17 Burst results for "Southern Baptist Theological Seminary"

"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

07:11 min | 11 months ago

"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"In iTunes. And he can follow us on social media as long as we're allowed by social media to be followed at the Improv Show, or Dan Profit, Well Fraternal editorial board opining on the Biden contradiction. Former vice president is running as a reassuring, watered a man of good character. We can reunite the country and crushed covert 19 after the disruptive trump presidency. Yet at the same time, he's also running on the most left wing policy program in decades. How can you reconcile the two? Well, the Journal suggests that you can't and what evidence is there today? QUERIES The Journal editorial board that Mr Biden will restrain his increasingly radical party along his long career. He has been the consummate party man floating right or left with the political tides as a presidential candidate this year, he has put in Particular policy imprint on the Democratic Party, Not one, the party has put its stamp on him. He conformed himself in his agenda to the priorities of the regular left, ditched his long opposition, a taxpayer funding of abortion, supporting tax rates and income and capital higher than any since the seventies. His version of the Green New Deal would spend $2 trillion in four years, and he aims to eliminate fossil fuels with mandates and regulation, as he effectively said in the final debate, So how do you reconcile those? You can't Joe Biden The idea of job and being the leader of the Free World. Joe Biden wasn't even a leader for the state of Delaware over four decades. He's just somebody who occupy space in D. C That doesn't make him unique, but it certainly disqualifies them. It should from being president hated states, doesn't it For more on this topic, we're pleased to be joined by our friend Albert Mueller. He's the theologian, an ordained minister who serves as the president. Of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Dr Mueller Thanks for joining us again Appreciate it, Dan, I'm glad to be with you. Thank you. So you wrote this. Ah, excellent piece at Albert Mohler dot com, a site for excellent pieces written by other bowler Christians conscious in the looming 2020 election, and why this is so important, Not just because of your standing in the Christian community, but also because of your about phase from 2016. 2 2020 on president Trump impart describe that for us as instruction for Christians to consider, you know, back in 2016. I had one of most evangelical Christians been just very consistently supportive of the Republican ticket. But Donald Trump of here to be a real aberration from that it is personal character, his background but also in his previous policies. And so, he said, he's going to be pro life. But to be honest, I didn't believe it. A zit turned out, he waas. He's turned out to be the most consequential pro life president and really American history. And, furthermore, many other policies, especially on religious liberty, So even though the president has quite bombastic in his personality, his his actual policies have turned out to be very much in alignment with what conservatives and conservative evangelicals overwhelmingly have wanted. And frankly, he's he's gone even beyond political necessity in defending the unborn, I take that very seriously. You know, you're right in here. It's kind of funny the way to frame and I think this is a good way to frame it. For people that have the same opinion you do of trump in terms of his bombast as Twitter feed and so forth. That really sort of rubs people the wrong way. You say I'm not voting for who will be my neighbor. I'm voting for who will be the president of United States. Couch. You know, I like a quiet neighborhood. I think President Trump likes a lot of noise, but it's what he does. That's important. I'm voting for a president on international issues, including international religious liberty, but especially on domestic issues, the sanctity of human life, The defense of religious liberty and, frankly, just pushing back against the insanity of the left. President Trump has done very well. I shudder at the thought of Joe Biden, frankly, and the left wing of the Democratic Party being elected just on the very issues that a frame Mike Urns for decades. Now, there was ah piece over life sinews dot com to that really speaks to the importance of your piece, which is 40 million Christians sit out elections and they need to be motivated to participate, and they break it down. But this is sort of the same dynamic that was once talked about in advance of George W. Bush's elections where there was an explicit play may to register and turnout. Evangelical Christians who hadn't been voting and it seems like this is an underappreciated under discussed cohort within The larger electorate. But boy, that's a big number that could have a big impact. If even if there was an incremental improvement in the turnout will your idea and you know they're two issues here. One of them is the number of older evangelicals been voting for quite a while, or at least a voting age. But they haven't voted consistently elections and haven't voted thoughtfully. We've got to really reach out to them. I've been doing everything I know. The second group is younger evangelicals, and, frankly, many of them have just never really been adequately shown why evangelical Christians have had such deep concerns. Over a number of issues from abortion and the sanctity of life issues to religious liberty and all the rest. We have some big challenges here. What do you say to the suggestion that well, now that we got Amy Cockney Barrett on the bench, and it's ah, sensibly, a 63 Pro Life court, for example, that Ah okay Trump did live up to his commitment with respect to Supreme Court and frankly other federal judicial appointments. But that's done now and now we don't need to be worried about the courts because of the appointments trumps mates and I can feel comfortable vote. Against Trump or sitting it out because I don't like him personally, You know, Dan, I shudder at the lack of just common civics on the part of so many Americans. The Supreme Court. The federal judiciary is like the last refuge. Now that's very important. And the problem is it had turned into a super liberal Legislature. Frankly, conservative majority is going to fix some of its activism. But let's just say that by the time it gets to the Supreme Court, you already have in case of federal legislation, Congress and the and the executive acting on it. So just take Joe Biden his word. He says that he would repeal the Hyde amendment that can just happen through Congress. The Supreme Court found that the Hyde amendment was constitutional. Not that it was mandatory AA. I think American pro life evangelicals failed to understand that if we lose the White House and both houses of Congress The Supreme Court. Not going to be able to be the final battle wall here and with respect to the where we are on some other issues like the redefinition moving from the redefinition of marriage, which many predicted this is where we go to the redefinition. Of gender identity itself there that that is that is the next front in terms of the state imposing its will on faithful people. Well, Joe Biden said this this weekend in the interview with the LGBT Q newspaper in Philadelphia, he said that with 100 days, so press four The Equality amendment, and that's a direct contradiction of religious liberty. And and when he was asked about religious liberty, he basically just threw it under the bus. I mean, it's not like we haven't been told what their intentions are, and also two of the suggestions about Biden being a one termer questions about Biden's capacity and health and so forth. Well, then you have Kamala Harris says the backstop in comma Harris, as demonstrated that she is particularly hostile to religion essentially compared the Knights of Columbus to the Ku Klux Klan in one judicial confirmation hearing. Yeah, it's studying its ominous and it's.

Joe Biden President Trump president Supreme Court Dan Profit Democratic Party vice president editorial board Congress Journal Albert Mohler Twitter Southern Baptist Theological S Delaware Kamala Harris Ku Klux Klan George W. Bush Albert Mueller
"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

