35 Burst results for "South Sudan"

A Modern Day Escape From Egypt

Israel Story

02:23 min | 3 weeks ago

A Modern Day Escape From Egypt

"When people ask me where my home is I find it quite hard to unser but i originally come from south sudan. That's that's that's where. I know. I come from but i don't really know where my home is. That's christina christina zia. She's tall has bleached cut hair. Dark skin and fierce is. That somehow don't seem to match shyness of her smile. She's nineteen years old but listening to her. You'd think she was much older. Or maybe i should say much more mature. I just feel. I've been so many places and every time they tried to call a. Place my hall. It was snatched away from me. Christina was born a refugee in fact. She's what un agencies call a second generation refugee and as is the case with many other refugees. It's hard to know where exactly to start her story. I could go all the way back to one thousand nine hundred ninety eight. When christina's parents to clean and philip took their three year old first born daughter viola and fled war-torn sudan. Search of a safer future this time might genocide could attorney typically begin in beirut lebanon where the bas wound up and where in two thousand and one christina was born or else i could fast forward a few years and starred in maadi a bustling suburb of cairo where christina spent her early child but instead i'm going to open with a scene which to christina to felt like a true beginning a modern day exodus from egypt. It's june two thousand and seven and wearing the sinai peninsula. It's pitch black night bedouin. Smugglers have just instructed. Six year old christina twelve-year-old viola. Their father they're pregnant mother and a few dozen other sudanese asylum seekers to climb onto the back of rickety pickup truck and they covered us. And they're like don't make any noise and If you do it will be problem to us and t- you of so just don't risk

Christina Christina Zia Christina South Sudan Maadi UN Viola Philip Beirut Lebanon Cairo Sinai Peninsula Egypt
Kenya Orders Closure of Two Refugee Camps and Gives Ultimatum to UN Agency

BBC World Service

01:25 min | 3 weeks ago

Kenya Orders Closure of Two Refugee Camps and Gives Ultimatum to UN Agency

"Kenya has ordered the closure of the country's largest refugee camps and given the United Nations 14 days to come up with a road map to do so. Only half a million refugees currently live in that the dab in Kakuma refugee camps, most of them from Somalia and south Sudan, respectively. Countries which are of course, still unstable. We could speak now, if the BBC's Kenya correspondent Fernando Monte who joins us from Nairobi. Hi, Ferdinand. We've been here for 4%. Suddenly, this is not the first time the government's made an announcement like this is a lizard third time. The first mentioned about 2017 when they all had be concerns about that. That particularly being a place where terrorists to recruit people to then conduct attacks in king about that here. The high control the unconstitutional for the government to close the come, which has mostly people fleeing the unrest in Somalia, Because can you also had international delegations? The government sitting the appeal in 2019 again said that and they came to an agreement with the United Nations to do what Linda repatriation but that hasn't seems to work. So now again, they into that secretary say that this time there will be no move for further negotiations on they want now. Not just Kakuma crossed, not just adopt coast but also Kakuma, which would affect at least close to half a

Kakuma Fernando Monte Kenya Somalia United Nations Sudan Ferdinand Nairobi BBC Government Linda
Myanmar Ambassador to UN denounces military coup

UN News

01:39 min | Last month

Myanmar Ambassador to UN denounces military coup

"The un special envoy on myanmar has strongly condemned continuing bloodshed in the country after dozens of protesters were reportedly killed at the weekend in a on sunday. Special envoy christine strana burgener said that she had received accounts of killings mistreatment of demonstrators and torture of prisoners. The development comes as the myanmar military continues to face international calls including from the security council for restraint dialogue and full respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. After the first february military coup according to reports violence continued across myanmar over the weekend with thirty eight people killed on sunday alone on monday. The un independent human rights expert on myanmar also reiterated his appeal to you and member states to act to address the crisis special reporter. Tom andrews said that he was outraged at reports that so many protesters had been murdered by myanmar security forces in a single day. You and rights chief. Michelle basch on. Monday called on the south. Sudanese authorities to hold accountable. Although supporting local militias in to jonglei region ms bachelet appeal follows a wave of attacks on villages across jong lie and greater administrative area between january and august last year organized and heavily armed community based militias from the dinka nuer and merlin communities carried out the violence according to the report issued by the mission south sudan on miss and the un rights office wage chr the military and political figures who supported the local armed. Groups should be prosecuted. Ms bachelet said adding that they had deliberately fueled unexploited legalize tensions among our stations. The high commissioner said it was of paramount importance that the government stopped the supply of weapons to these militias.

