would be entirely lost on us now. The kinds of ideologies that we recognize now if we're talking about communism, we know very much what that looks like. So it's important for us to figure out what the ideology is driving and shielding this regime, right?

Chinese Communist Party Chuck Schumer AOC Barack Obama Athens Soviet Union
 Gorbachev buried in Moscow in funeral snubbed by Putin

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 3 months ago

Gorbachev buried in Moscow in funeral snubbed by Putin

"Russians have been farewell to former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev who died earlier this week at the age of 91 Mona's filed past Gorbachev's coffin in the pillar hall of the House of the unions to pay their last respects The mansion near the Kremlin in Moscow has served as the venue for state funerals since Soviet times Gorbachev whose drastic reforms helped end the Cold War and precipitated the breakup of the Soviet Union is set to be buried in a relatively low key ceremony later on Saturday laid to rest at a main Moscow symmetry next to his wife rosa the Kremlin's refusal to declare a state funeral reflects its uneasiness about the legacy of Gorbachev I'm Charles De

Pillar Hall Gorbachev House Of The Unions Mikhail Gorbachev Mona Moscow Kremlin Soviet Union Rosa Charles De
John Zmirak and Eric Reflect on the Legacy of Mikhail Gorbachev

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:48 min | 3 months ago

John Zmirak and Eric Reflect on the Legacy of Mikhail Gorbachev

"John, you were just saying that in 1983, and I have never heard this before. If I heard it, I'd forgotten it. But that we were, in 1983, before Gorbachev, when I drop off was the head of the Soviet Union, we were in very serious danger of nuclear war. We didn't even know it. That's the ironic part. You and I, running around in college, could have just died. We would have had no preparation. Here's what happened. Reagan and Thatcher and the other leaders of NATO planned major military exercises in 1983 and something they did every 5 years. It was routine. Large scale military exercises to test military preparedness for NATO. The Russians didn't know that it was a routine. They thought, given the anti communist rhetoric of Thatcher and of Reagan, they thought it was an attack on the Soviet bloc that might entail a first strike nuclear attack on the Soviet Union. And they came to within 5 minutes of launching missiles because of because of a stray signal in West Germany that they interpreted as a missile code launch. Like one guy was told, okay, it looks like the west is launching their missiles. And it's at one point the Russian common knowledge. I mean, I'm just astonished to hear this. Because people kind of lost interest in the Cold War in the 90s. It's like, oh, that's over. We don't have to worry about preparedness ever again. We don't have to defend freedom anymore. And so it's done. It won on its own. Well,

Thatcher Soviet Union Nato Reagan Gorbachev John West Germany
Who Was Mikhail Gorbachev?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:51 min | 3 months ago

Who Was Mikhail Gorbachev?

"Yesterday, Mikhail Gorbachev passed away. Now for many young people out there, they have no idea who Gorbachev is. In fact, I was talking to some young people recently. I said, oh, you know, tell me about the Soviet Union never heard of the Soviet Union. In high school, never heard of the Soviet Union. They don't learn that stuff in school anymore. Now Gorbachev was a very special leader. Gorbachev by all estimates was ethical and full of integrity. In a country that was basically run by thugs and criminals and was nothing more than a massive cartel enterprise. Now Gorbachev was met with a fair amount of anti Soviet Union protests and he was one of the first people not to crack down on the anti communist anti totalitarian protest with force. Now, Gorbachev is not totally beloved in Eastern Europe. He's not. In fact, Vladimir Putin has said many times that one of the greatest mistakes that Russia ever made was the dissolution of the Soviet Union, brokered by Gorbachev. Gorbachev ended the Cold War. And yes, Gorbachev was outmaneuvered and out strategized by Reagan, but he was always inclined towards peace. Gorbachev was probably too good of a person to run the Soviet Union. And he did bring a lot of he brought a movement of sovereignty of in Estonia and Lithuania and Latvia in the Balkan Peninsula. The Soviet union was a far reaching totalitarian communist blanket over the eastern part of Europe and a lot of that has broken up and Russia is doing their best job to try to recreate that. Albeit very difficult and clumsily and at a very, very high cost.

Gorbachev Soviet Union Mikhail Gorbachev Vladimir Putin Eastern Europe Russia Reagan Balkan Peninsula Estonia Lithuania Latvia Europe
"soviet union" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:46 min | 3 months ago

"soviet union" Discussed on WTOP

"Gorbachev, the last leader of the Soviet Union, died yesterday in a hospital in Russia. As WTO national security correspondent JJ green tells us he left an indelible mark on the world. Mister Gorbachev tear down this wall. The famous words of the Lake U.S. president Ronald Reagan, on June 12th, 1987 at the Brandenburg gate and then West Berlin, Germany. Gorbachev acted on that over the next few years. He enacted changes inside the Soviet Union and later Russia that led to the crumbling of the Soviet Union and communism across the region. His actions eventually led to freedom for 15 countries that had been absorbed as Soviet republics and perhaps the most important thing at the time, his actions ended the likelihood of a nuclear war. JJ green. News. In Ukraine, UN inspectors are making their way toward the zapper Asia nuclear power plant. It's a long anticipated mission that the world hopes will help secure the Russian held facility in the middle of a war zone and avoid catastrophe underscoring the danger kief and Moscow again accusing each other today of attacking the area around Europe's biggest nuclear plant. In recent days, the plant was temporarily knocked offline because of fire damage to the transmission line there. The risks are so severe officials have started distributing anti radiation iodine tablets to nearby residents. Today marks 25 years since Princess Diana was tragically killed in a car crash in Paris. CBS correspondent Holly Williams now looks back at her enduring legacy. On paper, she was a perfect fit for the royal family. Aristocratic, beautiful and demure. And I

JJ green Soviet Union Gorbachev Mister Gorbachev Lake U.S. Russia West Berlin WTO Ronald Reagan Germany Ukraine UN Moscow Europe Holly Williams Princess Diana CBS Paris
"soviet union" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