09:15 min | 1 year ago

"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Special Siri's celebrating 75 years on the radio, we're delighted to have with us. The Reverend Dr Greg DeLoach, the interim dean and development officer of Mercer University, McAfee School of Theology. In Atlanta, Georgia. It is also the teaching pastor of First Baptist Church in Monroe, Georgia, and earlier served as senior pastor of churches in Augusta, Marietta, Chickamauga and Mansfield, Georgia. Greg is a graduate of shorter college and earned his master of divinity from the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and his doctor of ministry and Old Testament theology from Columbia Theological Seminary. He is the author of several books, including the forthcoming Let My People Go. Freed by a fresh wind Sermons on Exodus, Greg. Welcome today. One. Thank you. It's a pleasure to be here. Over the past few weeks, we have featured leaders from some of the institutions and denominations that we have worked with over the past 75 years since the founding of the Protestant hour and 1945 and that twin. The Southern Baptist Convention was part of that initial effort, but they left after a couple of years to establish their own communications Ministry. But in 2004, we forged a strong relationship with the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship and the school of Theology. Una lead is a vital part of that movement. First what you sketch for us, The history and mission of the CBS movement. It's been interesting. It's It's really parallel my ministry vocational calling of sorts because a student at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, right We're going through their own transitions, ahs that was reflective of what was happening. Denominational e corporate about this fellowship. Was a response to Baptist who wanted a more moderate on somebody even say, progressive way of being church both in the nation and in the world. And that included renewing or discovering new ways to do theological education, ways of practicing ministry and so forth. And so that began about in the late eighties. And early nineties, which again parallels also the forming of what is now called the McAfee School of Theology. That's part of Mercer. So introduce us again to the school. You serve as interim Dean and its part in the overall mission of Mercer University. I remember when I was a young pastor 1992 literally just out of seminary, And at the time Ah vice President, Dr Jim Broner was calling together pastors throughout the state of Georgia. To begin to think and vision about what theological education could look like. In Georgia. This is an exciting time. I was a young guy in my mid twenties. I was simply there as a as a body, but not so much as a voice but eager and interested. So watching the school go from an idea to an actual formation itself was very life giving. And so throughout my pastor, it's It was important to me to both financially be apart of supporting the school of theology. To look to the school of theology to call their graduates to serve on church staff and, ah, in God's good timing. I will credit it with that when the time came for me to make a transition to move from the senior pastor it to serving. The school. The school is an embedded school with Mercer University so again, remembering the history beginning in the early nineties, it was important to be part of established university and watching both the university and the particular school grow together. So what are some of the degree programs McAfee offers Almost any seminary is going to offer is the bread and butter of master of divinity degree, which is for most denominations critical for the purpose of ordination and credentialing in general. So we've offered that from the very beginning. We also offer what's called a master of Arts and Christian Ministry. This degree is for those that are not necessarily looking to pursue the past or chaplaincy, but rather a degree to help them be more theologically informed as they either serve congregations or perhaps more informed laity. Just a few years ago, we began offering the master of Arts and Christian Ministry as also on online options, so we offer both residential as well as an online option. And now we also offer a master of theological studies, which is a research degree. It's intended student for those that are preparing for Ah, higher ed work, PhD programs and the like. Then finally, I'm very excited to announce that as of this summer, June off 2020. We now have full approval from the Association of Theological Schools, the accrediting agency. McAfee is a part of to begin offering a fully online master of divinity degree. We do see ourselves as a residential school, but the delivery method is continuing to evolve and change. And so we're going to be launching that degree program in the fall of 2021. You still preach regularly in a church and I've been asking all are preachers in the Siri's this question, So I'd love to get your take a cz Well in these challenging times, with hostility in the political sphere, racial injustice, economic inequality. And so, muchmore what should preachers be doing in their pulpit? Zoom or otherwise, in this sort of environment and how Khun preaching Help us get through this. It sounds a little cliche to say this, but I still think it's true. It is important. In fact, it's imperative that a preacher must present a non anxious presence in an anxious world. Congregants themselves are very anxious and for good reason, and they bring that anxiety, too. Well, in this case, the virtual sanctuary and so we must name those things that make us anxious. We must name those things that are broken and falling apart in this world. But we also believe in a gospel a good news that has a response to this because the truth is There is always a pandemic going on. I don't mean that simply in the global health concern, but a person's individual live is going to be dealing with their own personal pandemics. They're dealing with their own crisis. They're dealing with their own injustices. They're dealing with their own ISMs that air marginalizing them, and pastors know that And so in this time, it's important now, more than ever to not acquiesce to the Cultural whims that may blow one direction or another or buy into Ah, certain sectarian ways of we against they, but rather recapturing that Martin Buber. Idea of I and thou are we relating in this midst of anxiety and non anxious ways. Greg, Your sermon today focuses on the gospel reading for this Sunday from Matthew Chapter. 20. Would you read it for us? It's a pleasure. Thank you. Here's me these good words from Matthew chapter 20. For the Kingdom of Heaven is like a landowner went out early in the morning to hire laborers for his vineyard. And after agreeing with the labors for the usual daily wage, he sent them into his vineyard. When he went out about nine o'clock. He saw others standing idle in the marketplace, and he said to them You also go into the vineyard and I will pay you whatever is right, so they went When it went out about again at noon, and about three o'clock he did the same. And about five o'clock he went out and found others standing around, and he said to them. Why are you standing here Idle all day. They said them because no one has hired us. He said to them, you also go into the vineyard. When evening came, the owner of the Vineyard said to his manager, call the labors and give them their pay, beginning with the last and then going to the first. When those hired about five o'clock came each of them received the usual daily wage. Now. When the first came, they thought they would receive Mohr, but each of them also received the usual daily wage. And when they received it, they grumbled against the landowner, saying These last worked on ly one hour and you have made them equal to us who have borne the burden of the day and the scorching heat. And he replied, Toa one of them. Friend I am doing, you know wrong. Did you not agree with me for the usual daily wage? Take what belongs to you and go. I choose to give to this last the same as I give to you. Am I not allowed to do what I choose with what belongs to me. Or are you envious? Because I am generous..

Mercer University Southern Baptist Theological S Georgia Dr Greg DeLoach McAfee Columbia Theological Seminary interim Dean First Baptist Church Southern Baptist Convention Association of Theological Sch Siri Atlanta Cooperative Baptist Fellowship school of Theology Mercer Monroe
"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on Reformgelical

Reformgelical

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on Reformgelical

"Ooh Yeah. It's Nice I need to do more shameless promotion I guess you do. If. I haven't seen that you need. To do more of that. Woke up to reform. Reform. Evangelical meet I am met our co hosted by not Matt's Co hosted by the not quite black enough eighty ruthless not at all man I couldn't believe that. Right. Eighty was not allowed in a group because he did not have A. GR- percentage a high percentage of blackness. I. It was crazy I sent out a newsletter about this the other day. I was in this group for months like probably a year more and I never. I. Never Spoke About Social Justice because I knew I'd get kicked out instantly if I did, right So it was like a preaching group, it was a black preachers group and then somebody asked a question about expository preaching I answered and somebody. Noticed my name. And they're like, how did you get in here? You are not black. And I was like, well, you know twenty percent Nigerian. You know that kind of thing and I had like two or three defenders that were like, how could you question his blackness? But then by the end of it, kicked me out I was not black enough. A UK to recover after that. Oh Yeah. I record. So I had a feeling I was going to get kicked out. So I recorded it all live when it happened it was hilarious. I was thinking about that after your shared that it was like why people don't do that. We're not like a man you are so white or your little Tan I don't know if you can hang out in our group out of. Those conversations don't happen that used to happen, but that was back during the racist that was the dark times that everyone. To Note, even get a Tan back then. Well, there was always I I'll never forget I was watching this prison show wants in college I think it was called Oz and it was about this white supremacist gang. In prison and the guy like I guess he got beat up or something and he ended up getting. A skin graft from a black guy. But you couldn't see the black skinny just like he had it. You could tell he had it or no he he you knew he had it but you couldn't tell okay and because of the skin graft, they shunned him even though you couldn't tell like, Oh, you've got a little bit of blocks good scooter you you're not allowed in arklow anymore. That was like that was like the most backwards thing ever back in two thousand, six But you know here in twenty twenty, we're way smarter and we're way more sophisticated. So absolutely. All right. So if you guys are watching wherever you are on facebook youtube twitter, if you want to put a little message in wherever you're listening to this, we will get it but you will not be able to see the messages. If you're on the same platform, I've had some people ask about that before we are also only doing a thirty minute show because my dad's coming into town and I gotta go pick them up at the airport. So we will be Indian, a little early in having a shortage show for those of you listen on the podcasts are on. US right later. So let's just get into the first thing I. wanted to start with with a question from you guys this was on our instagram. Direct message someone was asking he and his fiancee are engaged nineteen years old and they're feeling really discouraged that people aren't Kinda supporting it and he wanted to get our advice in our thoughts on it. It's eighty. Do you have any awards wisdom for young listener? Yeah. Well, I mean listen. It sounds like it's just about the age. It's not about anything else Let's just assume that. Yeah. So if it's just about being too young to get married you know that that really is an unfortunate situation because it's just not true. You know there's there's plenty of people that get married right out of high school and There's no biblical reason why you can't get married right Outta high school. It just doesn't make any sense at all from an age perspective if you're both you know nineteen or eighteen, whatever it is that's a perfectly legitimate time to get married if there's other reasons like you know. They know you better than I? Do I mean I don't want to venture a guess into what other reason could be that you know that might be something that's worth hearing people's advice for but Yeah might advice is that you look look at the scripture like we do with everything is there any reason in the scripture that in eighteen year olds could not get married to another eighteen year old I just can't imagine what that would be right yeah or in nineteen year olds and this guy has a fulltime job I should add. So he can provide right plumber it's a good job you could. Definitely. Make it work definitely can make it work, and again I'm not saying that if there's other things that are going on here like maybe the the woman you're marrying is got three kids already kind of thing, and maybe they're like a little bit concerned about you in that situation like, okay there could be other things I'm not saying that there couldn't be reasons why you might want to take a step back. But, the agent self doesn't seem like there's really nothing wrong there. Yeah. Absolutely. Although if you do have three kids nineteen. Oh that's what I'm saying I'm saying like the other things going on but if it's just about eight in, that's it..

