24 Burst results for "Southern Ocean"

"southern ocean" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:05 min | 2 months ago

"southern ocean" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Mr Vote didn't make it back. I wasn't gonna make it back, so I was careful in that regard. We only about 30. Seconds of how do you sail conservatively? If you knew there was bad weather up ahead, you and sort of stay in place. Um, no. You said you the further North. You are in the Southern Ocean, the milder the conditions. So instead of failing at, say, 47 or 45 to the south, I sailed it about 42 or 40 degrees, something that's about the That's about the most conservative thing. You mean. It's still so much very conservative, but find yourself to build the worst the weather by by a very large factor, so that that's I shall conservative in that was actually used to describe the North. And how do you feel? When you came home? I saw you coming. The coast of Canada. Your father was their friends were waving Canadian flags. Homecoming was extraordinary. Seems so Frances family again with something else. Whether it was a moment I'll never forget. If you'd like to see a agreed about this incredible adventure, go to Burt's website, which is of the five the numeral 55 capes. Com Burt Thanks for joining us, we'll be right back. RM World Travel Phone lines are open 24 7 at 803 78025 and So is the website at RM World traveled calm. Stay tuned. We're back after these messages. Going to the grocery store is on everyone's to do list. The problem is no one really likes to do it, especially during the holidays. That's why we signed up for butcher box dot com slash carry as they ship high quality meat conveniently right to your door, and they partner with folks who go above and beyond when it comes to carrying for animals, the environment and sustainability And right now, when you sign up it, but your box dot com slash carry you'll get one pack of bacon. Yes, one pack of bacon for free in every box for the life of your membership. That's butcher box dot com slash carry or our emerald travel dot com under sponsors. Have you heard the news? Metamucil now makes a delicious fiber gummy made by the fiber brand. You trust these gummies are delicious and convenient way to get more fiber. That's because Metamucil fiber gummies are made with an exclusive blend of prebiotic plant based fibers that are expertly crafted into delicious gummies that give you 5 G of fiber.

Mr Vote Burt RM World Southern Ocean Canada Frances partner
interview with Kate Breakey

The Candid Frame

07:55 min | 4 months ago

interview with Kate Breakey

"Welcome to the show. Thank you very much. It's a great honor in infect and I went to a legit from now on I went back and watched a whole lot of fees and. What I've seen missing. Thank you. That's very kind of you. Yeah. I very much enjoyed doing it especially when you have a chance with people to talk with people like you. But you're just saying that you raised in Australia and looking at your work. One of the things that I it brings to mind for me as a person who believes sorta appreciate your work is sort of a dearth of relationships that is a city boy have had with with wildlife and nature. Other than cats and dogs, occasional mice, you know. Growing up there really was no relationship with nature at all. I have a little more now because I live near the edge of the Angeles forest. So we get the occasional Bob Cat and bear and you know coyote. But still that connection with wildlife pretty rare and I think that is the case for most Westerners and a lot of your work revolves about their relationship with with animals but I'd love for you to sort of take us back to when you were growing up. In Australia and how that relationship, how that understanding of of of wildlife in relationship to the lives of human beings including us of sort of took shape. I mean I was very lucky. Kid had probably an idyllic childhood because in a a rural country town with. Like NATO Food in scrublands and wilderness, Invest Open spaces and. The Southern Ocean. One big sort of giant playground and there was wild animals, kangaroos everywhere and it was. It was just a lot of allowed animals. Lot of indigenous people obviously living in the towns still have been counted with a match Rura primal idea about the relationships that was just part of the way you incorporated in a way because you knew these people. Trees to climb as said, the Ocean to swim in galloped horses along the beach is kid Babak had like a fabulous life really and again strategies like of untouched food nece and beaches that go on fed miles in is not one single person on the except the odd. Not, to get eaten by shock, which happens routinely. saw. Also, I had parents who were. Interested godless got mystere interested in biology botany end I just grew up sort of fat knowledge is part of my experience of the world and I guess just evolved into love my desire to sort of make images about all of that stuff and so finally enough I've never taken photography 'cause I've never really lived in will victim cities not the kind of cities that kept intense thing going on that becomes. Hugely. Interesting to people who are strafed office. So I've never really taking pictures of people buildings and every now, and then when I get asked to jury show I often get someone else to come and sort of see my selection and I say but you haven't picked one person who. People. including genre he begins it gets a bit by. Anyway. I'm much appreciate I grew up. I went to at school lead freelance all those people who are doing that very conceptual sort of. City staff at copied them. But when it comes right down to what I WANNA do and what I love doing its photographing in the natural world and. Ordering it in this way. So I would say that my childhood absolutely was like the biggest influence in all of that in my life. I love because at the edge of the national forests, we have wildlife particularly the. Coyote packs up. Here. On the social media, I think it's called next door. There are a lot of people who you know who who are probably more city-fied than even I am I know Deauville complain about the coyotes in what they can do about it in my and I think wait a second. Clear in their yard right and it seems like people look at wildlife here as is the the inconvenience even though they live at, you know at the edge of the forest and I think when when I consider your work and your approach to it, you're the dynamic of how people exist with animals is very different from what many of us are used used to and so when you're when you're young you kind of mentioned that you had all that sort of wildlife around you. Talk to me about the relationship might sort of felt like was it like like a we're just we're just temporarily this we're living in their. In their. Not really because you know back then I guess in the sixties, people still went out and show Kangaroos to feed. Wildlife was just part of something that you still kind of used. It wasn't there wasn't a great deal respect for it. You know the Kangaroos are called every year because they basically, there's more kangaroos than they should be. It's like united. So every time there's a drought named died, but people go out and shoot them pharmacy eight them because it was cheap made now they used in. In restaurants because it's considered gourmet neat because it star Lean and good for you. Is All this fusion going on with kangaroo mation. Asian spices in the whole nine yards been to Australia. No not. You know you gotta gotTa sit nate is the best place on earth anyway. And so we had friends who had. Farms or because stations but sheep stations and envy would muster the sheep and then the shears would come in and share them in the be sheepdogs who are just working animals. It wasn't really very romantic. They just happened to be just tons and tons and tons of animals and ahead Ananta Nakal who sort of animal rescuers before it was really official, I would collect up injured bids the anything and bring them in and. Resurrect. Going out to their house, they was just everything was a wombat. There was mad pies. It was Joey kangaroos still a great spirit in Australia because we just had a, you probably know last Christmas we had this dreadful dreadful wildfires where green three billion animals died, and there was a great cold out to people to take animals that were bent to to see if they could be rescued and so sort of regular people do that they go out. In their cars and collect up these things that you know stagnant injured to take them back to the triage animal rescue centers to be either destroyed or treated as I. said that call out to people to to look after them and a surprising amount of people do this because Australia kind of especially, the comic stuff united the the Co Alison the kangaroo is so there is this kindness towards animals and I think because so few people. In this giant continent at so many more. So many wild animals there is a slightly different attitude I. Mean I was GonNa say about city people saying, what are we gonNA do about the coyotes deer eating my vegetable garden you know if you get rid of the coyotes, you'll have more rabbits and end up eating a vegetable garden. You can't control because system you you start ruining at the whole thing goes to hell as we saw Anna, we're getting the pollinate is going the birds in the beast is three billion less birds were in the seventies and they the pollinators and we needed a pollinators. So we actually have trees and on and on and on guys as you know is just becomes this huge horrendous mess. So it's more

Australia Joey Kangaroos Angeles Forest KID Nato Bob Cat Babak Scrublands Anna Ananta Nakal I. Nate Official
Bioluminescence Helps Prey Avoid Hungry Seals