04:16 min | 3 months ago

"soviet union" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"His death is because and this happened at the time. They don't want to give credit to the actual heroes of the anti communist movement. People like Margaret Thatcher, people like Ronald Reagan, people like Pope John Paul the second, they don't want to give credit to the actual anti communists who fought communism each and every day. Instead, they would prefer to believe that the Soviet Union was always quasi good hearted and at the very end their heart showed through when they saw that the empire could not survive. They simply allowed us to collapse out of the decency and warmth of their own heart. And you can see that in the coverage from CNN and The New York Times, here's a CNN's obituary for Mikhail Gorbachev. And Mikhail Gorbachev, the last leader of the former Soviet Union from 1985 until 1991, has died at the age of 91, Gorbachev died after a long illness, Russian state news agencies reported. Apparently, the man credited with introducing key political and economic reforms to the USSR in helping to end the Cold War had been in failing health for some time. Again, when we say that he helped end the Cold War, what we mean is that he read the writing on the wall, and then he made the mistake of allowing cracks to appear in a very, very weak facade, and the entire thing fell away. The lesson, by the way, that was learned by the Chinese from watching the Kyle Gorbachev is never, ever, allow political liberalization before economic liberalization. So what the Chinese have done is they'd strengthen their state apparatus, while also getting involved in mercantilism via the free market. Gorbachev sort of did the reverse. He allowed for political liberalization, at least in very, very small part in the ring of states that surrounded the actual Russian Empire, and then after that, economic liberalization took place. So allowing any sort of political break is what led to the fall of the Soviet Union, the only way however he could have held that up would have been on the base of a stronger economy in the economy simply did not exist in the Soviet Union. The Soviet Union was always a bit of a paper Tiger, not in the sense that they weren't militarily powerful. They were. But in the sense that they were retrograde economically. And if you actually wish to have a powerful and durable empire for a long period of time, meaning more than 70 years, then what you're going to need to do is actually build up the economy communism actually forbids that, which is why China has been able to strengthen itself on the basis of capitalism and now I think China actually is going to enter a period of economic stagnation that's going to weaken them over the course of the next couple of generations. In any case, the obituaries have been absolutely fawning about Mikhail Gorbachev. According to the according to CNN, with his outgoing charismatic nature, Gorbachev broke the mold for Soviet leaders who until then had been mostly remote icy figures, almost from the start of his leadership he strove for significant reforms. So the system would work more efficiently and more democratically. Hence the two key phrases of the Gorbachev era glasnost openness and perestroika restructuring. Well, I mean, he really did not have much of a choice, given the fact that the Soviet Union was already on its heels in Afghanistan, given the fact that Soviet Union was being dramatically outpaced by the United States, both militarily and economically speaking. He later said I began these reforms and my guiding stars were freedom and democracy with that bloodshed. So the people ceased to be a herd led by a shepherd, it would become citizens. That's a bit of revisionist history, but CNN goes right along with it. According to CNN, Gorbachev had humble beginnings he was born into a peasant family march 2nd, 1931 near the stavropol, and as a boy, he did farm labor along with his studies working with his father, who was a combine harvest operator in later life, Gorbachev said he was particularly proud of my ability to detect a fault in the combine instantly just by the sound of it. He became a member of the Communist Party in 1952. He completed a law degree at Moscow university in 1955, and that's when he got married. During the early 1960s, he became head of the agriculture department for the stavropol region by the end of the decade he had reasons to the top of the party hierarchy in the region. And by the way, I should mention here that if you became the top of the party hierarchy in the 1960s and the Soviet Union, this is not because you were a wonderful person. This is because you are a both political Brown noser and you had the capacity for absolute brutality because the Communist Party in the Soviet Union is one of the worst institutions in the history of humanity. So if you rise to the top of that, it's not because you are a wonderful open minded fellow as a general rule. He came to the attention of a Mikhail sussman Yuri andropov members of the Politburo, the principal policy setting body of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, according to CNN, who got him elected to the central committee in 1971 and arranged foreign trips for their rising star in 1978. He was back in Moscow the next year he was chosen as a candidate member of the Politburo, his stewardship of Soviet agriculture was not a success. I mean, no one's was, because as it turns out, collectivization is a horrible way since you agriculture.

Soviet Union Gorbachev Mikhail Gorbachev CNN Kyle Gorbachev Margaret Thatcher Pope John Paul Ronald Reagan Cold War The New York Times China Moscow university Communist Party Brown noser Afghanistan United States Mikhail sussman Yuri andropov Politburo Communist Party of the Soviet central committee
"soviet union" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:39 min | 3 months ago

"soviet union" Discussed on WTOP

"Croft and now at 70 of Tyson's corner and we have 70° of lamp on Plaza. At 9 41, Mikkel and Mikhail Gorbachev, the last leader of the Soviet Union, died yesterday in a hospital in Russia. He left an indelible mark on the world Mister Gorbachev tear down this wall. The famous words of the Lake U.S. president Ronald Reagan on June 12th, 1987 at the Brandenburg gate and then West Berlin, Germany. Gorbachev acted on that over the next few years. He enacted changes inside the Soviet Union and later Russia that led to the crumbling of the Soviet Union and communism across the region. His actions eventually led to freedom for 15 countries that had been absorbed as Soviet republics, and perhaps the most important thing at the time, his actions ended the likelihood of a nuclear war. JJ green, WTO news. A gang member is facing several years behind bars after admitting to shaking down some area businesses. What he called quote unquote rent money was really extortion. And that's what 27 year old hilmer Hernandez alvarado has pleaded guilty to. Hernandez alvarado most recently of hyattsville is a member of MS 13. He admits that he extorted money from businesses in parts of Langley park under MS 13 control. The extortion lasted at least between February of 2018 and December 2020, some of those businesses were unlicensed in owners who didn't pay up on a weekly basis, were threatened with violence. Hernandez alvarado faces up to 20 years in prison when he sentenced later this year. John dome in WTO P news

Soviet Union Mister Gorbachev Lake U.S. Mikkel Mikhail Gorbachev Russia Croft JJ green Tyson West Berlin Gorbachev Ronald Reagan Hernandez alvarado hilmer Hernandez alvarado Germany WTO hyattsville Langley park John dome
Mikhail Gorbachev, who steered Soviet breakup, dead at 91

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

Mikhail Gorbachev, who steered Soviet breakup, dead at 91

"Mikhail Gorbachev who steered the Soviet breakup has died after a long illness at 91 Gorbachev had set out to revitalize the Soviet Union but ended up unleashing forces that led to the collapse of communism though in power less than 7 years the changes included helping to end decades of east west nuclear confrontation in time his reforms resulted in the collapse of the authoritarian Soviet state and the freeing of Eastern European nations from Russian domination president Joe Biden says in a statement the result of the Gorbachev era was a safer world and greater freedom for millions of people I'm Charles De Ledesma

Mikhail Gorbachev Gorbachev Soviet Union Eastern European Nations East West Joe Biden Charles De Ledesma
Russian media: Ex-Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev dead at 91

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 3 months ago

Russian media: Ex-Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev dead at 91

"Russian media reports Mikhail Gorbachev the last leader of the Soviet Union has died He was 91 He was in power less than 7 years but Gorbachev unleashed a breathtaking series of changes Mister Gorbachev tear down this wall It included the freeing of Eastern European nations from Russian domination and the toppling of the Berlin Wall years later Gorbachev said the end of the Cold War was a moment in history for global cooperation and problem solving but it didn't happen The west and particularly the United States declared victory in the Cold War Euphoria and triumphalism went to the heads of western leaders Gorbachev resigned in 1991 the Soviet Union later collapsed News organizations quoted a statement saying Gorbachev died after a long illness I'm Ed Donahue

Gorbachev Mister Gorbachev Eastern European Nations Mikhail Gorbachev Soviet Union Berlin United States Ed Donahue
"soviet union" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

03:00 min | 8 months ago

"soviet union" Discussed on WBUR

"Had come to bury the Soviet Union and to build the new Commonwealth Much to his pleasure 11 republics turned up in all The 11 took part in a signing ceremony that makes them all cofounders of the Commonwealth First devised a fortnight ago by Russia by Russia and Ukraine This will not be a single state rather a collection of individual independent countries which hope they'll now get international recognition perhaps within a few days At an extraordinary moment at the end of 1991 the leaders of Russia Belarus and Ukraine and here we are right back with the areas and territories that made up the Kievan Rus' in the Middle Ages It's the leaders of those three Soviet republics who get together in a forest meeting house in Belarus in the countryside and they decide that the Soviet Union is dissolved And from that point in December 1991 those plates which had been union republics of the Soviet Union like Belarus like Ukraine all of a sudden become nation states and Ukraine is born not just as a nation but as a really big nation fungal bigger than France for example After the dissolution of the Soviet Union many Russian politicians including Vladimir Putin who became president in 2000 viewed the loss of Ukraine as a threat to Russia's theaters as one of the great global powers This fear was heightened further by the defeat of Victor Yanukovych in the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election by the pro Nieto and European integration candidacy of Victor Yushchenko During the presidential campaign Yushchenko became seriously ill in an apparent assassination attempt by poisoning Mass protests which became known as the orange revolution followed a second contest in which Yanukovych was declared the winner The Supreme Court invalidated the results and ordered a runoff after which Yushchenko was officially confirmed as president Putin's real fear is that Ukrainians are gravitating towards the European Union towards NATO towards democracy to put it in its most simple terms to look westwards and not to look northwards or eastwards and Putin can't really take the risk that it will be obvious to his own people that Ukrainians are making another and better choice turning their back on that sense of russianness and shared identity and saying no we want that European Union version of life that NATO version of life that western democracy version of life as an independent nation we are free to make that choice Vladimir Putin is saying they're not free to make that choice.