arklow twenty twenty UK Matt facebook twitter
"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"I continued to engage with people who I I know they're Christians. They're good people of faith, but they're so frustrated and worried about the direction of culture in America and I talked to so many, and they say well. You know we need to be just like the left we we need to fight. Fight like them. They're convinced the left fights some Nastier way that we must fight and and we've got a fight in this way. If we want preserve things, and my thinking is always you know I I'm headed to eternity. I'm not going to do something temporary. That jeopardizes my witness to other people, and it just seems like even within Christianity these days there's a segment of Christians who are so worked up and spun up on Politics that they're almost losing their religion thinking. They've gotTA lose it to save it. Yeah that's a very legitimate concern. There is no biblical justification for living in a mode of anger. And so that's that's something that really is is not an option for us and and I love what you that up with so many Christians saying, look at the left and look at how they play ball, and and look at the at the take. No prisoners approach well. The secular left thinks that their plan is all there. Is We as Christians? Christians we we're I'm a conservative, a very proud, traditional conservative, but I don't believe that politics is ever going to deliver on all that that I look for I believe only Christ will, and so you know, Christians. We're the people who can't take the route of ultimate politics because we can't wait. Politics is ultimate. We didn't have to be faithful. Absolutely, I I often these days with environmentalists that it's so interesting to watch the secular religion that in Christianity as long as you repent of your sins, you get salvation, and in secularism you can repent of your sins as long as you want, but as long as there are other centers. You're still toast unless you get rid of them and. Awful lot of what's going on is is repenting. Someone else's sent. Right You know you mentioned the climate change as people get on an airplane and fly across the Atlantic. Go to a conference. Complain about people who fly across the Atlantic. Right absolutely, and now that this terrible trend I'm seeing that that you and I may not be a racist, but we we've had racist ancestors in there, for we benefited from their sin, and we must repent of their sin, and somehow make right there and I. Don't know that that ins well in in the arguments of the day in any capacity. Well, for one thing, we can't explain who we are without our ancestors, and another thing, a biblical understanding, we cannot repent for someone else ascend we can we can. We can note it with lament, but but we can't repent for the dead. We can only repent for our own sense. We've got to do our best to live faithfully in this world, and we take history into account, but but we've got to live in this world and faithfulness and you know the the behind all of that. Is. is is frankly frustration with society that that can never turn out in a healthy way, and we're testing points in this culture right now, and that means only as a culture being tested, but but we are. The church is being tested as well. Definitely, so who are it's a pleasure to spend some time with you on the phone. I really did enjoy this conversation and I have not yet gotten my copy of your book, but I intend to the gathering storm. Thank you for stopping by I. Really appreciate it. Larry. Thank you so much enjoyed the conversation. I'M GONNA. Make sure you get that book. Thank you so much. We actually don't don't don't don't because I have been a authors well. I know I need to buy a copy. And I actually just click the button, so it's coming. Thank you God. Bless you and it's been great. I enjoyed the intelligent conversation. Thank you so much. L. Muller Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, his new book, the Gathering Storm, secularism, culture and the Church his book I. Just clicked it Seventeen, ninety, nine hard cover, but nine hundred seventy five. If you get it on kindle Amazon. I've read multiple copies of his book. They were supposed to send. Send me a review copy in. They actually said it to my office, and said of the House, so I haven't seen it but I intend to read it because I've read all of Al's books and I will read this one as well When we come back, we've got to delve into the police shooting and the John Bolton controversy if you WanNa, get a copy of. Of, Al Moeller's book The gathering storm text the word data, two, three, three, seven, seven seven, and I will send you back a link. You'll get the I e a H. and remodel the Georgia model for for where we are with the virus, but at the top I have put in L. Molars. Boggling Amazon so you can buy the gathering storm I enjoy the conversation. Conversation I I'll or somebody who look to respect deeply We've not actually spent that much time in conversation. We've traded emails in the past, but we've never actually had a extend conversations, so that was good. I was so glad to have him now. We've got other stuff to talk about John Bolton. The fallout is beginning from his book. They're sending me a copy of it. I got an angry email. Yesterday in fact you know I. It was actually a direct message on Instagram I don't want to. I don't want to be critical of the person who senate I understand where she's coming from a, but she's very upset with me because I said. I have invited John Bolton to come on and talk about his book. And here here's what she said. I have been your greatest fan and listen to your show every day. I've defended and supported you and others called progressive and sheep's clothing. I've always believed in your commitment to our country until today in all caps. I thought I was hearing things. When I heard John. Bolton's name I almost passed out when you said he was going.

John Bolton Atlantic Amazon America Al Moeller L. Muller Southern Baptist The Larry Georgia kindle
"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on Christ is the Cure

Christ is the Cure

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on Christ is the Cure

"Welcome to crisis the cure. We are continuing our summer series with a variety of guests. In today we have Steven Welcome who is a professor of Christian Theology at Southern Baptist theological seminary Hi. How are you doing today? I'm flying greats. Be with your neck. Yeah, thank you for jumping on so before we actually begin, we're going to talk about progressive confidential and before we begin. Would you care to introduce yourself? Sure! There's probably a lot of things that could be. Said but as you said I, I teach at Southern Baptist theological seminary in in Kentucky and I've been here now. This is going. I'm in my twenty first year, so time is flying by and enjoyed my time here. Originally I'm a native I grew up in. Canada in the roughly the Toronto area. for people that don't all the geography of candidates probably close enough and so I grew up there in a Christian home. All the way through high school and was part of became a Christian at sixteen and and then I was part of. A reformed. Baptist, church in in in Canada where pastor. William Payne was my pastor and I learned a lot from him, and then I went to to school in after high school I Went to the United States and I went to a school in Rochester New York Roberts Wesleyan college to do a science degree met my wife we attended. a reformed Baptist Church a new Covenant Theology Church in in Rochester with John Reid, singer as our home pastor, and then after college, I went to Trinity Evangelical Vinnie School Philip Call to ministry. And did my md Ph, d., and then pastored in the in south. Dakota and prairies for four years taught for three years in British Columbia in at Trinity, Western, university. On in in the Vancouver British Columbia area in Canada for three years prior to coming to southern, and and I have been married now does my thirty fifth year of marriage to my wife, who I met at college, and then we have five children that range from thirty years old all the way down to to twenty years old, so that's a little bit about me. Wow, yeah, you got a full house. Yup Yup. It's been good, so that's great. That's awesome. Yeah, so it sounds like you've been kind of all around. North America in British Columbia is beautiful. It is absolutely gorgeous. But the Lord calls to come to Kentucky Kentucky's beautiful, but it's hard to beat the Pacific, northwest but. It's a very beautiful area, but we did enjoy our time there for three years and but then came to southern. Loved our time here in, Kentucky Awesome. So the one thing is that. Most people probably know you're from Your Book King Through Covenant With Peter Gantry. Correctly Yeah gentry genders entry. So with that text, it's quite a whopper. I guess what led Y'all to pursue that in to go down that road to write that book. Well. Peter and a both are from Canada and so. Even though we didn't know each other much in those years, he taught at Toronto Baptist Seminary..

Southern Baptist theological s Canada New York Roberts Wesleyan coll Kentucky British Columbia Peter Gantry Toronto Baptist Seminary Kentucky Kentucky William Payne Steven Welcome Trinity Evangelical Vinnie Sch Rochester Baptist Church professor Toronto North America Dakota Vancouver Covenant Theology Church
"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on The World and Everything In It

The World and Everything In It

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on The World and Everything In It

"First question was why you felt. It was the right thing to not sign on to the Social Justice Statement and then my second question was how you deal with those who are using good things right now like the SBC wrassling with the abuse taking that opportunity to move it in a leftward direction. Too Good questions you can ask me anything Which you just did so. The social justice controversy is not new to me. That's what I kind of cut my teeth on. And that's one of the reasons. Why on the briefing? I defend the term cultural Marxism. Because that's what I heard them. Call it that's what I was force fed to read and didn't work But it did really excite me intellectually thought. Okay this is. This is a worthy opponent. You read Saul Linski. You Go. Okay this is. This is a worthy opponent. Or what I think. Hilarious get conservative Christians talking about the Frankfurt school which I dealt with extensively when I was in college and you know in other words. They're not reading the Frankfurt school but they they can see its effects and okay. That's good. You can trace this lineage. So I think that most of what's in that social justice statement is good and timely and needful but I'm a in conservative which means to say I believe not only in the right articulation but in the right process and that's why as an historical theologian. I'm going to walk through Nice. Sia The council three twenty five that affirm that Jesus stantione with father okay. Here's a process. You have the bishops of the church in a room and use walk through. I'm a son of the reformation. Okay here here's how the Augsburg Confession came about. Here's help. The catechism of Geneva came about in southern evangelical life the Chicago Statement on Biblical Air Sea. is probably the most important document of my lifetime. I was in high school when it was adopted but the Chicago statement was the definitive statement of Biblical and it emerged from two years. Appoint together the most significant evangelical figures putting him in a room and working for two years until a final conference. It was out of the end just to just to get everything right. Affirmations and denials the same thing was true in a differences the Danvers statement was produced by the council little man womanhood. The process that produced the social justice statement was six people. We didn't even know where meeting. I don't actually don't even know there. Were six of eight a few more In Dallas and dropped a statement and said we want to call people to sign decided. Well I have ever signed a document like that Because I have a. I have a long I as a historian and theologian. How long view history? I WanNa make sure that I'm GonNa live with these words with the rest of my life. If I'm going to put my my name on it and I did not feel that there were some distinctions made in that statement that should be made for instance the issue of race so criticizing critical race theory is necessary. Ma is one of the most toxic worldviews But the classical civil rights movement was not driven by critical race theory as a matter of fact critical race theory was a repudiation of the central argument of the of the civil rights movement. Well I can't distinguish that distinction and I'm President of the Southern Baptist theological seminary. I've got a moral responsibility to you. Know make make these distinctions really carefully. I have deep concerns about racism that are based in my Christian. Pauline Augustinian Worldview. That's prior far prior to critical race theory and operating of it completely different worldview. But you gotta be really careful if you're going to denounce critical theory. You make very clear. It kind of goes back to at modern art if you really are atheist materialist. Critical race theory makes perfect sense of intersection. -ality is brilliant. Okay so isolate these things but make very clear their pedigree and but but so. Where's the right concern here? Where where's the rightful concern behind? All this how how would Christians rightly. Think about it so it looked near my friends. But I didn't like being put in the corner and just to say I don't think any major evangelical figure has signed that statement outside of those and and it's not because a whole lot don't agree with is just. This is not the way we've done this kind of thing. And so that's hope that's honest and clear I know it's honest. Hope it's clear But I mean I I want to say with respect and see the the frustrating thing to me is that yes these are real issues and I mean I talk about them every day in my own way but I actually think that there were too many issues in that statement to be covered in anything. That's the think You needed like that much link for every one of these Issues get a second question. I've forgotten.

