20 Burst results for "Soviet Government"

Ladies' First

Your Brain on Facts

05:35 min | 3 months ago

Ladies' First

"Valentina Tereshkova was twenty two years old when she made her first parachute jump with a local aviation club in nineteen, fifty nine and she loved it. unbeknownst to her this exhilarating pastime was giving her skills that would bring her to the attention of the Soviet government. The Soviets needed someone who could handle themselves jumping from twenty thousand feet. The mandatory ejection altitude from the re entry of a rocket capsule. One of the many facets of the space race to the Soviets wanted to win was to have the first woman in space in February nineteen, sixty, two Tereshkova and four other women, three parachutists and one pilot began the intensive training to become cosmonauts. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. We're headed toward another presidential election and it seems like both a minute ago and an attorney ago that we had a female candidate for president would most people don't know is that the first female candidate? Rian before she was even allowed to vote. Victoria Claflin later, Victoria Woodhall was one of ten children born to illiterate mother and a petty criminal father. Would Hell attended school sporadically for a few years. At Age Fifteen, she married a doctor who soon revealed himself to be an alcoholic philanderer. To make matters worse the sixteen year old woodhall gave birth to a mentally handicapped son who would need extra care in eighteen fifty four. Three of would hold siblings had died as children. And she claims she had clairvoyant powers to communicate with them. Always looking for a new scam, to run. Her father put her on the road with her sister Tennessee as a faith healing and fortune telling act selling elixirs that promised to cure everything from asthma to cancer. They didn't. In fact, Tennessee was indicted for manslaughter after one of her patients died. By some good fortune that I don't know the sisters found themselves with a wealthy patron in the form of railroad magnate Cornelius Vanderbilt. He and Tennessee were rumored to be lovers. Stock Tips that she picked up during their relationship came in pretty handy during an eighteen, sixty, nine gold panic during which the sisters supposedly netted seven hundred thousand dollars. With. Vanderbilt's bankrolling Victoria and Tennessee then opened their own highly publicized firm named Woodhall Claflin and company becoming the first female stockbrokers on wall. Street. However they were never granted a seat on the New York Stock Exchange. It would take another near century before Muriel Siebert did in nineteen, sixty seven. In the same year that she became a stockbroker would attended her first suffragette rally and immediately became a passionate devotee of the 'cause. She befriended or beguiled a congressman to get her an invitation to testify before the House Judiciary Committee. She argued that women did already have the right to vote under the fourteenth and fifteenth amendments those granted persons born or naturalized in the United, states citizenship and prohibited voter discrimination. But the house declined to enact any legislation on the matter. Even still the appearance made her a celebrity among suffragettes. In. April. Of Eighteen seventy, just two months after opening her brokerage firm woodhull announced her candidacy for president of the United States on a platform of women's suffrage regulation of monopolies nationalization of railroads, an eight hour workday direct taxation. Abolition of the death penalty and welfare for the poor what whole helped organize the equal rights party. which nominated her at its May eighteen, seventy two. Famed abolitionist Frederick Douglass was selected as her running mate and told about eventually he never acknowledged it officially, and in fact, he campaigned for the incumbent Republican Ulysses s grant. What else name appeared on ballots in a couple of states. Knows for certain votes she received because apparently they weren't counted. All of this was essentially moot. Though considering that would hold did not reach the constitutionally required age of thirty five until six months after the inauguration. It would be nineteen, sixty four before a woman was actively considered for a nomination of a major party. When Margaret Smith qualified for the ballot of six state primaries even coming in second in Illinois. The only female candidate other than Clinton was faith spotted Eagle a native American activist who received a vote from Robert. Sexual. Junior. WHO's referred to as a faithless elector for not voting has pledged section also voted for why known Luke for vice. President. Luke is executive director of honor, the Earth a native environmental organization, which plays an active role in the Dakota access pipeline protests.

Valentina Tereshkova Tennessee Cornelius Vanderbilt President Trump Victoria Woodhall Muriel Siebert Victoria Claflin Woodhall Claflin United States Luke Soviet Government Frederick Douglass Rian Margaret Smith House Judiciary Committee Asthma United Clinton Congressman
"soviet government" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:44 min | 3 months ago