Soviet Union Russia Belarus Victor Yanukovych Vladimir Putin Victor Yushchenko Yushchenko Yanukovych France European Union NATO Supreme Court Putin
"soviet union" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:50 min | 9 months ago

"soviet union" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Knowledge someone who I guess has lived a life that has seen I guess the depths of the Cold War you've obviously had a career that of course spanned the collapse of the Soviet Union now to where we are today When you look at the economic pushback that Putin is seen right now from pretty much every major nation out there here Do you think that those tactics are effective in and of themselves With Putin himself I doubt it he's happy with autarky I think He very much I think wants to close the close the doors of the outside world to Russia certainly behaving that way And he's never been great in the field of economics So I think he would be just as happy If Russia were totally cut off from the outside world and forced to be self sufficient that's certainly how he reacted after 2014 And the Russian invasion of Crimea So I can see him not personally being very concerned about this but the pressure on him is growing from his business community And I also think from the public seeing their access to the Internet for example shut off now That has really become something the Russians depend on for communications not only among themselves but also with family abroad So this is a tough moment There's a lot of talk about whether the economic sanctions will be enough to I guess reverse some of what Putin is doing here But there's been a lot of calls now for some degree of a military response particularly from NATO Do you think that that is a position that NATO can stand by I think the secretary general secretary general stolberg was right when he spoke after the foreign ministers meeting today NATO's biggest responsibility right now is to stop this invasion in Ukraine from becoming a general war in Europe from becoming World War three Nobody wants to see that It's in nobody's interest to do so And so I think it is extraordinarily important for NATO to help the Ukrainians in every way can both on the military front and also on the humanitarian front But not to put boots on the ground and not to not to implement a no fly zone So I do think that is the has to be the top strategic objective for NATO right now to avoid World War three There's also a course concerns about the nuclear issue here We saw of course footage of what appeared to be an attack by Russian forces on a nuclear facility in Ukraine that of course alarmed a lot of folks about the security of some of those facilities What can be done if anything to ensure the security of those facilities Well the Russians certainly know nuclear power plants They built those vvs along with Ukrainians during the Soviet era So they know them well They understand them well What worries me is that they're not taking a very responsible stance now toward attacking civilian targets of all kinds especially a nuclear power plant But it is I think nevertheless important to not only pay attention at an international level Rafael grossi the secretary general of the IAEA excuse me director general speaking to the UN Security Council this morning keeping those controls in place at an international level to the degree possible and certainly the intention of the world at an international level But then second I think to remind the Russians that in fact you know if there were a nuclear accident at that plant it could impact Russian territory It could result in radiation contamination of Russian territory Do they really want to see that in their most fertile farmland down there in the south of Russia I don't think so So it's in their interest to ensure also that this plant remains safe and secure and does not get attacked All right rose really appreciate getting your insights Rose got a Mueller a lecturer over at the Stanford institute and the former deputy secretary general over at NATO Of course we are focused on the humanitarian toll We are also focused on the economic impact of financial ramifications here the ripple effects that we saw in markets this week We'll discuss that when we come back This is Wall Street.

NATO Putin Russia stolberg Crimea Soviet Union Ukraine Rafael grossi Europe IAEA UN Security Council Stanford institute Mueller Rose
"soviet union" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:51 min | 9 months ago

"soviet union" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"But there are actually have invested interest in as it were going back to the period of autarky that we saw under the Soviet Union where Russia was not exposed and engaged in integrated in the large European or global economy One point that President Biden made yesterday was where did Putin get the gumption to do this I mean he is flouting international law On an international stage making up history revised history of Ukraine pretending it doesn't have its own government language sovereignty how did he end up spinning this narrative and so far getting away with it I think Putin believes this narrative to be honest that's his reading of Russian history And he also has this sort of sense of what we call whataboutism I'm sure that he feels fully justified in doing this because he looks at the kind of larger sweep of events over the last 30 years or maybe since World War II he sees the United States and other countries intervening doing things that he would say well what's the difference now The United States has not annexed anyway We've certainly intervened in all kinds of places over the last decade and many of them have been completely and advisable and wrong But again multiple wrongs don't make a right But I'm sure that this is what Putin is justifying for himself Mike Meg's right Well actually this is going to be the biggest violation on top of other violations which is already made of annexing Crimea and now recognizing the independence of Donetsk and lorcan's perhaps as a prelude to an exertion as well To understand what that policy and self asset here in Georgia But the major biggest violation of another country's independence sovereignty since World War II And he's now moved into the realm of Adolf Hitler with Sudan London the invasion of Poland So you're comparing him to Italy Yes and that comes absolutely I am And if you take away you know convolve the things that we kind of know just look at the facts of what Hitler did Going back to on exertion of the Sudan London Angeles with Austria on the same premise that Austria was part of Germany because of language and culture and history and Adolf Hitler's own Personal and family history there is not much difference at this particular point Everybody always shies away from the comparisons because of the Holocaust and everything else that flood from that But in a Hitler's own version of mein kampf the idea of lebensraum when I was listening to some of the comments that Putin made I felt rather children thought where is the difference here Between some of the things we're seeing in 1930s And he was always much more careful himself If Putin doesn't seem to be answerable to anybody in the national community at least not at this moment How about a domestic community I mean when we look the United States has a presidential election in two years Vladimir Putin is up for reelection in two years The vote matters in the United States Does the vote matter do what people think about their president going to war in Ukraine matter in Russia It does matter Putin has to prove himself to be legitimate within the system Now will said there wasn't any opposition Alexander Navalny who was credible opposition figures sitting in jail having been poisoned and somehow miraculously survived But people can basically show that his pleasure by not voting The best advice you have if you are still advising the administration would be what Well we have to hang tight I mean basically we have to do our utmost to keep all of our allies on the same page But what we do have to be very careful about is not imposing anything that we can't take off again later because we have to be able to show that there is a cause and effect And that there is some space for a different outcome We hope to be talking to you again I'm sure we will Fiona hill was a member of the National Security Council specializing.