60-Second Science

02:22 min | 9 months ago

Bioluminescence Helps Prey Avoid Hungry Seals

"Deep in the inky depths of what's called the oceans, missile pelagics zone more than five hundred meters beneath the surface. The main source of light is not the sun even during the day. Most of the lay comes instead from bioluminescence organisms creatures that produce their own light. It's in these dark depths that southern elephants seals love to feast on squids and fish so initially we. We wanted to know how. INNOCENT SINCE UP, pry into that pauline. Gula From University of Saint Andrews Sea Mammal. Research Unit thanks to data logging technology researchers have a fairly good handle on how far elephants he'll travel to feed, and how long and how deep. But. Nobody really knew how they find. They're praying the darkness. Do they track the lights or is something else going on, so we'd be the sense that could pick up flushes produced by. That twelve being hunted by. Because we said that. Might. Be Looking For the light to get your snack, but it turned out that the fish actually used their bioluminescence to disorients seals after the seals began their attack. The thing is it. Shouldn't that the flashing pray well how to catch them non fasching? which we found out by looking at the duration of the chase, which was wrong girl for flushing. The fist. Was Always omitted just after the seal launch an attack, making it a defensive reactive maneuver to distract the seals. But at least one seal looking to turn that liability into a hunting strategy this, she'll which to master in catching the session prior because each time. You've tried to catch a prey fast to do this little head movement that was. Sense by the price. For induce the Prater Flash, because the prerequisites to approaching Predator the seal twitter head see where the lake came from an only then start the chase. So, even if some seals can use bioluminescence as way to find food for most, the light is a distraction. Gula thinks that seals probably rely more on their whiskers to sense the movements, their prey make in the water yet that fallout into understanding. What's happening? In. Stem that don't know much about to Shane the Southern Ocean.

Gula University Of Saint Andrews Se Twitter Flushing Shane
A Shortwave Christmas Carol

Short Wave

09:08 min | 1 year ago

A Shortwave Christmas Carol

"Hello anybody there so matty. Yes ma'am last week Brit and I connected to a radio station she's visa. I am radio in Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania have a conversation with space physicist and electrical engineer Nathaniel result. Thank you very much. It's a pleasure to be here and in two two thousand fourteen. His research took him to Antarctica cool. Yeah home to the South Pole and hub of scientific activity with research stations and field camps spread across the continent. New Zealand has a station down there. Several European countries due to scientists are asking questions. You can only answer in Arca and the Southern Ocean this time of year about wildlife wildlife like penguins. Yeah sure like penguins microbiology. tectonics the northern lights. Daniel was down there to look at the earth's magnetic field and polar regions. I picture this whole space. Mattie like science summer camp but spread across a desolate icebound landscape. What a dream? Yeah you're kind kind of summer camp and these people. They're far from home. which can be really tough? During the holidays so nathaniel when he was down there took part in a musical tradition tradition. That cues up every year on this day December. Twenty four South Pole station. We're ready and standing by thinks the Antarctic a Christmas carol basically the different stations in Antarctica. Sing to each other over shortwave radio. Oh my God this is legitimately the cutest thing you're seeing over the radio Transmission was from the Amundsen Scott South Pole station ahmanson shadow yacht ought. Here's a Christmas Carol from the Italian station. Mario's a Kelly singing an Italian Christmas Carol. I really liked service. I firmly believe this cute Nathaniel would have to agree with you and it's a beautiful thing and you know the different stations and people they have to have to watch out for each other because it's it's difficult environment down there and annual listening at McMurdo Station in a Blue Penguin Hoodie. Sure I'll add wondered if this caroline could be heard beyond Antarctica by shortwave listeners. And other parts of the world he wanted to know how far can these transmissions Israeli travel so how far away were people able to listen well. Before the Caroline Begin thin you'll put out an alert to shortwave radio listener saying hey if you I can hear this email us a lot of snow and people did. They were able to tune in. He got emails from the Netherlands. South America places far away from Antarctica. Some people were able to catch snippets of this singing at the bottom of the world so today. On the show shortwave. podcasts looks at shortwave radio how it works how it travels. And how anything of result is leveraging. A community of shortwave radio listeners for science. Emily Kwong are short. We've expert is nathaniel. Yes he's an assistant professor of physics and Engineering at the University of Scranton in Pennsylvania. Okay so obviously I know shortwave the charming daily science podcast. But tell me about shortwave. As in shortwave radio so since since the nineteen hundreds we've been using radio waves to communicate. The waves are all different sizes the lower the wave's frequency the longer the wavelength one. Of the unique characteristics. Of shortwave shortwave. Radio is that it can travel. The radio. Waves can travel long distances very long distances around the world because there are three to thirty megahertz hurts in frequency they travel through space to this electrically charged part of our atmosphere called the ionosphere and are reflected or refracted back down to Earth. If we didn't did not have the atmosphere these shortwave signals would travel off into space and not be able to travel around the globe but luckily for us. They can travel around the globe. They they propagate far distances and those with receivers on earth are able to listen. Nathaniel loves shortwave. Because you don't need a lot of equipment to send and capture one of these transmissions oh it can be incredibly simple. You need a transmitter on one side and a receiver on the other and a decent antenna and when I say A transmitter there. There are some people who they make their goal to talk as far around the world is possible with that as little as equipment as possible as low power as possible so maybe using a quarter of a awas and ten dollars worth of parts people are able to send signals that. Get the go all the way around the globe. This is the ultimate Lo fi form of communication gathering. Yeah and that communication could be anything broadcast propaganda spice stations emergency information weather reports rag chewing which is a term mm to describe people just talking about their daily life so radio twitter. Yeah the transmission just has to fall within the right frequency range to count ashore wave and there's an international community of hobby radio operators who seek out a special license from their respective governments to do this. That's called Ham Radio Ham. Yeah that's the hobby Of using this radio so nathaniel discovered that community on a boy Scout Jamboree Ham radio operator had set up a station in the middle of the woods and just turned all his crackling and buzzing sounds coming out of a radio and I heard him talking to these faraway places and and that was just really fascinating fascinating to me and he was hooked got his license in Nineteen Ninety Eight. Just a teenager transmitting to whoever's listening in the northern New Jersey New York metropolitan area area so just pure bruce springsteen propaganda it was mostly just his call son and seventy three. This is W. Two and AF whiskey to November Alpha Foxtrot threaten seventy-three means best regards. It's a pretty common ham. Radio sign off eventually he upgraded to a better transmitter through a wire out the window of his bedroom and attached hatched tree in his front yard and he managed to get a hold of a station in Hungary and it was just a very short contact. But you know that was pretty neat you just throw a wire out your window. And you're able to talk to guy in Hungary and and it worked in these moments stayed with him propelling his scientific methodology and his his career cool. Okay so tell me a little bit about that. How his nathaniel used shortwave for science in a lot of interesting ways because disturbances happening in the ionosphere on a sphere space weather solar wind conditions? All of that would affect radio waves so in Grad school he was able to show how a solar flare caused aradio blackout so cool. Yeah and during the big two thousand seventeen solar eclipse which I missed because it was cloudy. Tragedy so sad but Nathaniel hosted a community science experiment through his group Ham side. The group measured how the eclipse affected the transmission of medium and high frequency radio waves. And the way he's using radio for scientific inquiry is so innovative that this year the National Science Foundation awarded him a one point. Three million dollar grant deign to do what well he wants to bring. Universities and this network of Ham radio operators together to track. What's going on in the ionosphere where short waves propagate in a more day to day way which we we don't really do right now? No not really. We don't really understand what happens on short timescales like why is the fear doing this in New York City but doing doing something else in Pennsylvania overhead and Pennsylvania and. Why is that important to understand the ionosphere to that level of detail? Well we as a planet Senate are really dependent on things happening in space and disturbances in the ionosphere do affect communication satellites global positioning systems. which are used to land planes all these tools? We rely on to keep us safe and connected and so it's very important to try to understand how everything is is is connected together in order to make this systems more robust and and in order to make them work. And in order to you know transmit Christmas carols around the world essential I think a lot of Ham radio for me has always been about connecting people from different parts of the world together. And and you know if you if you even look at like why Ham radio exists if you actually look in the the laws I believe. It says that it's for international goodwill and It's important to try and promote this international goodwill kwon. Do you think our podcast connects people all around the world. I mean we don't have three million listeners. That's how how many people listen to him radio now yet. Not with that attitude okay. I know world domination is your project but I will say I got into radio because I enjoyed tuning in and not knowing what I was going to hear our podcast definitely. Does that help so I think so so from our team to whoever is out there listening in in the world happy holidays. Happy Holidays