"soviet government" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You my version of summer kitchen? Yes, please. So is 95 degrees out today and my downstairs neighbor is out of town and left me her keys. So it's been like for dinner. I am totally going to go down to her place. And like, Sear my chicken thigh, So you don't have to open the windows in my own apartment, not only going to break into her environment and cook, but when that's like all I could think of when I think of summer kitchens now. But when you were growing up in Ukraine, summer kitchens were a more legit affair. Maybe we'll call them. Can you tell us about them? Yeah, so some of kitchens exist all over Ukraine, especially going to rural areas and smaller towns, and they are A one room building. Basically nothing glamorous. Andre situated just a few steps away from your main porch from your main house on DH, and you know it. It looks almost like a smaller version of your houses. Got four walls, a roof. A porch on inside, You've got your stove and sometimes a a big kind of like masonry oven. If you had two specialists in the village, they would install one of those where you cook and also heats the building. And they are used during the summer to cook your everyday meals and also their main purpose actually is to do all of your preserving for winter because Ukraine is You know people that very seasonally and quite a few people still have called vegetable patches, but actually, they brought like small holdings. So you'd get this great big lots of vegetables and fruit come September, and people would bring all of their three liter jars out and would start preserving and And you know, it's almost like a semi industrial operation. So it it would be really quite messy and quite hot to do it in your main house. So these kitchens almost like kitchen workshops off sorts where people do all of these good things. Yeah. And what do you remember most about yours from when you were young, Eso our stomach. It's in wass. Made out of brick, just like Oh, main house. You know, For example, in northern Ukraine, you get the made out of wood. And they're very pretty. So I was was, you know, not as charming as some some of them can be, buddy. You know, of course, is a child have the most wonderful memories connected to it. So I was drawn in the summer would wake up and I was kind of, you know, trundled to the summer kitchen and my mom would be gone, you know, should be at work. And she would always leave things on the table there so she would pick some strawberries and leave them in this beautiful enamel bowl and she'd make these lazy dumplings as we call the maid with curd cheese. What's a lazy dumplings? At least dumplings. They're almost like Italian nudie so you'd use this curd Cheese, which is a guest on American equivalent will be Mix it with just a little bit of flour. You know, It's mainly cheese a little bit of flour, flour and an egg for binding a little bit of salt. And then you just make thes little pillows. Almost then you boil them and then actually, we had them sweet. I think my mom tossed them unbuttoned added a little bit of sugar as well. But now I make it with honey. Yeah, And she would also do all of this kind of crazy, Preserving come September, with all the jaws and everything and Take all of the Berries that we go and should have this really massive pot of jam on the stove and the best bit off. It was the foam that would collect on top. On Britain. Some people say what's come, But to us it was like the taste is bitter. It was like, basically area rated sugar and fruit juices so she'd collected Put it into a bowl, and that was a special treat. Oh, cool. But this is so interesting because I feel like you know, Every traditional culture has thiss notion of ago. Now it's time to harvest. Obviously, in the warmer months, we've to preserve for the cold it onto the year. Bye. Why was there this particular unique tradition of having its own structure? Having its own space? You right? This really beautiful line the book The summer kitchens encourage a very intimate, almost spiritual connection to every living thing around you. Why do you think that was so? Important in in the culture that you grew up in. Well, actually, you know, a young couple's life would often start in the summer kitchen, so they exist in one form or another in the early 20th century. But after the second World War A young couple would get married, and then they would get you know a piece of land. Perhaps even though it was the Soviet Union, you know, in the south of Ukraine in Ukraine, it was still possible and they would quickly build this little structure, one room structure and they would put a makeshift bed in it and a stove and then they would build the bigger house during the warmer months. You know, maybe the villages will come and help out. And then they would also put the seeds in for the you know, grow the vegetables put that small orchard trees, and so all of this there, life would basically kind of like classroom around them. And then eventually they move into the big house. But they would have this separate structure, which, of course, you know that would be handed to uses a as a kitchen in the summer, and now it's you know, we've seen so many of them with traveled all over Ukraine and you know we drove off. We did about 10,000 kilometers or so. Ukraine is huge on DH there so different sometimes there just one room, But some people have really gone all out. And you know, they even like add on different rooms and build a model a little bit. So you've got humane house and then you've got this summer kitchen with kind of like extra bits. Sometimes they turn them into granny flats and put like even a boffin and stuff, So you know they're developing more and more, and they're also disappearing suddenly. Some younger generations. You know, people of my age and younger. I don't really want them anymore. Perhaps they You know, preserving is still done by all the generations. But maybe the younger younger ones are not as interested anymore. In the book. You had an interesting note, which was that in the Soviet era. The Soviet government tried to standardize the cuisine across the U. S. S r, You know, huge. The biggest land mass my history. Yeah, Like, so you're trying to standardize all these cultures that exist over many thousands of miles, And you want that Ukrainian traditions and language.

Ukraine Soviet government Andre Soviet Union Britain
"soviet government" Discussed on Unexplained Mysteries

Unexplained Mysteries

03:04 min | 10 months ago

"soviet government" Discussed on Unexplained Mysteries

"The death of the D. At low of hikers in nineteen fifty nine has long baffled investigators and history buffs alike. Many popular theories like avalanches or wind phenomena can't account for their strangest injuries like the high levels of radiation on two bodies in order to explain the most outlandish damage. We have to look to human invention and the possibility that the Soviet government turned a directed energy weapon on the students. It might sound like something out of a science fiction movie. But Nikola Tesla allegedly invented a Reagan capable of firing beams of electricity at the start of the twentieth century in nineteen thirty seven. He bragged that he would demonstrate the weapons might but he was fatally struck by a car before he could back up. Those claims. Assuming Tesla wasn't lying it must have been possible to shoot directed energy from a weapon. If such a technology did exist the Soviet government would have been highly motivated to develop and test it in one thousand nine hundred fifty nine and those officials turn their newly invented death-ray on nine unsuspecting victims. The outlaw of hikers who merely found themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time. It's possible government officials didn't mean to kill the group. They pointed their prototype. Reagan at what they believed to be an uninhabited pass in the Ural Mountains. Then they turned it on only after the students had died. Did the government discover? They killed nine civilians in order to hide their complicity and prevent news of the classified weapon from getting out. Soviet officials scrambled to cover up the real cause of the data of hikers deaths. A beam of deadly electric energy would explain the gruesome damage to the hikers the car crash levels of trauma and the radiation exposure it also fits with investigator level even odds observation that the tree tops near the campsite were singed in nineteen ninety. He published an article called the enigma of the fireballs saying we found that some young pine trees at the edge of the forest had burn marks. But those marks did not have a concentric form or some other pattern. There was no epicenter. This once again confirmed that heated beams of a strong but completely unknown at least two. Us energy redirecting their firepower towards specific objects in this case people acting selectively.