Putin President Biden Mike Meg lorcan United States Adolf Hitler London Angeles Ukraine Sudan Soviet Union Russia Austria Hitler Donetsk Crimea Poland Georgia Alexander Navalny Italy London
"soviet union" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union" Discussed on Between The Lines

"Is between the lines with Tom Switzer. Well, far right fringe political movements around the world have long been peddling climate denial, but the political climate is changing. So much so that for the far right, climate denial is whining. What's likely to replace it? Now, the new narrative on the far right in Europe and the U.S. it goes like this. Ecological disaster is wrapped with fees of rampant immigration. So says Oliver millman and environment reporter for The Guardian U.S. he joins us from New York. All of our welcome to between the lines. Thanks very much, Tom. Good to be with you. Now, you begin your guardian essay with a reference to Boris Johnson's recent warnings about the collapse of civilization. What did the British pay in Maine when he linked this to climate change? So Johnson was speaking pride to the recent UN climate talks in Glasgow, cop 26. And he essentially warned that civilizations can go backwards as well as forwards and he cited the Roman Empire and he said it basically fell as a result of uncontrolled immigration. It could no longer control its borders. People came in from the eastern all over the place, he said, which is referenced the Goths and the vandals and so on, he came into the empire later on and he said that essentially that is a warning for what could happen if the world doesn't do anything about climate change, essentially linking immigration fears with the threat of climate change. And that is a narrative that has been used increasingly by right wing politicians and of course Boris Johnson is not a fringe far right figure. He's very different from Angela Merkel. He's very different from Donald Trump, but there is an emergent discourse on the right that as denial of climate science becomes less politically viable, voters are turned off by it because they can see the impacts of climate change unfolding in front of them, that there's this new narrative linking other themes popular on the right with climate change. And Boris Johnson's narrative you say has flourished in these far right fringe movements in Europe and the U.S. tell us more. Yeah, that's right. So you've got parties such as the national front in France, which once was quite derisive climate change. Marine le pen, marine le pen she said in 2019 new quota, environmentalism is the natural child of patriotism. Yes, that's right. So essentially nomads immigrants they have no loyalty to their new country in her words. They don't take care of the environment, they don't really care for the natural resources of the place they turn up in. So she's trying to put these kind of green kind of tinge on, which essentially quite nationalistic worldview. They've formed a new green wing called new ecology. They're trying to essentially move into that space that the center left and the left have occupied the other parties to the British national party, which is a far right party UK has said it's the only true green party because it focuses on migration, alternative for Germany, which again is a far right party. He's kind of warned of these gigantic mass and migration coming towards European countries due to harsh climatic conditions in Africa in the middle of the east again previously it's been quite dismissive of climate science, but now it's kind of repositioned itself as being something to be concerned about, but the response should be that's happening of borders. The rejection of asylum seekers you might come because of climate disruption and so on. So it's kind of very much wrapping this idea of climate breakdown with in some cases what's almost kind of blood and soil rhetoric around the idea of national purity about the ideas of keeping out those who they may see is unclean and unworthy of being in their country. Yes, this hardcore environmentalism you say, it's rooted in an earlier age of blood and soil nationalism. Some people said, it's always dangerous and flirting these things, but Hitler was an environmentalist and of course we know about the Nazis blood and soul nationalism. Now you refer to what academics Joe Turner and Dan Bailey call eco bordering. What does that mean? So it's essentially where restrictions immigration are painted as being vital to retain the natural prosperity and the environmental protection of a country. So therefore, if you keep out immigrants, if you ensure that only native born people are allowed to enjoy the environment, harness the environments, then that will actually help solve climate change. It will help the environment prosper. It will keep countries clean and tidy and free from pollution. So essentially, it's laying blame for a very much distraction on people from developing countries largely, those who actually consume far less than those in wealthy countries and blaming them for overpopulation in their own countries and then coming to wealthy countries and causing pollution there..

Boris Johnson Tom Switzer Oliver millman U.S. Marine le pen Europe The Guardian Angela Merkel Donald Trump Glasgow Maine UN Tom Johnson British national party New York France Germany Dan Bailey Africa
"soviet union" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

06:35 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union" Discussed on Between The Lines

"Day. Mary sarahi is author of not one inch, America, Russia, and the making of post Cold War style mate. Now Mary, the conventional wisdom among western pundits and politicians, it says that the Ukrainian crisis since 2014 and still heating up the accepted wisdom is that this is entirely Vladimir Putin's fault and the west is largely blindless. Not everyone agrees. Let's get your reaction to something that the distinguished political scientist John Michel. This is what he told me in early 2015. The fact is that the Russians won't tolerate a situation where Ukraine becomes a western bulwark on its border. And the Russians have made it clear that if Ukraine continues to pursue this policy of trying to align itself with the west, that the end result will be that Russia will go to great lengths to wreck Ukraine as a functioning society. And I believe that that's exactly what's happening now. What I find so amazing is that the west doesn't understand this. After all, the United States has something called the Monroe doctrine. And according to the Monroe doctrine, no great power from either Europe or Asia is allowed into the western hemisphere with its military forces. We consider it completely unacceptable for any distant great power to march up to our borders. Well, that's basically what's going on here. The Russians are saying there's no way that NATO and the EU can march up to our borders. We just won't accept this. And if the west continues to pursue this policy, what we will do is in effect destroy Ukraine. That's what they're doing. As professor join me, Sharma from the University of Chicago on this program in 2015, Mary sarahi. Yes, certainly. So another typically timid equivocal quotation from my friend Jean. No, John, John is John is onto something obviously Ukraine. It's a statement of the obvious to say that Ukraine is an important to Russia. What surprised me was that westerners did understand this, but did relatively little about it. Ukraine is the linchpin of Europe. If there's not going to be peace there, then we're not going to have peace. Obviously putting Ukraine in NATO would be a huge red flag to Russia as John identifies from his quotation. And because of that, policymakers at the time said, you know, we need some kind of a halfway house. We need to modulate expansion. And they came up with a program known as the partnership for peace. The partnership for peace allowed a wide array of countries to have a loose affiliation with NATO and to gain membership in stages if at all. And all the Russia didn't like this, Russia accepted it and even gained an affiliation with the partnership. And Russia remarkably accepted that Ukraine had a birth in that partnership as well. And that seemed to be a workable solution to the problem. But then because of a combination of self harming Russian choices and American hubris, having figured out the right answer, the Clinton administration then pushed it aside and decided to move ahead much more aggressively with all or nothing expansion. So the problem wasn't NATO expansion itself, the problem was how it happened. Other method that had been tried and that was marginalized. I think would have yielded the same result at less cost per inch as measured in units of damage to U.S. Russian relations. But unfortunately, because of a bunch of events, events such as yeltsin's decision to shed blood and Chechnya, also the United States 1994 midterm congressional elections, which the Republican Party won decisively, retaking the House and Senate. All these things combined to cause Clinton to shift away from this partnership solution to the more aggressive approach. And that put us on the darker timeline that we're on to today. Okay, but Ukraine's not part of NATO, but the Americans in Brussels keeps aiding and supporting Ukraine. Putin recently questioned Ukrainian statehood. He argued, quote, true sovereignty of Ukraine is possible only in partnership with Russia. There are also growing fears that Putin could launch a major invasion of Ukraine. He would argue this all gets back to the very issue you're talking about. Night I expansion, representing a betrayal of the negotiations that happened in the early 1990s. Mary. Yes, he does make that argument that he, because he uses these topics, he turns them from dry dusty history into issues of current international significance. But it's not just Putin though, it's me, shyam, demon Cohen, the late historian has been on this program married to Jeff ski, the prominent British journalist, Stephen Walt from Harvard, they're saying, if America is going fiddling in Russia's sphere of influence, shouldn't America be offended by this given that they have their own sphere of influence in Latin America. Yes. Again, this all shows that these issues that we're discussing today are not just of historical or academic interests but have real world importance. And as I was saying, in historical terms, this partnership method of expansion included a birth for Ukraine. But once that birth is basically taken away because the partnership becomes marginalized, once you've decided to expand NATO on this all or nothing method, then you've left Ukraine in the lurch because if you're going to either give countries article 5 and put them all the way in to NATO or not, that's untenable for Ukraine. It's such a red flag as you just described to put Ukraine into NATO. It would immediately create a massive conflict with Russia. But unfortunately, that's the situation we've gotten ourselves in. NATO expansion was not one thing. There was not just one way to expand NATO. It's a huge complex organization. And there were multiple alternative ways to expand known at the time. Mary, thanks so much for being on our end. Thanks to you. I am very happy to have joined you across the half a globe. Mary sarahi is author of not one inch, America, Russia, and the making of post.