Nathaniel Pennsylvania Antarctica Amundsen Scott South Pole Stat South Pole Station South Pole New Zealand Assistant Professor Of Physics Italian Station South America Pittsburgh Southern Ocean Hungary Mcmurdo Station University Of Scranton National Science Foundation Mattie Daniel
"southern ocean" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"southern ocean" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Learn more at Xerox Dot com slash asked me to think and that take another brief look at some of the other stories making using science this week with science report Australian researchers of unveil the structure of the influence a virus genome which they say could help improve development of vaccines and better pretty new pandemic influenza strains the influenza virus stores. It's genetic information in single strands of material known as Robin Nucleic Acid Aruna and until now it's been difficult for scientists to completely understand structure CIA scientists used multiple genetic sequencing approaches to and cover the structure of the Aruna inside the flu virus they found the viruses evolve the degree of flexibility in its genome structure which may help escape the immune system of the host. The findings reported in the journal Nature suggests that further understanding of how these arunee segments interact will help guide vaccine design and scientists bedroom understand that potential risk of new pandemic influenza viruses and you study is found autism spectrum spectrum disorder is mostly based on genetics rather than being influenced by external environmental factors. The findings reported in the Journal the American Medical Association based on Thirteen Years Worth of population research from five countries scientists examined more than two to million people twenty two thousand diagnosed as being on the spectrum in order to analyze potential autism risk factors like genetics environment and material effect they found autism spectrum disorder seems to be eighty percent genetic influences wash it environmental factors could own explain about zero point three percent of the risk. The study confirms that autism is strongly inherited and far less Judah environmental factors so the next step of the research will be the dive deep into the complicated genetics of. Autism spectrum disorder the Southern Ocean is getting greener. Thanks to increasing amounts of tiny plants then as further plankton the findings reported in the journal Geophysical Research Letters based on twenty one years of satellite data tracking levels that was a chlorophyll the chemical these tiny plants to harvest energy from light. They found that what is in the sub-tropical Pacific which includes the East Coast of Australia New Zealand of had chlorophyll increases of seven percent while what is the southern and western coast of Australia and that means the great southern Ocean as well as the Indian Ocean subtropical zone of the highest increases of.

pandemic influenza Robin Nucleic Acid Aruna Southern Ocean Geophysical Research Letters Xerox Indian Ocean CIA Australia New Zealand Judah Australia Journal the American Medical A twenty one years Thirteen Years eighty percent seven percent three percent
"southern ocean" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"southern ocean" Discussed on Science Friday

"Researchers writing in the journal nature ecology and volition this week have clues from the ice fish genome here to tell us more as Dr Bill Dietrich, professor of biochemistry and marine biology at northeastern university's marine science center in Boston, welcome Dr Dietrich. Well, thank you very much. Ire it's a pleasure to be on your show. It's probably to have you. Thank you paint. This picture the ice fish forest. So you know, we're on the radio. What does it look like? Okay. Well, imagine fairly large fish about half a meter in length. Wayne M one to two kilograms has very large crocodilian like head and a rather small body. It's skin is scale is-, and and very ghostly pale. And although you can't see this as antifreeze running through its white blood, and so moving just one fish. It's actually a group of species. Correct. Correct. It's a group of sixteen species. None of which produce a red blood cells. They're all profoundly Nemec who I discovered this. Well, this was I recognized. By Wailers around the turn of the nineteen hundreds when they were in the Southern Ocean, and they would catch fish, and, you know, open them up and even eat them, but the fish they noticed didn't have red blood in nineteen twenty nine Norwegian zoologist named Ditlow roof stod actually was able to capture one of these fishes, and he he communicated this finding some of his colleagues who later followed up on it. So okay. What is the magic the fish does that we can't do how how does it survive without red blood cells? Well, that's very interesting question. Of course, something that's been something I but looking into quite a bit. So what do they do they they've given up on red blood cells? But it was not a lethal condition for them on the other hand, it wasn't absolutely positive because we've seen that they've. Evolved. Very large vascular chair in a much expanded heart. They don't have scales on their skin. So they can breathe through their skin their number of compensations that allow them to do very well in this cold oxygen rich ocean that that live in and your team sequenced the genome of one species of these ice fish any clues to how it got this white blood because I've watched videos this it's just like a little Serem, right? That's right. We have been able to establish that virtually all of the hemoglobin genes are absent in this genome. We are also following up to try to find out the chicken or Royce ag- question did these fish lose their red blood cells? I and therefore didn't have cell their express hemoglobin in or alternatively. Did they lose their hemoglobin genes? And then the red cells whether so that's a question that we have to follow up. So you you say that there is enough oxygen circulating in this serum. That is instead of the red blood cells, and is that because they live in such cold water in Antarctica that the there's plenty of oxygen in the water that can suffused also through the skin and keep them going. Yes, they the Southern Ocean is essentially saturated knocks jn among other reasons because it's a very stormy there and that mixes of the water column, and so I guess in a long-term global warming would be a threat to these fish. These fish are in fact, compared to their red blooded relatives are much more sensitive temperature. And they in fact are likely to be Canaries in the coal mine, if we see fish beginning to drop out as the Southern Ocean more, so these fish have basically have had to find a way to adapt to not having the red blood cells. That's right. And the I think the the key clue to that is that you can take one of the red blooded fishes very closely related, and you can expose that fish to carbon monoxide. So that all of the hemoglobin is. No longer able to carry oxygen and yet this red blooded species doesn't die either. So what that's telling us is that even the red blooded fishes in the Southern Ocean are relying on their red cells more as a reserve capacity for oxygen and the red blooded fishers are also living on dissolved oxygen like the ice fishes..

Southern Ocean Dr Bill Dietrich professor of biochemistry Boston marine science center Royce ag Wayne M two kilograms
Kidnapped Sea Snails

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 2 years ago

Kidnapped Sea Snails

"Done. Why is your backpack all wet? It's not raining outside of drenched it and bug repellent. Why to mosquitoes like your backpack like me, but I don't like bug repellent makes my skin each. So I figured I could just wear a bug repellent. Drench backpack like shield and mosquitos could say away from me without a speck of repellent having to touch my skin the jury's still out on whether it works or not keep me updated. You know, you're not the first to use that technique. Amphion a strip crustacean living in the Southern Ocean, hold another animal called terra pods of plank tonic mollusc, also known as Cisse nails. See angels or see butterflies on their backs like backpacks and use them as a living shield the cease snails secrete, a poisonous chemical that deters predators like cod. Fishes amphibians are unaffected by the chemical. And when they carry the cease nails on their backs. They're also protected from predators ice fishes quickly realized the empha- pods carrying terra pods piggyback. Don't make a great snack. So they learned to avoid them taking my backpack shield idea to a whole new level. And it gets worse. Once the terrifies are in the clutches of the empha- pods. They can't hunt to feed so they starved to death as far as researchers can tell so far the sea snails don't benefit at all from the association. My backpack doesn't really benefit from our sociation. No. But I don't know if you'll get much benefit either this moment of science comes from Indiana University. There are thousands more moments of science on our website at a moment of science dot org. I'm Yale Zander d'arme dog less.