Frankfurt school Chicago Saul Linski Southern Baptist theological s Geneva President Dallas Ma
"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on Christian Podcast Community

Christian Podcast Community

08:56 min | 1 year ago

"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on Christian Podcast Community

"Gals I'm colleen sharp and Rachel Miller is my co host. And today we're GONNA be talking to Rachel Den Hollander and I know a lot of our listeners. Know who you are Rachel but maybe you could share a little bit about yourself and your story. Yeah absolutely as I am a wife. Jake Dan Hollander mom to four kids. I Jacob is currently a PhD student at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary we attend a small Reformed Baptist Church here in Louisville We home school our for kids. I was born and raised in Michigan. Hold Myself Both of us were in had. We had excellent experiences with home schooling and were loving so far the experience of home schooling our kids to and that you know that Kinda. Compasses a significant part of our life. Right now And then as well I miss survivor of sexual assault and do a lot of work in the sphere of advocacy with education and working with various nonprofits universities corporations and churches in nominations excellent. Thank you I wanted to ask you know. I'm fairly certain that most people most of our listeners are familiar with your background of how you got involved with advocacy but For those who might not. If you wanted to give a little I guess recap summary of how you got involved with advocacy. Absolutely I STI- An attorney by education member of the California Bar Association on a certified paralegal. I and I have a background in public policy and so even before really engaging in fulltime advocacy work I was quietly doing advocacy work using those skill sets and that an background but I became much more known in the ad because he world's Because I was the first person to speak publicly and file a police report against Larry Nassar and worked very closely with investigators and prosecutors to put that case together to reach other survivors And and worked with them for about two years until we got to the point where Larry pled guilty to multiple counts of sexual assault and possession of child porn and then that was when we had the at the sentencing hearing where most people became familiar with my name but the advocacy really started years before that. And then of course you know putting that case together with investigators and prosecutors Really pushed a lot of that forward an incense that point in time I have been working closely with various denominations with corporations institutions nonprofits. I and just in a wide variety of capacities using both my legal background and legislative background. I as well as working in education. I forgot to mention when we started that Rachel you have two bucks and People want to read more about your story and Some of what we're talking about today you Rachel's written what is a girl worth and then I also highly recommend how much is a little girl worth and even though I don't have daughters read it to my niece and have a copy of it so and we're gonNA link both those episode notes. I read your your book over giving and really appreciated All that would into that and all the work that you've done and I got your What is a little girl worth book? I got copies for my for my niece. And all of my little cousins lovely so it was a great thing for Christmas for them. And I've I've heard tell that you're working on a version for voice. I am Yes. I am very excited about that here. Because it's a message or poisoning just as much as our girls absolutely Collini. Both boy moms than I can. Yes I do appreciate that as well. So just little plug for those thinking so Rachel what. What are some differences? You've seen an how the church versus secular culture deals with abuse are honestly. I think that's one of the most interesting. Things are some of the differences. Because you know whenever you have. Institutions that becomes safe safe harbors or abusers whether or not that's intentional or who mishandled reports of abuse. You have certain common threads that run through it but there are also very different reasons at the core of why institutions days and. What I found most fascinating is that churches are actually the most difficult to be able to work with and to help understand The damage that they're doing and the reason for this is because churches are more often than not motivated by their theology and their convictions in how they are misdealing abuse rather than pure acumen week interest. So for example. In in the case with Larry Nassar at Michigan State University and you had a university that harbored one of the worst predators in record campus and sports history. But they did it primarily for your expected reasons. Some people who received reports of Larry's abuse request friends with him and just couldn't believe it wouldn't believe it. You had police officers who just did very Lazy Police Investigations Multiple Times. When Larry was reported to law enforcement you had some level of corruption in other police departments Where you had the head of the FBI department wining and dining with the president of the United States Association of gymnastics. And so you had you had all of these normal factors. You had economic interest a desire to hide liability desire to protect reputation. You had all of those things taking place with Larry Nassar but when you deal with churches it's a little bit different. There are churches. That certainly have those concerns in their purview. But more often than not particularly in conservative Churches Actually Biaggi that drives our response. Cheer Pius It's misunderstandings of grace and forgiveness. A misunderstanding of pastoral. Thorny a misunderstanding of what it means to hold the doctrines like Sola scripture in a way that leaves churches without any education or knowledge on how predators work and what sexually abusive dynamics look like and because those things are theologically and can actually motivated more often than not what happens is when someone raises their hand and says Hey. I see a problem here. The Church says Oh you're persecuting me you are attacking me you. WanNa tear down the church. You must be bitter. You must be angry. You WanNa you WANNA drag down these men of God and they actually tighten rings even more and they battened down the hatches even more churches are the most difficult to get to change Because they feel logically and conviction we believe they are doing the right thing and until we start dealing with the misplaced and misguided theology. It's going to be impossible to change how we handle abuse our churches. What would you say are some of those? You kind of mentioned them. But if you'd expand a little bit what would you say are some of the Theological beliefs that are underpinning poor response or misunderstandings that are Underneath the poor response I think one of the ones that you see very consistently is a misunderstanding of grace and forgiveness where forgiveness injustice are in practicality held up as dichotomies to each other as being in opposition to each other and so a survivor who wants to pursue justice or expect there to be some consequences to the abuser is automatically categorized as bitter or vindictive or unforgiving a survivor who is Sees concerned with reunifying with the abuser. Say you know. It's an abusive spouse and abusive family. Member a victim. He does not want to reunify with the Abuser. Is automatically characterized as unloving or unforgiving or bitter and so. You're not the core of that. We're not teaching the full theology of God. We are acting as if justice and forgiveness are in opposition to each other when in reality they're mutually dependent on each other in both exist in the character of God and thus both should exist in our churches. I see you see that at the court. I do think a lot of it as well. As a misunderstanding of Pastoral Authority we see the doctrine of scripture of pastoral authority and Church Authority and how that is healthy and a good thing but there are some churches that apply that in a way that really looks at the pastor as the only option for dealing with situations in the church And really takes the perspective that if the pastor is the one put over the congregation he is automatically equipped to handle and understand everything that takes place in that church and so rather than relying on the body of Christ rather than relying even on the extent common grace in experts and so understanding the dynamics of abuse how abusers work and the way victims respond. What evidence looks like sexual abuse cases rather than being informed and knowledgeable in the way we purchase pastors approach it as if they are the only option and they are completely equipped all on their own to handle these allegations and leaves them very poorly equipped. We also often have a misunderstanding of what it means to be. Solo scripture we see the doctrine.