Ukraine Russia Mary sarahi NATO John Michel America John Vladimir Putin Europe Putin Mary Sharma University of Chicago EU Asia Jean Clinton administration demon Cohen yeltsin
"soviet union" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union" Discussed on Between The Lines

"To between the lines on air online or via ABC listen up. This is Tom Switzer and thanks for tuning in. Later on the program. Climate denial is waning on far right fringe movements. What's likely to replace it? It might be just as scary. Essentially, it's lame blame for environmental destruction on people from developing countries largely, those who actually consume far less than those in wealthy countries and blaming them for overpopulation in their own countries and then coming to wealthy countries and cause inclusion there. Stay with us for my chat with the guardians Oliver millman. But first, how the U.S. lost the post Cold War peace. While 30 years ago, this happened. Fellow citizens here. In view of the world's situation that is developing the Commonwealth of Independent States. And terminating my activity as president of the USSR. It was an emotional moment for the man who's been described as a coach without a team. Outside and the chill of Moscow air, the red flag of communism was hauled down and the standard of the rising Russian Federation raised instead. Christmas 90 91, Moscow allowed the Baltic states to separate from the Soviet Union and the USSR flag was lowered at the Kremlin for the last time. Now the disintegration of the USSR marked not just the collapse of Soviet communism. It also marked according to the then president George H. W. Bush, the triumph of America's democratic mission. The biggest thing that has happened in the world and my life in our lives is this. By the grace of God, America won the Cold War. But did America's victory in the Cold War lead to hubris. Encouraging successive administrations to expand NATO, eastwards. Thus upsetting Russia's strategic sensibilities. The NATO enlargement in the late 1990s and beyond. So this is under presidents Clinton Bush junior, Obama, even Trump, denied our expansion represent a betrayal of any agreements to end the Cold War that the U.S. and the old Soviet Union made in the early 1990s. I do that in exchange for a reunified Germany, the west's alliance would not move east. Or has NATO enlargement being a great success locking in hard one democratic gains in central and Eastern Europe. Mary sarati is Professor of historical studies at Johns Hopkins University's school of advanced international studies and a research associate at Harvard University's center for European studies. Mary's new book is called not one inch. America, Russia, and the making of post Cold War style made. That's just been published by Yale University press. Mary, welcome to ABC radio. Thank you so much. Great to be connecting over the airwaves. Now, was the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union three decades ago was all that inevitable. No, it was not. And so it's worth taking some time now on the 30th anniversary to reflect on exactly what did happen, what went right and perhaps more pertinently for today as Putin is threatening Ukraine, what went wrong? Because I think that to understand the problems we have today, we need to go back to when things seem to be going right to the 1990s. At the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union was not inevitable. We can see that by comparison with China. There were popular revolutions in 1989 in both central and Eastern Europe and in China, but we can see how very differently they turned out because of course the regime in China in 1989 imposed violence in Tiananmen Square cracked down on the uprising and maintained a toll on power. So that shows that alternate outcomes were possible. Now, in central and Eastern Europe, the story turned out differently. In large part because of the Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, he decided to gamble that he could reform the Soviet Union and cooperate with the west and stay in power that way rather than by cracking down and using violence. But he underestimated the power of nationalities both in Europe and within the Soviet Union itself. And once he began with some reforms, some limited reforms, it became apparent that the people wanted much, much more. And when the wall came down, when different components of the Soviet Union, republic started clamoring for independence. He was overwhelmed and couldn't really handle all this crises. And then his most important political opponent Boris Yeltsin took advantage of all these crises, realized that he Boris Yeltsin could ride the wave of Russian nationalism and basically become leader of Russia and dismantle the Soviet Union, thereby leaving Mikhail Gorbachev, his hated nemesis as president of nothing. And so that's what yeltsin did. And that plan was daring, but it succeeded brilliantly, 30 years ago in December 1991. So all of these were very contingent events that could have turned out very differently. It also could have turned out much more violently. So I think it's worthwhile to really look at what happened and understand just how contingent those events were. And when empires collapse Mary, you know, brutality violence that they usually coincide. You think of the British departure from Kenya, Malaya, the Indian subcontinent. The French departure from Vietnam, Algeria, the Belgium from Congo, what's happened here with the Soviet Union's collapse was very much the exception. Now take us back to February 1990. When James biker, the U.S. Secretary of State, met with Mikhail Gorbachev. Yes, okay. So the wall comes down and it's clear that along with the wall, the Cold War order is crumbling. So the obvious question is what next? What order is going to follow? And all around the world political leaders like Secretary of State James baker, president George H. W. Bush, Mikhail Gorbachev, Margaret Thatcher. They're all trying to figure out what now. And so James baker goes to Moscow and is part of a hypothetical bargain. He says words to the following effect to Mikhail Gorbachev, the leader of the Soviet Union. How about you let your half of Germany go so it can unite after the fall of the wall and we agree that NATO will not shift one inch eastward. The problem is that baker by saying that is leaning too far forward over his skis. When he gets back to Washington, his boss and old friend George Bush says you know James, that's not actually what I want. What I want is not only to preserve NATO, but also to preserve its ability to expand. So instead, James, what we're going to do is we're going to move NATO across the Cold War line, but we'll just make concessions as we do so. And the net result is actually that the territory of former East Germany to this day is the only part of Europe that is guaranteed by treaty to be nuclear free. That was the concession. The problem is that it took Gorbachev a while to figure out that what baker had said was no longer on offer. And that is the heart of the controversy that lasts to this.

Soviet Union U.S. NATO Tom Switzer Oliver millman rising Russian Federation Mikhail Gorbachev Eastern Europe Moscow Clinton Bush old Soviet Union west's alliance Mary sarati school of advanced internation center for European studies ABC radio Russia Commonwealth of Independent St George Bush
"soviet union" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"The Soviet Union in the seventies. His name was best Makov, Yuri Best cop, and they asked him. What were the four stages of combination continent communism. And the first thing he said, was demoralization. Meaning take the morals of society away. We have that next thing is, uh, I'm losing my train of thought. Anyway. It was too December, You ate the the society and then the next thing was to to, um You know? Function, manufacture a crisis. And then after that you have control. No, but his name was in the car were in that tug of war right now, And I never thought I'd see the day Tom. I never saw that. See the day in my lifetime. But, boy, am I worried about the country that Mike My kids are inheriting and my grandchildren are going to grow up in and we don't stand up and we don't rise up. If we don't rise up, and we just say enough is enough, And that means showing up at school board meetings of people. I never went through a school board meeting. You know, I haven't gone to a Pima County supervisors. You've got to go that we have to show up. We gotta show up and be heard. And you know they're not nice to us, so why should we be nice to them? Precise and if they're going to tell you as a free citizen as a taxpayer in this county, you can only speak for two minutes or three minutes. Yeah, well, it's the limit. The response..