Soviet government Reagan Nikola Tesla Ural Mountains investigator
On This Day in History: The Kyshtym Disaster

This Day in History Class

04:38 min | 1 year ago

On This Day in History: The Kyshtym Disaster

"The Day was September Twenty Ninth Nineteen fifty seven a waste tank exploded at plutonium processing plant in the Soviet Union. The explosion led to the contamination of nearby towns but the Soviet Oh via government resorted to covering up the custom disaster as it's now known people in the area are still suffering from the effects of the nuclear contamination and in nineteen fifty seven during the Cold War the Soviet Union was embroiled in a nuclear arms race with the United States the custom but nuclear energy complex then known as Chelyabinsk Forty was located in the euro mountains several miles east of the city of Keystone. The nuclear lear reactors and plutonium processing plant were built at the complex in the nineteen forties for the development of nuclear weapons. The city built to house the workers was called Chillier Pinsk sixty five the secret nuclear facility is now called my Yuck and the surrounding city is known as as yours there was such a I pushed develop nuclear weapons that safety and research on the effects of radioactivity on people and the environment was not a priority even before the nineteen fifty fifty seven disaster was the source of many hazards and accidents workers did not wear protective gear nuclear reactors dumped radioactive waste right into the take our river villagers who used the contaminated water faced radiation poisoning and other illnesses though there there have been many accidents at the plant since it opened the one. It's infamous bore happened on September. Twenty Ninth Nineteen fifty seven cooling systems surrounded the buried tanks that contained liquid reactor waste but one of the cooling systems had been malfunctioning the waist grew so hot from atomic decay the system failed the tanks cooling liquid evaporated and the seventy to eighty tons of radioactive waste inside the tank combusted the live live birth in the explosion created an aerosol plume of radioactive fallout that was spread over about eight thousand square miles or twenty thousand square kilometers earth though around two hundred and seventy thousand people lived in the area. Only eleven thousand people were evacuated and evacuations were slow and and left many people behind the Soviet government did not tell evacuees what happened and the people who remained in the area were exposed to radiation as they were tasked with destroying crops livestock in fact the Soviets kept the cause of the disaster a secret even as radiation sickness that many people people to the hospital and people began dying the Western press did receive reports that there had been a nuclear accident in the Soviet Union but those reports were a little more than rumor until the dissident Soviet biologist Zota's a met Beta reported on the disaster in the journal New Scientist in nineteen seventy six you the Soviet government continued to deny the occurrence of the disaster until it began declassifying relevant documents in nineteen eighty nine. It's been posited the US CIA knew about the disaster for years before it was uncovered but kept it a secret and later downplayed the severity of the accident to avoid data sowing doubt about the safety of American nuclear plants. The custom disaster was rated at a level six as a serious accident on the International National Nuclear and radiological event scale making it the third most severe nuclear accident ever the two above it major accidents rated as level seven on the scale are the disasters at Fukushima answer noble the reason the disaster is remembered as the cash disaster. Even though it didn't take place there is because people were told that a boiler explosion the city caused a mess that residents were made to clean up with no protective gear. Russia has claimed claimed that the plant stopped dumping waste into the river though some people have questioned whether the dumps ever really stopped some villagers who lived along the river where relocated but many still live in their contaminated villages cancer birth defects miscarriages and other health issues occur at the higher rates in places along the river. The Mayak plant is still in operation but it no longer processes weapons-grade plutonium it now reprocesses processes spent nuclear fuel.

Soviet Union Soviet Government International National Nuclear United States Chelyabinsk Chillier Pinsk Keystone Russia Zota New Scientist CIA Twenty Thousand Square Kilomet Eight Thousand Square Miles Eighty Tons
On This Day in History: Igor Gouzenko Defected to Canada