Larry Nassar Rachel Rachel Den Hollander assault Jake Dan Hollander Michigan Rachel Miller Jacob Louisville colleen sharp Southern Baptist Theological S Reformed Baptist Church Pastoral Authority Pius It STI California Bar Association Collini Church Authority FBI
"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

12:07 min | 2 years ago

"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Inside the beltway. I'm Hugh Hewitt. If you're driving around anywhere in this country right now, there is one unifying prayer that binds all Christians together called the apostles, creed. It reads very, very simply I believe in God, the father almighty maker of heaven and earth. And Jesus Christ only son, our Lord, who was conceived of the Holy Spirit born of the virgin. Mary suffered under punches. Pilot was crucified dead. And buried he descended into hell? That Thurday rose again from the dead, he ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of God. The father almighty, Wendy, shall come to judge the quick and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit the holy Catholic church, the community of saints, the forgiveness of sins the resurrection of the body and the life everlasting. Amen. That's known as the apostles, creed every Catholic plays the prays the rosary says it most Protestants said at least we monthly in all of their services and there's a new book on the apostles, creed by Dr Albert. Moeller are Albert molar junior as the president, southern Baptist theological seminary in Louisville. His new book as the apostles, creed discovering authentic Christianity, in age of counterfeits, and he joins me now. Dr molar, always a pleasure. How are you, my friend? I'm doing great Hugh and really glad to be with you and the conversation about something as important as the apostles creed all Christians believe more than is contained in the apostles, creed. But none can believe less Albert molar, explain that. Well, it's the baseline of, of real Christianity authentic Christianity, when you consider the affirmations made in, in all those lines of the which, by the way you said in about thirty seconds. It's, it's a it's a very short concise statement of the Christian faith. It doesn't tell you how to organize church. It doesn't tell you whether or not have the ships that is it doesn't tell you a very great deal in every church has to come to some conclusion about many issues beyond the Cree, but true Christianity, Christianity, is found in this greets you got to have this much just to be authentic as, as a Christian. This is how throughout the centuries Christians have determine that the true church. That's not a true church. That that's true Christianity. It has started with the apostles, creed. It doesn't say a lick about infant baptism. It doesn't attempt to interpret revelation. It's simply states. The very basics that if you can't agree to this play. Please don't consider yourself Christian. That's right. And one of the interesting things about it is that it really begins a narrative, telling the story of Jesus. And of course, it begins with that great theistic affirmation. I believe in God, the father almighty maker of heaven and earth. And then everything else follows it's actually the most venerable and concise summary of the Christian faith, and that's why it's been so honored throughout Christian history. No, Dr Miller. I always say the length role. You've got to say the title of book seven times for anyone to remember at the apostles, creed the apostles, creed the apostles, creed that won't work. Here. People will go to Google put in the apostles, creed, and no get like a million listings. They have to add, the subtitle discovering than Christianity or your name, Albert molar. But the question remains they'll find it because they'll find out Bert Muller, and it will be a bestseller, like three dozen books or whatever it is. But why did you turn the apostles creed in twenty nineteen? Well, that's a. Question. Hugh, you know, as a young theologian and looking at the history of the Christian church. I recognize they've been three units that Christians everywhere throughout time have taught and one of them is the ten commandments and then the Lord's prayer, and the third, the apostles creed, and I'm thankful to been able to write books on all three of these a book on the on the ten commandments and a book on the Lord's prayer. And, and now this book on the apostles, creed kind of a tripod of Christian instruction throughout the than the Lydia of, of Christian worship and service. So I think it is good enough that every generation of Christians is focused on these three units. The ten commandments the Lord's prayer, and the apostles, creed. Then I wanted to do the same now Dr Moore I like it's timeliness, its utility. It's great utility is arriving in an age of confusion where a lot of the media that we consume is produced by people who. Not know nor do they believe in the apostles, creed, like you and I both do. And therefore, if you among that number, I couldn't have been join you to go and read this. So you at least understand the perimeter into which all Christians will come if they're genuinely Christian about which they ought to agree, don't they'll introduce me Joe bag donuts over here and say he represents Christianity or Sally over here and say, she represents Christianity, this represents Christianity. You know, Christianity's a defined set of beliefs in our day of, frankly, everything being packaged, and repackaged, and Atanas individualism, killing many people, you know, religion, just you is them of the apostles, creed reminds us that Christianity is a giant truth claim, and it's a unified, truth claim, and it's a very specific truthfully. And it's reduce -able to this creed as every creed is a is a summary of the faith, but you've got to start here. And if you're doing to start here than than you rejecting Christianity, that it's pretty bold statement, but that's the truth. It also puts the Chris fiction resurrection at the center of every Christian's wife and embraces the miraculously in embraces, the next life, embraces, everything. And therefore, if you can't go along with this, you really can't purport to represent the church right about that. Elbert molar. No, you're right. As I say every Chris. You know, believe more than this, but no, Christian can believe less than this, and, you know, historically, it's really interesting, given all of the debates in the divisions in historic Christianity. It's very significant that the apostles creed is used by the eastern church. But by the Roman Catholic church, and by the historic Protestant churches. So that tells you just how central it is to the life of the church. And if there's going to be any kind of a renewal, I talked Alan Sears earlier about the fifties being the high tide for Christianity. Under Eisenhower a couple of days ago. Got a new book on Eisenhower's faith light if there's any sort of possibility in this country. I don't discount it in other places like China and Africa of revival, you'll have to agree on this. I don't you have to get the basics about which revival would rally around. Oh, that's right. Because revival means bringing life back to something. And so it's, it's reviving a church, it's, it's not reviving something that, that, that new not creating something new, it's reviving historic Christianity, and you're gonna have to find historic Christianity, in order to pray for God to revive it, and by the way, I believe that he does. And he will pray that he will do so here, but if he does then everywhere in scripture, where revival comes it comes as a, a reaffirmation and reimb- racing the faith not the invention of something new. So let me go to the key part of the crate. I mentioned this to you, when we were setting up the interview, there's always been one line in the creed, which is confounded me he descended into hell. And it's sort of like Luther saying, God, forsaken, God who can understand that. I've always done the Catholic thing, which is just over it. It's how we deal with revelation. Okay. I worry about that later. It's your shortest chapter, and you knowledge it as such, what does it mean? And why is it your shortest chapter will it's my shortest chapter because there isn't much to say other than what the creed asserts when it says that he descended into hell. It means he descended into Haiti's the realm of the dead, which which means more than anything else he genuinely died. And, and so what we're voiding here is the medieval speculation about all kinds of things that Jesus did during the three days that he was in the grave, the most important part of the creed, when it says that he descended into hell is to make very clear. He really died. He associated with all those who had died before him. He was, you know, in the Old Testament is called she'll and the New Testament is called Haiti's. He he went to the realm of the dead, which is, which is where we will go when we die. It's just say he genuinely died. The only way out of the realm of the dead is resurrection, and that's the very next line. That, that that's exactly what happened. He was raised from the dead. No. Let me also spend just a moment with you on why Christianity presents itself as an obstacle to modern America. He shall come to judge the quick and the dead expand on judgment. Al. Yeah. You know, the, the clear horizon of the bible is that judgment is coming, and that God will judge all when it says the quick and the dead is, you know, that that comes from the Latin meaning that dead in the alive. So all will be made alive to be judged. And you know, this is so incredibly important, because God's judgment will be absolutely perfect. Human Justice is approximate we can arrested drunk driver, but we can't give you know, restoration of the limb to the, the blue Austin, God's judgment will be perfect. So not only will the wrongdoer be punished, but the one who was wrong will be made whole, and it's a it's, it's, it's something that Christians must look forward to but it's also can be a terrible day of judgment. You think about all the human soon and human evil every single one of us, and then all of us together and, and God will judge nations doing the book of revelation. We're told the Christ will judge the nations with a rod of iron. And so history, which we like to talk about the judgments of history. The judgments of history are just awaiting the judge. That's God of every emperor Caesar potentate every to Tallaght -tarian dictator every resume every society is going to be judged by God. And, you know, you honestly that that's what keeps me functioning. I is knowing the Guzman is coming might my friend, David Ellen white used to like to remind people the old Catholic teaching which is every Catholic reflect every day on death judgment heaven in hell. That was that was the way you could get your Cup of set in the morning, death judgment heaven, and hell and the apostles, creed is very obvious about Al my recommendation to everyone. I want to give you the last word is that if you've got a bible, study going, go get the apostles, creed by Albert molar, and read through it just so you can all agree on the basics has it taken off, as it is it serving that purpose. It is and. That was my great hope that people would see it and they recognize I need more about the apostles, creed. And my hope is that God will use it in order to revive in them than legit Christ, and to ground them in Christian through Albert molar. Great new book. Congratulations, as always the president, southern Baptist theological seminaries probably got three more books underway as we speak. But this one, this is a keeper as is book on the ten commandments and the Lord's prayer the trip tick of basics. Thank you. I'll always great to talk to him. I really just love talk down Waller someday. I'm going to find a book that he hasn't already read I gave up asking him but some I'm going to find a book. He has already read, and then I'm going to stump him, but whenever I bring up a book, he's already ready, and you should see library, if you ever get the Louisville and you know him well enough when you see his library, you're gonna say, whoa. This is what Jefferson was like time to tell you remind you as well about relief, factor dot com. Third hour, the day, see the package. It's right there in front of me. I took it in.