Tom two minutes Mike three minutes Makov December Yuri Best cop seventies four stages first thing Pima County Union Soviet
"soviet union" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union" Discussed on TechStuff

"A little bit more about space suits. So let's get to it today. We're going to talk about spay and as-as most recent program intended to put american astronauts back on the moon and eventually go beyond the moon. But first let's do a quick look back into the history of the space program so back in the early nineteen sixties. The united states was a fierce competition with the then soviet union the soviets had shocked americans upon the launch of the satellite sputnik that was the first manmade object launched into orbit around the earth.

soviet union united states
"soviet union" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The way, I miss called his Child's freed, the professor emeritus at Harvard University, who did serve as Ronald Reagan's Solicitor general from 1985 to 1989, but again his view Of criminal law. In Salvati case I thought was just reprehensible because the idea was that if you were framed by the government, and you could get the earlier you could get The proof that you had been framed. Then the judges should be more considerate and more kids and being able to being willing to consider your your appeal. But if you've been in there a while, tough luck, Um, a crazy legal theory on DSA. Someone who I think was wrong, Then I think he's wrong. Now, let's go to the phones were gonna start it off with Karen in Watertown. Karen, did you get a chance to watch much of that today? You know. What's that? You know, you were the voice of reason. All right? You know, I'm unless one Democrat and I feel like this is like bizarro world going on. And you had. I think. A week ago, Harvey Silverglate and I missed the live presentation that show but I listen to the podcast. And Harvey Silverglate called it a show trial. I forget the Kind of trial. Who's comparing two show trials show trials were done in the old days in the Soviet Union. I mean, that's the way you do not want to be a fault that his show trial because a show trial has a predetermined outcome. Head. It's not gonna get it never ends well for the defendant in a show trial, okay, guilty before he's proven innocent, and you know To their credit. The today show, as did Harvey Silverglade. In his argument. They played not only Trump's words that like hell if you still want your country. And then, he said. Wants to proceed peacefully and patriotic Lee Capital and you don't s O. It's interesting because I watched the NBC Nightly news is Lester Hope and all we played with. You gotta fight like hell. But they didn't include the peaceful patriotic comments. That's what that's what that's what's called editing and it's It's unfair. Um, And there's nothing and look, Um I would not expect much more off NBC Nightly news. I would, I would hope for more. But that's kind of what you get these days. This is it's kind of what I know. But their credit, NBC today So T air both both quotes. But you know what? It comes down to Karen in that business, and I was in that business for a long time, and I have appeared on NBC's The Today Show. When I was a reporter, a channel four. We were Philly with NBC. So I've been my stories have been on the morning show. It zah different set of producers. So you have producers in the morning who fairer in terms of putting the show together, then the producers are more balanced. I should say then the it Zoe, you're very sharp person to notice that difference because the average person isn't seeing that difference. Well, it's the morning shows his oven audience, different element of the announcers and even shows different, different audience to print it moment I have to say one thing. The budging Raskin Yes. I believe his son committed suicide but his right around New Year's Eve for something. Yes, he's saying, living with emotion, and he was very emotional. Just just putting it out there. Well, let me just let me let me feel that influence his son. I really told disagree with him. And you know, I'm a sort of left wing Democrat. I'm I'm this this outcast or with E. I disagree with the first impeachment. I just with this one, you know, really. It was hardly civil great when he said The voters. Voted trump out of office in November. So what's the point of this? Impeachment? It the point and I grooved insurance. Is that yeah, to just come out Partisanship division. And like, Oh, well, we're righteous and and we're the good ones. I don't know. It's just It's so simplistic to to look at Trump's words in the rally that day and say, Oh, yes, that is right. You know, I really disagree with what you did for the two months leading up to election. And as you said, I think a week ago, you know, he could have been a class act and around Thanksgiving could have exited And you know with his head high and said, Look, you know I lost but he didn't and that was really dangerous. I also I also think the mistake If you want to find Trump guilty off anything if you really want to stretch, I think he should have totally separated himself from that rally that day, because by going to that rally, and I'm sure encouraging people to go to that rally and publicizing that rally, he basically brought people to Washington on a false promise. And the false promise was that somehow some way the will of the American public would be refuted, and that somehow some way there would be some Mac a nation while the electoral college votes were counted, and he would emerge, the winner wasn't going to happen. It was all preordained. And because people don't understand civics, they're not taught civics in high school. They don't understand. That there was merely a ceremonial event. Ah, lot of those folks who are out there demonstrating thought that their mere presence would influence members of the Senate, and that is the mist. But that's not the mist. That is what that is What I hold Trump most guilty off. I agree with this because it's so cute when you little bit simplistic. Just say he incited insurrection. No, he did not. His words do not incite insurrection. It's all the actions like that leave enough to it to mislead. Um, but I don't think that they felt that that would have been any what they would consider to be an impeachable offense. I think again long about Thanksgiving. He should have folded his cards and said, Guess what? I'll be back. You know that an artist Schwarzenegger tragedy tragedy for the woman who was shot on Capitol police. Tragedy for the police officer for the capital to each other's who lost his life trying to treat people by the way, I think, who had medical problems that day and who died? You know you're in a huge crowd. You hit the You hit the ground. You have a heart attack, or you have something like that. There's no one there to help you. Um so Uh, is always carrying I so appreciate your calling this show and identifying yourself. I know that that you are a genuine liberal. Harvey Silverglate is a genuine liberal. Um, uh, We're going to hear that, you know, I mean, that's a hobbyist. Open minded liberal. Yes, you absolutely are. Um and we might disagree on some subjects, but I think we have a lot more in common than people would realize I will talk with you soon. Okay? I hope you have good work. Thanks, Karen. I promise. Thank you very much Appreciated. Good night 617 to 5 14 30, Triple eight. 9 to 9 10 30. We'll come right back on night side By the way, the ladies line 617931 10 30. You heard if you watch today, If you watch the news, you heard what happened. I got plenty of sound bites here. The sound bites I want to hear from tonight are yours. Whatever your point of view about this entire process. You must have an opinion on this at this point coming back on night side right after the News at the bottom of the hour. Nightside With Dan Ray WBZ Boston's news radio have weight to lose, but feel your situation is different than mine or the other.