This Day in History Class

04:41 min | 1 year ago

On This Day in History: Igor Gouzenko Defected to Canada

"Was september fifth nineteen forty five soviet viet- cipher clerk eager goozeica left at the soviet embassy in ottawa ontario carrying more than one hundred secret documents during world award to canada and the soviet union became allies. Ottawa was an important site for the g._r._u. Which was the main intelligence directorate of the u._s._s._r.'s general staff whose anka was an intelligence officer working at the headquarters in moscow in nineteen forty three. It was sent to ottawa. His official title was civilian employees of the soviet embassy at ottawa but he was actually a cipher clerk on the staff. After the military attache colonel nikolai voted it was gonzaga's job to deal with transmissions to and from moscow his wife spent lana moved to canada with him a few months after he arrived in ottawa. Zanka was impressed with life in ottawa where or he found that his quality of life was better than it was in the soviet union in canada. There were democratic elections freedom of speech and better better living conditions in comparison life under soviet rule and conditions at the soviet embassy were oppressive. Kuzinca also found out that at the g. argue and the people's commissariat of internal affairs which also led intelligence activities were using the embassy as a headquarters from which they conducted conducted espionage activities against canada. It's about inhabit ordered to keep his firing secret from the soviet ambassador. Georgi zarubin in the soviet union was not simply an ally of canada in nineteen forty four the boat and expectedly told gazeta that he and his wife and his son were being sent back to moscow he had his departure delayed but he knew that the reasons for his dismissal could not be good and and he feared the situation he may return to in moscow disenchanted with the soviet union and attracted to life in canada gazeta began planning his defection he copied or took documents that he believed canadian officials would be interested in on september fifth nineteen forty five five he left the embassy carrying telegrams sent to and received from moscow and many other documents that day and the next he took his these documents and story of soviet espionage to the minister of justice the ottawa journal and the ottawa magistrates court but they turned him away on the night of september six. He and his family hid in a neighbor's apartment. While soviet agents raided his home another a neighbor called the ottawa police who confronted the soviet agents and got them to leave with the help of norman robertson who was the under secretary of state for the department of external affairs kuzinca was taken to the royal canadian mounted police headquarters the next morning for questioning zanka good gave the r._c._m._p. Documents detailing the soviets espionage efforts in canadian government departments and in western atomic research project prime minister mackenzie king was initially hesitant and unsure of gonzaga's motives but just two days after he defected kuzinca anka and his family were given political asylum and put in protective custody where they continued to be questioned. Gonzaga's documents revealed field that there was a large scale system of soviet espionage through which the soviets provided moscow with classified information news of the zenko. Thank affair as it became known went public in early february nineteen forty six a royal commission was called to investigate the accusations which lead lead to the arrest of thirty nine suspects eighteen of those people were convicted in was sent to labor camps in siberia. The soviet government admitted that it obtained certain secret information from canadians but said that the information was useless. The kuzinca affair encouraged distrust of the soviet union and inspired anticommunist intimate in the west. The affair has been credited as an inciting incident. President of the cold war zanka lived under police protection with his family and canada for the rest of his life.

Soviet Embassy Soviet Union Ottawa Canada Soviet Government Moscow Ottawa Journal Kuzinca Anka Gonzaga Ottawa Magistrates Court Zanka Georgi Zarubin Royal Canadian Mounted Police Ontario Mackenzie King Colonel Nikolai Officer Norman Robertson Official
"soviet government" Discussed on The Televerse

The Televerse

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"soviet government" Discussed on The Televerse

"So probably not sure noble right away, either. But I will then make sure I keep in mind. For, you know, when I do have the head space for that to, to, to catch up with it, and, and certainly to. See more terrific performances. And again, a story that I thought I have the basic outlines of, but I'm certain I don't really know more than just a very skewed and very politicized overview. So, yeah, it's that's when I will now look forward to catching up with. Yeah. I think that's one of the good things about this is that there's, there's a degree of, like we know what happened, but I think like the concept of what actually happened and how like went down and how the Soviet government responded to is something that's a little more Paik. It's like, no, we know that it had a massive meltdown explosion. And that now we think about it as this weird sort of sight of while they're turnover dunks, and the wildlife, and the plant life, have really come roaring back and have adapted to. The fact that it's just radiated for another, like seventy sixty years. And but is also to the point where now it's like a somewhat of a tourism site as well. And so that having all of that in the background along with learning, what actually happened what the Soviet government was trying to do too at nationally cover up, but then try to deal with it. I think is just it adds a layer things that I just don't think we're in my mind. And I think that the other thing I'll add is if you liked command control, which is a book about the Tennessee nuclear missile explosion that happened in the eighties while. That is also a really good comparison to sort of the process that this, this Tra noble kind of goes through. So I think that, that or if you watch the American experience out of tation of commanding troll, which is significantly less than the book. But if you watch watch that or read that I think you'll really liked her noble. Okay. But to no good snow. I l certainly, you know, very much enjoyed dead wood the movie, which is when I had been in for two for a while. And I'm sure holds no peel for you. If you haven't seen the show. I mean, obviously, it's a it's a really well done, and beautiful an interesting movie, but it's very much a continuation of the series. There's it's a little Spence along since it went off the air. There's a little hand holding will too much hand holding with, like shot like flashbacks relic quickly will shots interspersed of events from the finale. And in other parts of the, the series run that I wish they had just trusted the actors to convey it, because they were playing the hell out of that. We don't need to cut back to alma Garret and says Bullock, sexy times because it is all over their faces too. Yeah. There's some you know it's a bit. I mean, I think I think they're trying to help those who have watched in a while, or those who never seen the show, but other than that was a bit on the nose. But other than that, I think it's a really effective and, and powerful, you know, kind of conclusion movie completely unnecessary, not even sorry because I, I know some people feel like it got cut off out of nowhere, the end of, of dead. But for me that was a perfect ending for that show, the idea that there isn't some resolution in some answers, it just life, just keeps going on. And they're out here in the like on the, the frontier and everything so insecure and can change in a moment. And the idea that there isn't some some, like final, grace note, Capri just fits with the world of the show, so much better. I really didn't think they needed it. But I mean I'm not gonna complain about. More more interactions with these characters that are so fascinating and performances. That are just absolutely compelling in wonderful. So I was really glad to get to spend time in that world again to, to see all these cast is so amazing..