Hugh Hewitt Albert molar Louisville president Chris Dr Albert holy Catholic church Haiti Eisenhower Elbert molar Holy Spirit Roman Catholic church Thurday Wendy Google Mary Christian church southern Baptist theological s Alan Sears
"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

12:02 min | 2 years ago

"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"The beltway. I'm Hugh Hewitt. If you're driving around anywhere, in this country right now, there is one unifying prayer that binds all Christians together. It's called the apostles, creed. It reads very, very simply I believe in God, the father almighty maker of heaven and earth. And Jesus Christ is only son, our Lord, who was conceived of the Holy Spirit born of the virgin. Mary suffered under punches. Pilot was crucified dead. And buried he descended into hell? That Thurday rose again from the dead, he ascended into heaven and sits at the right end of God. The father almighty whence, he shall come to judge the quick and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit the holy Catholic church the community of saints. Forget this sends the resurrection of the body and the life ever lasting. Amen. That's known as the apostles, creed every Catholic plays the prays the rosary says it, most Protestants that at least week monthly in all of their services and there's a new book on the apostles, creed by Dr. Albert molar are Albert molar junior is the president, southern Baptist theological seminary in Louisville. His new book is the apostles, creed discovering authentic Christianity in age of counterfeits, and he joins me now. Dr molar, always a pleasure. How are you, my friend? I'm doing great Hugh. Really glad to be with you and got Rian conversation about something as important as the apostles creed all Christians believe more than is contained in the apostles, creed. But none can believe less Albert molar, explain that. Well, it's the baseline of, of real Christianity authentic Christianity, when you consider the affirmations made in, in all those lines of the, which all you said in about thirty seconds. It's, it's a it's a very short concise statement of the Christian faith. It doesn't tell you how to organize. It doesn't tell you whether or not have to ships that it, it doesn't tell you a very great deal in every characteristic, come some conclusion about many issues, the on the creed. But true Christianity Christianity is found in this Crete's that you've got to have this much just to be authentic as, as a Christian. This is how throughout the centuries. Christians have determined that the true church. That's not a true church. That that's true Christianity. It has started with the apostles, creed. It doesn't say a lick about infant baptism. It doesn't attempt to interpret revelation. It's simply states. The very basics that if you can't agree to this plea. Please don't consider yourself Christian. That's right. And one of the interesting things about it is that it really begins in narrative, telling the story of Jesus. And, and of course, it begins with that great theistic affirmation. I believe in God. The father almighty maker of heaven and earth. And then everything else follows it's actually the most venerable and concise summary of the Christian faith. And that's why it's been so honored throughout Christian history. Now, Dr Miller, I always say the length role. You've got to say the title of book seven times for anyone to remember the apostles, creed the apostles, creed the apostles, creed that won't work here. People will go to Google. They'll put in the apostles creed, and they'll get a million listings, they have to add, the subtitle discovering than Christianity or your name, Albert molar. But the question remained they'll find it because they'll find out but and it will be a bestseller, like three dozen books or whatever it is. But why did you turn to the apostles creed in twenty nineteen? Well, that's a great question. Hugh. As a young theologian and looking at the history of the Christian church recognized that they've been three units that Christians everywhere throughout time of taught, and one of them is the ten commandments and then the Lord's prayer, and the third, the apostles creed, and I'm thankful to been able to write books on all three of these a book on the on the ten commandments and a book on the Lord's prayer. And, and now this book on the apostles, creed kind of a tripod of Christian instruction throughout the, the millennia of, of Christian worship and service. So I think is good enough that every generation of Christians has focused on these three units, the ten commandments the Lord's prayer, and the apostles, creed. I wanted to do the same now Dr Moore I like it's timeliness, its utility. It's great utility is arriving in an age of confusion where a lot of the media that we consume is produced by people who do not know nor do. Are they believe in the apostles creed, like you and I both do? And therefore, if you are among that number I have been join you to go and read this. So you at least understand the perimeter into which all Christians will come if they're genuinely Christian about which they ought to agree. Don't don't introduce me to Joe bag donuts over here and say he represents Christianity or Sally over here and say, she represents Christianity, this represents Christianity. You know, a defined set of beliefs in our day of, frankly, everything being packaged in repackaged, and a Thomas individualism, killing many people, you know, religions just you is the, the apostles, creed reminds us that Christianity is a giant truth claim, and it's a unified truth claim, and it's a very specific truth claim and it's reduce -able to this creed as every creed is a is a summary of the faith, but you've got to start here and doing to start here than than you rejecting Christianity that volts, but that's the truth. Also, puts the crucifixion resurrection at the center of every Christian's wife embraces, the miraculously embraces the next life in braces, everything. And therefore, if you can't go along with this, you really can't purport to represent the church right about that Albert more. No, you're right. As I say every Chris. You know, believe more than this, but no, Christian can believe less than this, and, you know, historically, it's really interesting, given all of the debates in the divisions in historic Christianity. It's very significant that the apostles creed is used by the eastern church. But by the Roman Catholic church, and by the historic Protestant churches. So that tells you just how central it is to the life of the church. And if there's going to be any kind of renew. I talked Allen tears earlier about the fifties being the high tide for Christianity under Eisenhower a couple of days ago. Got a new book on faith life if there's any sort of possibility in this country. I don't discount in other places like China, Napa of revival, you'll have to agree on this. I don't you, you have to get the basics about which revival would rally around. No. That's right. Because revival means bringing back to something. And so it's, it's reviving a church, it's, it's not reviving something that, that, that new not creating something new, it's reviving historic Christianity, and you're going to have to find historic Christianity in order to pray for revive. And by the way, I believe that he does. And he will pray that he will do so here. But if he does then everywhere in scripture, where revival comes it comes as a, a reaffirmation and reimb- racing the faith and not the invention of something new. So let me go to the key part of the Crete. I mentioned this when we were setting up the interview, there's always been one line in creed, which is confounded me he descended into hell. And it's sort of like Luther saying, godforsaken God who can understand that. I've always done the Catholic thing, which is skipped over it. It's how we deal with revelation. Okay. I worry about that later. It's your shortest chapter, and you knowledge it as such, what does it mean? And why is it your shortest chapter? Well, it's shortest chapter because there isn't much to say other than what the creed asserts when it says that he descended into hell. It means he descended into Haiti's the realm of the dead, which means more than anything else he genuinely died. And, and so what we're voiding here is the medieval speculation about all kinds of things that uses did during the three days, he was in the grave, the most important part of the creed, when it says that he descended into hell is to make very clear. He really died. He associated with all of those who had died before him. He was, you know, in the Old Testament is called she'll and the New Testament is called Haiti's. He went to the realm of the dead, which is, which is where we will go when we die is just to say he genuinely died. The only way out of the realm of the dead is resurrection, and that's the very next line. That, that, that, that's exactly what happened. He was raised from the dead. Now, let me also spend just a moment with you on why Christianity presents itself as an obstacle to modern America. He shall come to judge the quick and the dead expand on judgment. Al. Yeah. You know, the, the clear horizon of the bible is that judgment is coming, and that God will judge all it says the quick and the dead is you know, that that comes from the Latin meaning that dead in the alive. So all will be made alive to be judged. And you know, this is so incredibly important, because God's judgment will be absolutely perfect human Justice approximate, we can arrest the drunk driver. But we can't give the restoration of the limb to the it. God's judgment will be perfect. So not only will the wrongdoer be punished, but the one who was wrong will be made whole, and it's, it's, it's something that Christians Muslims forward to, but it's also can be a terrible day of judgment. You think about all the human and human evil every single one of us, and then all of us together and, and God will judge nations doing the book of revelation. We're told Christ will judge the nations with a rod of iron. And so history, which we like to talk about the judgments of history. The judgments of history are just awaiting the judge God of every emperor Caesar potentate, every Taliban dictator every reunion, every society is going to be judged by God. And you honestly that that's what keeps me functioning. I is knowing that God doesn't is coming might my friend. David Allen white used to like to remind people, the old Catholic, teaching which is every Catholic reflect every day on death judgment heaven in hell. That was that was the way you could get your compass set in the morning, death judgment heaven, and hell, and the apostles, creed is very obvious. Al my recommendation to everyone. I want to give you the last word is, if you've got a bible, study going, go get the apostles, creed by Albert Muller and read through it just so you can all agree on the basics has it taken off, as it is it serving that purpose. It is and. That was my great hope that people would see it and they recognize I need to know. More about the apostles, creed. And my hope is that, that God will use it in order to revive in them than of Christ, and to ground them in Christian through Albert Muller. Great new book. Congratulations, as always the president, southern Baptist theological seminaries probably got three more books underway as we speak. But this one, this is a keeper as is book on the ten commandments and the Lord's prayer the trip tick of basics. Thank you. I'll always great to talk to him. I really. I just love Dogana molar someday. I'm going to find a book that he hasn't already read I gave up asking him. But someday, I'm going to find a book. He has an already read, and then I'm going to stump him, but whenever I bring up a book. He's already read it and you should see library, if you ever get the Louisville and, you know him well enough when you see library, you're gonna say, whoa. This is what Jefferson was like time to tell you remind you as well about relief, factor dot com..