Yale Zander Southern Ocean Cisse Indiana University
Blue Whales Have Changed Their Tune

60-Second Science

02:33 min | 2 years ago

Blue Whales Have Changed Their Tune

"This is science Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. Blue whales are the largest animals ever to exist on earth, but they're still tough to track because they live underwater where we can't easily see them and often in remote areas like the Southern Ocean. But the whales songs can travel hundreds of kilometers underwater. So scientists often listen for them instead. By the way, that sped up ten times. He can hear it. Over the years. These eavesdropping biologists have noticed a mysterious trend that certain blue whale calls are gradually lowering in pitch over time. For example. Here's a call from two thousand two followed by one from twenty seventeen. It has been observed for many the way today Shen one wide so woman as to would white explanation. Emmanuel Lewa is a bio acoustic at the university of New South Wales in Australia. She did the work at the university of breast and France her team confirmed the phenomenon holds true for populations of blue whales in the southern Indian Ocean to and they suggest one reason may be that whale numbers have rebounded from the days of captain Ahab. More whales means individuals don't have to shout his loud to be heard by other whales, and because of an anatomical peculiarity in the way, Wales sing the softer. They sing the lower the pitch. The scientists have another theory to which may be acting in concert with the first which is that whales are singing more softly, and therefore more deeply because increasingly acidic ocean waters carry their calls further the full right up is in the journal of geophysical research oceans, low Wigner team noticed one other short term trend. That southern blue whales songs actually, get higher in pitch during the austral summer perhaps in an effort to be heard over cracking icebergs like when you put some ice cube in your drink. You will your crack? So it's the same one is bed. So it's will be really loud and you yards across a new Shannon basing to solve these mysteries. More definitively. Scientists say will need to keep listening and monitor the changing chemical and Kucic properties of the oceans to see which of these ideas are borne out and which of them don't hold water. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

Christopher Dodd Yata Emmanuel Lewa Southern Ocean Indian Ocean University Of New South Wales Christopher Don Journal Of Geophysical Researc Shen Captain Ahab Wales Kucic Australia University Of Breast Wigner France Sixty Seconds
"southern ocean" Discussed on RuPaul: What's The Tee with Michelle Visage

RuPaul: What's The Tee with Michelle Visage

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"southern ocean" Discussed on RuPaul: What's The Tee with Michelle Visage

"We were talking about us. Julia a minute ago. And I was telling these guys that in ninety eight I was doing a tour in Australia. I did Sydney Melbourne Perth presi- and Brizzi. Yeah. I believe is Brizzi at alight. I've never been to adults. Oh, I like it. We actually we've been talking about going to the Southern Ocean lodge Southern Ocean lodge because it's supposed to be very chic. And it's in Adelaide. It's off it's an island off of Adelaide. Oh, I don't is. Is that the one you were showing me that? Yes, it looked major. Well, I have showed you pictures of of Khalid that one is that the Kolia is up in on Hamilton island. Yuck. Cough on a per yet. Take that that's her water. This one's yours. You open this one yesterday. It's it's up near Brizzi. Hamilton island is on the gold Gold Coast, and it's a resort island. And it's got this beautiful resort there called Kuala, and we went there. But then we thought let's go back and do that other place, which is Southern Ocean lodge, which is off of Adelaide. I've never been at before. But, you know, Georgia's weird about Australia. You know, he's he's a stray leeann. Well, yeah. And he's he he doesn't want to go back anytime soon. He'll go back, but isn't going soon. I always want to go back because I love it. That's great. Yeah. But we were there in ninety eight doing this tour. This promoter booked all the cities. And when I got there, I realized he had overbooked me. He had done this thing where he said, I was doing these tea dances and appearances at in in addition to the nightclubs, okay? That I knew about he had booked me at t dances. And at meet-and-greet. And all these kind of things right out clearing it. Yeah. No, he got the money upfront. And of course, in the end, he was he knew that why couldn't do it physically because something doing something else? And that he would pocket the money, and I would have a terrible reputation. So when I got wind of what was going on. How did you get wind? I got there and saw advertisements saying I'm going to be here. And there and here is no, no, I'm book for this place that place and you said to him what's this all about? Well, we couldn't get hold of him. And so I called ahead to the to the clubs that I was working in and said, hey, you wear of this what's going on? And they said what we saw that. Because they we when you work at a club. They have not exclusive things. It's usually thirty day. They're bringing me into let's say Brisbane, right? I have a clause in the contract is I can't appear anywhere. Else because why would evaded to another club? Yes. Why would they pay right for me to come all this way? Act. If I'm also appearing another club. Correct. So it's a it's a radius distance. And it's a time. So I call the this is what's going on that? Yeah, we saw that. I have nothing to do with that the promoted. He says, okay. Well, then I tell you what we will deal with you. So the gigs after the first gig I dealt with the club. And I got the money the money that was owed to me from the club. And so that the guy couldn't get the money because the other half. So you're ready gotten your half. Depa I'd gotten the half deposit, but the other half, I don't normally the promoter would pay you. Yes. Yes. So he the promoter pantley got wind vet called a. Magistrate or sheriff or something like that. And said I was defrauding him do. So by the time, I got the money in Melbourne that I went to Perth I got shot. And when I was at Perth, I got wind that the marshalls were blocking all the doors 'cause they were going to arrest me. Arrest you because he the because the dirty promoter said I was stealing money something like that. So I performed there were marshalls all around me waiting for me Jefferson. Yes. Marshall, Jefferson, Tucker Marshall, Tucker bama's there too. Yeah. Yeah. And Marshall Dylan oh Marshall. And I got out of drag and did a little sitcom move where they don't know. What I look like did a Hannah Montana a Hannah mother fucking Montana..

Brizzi Adelaide Southern Ocean lodge Hamilton island Tucker Marshall Australia Sydney Melbourne Perth Hannah Montana Perth Jefferson Julia Marshall Dylan t dances Khalid Brisbane Georgia Melbourne Tucker bama thirty day
How can we eliminate the plastic waste clogging our oceans?

FT News

07:20 min | 2 years ago

How can we eliminate the plastic waste clogging our oceans?