Soviet government Bullock Tennessee alma Garret Spence seventy sixty years
"soviet government" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"soviet government" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"And can't even keep cities, clean New York, San Francisco, Los homelessness, ramp in unsanitary grotesque, health hazards, they've run by Democrats, and yet these people claim they're going to save the planet in the oceans and so forth. Anyway, new Bruns. It's texas. And this is Jonathan. Great to have you on the network. Hi. Hi, rush. How are you? Fine. Thank you. Thanks for having me. I'm thirty eight years old. And I've been watching that series to noble. You were speaking about earlier. Oh, and it is mind boggling, and I would the small kid when that happened and remember feeling with as a kid when it happened and what I'm anyway, speed hung. I'm watching the show and I'm watching how their government is handling that tragedy. And then how our governments handle this wall thing it's just it's, it's it's mind boggling, I feel like what's the difference between the media and the g get this point and control of the narrative. Now. That's an interesting. Take your watching the way. Sure, noble portrays, the Soviet government in a state of utter denial. About about shinola what happened and comparing the KGB to the American media when it comes to you mentioned the wall and so forth. How old were you see your thirty eight now? So are you are you do you believe the depictions of what you're seeing in this show of the Soviet government and life in the Soviet Union? And you believe what you're seeing when I was a kid we every member being like elementary school. They talked about communism and how it was and, and watching the show and just to enter Jack my dad used to work for the red Kanda visit and offer Virginia. And so he'd come home, and he told stories and things like that, about the nuclear stuff. But as far as what you're saying about the Soviet Union, how Iran and stuff, it, it, it really brings.

Soviet government Soviet Union Jack Bruns texas San Francisco New York Jonathan Iran Virginia thirty eight years
"soviet government" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"soviet government" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"And here's the people that you can go after and then like if you play that on your imagination, you get some real sense of exactly what sort of horror that would produce. You know, you think about the rape, for example, or or just the theft or, but, but it's the rape that you can really think about as as as absolute revenge for all that bitter resentment all fueled by the fact that, you know, you'd sat there for the last twenty years being completely, goddamn, useless, and bitter, and and and and angry, and and and and fantasizing about the day that would come where you'd have your. Opportunity God, and then the whole country, and that was the whole country. Just unbelievable. Yeah. I think he he spells that out very clearly, and he says it's what he's saying. You know, I'm saying that you've got a psychopath in your platoon. He saying that psychopath all that psychopath needs to flip is is the somewhat to tell him that. That's the right thing to do. And that's exactly what happened. What you said. That's it guys that were slightly psychopathic. Yep. And then it becomes okay? I'm the on the head psychopath, and you're in my village. And you're let's say you're one of those people that are in the middle. Well, whose side you're going to be on? I'm a psychopath. If you if you're not on my side, I'm gonna kill you next. Yeah. So you go hell, no. I'm on your side too. Yep. And that's. It doesn't look it's not like it takes much pressure. On people to have them fold. I mean, one of the things you see you see happening right now in our cultures. That's happening to people all the time with these Twitter wars, you know, someone will say something, they'll express an opinion, and then they'll get mauled by and but only abstractly right? It's not like there's pitchfork wielding mobs at their house on an anon- making light of it. It's no it's no pleasant thing to be more on Twitter. But that's that's an abstraction compared to these people showing up at your house. You know, and y- and what'll happen is that people will go through an abject apology in own. They'll say, well, I really didn't mean it. And now, I understand what my privileges and see how what I said could have been very hurtful to people. And you know, they they wonder through that entire apology enfold almost instantly, and that's under almost almost no pressure. Compared to what real pressure is an real pressure is when the wolves are actually at your door rather than just barking off in the day. Distance but people will fold just when they're barking in the distance. So there's one lawyer that he talks about here is the same thing as the destroy the describing I forget the guy's name. But this guy was like the premier prosecuting lawyer for for the Soviet government, and he just rips people part over and over again. And as you read about what happens him sure enough. He's one of the guys have been up on the on the defensive and. Yep. The executed. Yeah. Like, they always these tackle they built they built. A place of butchery and then threw themselves into it. You know, that's an and you see, socialists and documents this very carefully. I mean Stalin killed all the people who who were foremost actors in the Russian revolution. Right. So I mean, everyone was fed into the great grinding machine. So and Stalin himself. I mean. It looked to me like see he got himself into something approximating positive feedback loop, which is a very dangerous thing to have happened in. I think socialists, and doesn't a lovely job detailing this as well. So it's like magin that I have a fair amount of contempt for people to begin with. And then I find that people are I'm not trusting person. And I find that. I I'm very paranoid about the fact that people are lying to me, and then I develop a certain amount of power and a reputation on..

Stalin Twitter rape Soviet government theft twenty years
"soviet government" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"soviet government" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"Of the soviet union and the chief of staff of the soviet military agreeing to nuclear cuts for the first time ever in history and then gorbachev tying test but those cuts were made by the top level of the soviet government and we can return on the basis of those cuts and four months later we did any pivot for a moment what do you make of relations between the us and russia today i've never seen an american president praise a russian leader the way trump does to putin the idea of having a total inability to say anything critical about russian leader and total inability to say anything nice about a chancellor of germany prime minister britain president of france is to me very bikila in the reagan administration we always had the watchword be nice to your friends and be strong with your enemies thank you so much okay very good thank you sarah you've been listening to foreign policies the er podcast i'm sarah wild mun and i've been your host our podcast this week was produced by dan ephron edited by rob sachs for more information about foreign policy to subscribe to the er visit foreign policy dot com stitcher itunes or wherever you get your podcasts.