Dr. Albert molar Hugh Hewitt Albert Muller Louisville Albert molar Crete president David Allen white holy Catholic church Haiti Holy Spirit Christian church Roman Catholic church Thurday Google Mary southern Baptist theological s Rian Dr Miller Dr Moore
"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Albert Muller is president of the southern Baptist theological seminary in Louisville Kentucky recently, he gave his take on whether women should be ordained as pastors in an online video. It's a question of authority. I guess what makes everybody nervous. But the apostle Paul makes that argument, I forbid, a woman have thority over a man. If you look at the denominations were women do the preaching they're also the denominations where people do the leaving. And I think there's something about the order of creation and I will cite scripture on that. That means that, that God intends for the preaching voice to be a male voice that was Muller, president of a southern Baptist theological seminary Muller believes in complementary in ISM the idea as professor. Neil said that the bible lays out different but complementary roles for men and women in the church, those roles were among the debates among Southern Baptists under discussion as leaders gather this week in Birmingham. We're speaking with NPR's Tom gjelten, and Jerusha Neil, who teaches at the Duke divinity school. And joining us now are two pastors who are attending that meeting. Dwight mckissick is the senior pastor at cornerstone, Baptist church in Arlington, Texas, pastor mckissick, welcome to the program. Glad to be here and Tom Lasko is the senior pastor of grace, Baptist church in Cape. Coral, florida. Pastor Lasko, thanks for being here. It's my joy, thanks for the invitation. Let me get both of your takes on what we just heard from another pastor in your faith as it relates to the role of women in preaching. He said, God intends for the preaching voice to be a male voice. I'd love to hear from you, both pastor mckissick and pastor Lasko, as to your take on that pastor mckissick. Let me start with you. On us. Hillman, bosses you out. Julia. TV..

Pastor Lasko Albert Muller Dwight mckissick southern Baptist theological s Baptist church Jerusha Neil president Duke divinity school Louisville Kentucky Tom gjelten Hillman Birmingham Paul Julia NPR Arlington florida Texas professor
"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

Atheist Nomads

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

"And then it's like my mom's old biology book from when she was growing up. Not only did it have the male and female, sex organs. But they figured why not save space and draw them together. Coitus labeled them at least she understood that the pitas went into the vagina at some. They don't even cover that. And like public edge, you know, because they can't say the word peanuts. And what so what or China, and then I could only imagine same gay. By the win. And then being brands steeply confused too. Just like, wait a minute. Wait, if you have any questions about sexuality or gender is watch Steven universe because all my God. It's so awesome. Yeah. But also, I think I need a sound for whatever I save a Jonah, I'm blanking after maybe a hoo-ha hoot hoot. Who? Yeah. But it's it's a yeah. It's not good. I lot of healing to be done. Yeah. For sure on kind of a related note in August. The Americans like logical association released the report with guidelines for mental health professionals to follow in addressing the toxic effects of traditional masculinity ideology areas that have been identified as particularly toxic or self reliance antifa Minniti achievement Schule of the appearance of weakness and adventure risk in violence. Now, let's bring in Albert molar president of the southern Baptist theological seminary and a member of the council on biblical manhood and womanhood believe that's a thing. But I totally believe that that's the thing. I'm sure he's got some real smart opinions on. Yes, he thinks these guys lions all cannot quote, be honestly and consistently squared with any form of historic. Biblical christianity. Okay. He's got an absolute point. This is not Christian. It's not possible to mesh that those kinds of concepts with modern evangelical Christianity, right? Other branches of Christianity are capable of addressing it. Evangelical ISM can't it is too tight up in absurd macho America fuck ya bullshit, right? Yeah. I mean, even if you just take one thing out of that. Let's say respect women that wipes out a whole bunch of religions. Hi, it's just not not Copacetic. Right. But as a society, that's what we've evolved into. So this is what we demand of people is you have to be respect. Right. And the more more literally a group takes the bible. Yeah. The more they are not capable of existing without toxic masculinity. Yeah. Because the bible. Is full of toxic masculine ideology. I mean, the worship a war. God, right. When it comes down to of course, it's going to be all violence and rape, and pillage and stone and sacrifice and kill all the men, and and keep all the the women and girls for sex slaves. Yeah. Well, I just like how he's like admirable. He says a. This is all can be confused. The fact that there is supposed to be some difference between men women and men that was a quote from this guy. And it's like, wait. Wait, wait, wait. That's not at all what they are talking about. We're not. We're not demanding the manly man become what do you call that? Drudge innis. The ninety percent of society is to be the same. You know? Yeah. And that's what the thing if he introduced equal rights to people who who are transgender that does not mean that all men are going to become women and women are gonna become and the sex means nothing and gender nothing. No. That's not. We're just say that. There's a group a small group of people who've been trampled on please. Write show them the same respect, you would show everybody exactly an-. And the thing is that. I also think this this. This wasn't also saying that. Oh, masculinity period is horrible. Like, it's not saying that at all. It's just saying, hey, this toxic mix Lindsay is making it. So that people aren't reaching out for help that there's a lot more bullying going on that. It's it's yeah. I think a lot to do with the mental health issue. Right. My own personal experience growing up in a conservative Christian every part of my life, including my school..

Drudge innis southern Baptist theological s China Jonah Steven rape Lindsay Albert president ninety percent
"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Well, they had other ideas other convictions at motivated their their vote in the reason why perhaps you don't buy that is because of the the disconnection with the people group that I'm talking about it this particular church. There was intimacy with me serving as their past. There were critical conversations as to why they were making these votes. There was a talking through issues of history and issues on as to why African Americans particularly vote this way and watch some Anglo America's in the south vote another way, but but there has to be a time where we where we stopped making blanket statements, and we enter into nuance dialogue about these these principle. I wanna give Lawrence wear a chance to respond to that before turn to some more, coal caller. So so Mr. wear go ahead. I mean, I think he's right that we need to do more research. I mean, I'm al- almost collar. So I'm all about research. But I think that we need to kind of come to terms with the fact that while his church may have been a church where people of color are welcomed and embraced a lot of these churches. A number of these churches are churches where if I were to go in, and I've been to many of these where I mean when I was a member of the SPCA I used to go to these churches quite frequently where you walk in and people look at you like you are an alien like you should not be there. And so I think there needs to be a reckoning with that with that experience and needs to be a reckoning with what it means to be a black person in the SBC going to churches where you know, people just do not want you there, and they're having conversations, and they're doing things that are ultimately pushing the the racial compensation back backwards instead of pushing it forward, and hopefully they'll this report is one of the things that may push it forward here. But but I think it will neglecting our callers. Here. So let me turn to them. Joe is calling from New Orleans. Joe you're on the air. I just wanted to say that I've got really serious southern bad district. Crit I was conceived in Waco where my parents are in grad school and morning Louisville where they were getting their doctorate in divinity. And I think you gentlemen, are trying to put lipstick on a pig. I mean, the institution is. So thoroughly corrupted by racism that I don't think it's reasonable expect to affect any kind of meaningful change without a total reconstitution. That's it. Well, Joe thank you for your call. It was about task Joe what a reconstitution would look like, but Albert molar your president of of the the southern Baptist theological seminary. What are you respond? How do you respond to Joe? Well, I think with respect first of all but with affection for the southern Baptist convention because I I would also say look, by the way, it's going to be completely reconstituted that's called time generational change. And so one of the key questions and also say to professor wear I respected his his criticism. I kinda regret that he left the SBC too soon because I think you look at the trajectory and UC that God's doing an amazing thing, and the SBC there are there are things happening that never would have been possible, you know, a generation ago, and this is a denomination..

Joe SBC southern Baptist theological s Anglo America Lawrence New Orleans professor Louisville Waco Albert president
"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Well, they had other ideas other convictions at motivated their their vote in the reason why perhaps you don't buy that is because of the the disconnection with the people group that I'm talking about it this particular church. There was intimacy with me serving as their past. There were critical conversations as to why they were making these votes. There was a talking through issues of history and issues on as to why African Americans particularly vote this way and watch some Anglo America's in the south vote another way, but but there has to be a time where we where we stopped making blanket statements, and we enter into nuance dialogue about these these principle. I wanna give Lawrence wear a chance to respond to that before turn to some more, coal caller. So so Mr. wear go ahead. I mean, I think he's right that we need to do more research. I mean, I'm al- almost collar. So I'm all about research. But I think that we need to kind of come to terms with the fact that while his church may have been a church where people of color are welcomed and embraced a lot of these churches. A number of these churches are churches where if I were to go in, and I've been to many of these where I mean when I was a member of the SPCA I used to go to these churches quite frequently where you walk in and people look at you like you are an alien like you should not be there. And so I think there needs to be a reckoning with that with that experience and needs to be a reckoning with what it means to be a black person in the SBC going to churches where you know, people just do not want you there, and they're having conversations, and they're doing things that are ultimately pushing the the racial compensation back backwards instead of pushing it forward, and hopefully they'll this report is one of the things that may push it forward here. But but I think it will neglecting our callers. Here. So let me turn to them. Joe is calling from New Orleans. Joe you're on the air. I just wanted to say that I've got really serious southern bad district. Crit I was conceived in Waco where my parents are in grad school and morning Louisville where they were getting their doctorate in divinity. And I think you gentlemen, are trying to put lipstick on a pig. I mean, the institution is. So thoroughly corrupted by racism that I don't think it's reasonable expect to affect any kind of meaningful change without a total reconstitution. That's it. Well, Joe thank you for your call. It was about task Joe what a reconstitution would look like, but Albert molar your president of of the the southern Baptist theological seminary. What are you respond? How do you respond to Joe? Well, I think with respect first of all but with affection for the southern Baptist convention because I I would also say look, by the way, it's going to be completely reconstituted that's called time generational change. And so one of the key questions and also say to professor wear I respected his his criticism. I kinda regret that he left the SBC too soon because I think you look at the trajectory and UC that God's doing an amazing thing, and the SBC there are there are things happening that never would have been possible, you know, a generation ago, and this is a denomination..