"At plastic pollution in oceans, which is now so bad that plastics have entered the human food chain by the fish that ingested Ellen MacArthur. Four around the world, sailor turn campaigner tells Leslie hook companies that create the packaging a starting to understand that a big part of the solution lies in their hands. I I just like to ask how did you go from being a yachtswoman to being an environmental campaigner, and how does your work as yachtswoman inform your work? Now. It's an interesting question because I never thought I would leave sailing. My life was sailing from the age of four all I wanted to do was sale and one day somehow I wanted to sail around the world. So I really was living the dream when I was undertaking the records and transatlantic races. It was everything I'd ever dreamt off. But when you set set on the boat around the world, you prepare for months, you design a boat you build a boat you prepare the boat and you put on that boat. Everything you need for your survival for two or three months of trip. And when you're two and a half thousand miles away from the nearest town deep in the Southern Ocean. You really begun to understand what the definition of the word finite means, you know, those resources you have with you on that boat. What you have available to you know, to eat and fuel for the generator. It's all you have. And I'd never translated that definition of the word. Not anything outside of sailing. It was my world at C, which was almost entirely separate from life on land. But at the end of the round the world record when I broke around the world record. I began to realize that actually our global economy is no different. You know, we have resources which are available to us once in the history humanity. And yet we use them up. It was a question. It was a real question that was the back of my mind, and I just couldn't get rid of it. I couldn't forget it. I couldn't ignore it. And I began to learn and study and speak to experts and scientists and chief executives to understand, you know, how resources used in our global economy, and and what's the future look like and so much of the narrative by then was around using less and doing less than being efficient with I use of resources, and no, that's obviously vital. What struck me? Was it wasn't the solution? It was vital in the transition to what. And what fascinated me was what I comic model can work in the long term. And that's where I began to come across ideas of the secular economy. Now, the word circular economy wasn't a very popular term. When you founded the Ellen MacArthur foundation. I think in two thousand. Nd and ten in a nutshell. Can you explain what the circular economy is? And why it's so important the best way to describe a circular economy is to look into Konami, which is predominantly linear. You know, at the moment, we take a material out of the ground. We make something out of it. And then ultimately a lot of it not all but a lot of it gets thrown away within a secular Konami. You move that line to become a circle and you look at regenerative economic mechanisms by designing out the concept of waste and pollution. You keep production materials and components in use and you regenerate natural systems and the issue of ocean, plastics, it's one that's really been in the headlines in a tremendous issue of concern. What do you think is the answer for ocean, plastics? I mean, designing outweighs altogether. Sounds great. But how do we get there? And what can we do about plastics in the ocean? Now what obviously plastics notion is the result of a broken system. Plastic should never be in the ocean. The fact is that many of those plastics will never design to. Anything else within waste at the end of their life. There are many efforts globally never enough. But there are many cleaning the beaches and looking at how to extract the plastic we have in the ocean out. You know, how do we remove it? But the fact is we produce seventy eight million tons a year and thirty two percent of that leaks out into the environment. We reckon about eight million tonnes ends up in the ocean every year and that figure gets greater and greater as every year passes. So the work of the foundation is to go to the beginning of the pipe of plastic packaging production, and indeed design and say if we shift the plastic packaging system to be one which is regenerative restorative with the principles of a circular economy, one whereby no plastic would ever be designed or made whereby it didn't have value. And today a lot of the plastic packaging. That's produced. It has no value. It's not recyclable. It's designed to keep some washing powder. Dry or keep a chicken fresh, and we don't worry about what happens after if we can design for a system, we can design all plastic packaging. So it's recyclable Compostable over us. Sibal, and we can make that recyclable Compostable and reusable fit within a system. So it never becomes waste. And if you seen firsthand the impacts of ocean, plastic is it something that struck you when you were out there sailing, actually when I raced around the world, I went down the Atlantic, right? Random talk, ticker effectively, and then backup the Atlantic home. So I didn't really see that much floating in the ocean. At all it was a long way from the Pacific gyros that we now know so well to be harbors of millions of tons of plastic and my interest in this comes from how we use resources, and the fact that we have so much plastic packaging leaking the ocean is the result of that broken system. So what can individuals do in their daily life who want to be part of the circular economy? I think one of the challenges is a lot of the pressure around ocean, plastics has been on the end of the pipe on those who have them, you know, in our homes, particularly in emerging markets. But the fact is that if that plastic is designed so that it becomes waste if it's designed to it's not recyclable. What do we do with it? You know, I've been working on. This subject for four years. And I don't know what to do with all of us can my house. I really don't. I don't understand it. It's not marked. It says check with your local recycling facility, but there's no number on there. So actually the system doesn't work. So we're working on at the foundation is changing the system. So that all packaging is recyclable Compostable over usable that then enables the consumer to do the right thing. Currently we actually can't because the system doesn't unable to do that. If we, you know us general products in general life. So you're going to the view of things in that way. Go into the records. And I think what's been really interesting on our journeys is it began four years ago at the World Economic Forum. We got together with many of the biggest brands in the world in the plastic packaging space and said, currently what are the numbers? We did a report look at the numbers we found that two percent of seventy eight million tonnes actually gets recycled into the prospect of the same quality eight percent gets down cycled thirty two percent leaks out in environment. And actually when you look at the numbers, it's quite horrifying. For a world where we feel. We're doing quite well at recycling whereas globally, those the ticks don't really add up and we sat down with the company's. Once we had those numbers within started to say, well, if the situation as it is doesn't work, which clearly it doesn't what could. And that's where we came along. With fifty percent of plastic packaging should be desirable to be recyclable twenty percent should be entirely reusable. So it goes many many many times before it gets recycled, and thirty percents is the thin film kind of small format packaging, which really is never really recyclable. But it's not designed to be recyclable. And it's much of that that leaks out in environment. Particularly emerging markets that needs to be redesigned either a different material or different distribution method to enable those people to be lifted out of poverty and Avak says to those really important materials foods powders as we have. But in an accessible way that doesn't involve creating waste, and we now have a significant proportion of the global companies working in the plastic packaging space signed up to say they will Adair to one

Southern Ocean Ellen Macarthur Ellen Macarthur Foundation Konami Leslie ND Avak Adair Sibal Atlantic Thirty Two Percent Four Years Seventy Eight Million Tonnes Seventy Eight Million Tons Eight Million Tonnes Twenty Percent Eight Percent
"southern ocean" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"southern ocean" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Swimming, through the wa I spent the whole afternoon just looking for information on this creature because of how terrified I am of chickens. And I was thinking that this creature was from my nightmares materializing in the real world. And after a whole afternoon of obsession. I found out the creature had a name. It was a real thing. It wasn't some optical illusion. CGI it's called. Opinion status. Zemlya pin yesterday's eczema. That's an opinion states anything asked or. The sea cucumber. It's called the sea cucumber. Apparently, scientists really caught video of this. Sea cucumber too bizarre hen mimicking aquatic, demon in the Southern Ocean. It's what it looks like. Six. Demon. It's in the Southern Ocean near eastern Antarctica Silverman. Seeing there before they've been seen in the Gulf though, from I understand, you're showing this colorful. See cucumber drifting through the water fins at the top of the bottom of its tubby translucent lab body. It looks like the wings and legs of a plucked pink. Frightening foul ready for the pot. So they called the headless chicken monster. Like, I said found in the Gulf of Mexico recently detected by scientists with the Australian Antarctic division part of the strategy department of environment dedicated to investigating Antarctica and the Southern Ocean average, they call it e- exe- Mia. They measure between two and eight inches in length. Adults colors can range from dark reddish Brown to crimson juveniles are typically pale their appeals sh sheet of pink. According to a study published in one thousand nine hundred journal Smithsonian contributions to bring sciences does your most types of CQ cumbersome spend, the majority of their time on the seedbed swimming CQ covers like e exe- Mia. They land only to feed researchers reported the one thousand nine hundred ninety I know I don't want this to sound like some. National Geographic description. Of course, the technocrats have a tendency to make anything that looks strange in paranormal sounds so mundane, but man. That'd be scary. For me. I was watching. In fact, the video was in my article tonight if going to look at it, it's pretty amazing triple eight six seven three thirty seven hundred that's triple eight six seven three thirty seven hundred. I'm CLYDE Lewis. You're listening to ground zero. And we'll be back. Are.