dan ephron er sarah britain germany putin gorbachev chief of staff rob sachs soviet union reagan administration france prime minister chancellor president russia us soviet government four months
"soviet government" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"soviet government" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Thousand i'm glad nine i heard of it read about russian your scientists book is yuri in two lobban thousand nine said russian that scientists a ufo yuri had lobban destroyed said the asteroid that a to ufo save the earth had destroyed from devastation the from asteroid to what save disaster the earth was that from the devastation that was from the all what the russian does astor was that the that was all the russian was a meteor russian meteor was it a meteor would have a been meteor maybe it russian meteor was that a would meteor have been a meteor would have been a meteoroid can you tell us a little bit about that because yeah that sounds fascinating i don't could know if you it's tell true us a little bit about i don't that know what kind of evidence there is the back that up but that's that's pretty interesting there's been a lot of things coming out of russia since the collapse of the soviet government and i know that george knapp among others have taken a great long look i know at this that sort george of thing knapp among and others what we have get taken a great out of long some of look this at this is sort of thing and very what we good get landing out of some reports of this is and very things good that landing sort of mimic reports what we've seen and here things in the united that sort states of mimic or seen in western europe and that sort what of thing we've seen and here we in talk the united about states or seen in western some of europe the and that sort activities of thing and we talk about from some of the our activities astronauts their astronauts from looking out our for the astronauts united states their looking astronauts out for the ice looking out for the world looking out but for one the of united the things states that of worries looking out for the is looking out for the world i know one of the things sintus that worries is was known as i know earth quash crossing scientists asteroids is which was known as these earth if this large crossing enough asteroids it could literally which devastate life if this large enough on the.

yuri astor russia soviet government george knapp europe
"soviet government" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"soviet government" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Thousand i'm glad nine i heard of it read about russian your scientists book is yuri in two lobban thousand nine said russian that scientists a ufo yuri had lobban destroyed said the asteroid that a to ufo save the earth had destroyed from devastation the from asteroid to what save disaster the earth was that from the devastation that was from the all what the russian does astor was that the that was all the russian was a meteor russian meteor was it a meteor would have a been meteor maybe it russian meteor was that a would meteor have been a meteor would have been a meteoroid can you tell us a little bit about that because yeah that sounds fascinating i don't could know if you it's tell true us a little bit about i don't that know what kind of evidence there is the back that up but that's that's pretty interesting there's been a lot of things coming out of russia since the collapse of the soviet government and i know that george knapp among others have taken a great long look i know at this that sort george of thing knapp among and others what we have get taken a great out of long some of look this at this is sort of thing and very what we good get landing out of some reports of this is and very things good that landing sort of mimic reports what we've seen and here things in the united that sort states of mimic or seen in western europe and that sort what of thing we've seen and here we in talk the united about states or seen in western some of europe the and that sort activities of thing and we talk about from some of the our activities astronauts their astronauts from looking out our for the astronauts united states their looking astronauts out for the ice looking out for the world looking out but for one the of united the things states that of worries looking out for the is looking out for the world i know one of the things sintus that worries is was known as i know earth quash crossing scientists asteroids is which was known as these earth if this large crossing enough asteroids it could literally which devastate life if this large enough on the.

yuri astor russia soviet government george knapp europe
"soviet government" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"soviet government" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The power plant the city was called prepaid and it tells the people who build the nuclear plant they continued building your actors and also the operate so fifty thousand people altogether and and eventually it was it was the people at the very top of the soviet government the head of the soviet government pskov who took the decision on a vacation no other low official dared to make that that the that decision so it was going for their weddings on the streets there were children playing in the sand and radiation was all over but again the the system was so much centralized and people were so afraid to take responsibility the officials so it had it had to go all the way up to to to to moscow so eventually on the april twentyseventh in the second half of the day they brought the buses and they remove those people from from the city day and a half there right living their lives in pretty serious radiation yeah two two miles away from from the central from the exploded reactor you talked about the wind how did they fare in terms of wind direction with a in the path of the window or they well they were okay for the first for for the first half of the day of the penny six and so the radiation at the power plant at the station was high the radiation in the city was last but then at surely by the by by the evening of twenty six it became really really very high and so th they told them that they were bringing them out of the city for three days only they told just stake your your documents take your money nothing else so when you go today pretty pitch again you can see this apartments that were abandoned the schools that were abandoned just almost in the middle middle of the day with the text books and and and notebooks that students had still there somewhere on the floor so the the devastation happened really people didn't have much time to to to to do that and then they started to realize that that was not enough so by early may of nineteen eighty six again this cough came and he only was the one who had the power to do that he decreed i and degration.

soviet government official moscow three days
"soviet government" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"soviet government" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Number declined since two thousand fourteen but there's still a lot of foreigners so now while you were working there you weren't taking classes or anything what was sort of research i able to do as as a student why spent my first year in moscow working in historical archives so spending time in the archives of the soviet union where you can look at the papers of their finance ministry in the papers of their foreign ministry to try to understand what was driving politics during that time period how easily accessible those it depends what you're looking for so if you're looking for secret kgb paper hit list is not there it's not there there's a tiny number of papers in the kgb that you can get access to very easily there you spoke russian at this and you read russian seriously in order to do this right and so you would just went to the library and you present yourself did they need a couple of pieces of paper but more or less you can get access to it they're used to having researchers both russian and foreign and it's not a super efficient process but it's pretty straightforward to get access to most of the types of papers you might want to see as a researcher so give me an example of what you were looking to see what would you find in moscow in these historical records that you couldn't get on the internet sheriffs in my first book was on the collapse of the soviet economies of the period from nine hundred eighty five thousand nine hundred ninety one time in re in re the opposite exactly in the puzzle yeltsin had a great time i if yeltsin seemed to be having a party but the question to me before then was what went wrong how was it that an economy that seemed pretty stable for the entirety of its justin suddenly fell apart and so the puzzle was to put together the politics that led everything to freeze up and and eventually dissolve and so i spent time working in mikhail gorbachev was the final leader of the soviet union his personal papers to look at the memos he was writing to his aides and the notifications he was getting from other parts of the soviet government understand so i want to take a break when we get back i want to find out the premise or.