Trump Karen Harvey Silverglate NBC Um Ronald Reagan Harvey Silverglade Harvard University Soviet Union professor Watertown Senate Lee Capital Lester Hope Zoe Raskin
"soviet union" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Com 5 36, and then you'd be a peacemaker to football. How did she were Brett Farve camp came out and said the kid should not play youth football. I saw that grabbed my attention, But in the story I read I'm sure there's different right up something right? Did you? Did you find an age Does it say what age is? He says he has three grandkids 10 6 and three and I wouldn't encourage them to play tackle football at all right. But how about the 13 year old? They're on the cusp of middle school and bright And is it OK there Because that's you know, that's what we would buy. I've been Josh played. On Carter both played before the sixth grade. But we shouldn't let him but you know when they get the middle school, I think is the benchmark for people. But he didn't mention an age. I guess he's talking about his grandkids age. Yeah, I think that's what it is. It's probably you know, he's probably is a I'm not a doctor. I can't tell you exactly right. But he but he said, Hey, you know, he said Kid should be warned about playing tackle football due to concussion fears and the lack of treatment for Mild traumatic brain injuries, he said. I love tackle football, but I just don't think it's a very smart thing to do for kids. I understand that sentiment, but men when you start if tackling for the first time Is when they've got some speed and some wait. Tell him That seems kind of scary. Yeah. You wanted to be coached up right to Yeah, That's the other thing. Yeah, that's the deal. That's half the battle. We lost a couple of greats over the weekend. How In in in in all different sectors, really of our culture. George Shultz died. The former secretary of state under Ronald Reagan Solve was 100. Yeah. You know, it was 100 years old. Wow. Wow. Well, that's a lot of history passing on it. Yes, yes, served his country in the military wore the uniform. But in fact it was read One quote to call him one of the most consequential policy policy makers of all time. Well, you know, he got there. I'm sure you had a big role in the the Mr Gorbachev, tear down this wall speech of the Cold War. Yeah, s Oh, yeah. Wow, To think about that to bring down Russia. Yeah, I mean, that's that's truly amazing. It is amazing. Guess the Soviet Union rather not Russian, but hey, was teaching at Stanford, by the way. Still a bit Well, A pinto. What age? Well, he had a professor emeritus title there. But he died of this home on Stanford's campus Saturday, where he spent his later years teaching economics. I'll be done. Yeah, one of two people In history to have held four different federal Cabinet posts. Uh, I don't I could name the other three He was Treasury secretary director Management budget ended his labor secretary under Nixon, secretary of state under Ronald Reagan. So I had no idea. Yeah, I just do. Secretary of State. How about that? Okay. George Shultz died. We also wants Leon Spinks. Former heavyweight champion of the world. That's a heck of a fight. If I remember it was it was it was a full fight. 15 rounder. And he didn't Did he not. Where do these dark Muhammed Ali out? Yeah, yeah. How do you beat Muhammad on leave? Yeah. Leon said it without any front teeth exact in that amazing, Yes. Yeah, that was only Leon Spinks at the time that it was only is eighth professional fight. How did he go from zero to fighting? Mohammed Ali just well. He was in the Olympics. He's young. He was in the Olympics, and 76 he fought is a light heavyweight. He won a gold medal there. People. You know, people always talk about all the woman upset. That was, but Leon Spinks was a good fighter. Yeah, yeah. They met again seven months later at the Superdome in New Orleans, and only one Okay, that time. Hey, fought again and 81 against Larry Holmes and lost. Where? What? What has happened. What has happened to boxing? I can't. Maybe your boxer. I know in an amazing where I could remember is a kid. My dad was into it, And it was Ernie Shavers and George Foreman and used to Mohammad Ali and Ken Norton. And I can remember those guys start parsing Friday night boxing with my grandpa. Yeah. Every Friday night. Jill Ip Had box I think was Gillette had boxing on And why would you box with your grandpa? A little prayer fellows like that. You know how it was great. My dad was in the box into his great memories. Yeah, but managed when it went away. It went away. It's all street fighting now. It well, I don't know that you talk about the M m Make stuff. Yeah, Yeah, that Zamora popular thing. Yeah, okay. I mean, you think about for me? I mean, who was the last Shawn? Who you have is the last great heavyweight. Uh, This guy. Got it? Yeah, it's possible. Say, yeah, I can't remember his name. Great fighter. For me. It was kind of after Larry Holmes. We had a vander Holyfield. Yeah, I guess you didn't. And then, uh, yeah. Mike Tyson, obviously. Yeah, it was after those guys. I remember watching the Michael Spinks. Yes, Brother, Tyson Fight, right and friend of my dad's had Pay per view, so he invited us over. And it was a big, huge build up. Lasted 91 2nd, right. Exactly, Yeah. This guy just remember me paid like 70 75 bucks from to the paper view. You know 91. Yeah. You paid a dollar of second. Wow, I'm coming up here and find 45. Now the President Trump is gone. That's what the Washington Post is looking into. They talk about right. I think they aren't They great. If there really are there on top of things, we'll get into that. And then the six o'clock I We'll talk about some of the commercials from the Super Bowl, plus stupid jokes. Review of the half time show, Okay, we'll get into that. But right now it's traffic.

Leon Spinks football George Shultz Ronald Reagan Larry Holmes Brett Farve Michael Spinks Stanford Muhammed Ali Olympics Josh Carter Treasury secretary director Ma Russia gold medal Washington Post boxing New Orleans Soviet Union
"soviet union" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"soviet union" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mm. Go ahead and sign up. I was actually born in in the Soviet Union. So you were Michaelis. Yeah. So you have training. You're ready. I'm ready. Um, e talk to somebody on the New York State Vaccine Distribution Task Force, which is supposed to be advising the stamina to do of this name's Rose Do him. Justice runs a Community Health Care Association of New York State. She says she is spending all day every day trying to distribute vaccine. Have to say she made a pretty convincing case for why Dennis are not being vaccinated till week for even though the designated one, eh? In New York state. The state estimated that there are two million health care workers two million people who fall into that One a priority, so that's a lot of people and it's just not feasible to vaccinate everybody the first day. So the state decided the first dibs should go to people who were in more immediate danger, like medical personnel who care directly for covert patients and nursing home staffs and residents. When I ran that by Dr Naimark. She agreed. It seems sensible. Nobody had told this to her. Nobody is pretending. Vaccine distribution is going well in New York. Right now, The state is only managed to administer about 40% of the vaccine that's been given which is actually better than the country as a whole, which is used about 1/4 of the vaccine that's out there. Still Crazy rose to hand used to describe her own feeling about how it's going with this. And what panicked. I'm e ticked off some of the many, many logistical challenges they faced figure out which facilities could look over the most shots and had a staff and schedule in track Hundreds of thousands of people getting vaccine they had to create scheduling software and figure out what to do in smaller health centers of people don't show up for appointments. Which is an issue because once you have opened up a violent vaccine, you have to use all the 10 doses inside of it in a few hours, or they go bad. Their health centers have been told to vaccinate people from other kinds of facilities like mental health providers. And the health centers are trying to figure out okay. How much allocation do they have? How much of the other providers staff can they accommodate? How can they get those people either to come to the health center or Is there a way to get some of the vaccine to those residential settings? Right? It's so Don't know the details. They're so kind of mind numbing when he described it there. Yes, This process begins in the front end with he's like super genius is using this incredibly advanced science to like, Invent the thing that was the hard part And then just literally like, how do we schedule people from this facility into like a time when we can get enough of them to use all the dose in the vial? You know, That's what we're getting stuck. Yes, And I think that's really.

New York Community Health Care Associat Dr Naimark Michaelis Soviet Union Dennis
"soviet union" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"soviet union" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Was actually born in in the Soviet Union. So you were Michaelis. Yeah. So you have training. You're ready. I'm ready. Uh, e talk to somebody on the New York State Vaccine Distribution Task Force, which is supposed to be advising the statement. To do of this name's Rose Do him. Justice runs a Community Health Care Association of New York State. She says she is spending all day every day trying to distribute vaccine. Have to say she made a pretty convincing case for why Dennis are not being vaccinated till week for even though the designated one, eh? In New York state. The state estimated that there are two million health care workers two million people who fall into that One a priority, so that's a lot of people and it's just not feasible to vaccinate everybody the first day. So the state decided the first dibs should go to people who were in more immediate danger, like medical personnel who care directly for covert patients and nursing home staffs and residents. When I ran that by Dr Naimark. She agreed. It seems sensible. Nobody had told this to her. Nobody is pretending. Vaccine distribution is going well in New York. Right now, The state is only managed to administer about 40% of the vaccine that's been given which is actually better than the country as a whole, which is used about 1/4 of the vaccine that's out there. Still Crazy rose to hand used to describe her own feeling about how it's going with this. And what panicked. I'm e ticked off some of the many, many logistical challenges they faced figure out which facilities could look over the most shots on the staff and schedule and track hundreds of thousands of people getting vaccine. They had to create scheduling software and figure out what to do in smaller health centers of people don't show up for appointments. Which is an issue because once you have opened up a violent vaccine, you have to use all the 10 doses inside of it in a few hours, or they go bad. Their health centers have been told to vaccinate people from other kinds of facilities like mental health providers. And the health centers are trying to figure out okay. How much allocation do they have? How much of the other providers staff can they accommodate? How can they get those people either to come to the health center or Is there a way to get some of the vaccine to those residential settings? Right? It's so, um Don't know the details. They're so kind of mind numbing when he described it. Yes, this process begins in the front end with these, like super genius is using this incredibly advanced science. To like, Invent the thing that was the hard part. And then just literally like, how do we schedule people from this facility into like a time when we can get enough of them to use all the dose in the vial? Yeah, That's what we're getting stuck. Yes, And I think that's really where but that people who do that kind of thing don't get enough credit. Exactly. There's no Nobel Prize for.