Southern Ocean Gulf CLYDE Lewis Antarctica Smithsonian department of environment Mexico eight inches
"southern ocean" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"southern ocean" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Swimming, through I spent the whole afternoon just looking for information on this creature because how terrified I am of chickens. And I was thinking that this creature was from my nightmares materializing in the real world. And after a whole afternoon of obsession. I found out the creature had a name. It was a real thing. It wasn't some optical illusion. CGI it's called. Exe- Mia pin yesterday's eczema, that's Spanish heaters and opinion, states eczema. Or? The sea cucumber. It's called the sea cucumber. Apparently, scientists really caught video of this. Sea cucumber too bizarre hen mimicking aquatic, demon in the Southern Ocean. So it looks like. Demon. It's in the Southern Ocean near eastern Antarctica. It's never been seen there before they've been seen in the Gulf though from I understand. So what did you showing this colorful? Sea cucumber drifting through the water fins at the top of the bottom of its tubby translucent body. It looks like the wings and legs of a plucked pink. Frightening foul ready for the pot. So they call the headless chicken monster. Like, I said found in the Gulf of Mexico recently detected by scientists with the Australian an Arctic division part of the department of environment dedicated to investigating Antarctica in the Southern Ocean on average, they call it e- exe- Mia. They measure between two and eight inches in length. Adults colors can range from dark reddish Brown to crimson though, juveniles are typically pale their appeals. Sheet of pink. According to a study published in one thousand nine hundred journal Smithsonian contributions to bring scientists does your while most types of sea, cucumbers spend, the majority of their time on the seabed swimming, CQ you like e exe- Mia. They land only feed researchers reported the nineteen ninety study. I know I don't want this to sound like some. National Geographic description. Of course, the technocrats have a tendency to make anything that looks strange in paranormal sounds so mundane, but man. Scary for me. I was watching in fact, the videos in my article tonight if you to look at it, it's pretty amazing triple eight six seven three three seven hundred seventy three thirty seven hundred. I'm quite Lewis. You're listening to ground zero. And.

Southern Ocean Gulf Antarctica eczema Lewis Smithsonian Mexico eight inches
Southern Ocean discussed on Sean Hannity

Sean Hannity

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

Southern Ocean discussed on Sean Hannity

"Australian researchers have named a creature found in the deep sea, a headless chicken monster discovery was made in the Southern Ocean off the coast of east Antarctica using new technology. Researchers say they have a recording device that allowed them to capture on film type of deep sea

Southern Ocean
"southern ocean" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"southern ocean" Discussed on The Science Show

"Melt those sheets from below. And that's another thing that we're very concerned about. And so what Emily's doing now is to understand the system well enough that if we suddenly put much more comebacks I've into the system or put much less what will happen. I mean, those predictions made on the Suming business as usual, but business now be as usual and Emily's work is going to help us understand what the influence of the changes will. It. I think there's something about we doing every has started to draw Ford earned standing of some of the mixing processes about five years ago. I was down in the Southern Ocean on one of these voyages being bounced around by the voiced waves of this other nation and rather than the all go flutes that we mentioned a moment today, what we deployed with surface drifters. So of -ly fancy version of rubber docs that we through over this side of the ship. But we did so in a smart and novel way we looked at the satellite data that tell us what the surface currents that the ocean were, and we put our rubber ducks in very specific places based on the satellite data where we hopes that we would get particular insight into the mixing processes of the surface of the ocean, and then we track rubber duck spy satellites. And what we've now been doing five years later is analyzing the results and the mathematics tell us. That the mixing is determined by keys structures that emerge from the surface currents. And so you get these amazing things calls stable and unstable manifold, which sound a bit suspicious that maybe as we went out searching for unstable manacles in the Southern Ocean, which the ship's captain. I was totally insane. When I told him we can't go searching for the stable manifold and deploy Rubberduck nearby them. But actually that's exactly what we did and what the results that we been showing is that we can use that quantify the amount of mixing. And if you put a set of rubber ducks close to the intersection of stable and unstable manifold, then you see that they zoom off in completely different directions. So I have a photograph where we deployed three of these drifters at exactly the same point. And then as we watched them evolve with the satellite over time, they. They ended up quite literally hundreds and hundreds of kilometers apart from each other within the space of a few months. This seems to me to indicate yet again, how many different lines of research you have going to point towards climate change and people underestimate Justice. She'll weight of the information you're gathering about cows agriculture about the Asper atmosphere about the water, hundreds of different imports giving you a story about what climate might be doing in the future. I think that's absolutely right. So I describe it as we looking at one small piece of very, very large Ixil even that one's more peace. The project that I'm involved in the moment just in the UK looking at this as more than one hundred scientists working on it. So then really is a huge Lee, rich and diverse set of people looking at different aspects of the problem. But all those different aspects point in the same direction at the fact that the climate is changing that changes. Largely human juice, and they all point to the same concern about the future in terms of our impact on the climate and what that might mean in terms of the wrister people to infrastructure, talk quantum me to or ecosystems Dr Emily shock Bros. with the British Antarctic survey in Cambridge, and she was with professor Herbert Huppert of King's College, measuring the movement of five hundred Amazon rivers with rubber Ducky and smart maths down south of stray, Leah..

Southern Ocean Dr Emily shock Bros. UK Ford Suming Herbert Huppert Leah Rubberduck Lee Cambridge King's College professor five years
"southern ocean" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"southern ocean" Discussed on The Science Show

"And so on. Absolutely freezing hands tied state water samples, and the really very cold conditions. And sometimes the waves say strong. The conditions say rough that we have to stop Louis onto experiments. When you say water sample. Presumably of the movement they're over here is water with the different constitutional, whatever. It's both. Actually, one of the key measurements that we've been taking for many, many, many decades, simply just the temperature and this Lindsey water. Because by looking at those, you can understand where the water has been coming from. So we can detect water in the Southern Ocean around and taught. That's come all the way from the north lanting and we're able to determine that by looking at the temperature insolence water batch thousands of kilometres. Yes, it's really amazing. So there's this huge global overturning secular at the ocean that connects up these hugely distant parts of the world, and it's incredibly important to understand that circulation because it's the way in which heat and carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, then get sick lated around the globe relations. Very important from standing climate change. We're, of course talking about something not terribly far south of stray. Leo south of Tasmanian show on. What right to SIS public goes very strong and fast or what? So two different things. One is the overturning secularization at the Asian that say, brings won't of rule away from the North Atlantic down to the bottom of the Southern Ocean. And then back up to the surface at the sedation, that's incredibly sleigh. There's also a current that circulates around Antarctica south Tasmania, and that's his shoes, strong current at something like the equivalent of five hundred Amazon rivers all flowing and talked and the two connected actually that overturning circulation and the shoot Antarctic's composer current apart of the same dynamics and Herbert who we have sitting next to me here is an expert on fluid before we get to Herbert, what are you doing? What are you trying to make sense of the key thing that we're trying to make sense of is understanding the amount mixing that goes on in this other nation. And that's really important primarily because it's. Key to understanding what drives these huge that relations. Specifically, we've been trying to understand the amount of sensually stirring that goes on. So you imagine a Cup of coffee for example, and you pour some thick cream into that coffee and stir right around, you'd see some patents in the cream as you do. So what we're wanting to do is basically quantify how much mixing how much stirring goes on in that sort of process shall almost impossible to calculate with all those currents green different directions, but how you do it will it is, of course, a complicated problem and with only begun to understand reasonably recently before the few measurements and docked. But there are very strong currencies Emily has said, but now we have a few floats and understanding of the mathematics. I mean, we know the quesion. So what using both mathematics and some relatively sophisticated new ideas in pure mathematics to see how best we can. Understand the data and put it together. Those Argo floats we have in Tasmania where they mount floating the in BAC messages via satellite all the time. Yes, I find a tra- Michael because I have been to the tactic, but I had a totally different experience to Emily the son Sean most of the time, and it was wonderful. I remember being up eighteen hours a day and enjoying all of it even when we came close to a nice book where I wanted to take some measurements. But yes, we do follow different floats. And the thing that I found fascinating on that trip, we had three floats that we put out. One was controlled from the ship. One was controlled from southern California and the other somewhere in Europe. And I thought it was fascinating that these floats that we were launching control from elsewhere and gave us good data because what we could also do in the control is have the move up and down. So we got a lot of data from that obvious. Is influenced by sorts of things, the wind and who knows what else, but also the terrain, which is below deep in the ocean, the values in the mountains, huge mountains do take that into consideration as well..