soviet union kgb researcher moscow yeltsin mikhail gorbachev soviet government
"soviet government" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"soviet government" Discussed on WGTK

"To you all indications show that time may be running out for jews still waiting to be rescued and the former soviet union ethnic cleansing genocide and neonazism are on the rise everywhere it should be no surprise that jews who are praying for help to return to their homeland of israel before the doors close again on getting more desperate i saw a dramatic change when even the newspaper in our own neighborhood became openly antisemitic i was terrified before it was always just below the surface this is simeon and his parents brought him here to israel just a year ago because his parents were concerned that when they die simeon would be killed and their apartment in moscow taken by the authorities so they came to israel several chip pursued i came to easily night lighting six from russia it had with some democratic changes there is much of the semitism of people are still tired the jews should be looked down on and all have it's our hearty change as they grow up aretha education as it only a jewish people they are each their clever they all the travels of that are so the cost hutus is more and more to be newspapers and on the bill of usm this soviet government was supporting enticing it this view realized this for the sake of our children be must goal this plane ticket may look like any other plane ticket but this one is different because this plane ticket can bring a jew in the former soviet union's home to israel for the land of milk and honey there's just one catch this ticket has a time limit the doors of opportunity and immigration to israel are open now we don't know how long those doors will remain open so won't you go to your phone now and help sponsor one individual one ticket one new life that you can plant in the land of israel on wings of.

israel simeon russia soviet government soviet union moscow milk
"soviet government" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"soviet government" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Know that nature or god has given us protections against going out of our minds because we could understand but the murder of a hundred million people as we would go crazy so the morning stops is pretty much after fifty somebody shoots up the people in vegas how many how many of the vegas killer kill or was that the number was about fifty rivals around 50 and and we are properly horrified how many times is fifty go into a hundred million two million times veteran tool million vegas shootings you know some some a young people that a thing to help people understand the holocaust by by taking six million paperclips a it's a document tree up there it's been seen by a lot of people because it's so hard we the mulling kim wraparound these things and aside from a hundred million that were murdered an most of them it's a horrible ways most through deliberate starvation but many tortured to death and many just worked to death frozen to death of course shot buried alive in addition to all of them about a billion people were just enslaved and remember for every one of those people who died there so many people who suffered the ripple effects of sufferings been some great so why don't your kids learn anything about communism and kayce school or college why didn't you what is the hammer and sickle evoke contempt like the swastika those y actually put out a video on the subject for prager university warnings in communism is hated its nazism scotts seven and a half million views came out may of last year really it's amazing sold out but it's very important video lawyers in communism save islamicism but i'll tell you what's provoking if 'cause i've been mentioning this on the air i am now virtually done with a book titled red famine and it's about the whole of the more which is the cranium term of four the mass murder of ukrainians by the soviet government 1932 thirty three.

murder vegas soviet government kayce school prager
"soviet government" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"soviet government" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To the cold war a nice eighty seven the the soviet government advice adult trump to visit moscow i'm supposed aid to talk about a hotel but seventy people live took to kgb defectors on the made thousands community this was the kind of classic cultivation operation that that's what you call in the intelligence agency business and i think we've seen a patent all attempts to woo donald trump to befriend him during powered him going by said he is but for all the complements that the donald trump has offered putin he hasn't tried to lift us sanctions on russia so let me ask is trump innocence playing vladimir putin um i i have met anyone who's who's who's serious these suggested that i i think in his head of higher relationship it's kelly the tv pollution is the senior partner uh although that's why we call you you're an expert on this kind of stuff now but let he hasn't gotten the gift that that would mean the most to him extensively while i mean you're you're you're right i mean putin overstay his is number one political priority is to get americans sanctions lifted is damage the economy he sees it as a as a wide a plot by the west against russia but what putin has got big time if if we look back on this extraordinary year is he's he's got divisions he's god's turmoil inside the us he's got americo mess retreating from from being a kind of leading force in the international stage in at that says his interests for a while so i think is a makes recco prepares them but i i think he finishes the year fitting very happy about about weddings are in about his relationship with old film what do you make of the of the claims about see a assistance in alert in russia to.

cold war donald trump russia soviet government moscow vladimir putin senior partner
"soviet government" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

News Radio WGOW

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"soviet government" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