New York Community Health Care Associat Dr Naimark Michaelis Soviet Union Nobel Prize Dennis
"soviet union" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:25 min | 2 years ago

"soviet union" Discussed on KQED Radio

"U. S was when the Soviet Union the USSR, what later got called the Evil Empire by Ronald Reagan. Sent up a satellite successfully in the US walk up. To the sweat off something coming from out of space on destroying the U. S. And there was a Moment where people came together. And achieved something that lasted a very long time, which is us superiority in space. I'm hopeful that we're getting closer to despotic moment. Is the building building building and I think the combination of inequality and injustice have come together. But I'm not completely optimistic because I don't expect this to be a top down process. If you're hoping for top part down process, it's not gonna happen. This has got to be bottom up. It really has got to come from the grass roots and develop into a lasting movements. The companies have gotten it. Because the employees care and the employees have put enormous pressure on companies to be more socially responsible. I don't think governments quite get it is yet so it's gonna have to be a sustained movement, but I think we're closer to the Sputnik moment than we've been for a long time. That's a great point of make, and I should say, by the way that if anyone who's watching one starts a question Please do go ahead with a cure a function on the screen and we would love to bring in some of your questions into the discussion of B. Proceed But I should say that I think you made a great point them home because again. When I think about what's happened the last six months and compare it to 2000 and eight there two things that leap out of me. One is that the CEO this time round do appear to be sprouting a social conscience. In a way that they absolutely were not in 2000 and eight for the most part on do you know you could sit there and say, Well, this is just about their own survival, and they're concerned about, you know, sort of pitch books of the gate. But certainly the mood in the C suite changed on the other thing that I'm very struck by is the degree to which millennials on younger people and Mama and I both got teenagers about same age. Um, absolutely engaged. And to my shame my daughter through her social media posts has bean learning about the news on average, about a day or two ahead of me. Because they're all busy talking to each other's teenagers on she is red hot, engaged in a way that I wasn't at her age. And I don't think that really teenagers were back in 2008. Either of you guys got any thoughts about that? Well, what I think one of the things that is the case. I mean, I think this is gonna be one of the big challenges for in the 21st century for companies that I want. I want to lead in the 21st century. They're gonna have to deal with the fact that Consumers and in fact, especially younger consumers care about these issues where there's thies social questions or whether it's the environmental climate change questions they're having to pay attention to these, and in many Cases, these young people whether this till the weather, the teenagers or college or at work, now have a voice. They get to organize the getting engaged to get to speak and and and and they find their ways into working for these companies, and in those companies, they have a voice so quite often, and it's quite intrigued to see what the I suspect part of the response we're seeing from business is in part driven by that, but I think it's also impart driven by the fact that they're starting to see the reality around them. I mean, look at the range of issues whether the social questions the environmental questions But even questions around the 24th century comes gonna have to deal with like, how do we deal with the use of technology in our systems and our economies in our business where there's everything from privacy or the role of platforms and these questions? These have become real questions that companies in the 21st century having to now really think about I think everything's changed said is right. Think companies generally realize you can't be a good house in a bad neighborhood that you've got it care about the neighborhood. But I think there's something else that I know that you very aware of Julian. Is that there's a level of embarrassment because within weeks off this crisis while the unemployment wait was shooting up, while more than 30 million Americans have lost their jobs at that point. Cos We're raising money left right and center at very low rates. Wall Street had disconnected from Main Street. And that's because the policy response was very effective when it came to financial side and it is Cos and which investors that benefit from from these asset markets. It's not the person in the street. So there's also part of an embarrassment that Cos the big companies expect and owners of financial assets are doing so much better than the rest of the world. And there's a fear that comes with that. Which is you know you You said it wants to pitch fork. You know they come. So I think as much of it is that there's a positive has also less charitable and element going on here..

US Ronald Reagan Soviet Union U. S USSR CEO Mama thies Julian
"soviet union" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"soviet union" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"The heavily favored Soviet Union 4 to 3. One of the biggest upsets and Olympic history overcame the steroids and everything. I mean, these folks good grief, flipping risky. Do you remember that thing that what was that? Oh, that the movie that you guys used to always watch with Michael Jordan and the space jam based jammer by they get up. It's time to jam out what it was like those. What are those guys from that planet or whatever. Believe they were called the mon star Amon stars. That's what the Russian team looked like. It was good. It was very true. Yeah, and they came out on ice. And we're going one that exactly, But they beat them voice a 43. Yeah. Where they jacked up on steroids. You know they were. Of course they were. They were all made in a lab somewhere in Russia. Yeah, I'm imagining it like the rocky training sequence where it's going back and forth with Dolph Lundgren, right? Yeah. And they're just injecting him with more steroids. Look Like he could pick you up and rip you in. Hell can he see Scaring Jay's away ski? Well, how about some more recent history? Okay, This is also from the scientific community. Oh, here we go. 2017 the discovery of seven earth size planets orbiting the store. Trappist one Trappist one Yet now this raises the possibility of alien life. Of course it does, but seven earth size planets in the habitable zone of a star. Ah, one of the odds I'm curious about it. I know you don't give two rats hats as they say. I could not care less. But there you go. You don't care about alliums? No, I don't care about alliums. Whatever they are, like, Oh, aliens. No, I don't get really aliens. The troll guy here know that guy's just weird, isn't it? Well, I would love to discover some alien life, Would you? Really? Yeah. I would be thrilled. What would you do with this? Like the dog chasing the car? You know when she catch it? What do you wanna go? That's a good point. Well, I'm gonna take you back a little bit. But I mean, way back. Way, Way, Way. Way back. That's going way back then. A little further back. 14 55, Lord, man, it'll be this forward back. Johannes Gutenberg Princes First Bible. Whoa! That's a big one changes everything that does change everything. Now everybody can read the Bible. You see? Yes, you have to read to you by the church elders or the priest or whatever. That's what started kind of people having an individual relationship with religion. Dear Ugo. Interesting, isn't it? But before that they were selling tickets to get into heaven with we're not indulgences and that kind of Yeah, That's really kind of strange. Isn't it? A little shady? Yeah. Look, you can you can cheat on your wife. But if you pay us, and we'll sort of a race that that's just kinda creepy. Yeah. 18 36 Alamo is besieged for 13 days that last until March, 6 this is by the Mexican army. You know what? I had almost forgotten. And you're not supposed to forget the element. Almost let my mind Thanks for and don't forget the main. All right. Remember the man? Yes, but this was General Santa Anna. Yes. And eventually the entire garrison was killed. Good lordy. Yes. And don't forget that. It just was slipping my mind again. Good Lord. We were talking about movie food earlier. Yeah, s so it is interesting that on this date in 18 96 The Tootsie roll was first introduced. Well, Leo Hirschfield introduced that forced the Tootsie roll. I'm actually not that happy about it. Tootsie rolls stink on I You don't like to see role that candy corn. You got something against came to go. The deal with you and Kandy. Cool having a bomb in the studio talking about candy corn, But give me some sardines. Yeah, that's the irony Is that you? Hey, candy, corn and Tootsie rolls, But you love sardines. What is the deal with your taste buds?.

Dolph Lundgren Soviet Union Michael Jordan Leo Hirschfield Russia Kandy General Santa Anna Alamo Lord Mexican army ski Jay