Southern Ocean Tasmania Emily Herbert Louis North Atlantic California Europe Leo Antarctica Michael Sean eighteen hours
"southern ocean" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"southern ocean" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Have mona pizza you could do anything with them but ninety nine percent of those preview natural that are ground up into animal feed boil down to oil and turned into supplements some to me to my mind that is not necessarily the wisest use to be made of this really really important source both for the ecology of the ocean but also for humans so this peruvian they and trophies yeah they're basically they're in the same family as as the answer is that we've eaten that we all eat from from the mediterranean coast of africa and yeah it's just the only reason that we don't eat them is because this massive what's called the reduction industry has sort of cornered the market on the mall now i also think it's important not to necessarily blame the settlement industry for this because really mega three supplements are just the latest incarnation of the the reduction industry trying to market their products we've had a reduction industry around for two hundred years and actually the first target of the reduction industry was wales and really you know in the in the early twentieth century over three hundred and fifty thousand great whales in the southern ocean where reduced largely to make margarine and remember all the time we were always hearing in the sixties and seventies that margarine with this great heart health healthy replacement for butter and all this kind of thing we'll turns out it's not true and it also turns out that it was probably entirely unnecessary to reduce all of these great whales now there used to be four hundred thousand great whales in the southern ocean now there are probably less than fifteen thousand and all that was because of this reduction industry today obviously we're not targeting wales for reduction but instead we're targeting this major chunk of the ocean something like twenty to twenty five million metric tons are reduced every year twenty to twenty five million metric tons of fish are reduced each and every year how much is it that's like a quarter of all the fish that we catch a quarter of all the fish that we catch that never hits a human plate most of it goes to feeding animals some making fertilizer and again some of it goes to making a mega three supplements so when you talk about reduction and the reduction industry explain what you're talking about so there were production industry basically takes all these little fish catches them by the millions of pounds or billions of pounds puts them in a bigger and boils them down into oil that is used for dietary supplements also used in animal feed and then the other product is called fishmeal sometimes called fish flour which is basically this sort of dust that gets incorporated into pellets and fed to animals the reduction industry was really focused on terrestrial animal feed at first so a lot of chickens were fed fishmeal on pigs were also fed fishmeal and fish oil to some degree but most recently more and more of that fishmeal and fish oil is being used to feed salmon and to create aquaculture throughout the world so a lot of the small fish that are being harvested in order to be reduced for animal feed and for supplements what happens to to the fish that ethos smaller fish that are being harvested the fish that are harvested by the supplement industry are keystone species they are essential for growing larger fish and if we remove those smaller fish from system then we're going to see fewer bigger fish i mean i think some of your listeners might remember the big cod crashes of the nineteen eighties and mark lansky famously wrote that book cod and we all know about how we lost all these cod and we overfished them and so forth and so on but what people don't generally know is that prior to the cod collapse there was a huge assault on the prey base of cod on the grand banks to fish called a capelin on caitlyn oily fish they also used by the reduction industry and it was really during the seventies and eighties as the animal feed business started to ramp up in certain catching all those little fish that we started to see a real impact upon predators and i did when i was working on an earlier book i go back and interview some of the sources that mark kurlansky used for his book cod and one of them i remember in particular candidates said you know the overfishing of did occur but look at all the little fish.

twenty five million metric ton ninety nine percent two hundred years
"southern ocean" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"southern ocean" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"Okay so if that slows down what are the implications for the climate well one thing it does it stops removing heat from the southern ocean and that's a problem because the southern ocean butts up against the anti arctic ice shelves and as the water there gets warmer because it's not moving the heat north it melts these ice shelves faster and it's going to result in sealevel rise well we've been hearing about the anti arctic glaciers and that there's sort of feedback loop down there can you take me through that yeah that's another thing that we explicitly illustrate in our ice melt paper two years ago as this is melts you get this fresh water coming out onto the southern ocean which then tends to stabilize that ocean so you don't get the overturning down there and that actually makes it cooler arou round and arctic so you get the warm water underneath melting the ice shelves but at the surface the snowfall rate over the continent is actually reduced by this cooler surrounding oceans so it affects the mass balance of the of the ice sheets and it affects it in the direction of losing mass because you're you're the ice shelves are are melting so that is an amplifying feedback which makes the sea level rise go faster now in your paper you talk about how this doesn't just happen in a nice gradual way that there can be things you call pulses what what are they well in the case of ice sheets as you begin to lose the ice shelves then you can get rapid disintegration and discharge of is.

sealevel rise two years
"southern ocean" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"southern ocean" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The craft into the southern ocean but chinese ground controllers lost contact with it the timing and location of its reentry into the atmosphere are uncertain the diocese of the colombian city of cuckoo tom the border with venezuela has donated a quarter of a million wafers to venezuela's catholic church for this week's easter celebrations a statement from the colombian church said the way i have been handed to representatives of the venezuelan church on the bridge between the two countries his nncholas russia the economic crisis has hit venezuela hard shortages mid simpson basic foodstuffs are common including flour and churches in venezuela were finding it difficult to buy their own wafers in the runup tweets when the way i used to celebrate holy communion the colombian catholic church considered it was its moral duty to help it's well and celebrate the festivities and made a large donation of waivers coach in los angeles has ruled that coffee sold in the state of california should carry a cancer warning label the council for education and research on toxics had sued about ninety coffee companies over their failure to warn customers about toxic chemical contained in coffee the group argue acrylamide which is produced when coffee is roasted is considered carcinogenic under california law bbc news thanks you're listening to the newsroom from the bbc world service with me nick miles and we begin in the middle east where hamas and other palestinian groups have called for six weeks of mass protests to start today near the border between gaza and israel the palestinians have said that they want the demonstrations to remain peaceful but israel warns that the move is aimed at igniting a new confrontation and they've deployed military reinforcements nearby reports are now coming in that a man has been killed by israeli tank shells in gaza are buffets editor sebastian asha spoke to me earlier about the protests we're used to seeing big costa protests strictly from gaza but we haven't seen the intensity that was expected after the announcement by president trump but the us was moving its embassy to jerusalem and there were protests for awhile but it didn't build in real intensity on the ground and this is is essentially happening with the prospect of the inauguration of that embassy very soon it's due to happen in may so though it's not the.

trump president editor israel middle east bbc russia jerusalem us venezuela sebastian asha gaza hamas california los angeles colombian catholic church colombian church catholic church
"southern ocean" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"southern ocean" Discussed on Future Tense

"But this is only one side of the coin today animals themselves become partners in pursuit of scientific discovery dr clive mcmahon is the animal trekking operations manager for the integrated marine observing service he's following elephants seals into the depths of the southern ocean so the instruments that term we attached to the elephants whose or cold cg dean recorders and safety be stands for conduct of aotea temperature and dipped so what the instrument is measuring measuring how much salt is in the water the temperature of the water and obviously how this changes as the animal dives because elephants heels dr of really deeply they can go up to two thousand meters we get a really neat and detailed picture of what the water column looks like around the antarctic so helping us to identify these areas of bottom water formation on bottom water well it's one of the most important water bodies that dr ocean currents around the world and we need these currents to mix water to mix heat to mix oxygen carbon dioxide all of those sorts of things so it is really important that we have a good handle on way this bottomorder is formed and how much of it is formed and the data coming back from the seals is helping us do that okay so why adopt this particular approach what is it that slow fans allayed in fields of that you'll calmed get from other forms of monitoring the antarctic is quite a hostile place so in winter it's all frozen and what that means is it's really hard for us to get in they wish ship so we need super duper icebreakers that we we don't always have access to so there's very little information from south of sixty degrees now the alternative to using a big ship of course is to you some kind of instrument that you put in the ocean like an argo flight and it might tom dropped.