"Okay digital had of joe looking towards been released and not by the government of the jfk assassination files tomba's chambers is our guest dr chambers is a professor of american history at niagara university and as we go to the next call here one of the tidbits seems to be causing at least some stir is the fact that lee harvey oswald on twenty eight september 1963 the assassination of course that november that he uh met with a console at the mex soviet embassy in mexico city one valerie leather image kostikov who is described as a kgb agent who worked for the kgb 13th department that is to say their assassination department now the fbi believes that this meeting related to a visa or passport application for oswald but one thing that may be coming out of this is that there are details about the arrangements that the us had with the mexican government which allowed the us to spy on cuba the cuban embassy the soviet embassy and other embassies so mexico dodger chambers may be the most absurd of all about these revelations i would think so and just looking through some of the records that are available it does seem like a lot of the more recent information was about surveillance activities in mexico koa in nicaragua and panama and so that there is a collection of record to note uh countries that were just starting to tab emerge in that might upset people although i can't imagine president trump would be that they're worried about upsetting mexico he's able to enjoy doing that exactly i would think this would almost be ah the a plus in his column and again the soviet government no longer exists and the cuban government certainly is it may be a direct livio descended from fidel castro the brother rahul but both led government and and the circumstances surrounding it are considerably different from the days when the say confrontation was just a we had just been a few months removed from the cuban missile crisis here's a james who is in dallas denied lissouba clift radio believe me james hey jim how're you doing are always enjoyed the show sir thank you um yeah i'm i'm one of those uh 1950 three people that you were just talking about i was ten years old i was gonna elementary school and hours was in third graders saw.

soviet government jim lissouba clift president panama cuba kgb mexico dallas rahul fidel castro cuban government joe trump nicaragua soviet embassy mexican government us fbi lee harvey oswald niagara university professor dr chambers tomba ten years
"soviet government" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"soviet government" Discussed on Here & Now

"Is not so bad i mean clearly showing evidence of destruction over more than a dozen years and at places where there were clearly airstrikes during the islamic state uh years but it's it's not too bad we hope if they do need help you spoke to another man outside a mosque matheson the security situation is good now but me where three years we back our river tees soviet government or their governance you support they should airbus is opportunity award for someone should add so some people you know coming back and they're they're not finding their homes and you right first of all the iraqi government is broke from fighting isis and also many don't trust people influenza because even though they were brutalised by isis there are suspected of supporting isis it really feels like a city where people feel that being punished punish perhaps for having had the temerity to turn against the government and and and and submit to islamic state authority and there are many of them who is still stuck out in the desert because of this cloud of suspicion therein displaced camps the not able to go back some of them have got security clearance but for one reason or another they they feel unable to go back to the city some of them talk about the role of shiite militias who are out for revenge and that set me and elements well let's remind ourselves why there's that suspicion because when isis first came there was anger at the government and they thought will maybe this oil you know maybe this'll.

matheson soviet government airbus iraqi government three years
"soviet government" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"soviet government" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"The arctic ocean kuby uh there's a lot of stormed up yeah so it i'd be russia and america an an and yet are each other i either arctic i think it's more of copperation chapa but you're actually have to bring up their fourth the arctic ocean they say to the founder of territory no claim or uh you have you know naturally short and so forth but i'll tell you from my coach from the information i have on the official soviet sources there's been a wave of you will fall activity and you're so you get area there were a gigantic wave in ninety seven nine varying 14year off you up old over the arctic area in a later years get up to russian um before soviet now russian expedition through that lake what spoken utter area who is in charge the arctic and antarctic expedition what he himself in 1984 observed you brought forward in the area and he was an effort to talk about it here opel stake it uh the uh what what they had countered in a 1984 um so you have laugh i fucking bit sometime clerkship they have a little fat uh hibiscus because i'll give you a little while you sold at high incredible level paul i've i've got to ask you to read on earlier you had said that the soviet government did not want anybody their citizens talking about these cases while they were studying them beat all clandestinely why was that why didn't they want you to be forthright about this whoa you know if we're on a clique well if one could describe it to be boys drawing attention and soviet full don't go away with it on a more correct will and cola all game you now do you off on your fact the felix legal were observing things him this guy did they shoot them because the sold it to a.

founder soviet government russia america official opel felix 14year
"soviet government" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"soviet government" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"You falling us soil activity there especially during poking activity and so forth and directions no good woman clam the american stomach with out there it could uh i told him dahlin who gave up that ireland had in exchange you force dominant could but fell had a very bright so back so many years ago that those areas where of interests just like the by the arctic ocean look at the arctic question kuby uh there's a lot of stormed up the soviets at the russian antiamerica empty and and yet so each other uh either art the i think it on more of cooperation chapter but russia has to bring up their forcus through the arctic ocean they say to this founder uh territory no claim or uh you you know naturally short and so forth but i'll tell you from my coach from the information i have from the official soviets source if there's been a wave of you will fall activity in your so you get area there wasn't joerg ethical brief in 1979 very important year often you up all over the arctic area in a later years um they have don't be rushing um before soviet now russian expedition through that lake west stalking can utter area who is in charge the arctic and antarctic expedition what you know cute cute himself in 1984 observed you for a fourth easy area and he wasn't it an effort to talk about it he open it uh the uh what what did have countered in a 1984 um so you have laugh i find that sometime clerkship they have a little fat uh in additional because you up fourteen a little while oh you so at high and credible level paul i've got i've got to ask you to read out earlier you had said that the soviet government did not want anybody their citizens talking about these cases while while they were studying them you know clandestinely why was that why didn't they want you to be forthright about this or two uh you know if we're on a holistic well if one could describe it to you bruce join and soon and soviet full don't go away but if i remember correctly apple and physical game you now do you off on the effect the.

ireland russia founder stalking soviet government apple official lake west