Joe SBC southern Baptist theological s Anglo America Lawrence New Orleans professor Louisville Waco Albert president
"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Org. Albert molar is with us. He's president of the southern Baptist theological seminary. Curtis. Woods is with us. He is a member of the research committee that wrote this report, and he's also a professor of applied the all Aji at the seminary as well. President molar lemme ask you let's talk a little bit more about what you said about the the through mid twentieth. Century findings. This report revealed that we're the real shockers to you. I mean, for example, as I read it on the one hand the seminary began accepting black students as early as nineteen forty an integrated classrooms in nineteen fifty one. That's though, it'd be a head of Brown v board, but that in nineteen sixty one when the school invited Dr Martin Luther King to speak. There was leadership and faculty there that really that may have objected to that. And then the seminaries then president alternately apologized for inviting Dr king t to speak. It's tells more about that. Well, that's a big jump in history. Isn't it? If you go from the early twentieth century and the explicit support of white supremacy. We simply I this is not to absolve the seminary in any way to the contrary, but we do have to recognize this was deeply driven throughout US culture. I mean all in the generics. Movement all the way up to the supreme court, Oliver Wendell home. So it it's hard to separate this from a huge national conversation. But by the time, you get to the nineteen sixties. Clearly, there is a counter narrative, and there was no one who are ticketed and represented that counter narrative better than Martin Luther King junior. The by the way, in in in many contexts legal segregation is such that it's not only allowing segregation is mandating segregation in part of the history with win the seminary integrated did so in violation of the day law that was the law that required. Segregation here in Louisville Kentucky. So it was it was a huge cultural reality by the time. You get to king in sixty one. It was an extremely brave act of the seminary to invite the most famous and influential civil rights leader to the campus to give what we're called Julius gay lectures, a prominent academic lectureship, and and he did so in public and with a packed chapel..

Dr Martin Luther King president southern Baptist theological s professor Dr king t US Curtis Louisville Oliver Wendell Kentucky supreme court Brown research committee one hand
"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Org. Albert molar is with us. He's president of the southern Baptist theological seminary. Curtis. Woods is with us. He is a member of the research committee that wrote this report, and he's also a professor of applied the all Aji at the seminary as well. President molar lemme ask you let's talk a little bit more about what you said about the the through mid twentieth. Century findings. This report revealed that we're the real shockers to you. I mean, for example, as I read it on the one hand the seminary began accepting black students as early as nineteen forty an integrated classrooms in nineteen fifty one. That's though, it'd be a head of Brown v board, but that in nineteen sixty one when the school invited Dr Martin Luther King to speak. There was leadership and faculty there that really that may have objected to that. And then the seminaries then president alternately apologized for inviting Dr king t to speak. It's tells more about that. Well, that's a big jump in history. Isn't it? If you go from the early twentieth century and the explicit support of white supremacy. We simply I this is not to absolve the seminary in any way to the contrary, but we do have to recognize this was deeply driven throughout US culture. I mean all in the generics. Movement all the way up to the supreme court, Oliver Wendell home. So it it's hard to separate this from a huge national conversation. But by the time, you get to the nineteen sixties. Clearly, there is a counter narrative, and there was no one who are ticketed and represented that counter narrative better than Martin Luther King junior. The by the way, in in in many contexts legal segregation is such that it's not only allowing segregation is mandating segregation in part of the history with win the seminary integrated did so in violation of the day law that was the law that required. Segregation here in Louisville Kentucky. So it was it was a huge cultural reality by the time. You get to king in sixty one. It was an extremely brave act of the seminary to invite the most famous and influential civil rights leader to the campus to give what we're called Julius gay lectures, a prominent academic lectureship, and and he did so in public and with a packed chapel..

Dr Martin Luther King president southern Baptist theological s professor Dr king t US Curtis Louisville Oliver Wendell Kentucky supreme court Brown research committee one hand
"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"The biggest shock to me as president to the institution was how long notions of white racial supremacy explicitly articulated lived well into the twentieth century. That was the biggest surprise, right? And I'm very glad you brought that up because that's a point that is worth underscoring. And I think it is. It is the newest thing here because Curtis woods, for example as. Reading the report here. I'm seeing that you found that the faculty at the seminary before what the mid mid twentieth century, basically was a forced to perpetuate that claim about the old south was an idyllic place for both slaves and masters, and they claim that the south went to war to uphold their honor rather than slavery that they actively use kind of junk science to support a belief in white superiority, I mean, there's there's quite a lot through the through at least the middle part of the twentieth century. Sure. So when you think about the loss of these loss, calls narratives, of course, when we were trying to show, honestly that these particular founders found themselves pretty much capitulating to the to the beliefs in the mores of most. Whites are them back this in the south that that the north had had adjudicated that those who were only slaves were were no longer walking Incan inconsistency with with the American ideal in the American ideal that we were trying to show at that point was was that this nation was founded on principles of white supremacy. I think it would be it would be hard for us to be honest with the constitution in reading the constitution. That says if we're reading the declaration, we hold these truths to be all the to be evident that all men were created equal be hard, not to read men as as white male land owners at that particular time, and and most of the founders have bought into that belief. They bought into the belief that that this nation was a a white nation, and it should be ran. It should be found. Added in should be owned by a white, man. Well, we have to take a quick break here. But when we come back when we come back, we're going to explore more of the findings of this searing self examination that the seminary of the southern Baptist convention underwent about its history of racism, and I'm joined today by Curtis woods. He's a member of the southern Baptist theological seminary research committee is also a professor at the seminary as well and Albert molar joins us. He is the president of the southern Baptist theological seminary. I'm Meghna Chakrabarti. This is on point..

southern Baptist theological s Curtis woods southern Baptist president Meghna Chakrabarti Albert molar research committee professor
"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"southern baptist theological seminary" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"The biggest shock to me as president to the institution was how long notions of white racial supremacy explicitly articulated lived well into the twentieth century. That was the biggest surprise, right? And I'm very glad you brought that up because that's a point that is worth underscoring. And I think it is. It is the newest thing here because Curtis woods, for example as. Reading the report here. I'm seeing that you found that the faculty at the seminary before what the mid mid twentieth century, basically was a forced to perpetuate that claim about the old south was an idyllic place for both slaves and masters, and they claim that the south went to war to uphold their honor rather than slavery that they actively use kind of junk science to support a belief in white superiority, I mean, there's there's quite a lot through the through at least the middle part of the twentieth century. Sure. So when you think about the loss of these loss, calls narratives, of course, when we were trying to show, honestly that these particular founders found themselves pretty much capitulating to the to the beliefs in the mores of most. Whites are them back this in the south that that the north had had adjudicated that those who were only slaves were were no longer walking Incan inconsistency with with the American ideal in the American ideal that we were trying to show at that point was was that this nation was founded on principles of white supremacy. I think it would be it would be hard for us to be honest with the constitution in reading the constitution. That says if we're reading the declaration, we hold these truths to be all the to be evident that all men were created equal be hard, not to read men as as white male land owners at that particular time, and and most of the founders have bought into that belief. They bought into the belief that that this nation was a a white nation, and it should be ran. It should be found. Added in should be owned by a white, man. Well, we have to take a quick break here. But when we come back when we come back, we're going to explore more of the findings of this searing self examination that the seminary of the southern Baptist convention underwent about its history of racism, and I'm joined today by Curtis woods. He's a member of the southern Baptist theological seminary research committee is also a professor at the seminary as well and Albert molar joins us. He is the president of the southern Baptist theological seminary. I'm Meghna Chakrabarti. This is on point..

southern Baptist theological s Curtis woods southern Baptist president Meghna Chakrabarti Albert molar research committee professor