carbon dioxide antarctic dr clive mcmahon operations manager argo tom two thousand meters sixty degrees
"southern ocean" Discussed on The Compass

The Compass

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"southern ocean" Discussed on The Compass

"Since one or tell us un as it can see those a bunch of massive view this is the colon it takes effect every hour who year which shows when they arrive when they depart on reproductive success a which chicks surviving which using an network if cameras tom hart from oxford university monitors the three species of brushtail penguin on the topic peninsula the chinstrap a daily and jen to every summit he visits the cameras to change the batteries in the spring of 2016 he noticed a sharp decline in the number of chicks successfully fledged on kouwa bill island give long and has about two thousand gmt penguins on it and there was a big dial fat right the end of the season i i'll come back i buy didn't say but we started getting all these reports solve of dial so what caused the sudden penguin dawn of the evidence according to scientists at the net bought palmer research station suggests it wasn't disease but starvation that points to a problem with the krill they could have suffered that owned by breeding year or returnee wales could have taken a larger share climate change is another of the key suspects mont belcher from the british antarctic survey climate change is likely to have a very large impact on all aspects of the southern ocean ecosystem not least in antarctic krill spare they all very much dependent throw their only lot history stages on the nordli extent of of sea ice where they this morning and egg duration phase takes place so clearly the location of the the ice age and the timing of the extent of the ice age while have a major impact and as to wear krill ultimately will will end up in the southern ocean which kearns they get in trained in and indeed there they're overrule success brent spirit from the hope see will research institute also expects an impact where i think the key here with all the discussion about changes in climate which is clearly happening local changes in climate regional changes in climate oceana graphic climber atmosphere climate is is a question is how quick.

kouwa bill island palmer research station wales climate change tom hart oxford university jen mont belcher antarctic kearns
"southern ocean" Discussed on The Compass

The Compass

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"southern ocean" Discussed on The Compass

"Where we all right now mid wounded this is a very strange place it's a world without will sell their animals that live their whole lives it never touching a solid halt service and that means they got bodies that a light blend gloss to the sort of the real all of the bodies very delicate made a jelly on the only way to understand the used to come and see it because if you try and fish these up with an old you get is a lot of snow in the bottom of the net look at ice fish there crocodile ice fish that beauty has us it's now is really like crocodile like just everywhere we go there is something amazing and something different all the krill oil really starting to swarm around us now on i mean they're almost see through sometimes catch a flash of of what in a got the line down the body and they've actually go it'll organised like headlights dotted along nipple he's as well which when we switch onto lights later he will be able to see some of their follow it displays controlled by sobs finished standing bart bay those krill are the foundation of life in the antarctic food for the seals the wales amd the penguins that live on the west antarctic peninsula this is one of the fastest warming areas all nurse warming temperatures means less the ice less sea ice means less habitat for the algae that the krill each and that could be catastrophic for the mammals and birds in this part of the southern ocean.

bart bay wales west antarctic peninsula
"southern ocean" Discussed on The Compass

The Compass

02:52 min | 3 years ago

"southern ocean" Discussed on The Compass

"The oceans at both ends of the world are changing fast some animals may adapt to warmer washers others won't in the arctic the shifting climate will certainly changed the lives of native people and bring more workers from the south a place lex foul barred perfectly positioned on the northeast passage from asia across northern europe to north america is likely to take home new found importance in world trade mats four shummer is a local biologist when the coo as goes we will for transportation sponsorships say it will open for expiration so for petroleum and other natural resources so yeah it would change the picture a law and that could have consequences for a place like this because it could be increased in size considered if you have ships coming in because swap out his position that they actually the hub the main entrance to cross polo routes so yeah that's going to be quite interesting to watch there are a lot of people who are wondering about what had happened to small bag if it should be possible to say through the northeast passage tarin sorensen is deacon at the foul barred kheirkhah the most northerly church in the world laudable spilling of oil what about the fuel affect the arctic there are many questions i'm liz bonin and this is ocean stories today are discovering how a warming climate is changing the arctic and southern oceans mother 10 meters vents are secure descending we had south sixty degrees south far beyond the southern tip of south africa chile and new zealand to the mother of the oceans the water that brings life to the rest of the world the antibiotics particularly important because it's where a lot of the deepocean is of the world are all effectively breathing in our guide to the deep a southampton universities ocean explorer john copley deep water the fills the bottom of mary on his trench in the pacific actually begun its journey into the deep sea surface around antarctica in winter in the antarctic a lot more of the sea freezes around antarctica we get this phenomenal growth of sea ice spreading out from the continent and if it effectively doubles the size of the of the antarctic and as the surface sea freezes to form at sea ice it leaves behind very cold very salty water man very cold very saw.

lex asia europe north america coo tarin sorensen liz bonin chile mary antarctic south africa john copley sixty degrees 10 meters
"southern ocean" Discussed on The Compass

The Compass

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"southern ocean" Discussed on The Compass

"We started in the atlantic and then traveled to the indian ocean were making our way around the world welcome back to the compass podcast and our mini series ocean stories made by the bbc world service are podcasts are introducing you to the people who make their living from the depths and the shallows of our oceans i am liz bonnin and this is part three the arctic and southern oceans the oceans cover seventy percent of our planet's surface the wildlife they contain is extraordinary but so too are the people who make their living from the depths in the shallows of our seas in this special fourpart series for the compass i'm introducing each of them from the ice strewn landscapes of alaska to the coral reef coastlines of madagascar from the bbc world service this is ocean stories part three the arctic and southern oceans these are the extremes of two very different oceans where life has evolved to survive the intense cold to oceans where the climate is changing rapidly where the fish mammals and people are learning to adapt we begin in the far north the ocean encircled by russia norway iceland greenland canada and alaska the arctic ocean has tempted explorers in search of a faster passage from east to west for centuries as the water is warm the voyage becomes less dangerous and the plenty full rich resources of the north are suddenly within reach our marine ecologists john copley is watching closely.

liz bonnin alaska madagascar bbc coral reef russia john copley seventy percent
"southern ocean" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"southern ocean" Discussed on Future Tense

"The might extend to be able to record video so we were already experimenting with tags that combined gps locations with short video clips of delivery birdseye view of what they're doing wherever they are not can help some stand why they are visiting the places using the locations that they are doing what are they doing there by feeding roosting trying to fund mates without actually having now visual as to what the birds might be doing we might be guessing md we've already seen developments aware tags basically create their own is their own updates so learning more about anymore behavior for hyperactive devices but this is only one side of the coin today animals themselves become partners in pursuit of scientific discovery dr clive mcmahon is the animal trekking operations manager for the integrated marine observing service he's following elephants seals into the depths of the southern ocean so the instruments that term we attached to the elephants heels a cold cted recorders and safety be stands for conduct vity temperature and did so what the instrument is measuring these measuring how much salt as in the water the temperature of the water and obviously how this changes as the animal dives because elephants heels dive really deeply they can go up to two thousand meters we get a really neat and detailed picture of what the water column looks like around the antibiotic tell ping us to identify these areas of bottom water formation and bottom water will it's one of the the most important water bodies that dr ocean currents around the world and we need these currents to mix water to mix hate to mix oxygen carbon dioxide all of those sorts of things so it's really important that we have a good handle on way this bottomorder is formed and how much of it is formed and the data coming back from the seals is helping us do that okay so why adopt this particular approach what is it that baseload fans allayed fields awful that you can't get from other forms of monitoring.

carbon dioxide gps dr clive mcmahon operations manager two thousand meters