Myanmar Christine Strana Burgener Security Council For Restraint UN Tom Andrews Michelle Basch Jonglei Ms Bachelet South Sudan Government
Violence engulfs South Sudan

UN News

01:18 min | 2 months ago

Violence engulfs South Sudan

"Extreme violence involving thousands of fighters at a time has engulfed. Most of south sudan a decade after independence. You and human rights council appointed investigators said on friday. According to the commission on human rights in south sudan the bloodshed and exactions faced by civilians are the worst recorded. Since the country's civil war began in december two thousand thirteen some of the most brutal attacks have been carried out in the states of central equatoria jonglei and greater people administrative area with up to fifty thousand fighters involved in one attack on the village of liqun. Gory in jonglei. Here's commission chairperson. Jasmine super we have documented the new levels of militia violence engulfing more than three quarters of the country at localized level in which children carry weapons and women. At traded as spoils of war like chattels abducted. Boys have been forced to fight. And in some instances forcibly assimilated into rival armed groups. The commission's warning comes two years. Since the revitalized peace agreement was signed which masuku had led to a reduction in hostilities nationally without resulting south sudan increasingly bitter polarized identity where ethnicity was prized above. All the commission on human rights in south sudan is due to present its report to the human rights council in geneva on the tenth of march

South Sudan Jonglei Commission On Human Rights Masuku Human Rights Council Geneva
China gets in on the SolarWinds act

The CyberWire

03:50 min | 2 months ago

China gets in on the SolarWinds act

"Reuters reports that the fbi investigation of the solar wind supply. Chain attack is looking into evidence that chinese threat actors successfully exploited a vulnerability in the company's software to compromise the national finance center a payroll system operated by the us department of agriculture. The department of agriculture's reaction to the story is ambiguous. The agriculture department emailed reuters to say that. Usda has notified all customers including individuals and organizations whose data has been affected by the solar winds orion code compromise but a second departmental spokesman said after the story broke that there was no data breach related to solar winds at usda but offered no further clarification the vulnerability the chinese threat actors are believed to have exploited is said to be different from the one used by. Unc twenty four fifty two. The thread actor widely believed to be a russian intelligence service. Reuters anonymous sources told them that the campaign used and infrastructure that have been previously deployed by state backed chinese cyber spies as the washington post observes many have suspected another group was also actively exploiting solar winds but reuters. Report is the first to suggest that this second threat actor was connected to the chinese government. The chinese foreign ministry denied any involvement observing i and in fairness correctly that attribution is a complex technical issue the ministry then moved onto unlikely insistence on the usual pieties. China resolutely opposes and combat's any form of cyber attacks and cyber theft. It's doubtful that any government on the planet even say the holy sea or san marino resolutely opposes any form of cyber attack unless cyber attack is construed narrowly as to rule out any form of interception surveillance or retaliation if any pure cyber are running any government. It's doubtful that government is in beijing. Some have said that majors cyber attacks are often more like riots than bank jobs with multiple actors going after the same targets for their own reasons. Reuters quotes former. Us chief information security officer retired air force general gregory to hill. Who thinks it's not that unusual for more than one group to hit the same product. He prefers the racing metaphor to the criminal. One quote it wouldn't be the first time we've seen a nation state actor surfing in behind someone else. It's like drafting in nascar. To heal said it's worth noting that while the national finance center is housed in the department of agriculture. Its responsibilities aren't confined there. The nfc also handles payroll for other government agencies. Some of the more interesting ones from the point of view of national security are the fbi the state department the department of homeland security and the treasury department the nfc claims on its website to payroll more than six hundred thousand employees and also provides customizable and flexible financial management services and integrated shared service solutions. The data held by the nfc would include social security numbers phone numbers personal email addresses and banking information and also associations between individual employees and their agencies. Such information is useful for building. Human target dossiers of individuals of interest and chinese services have shown an appetite for such sweeping collection in the past against the us most notably in the office of personnel management breach of two thousand fifteen

Reuters Us Department Of Agriculture NFC Chinese Foreign Ministry Department Of Agriculture Agriculture Department Holy Sea FBI UNC Washington Post San Marino Beijing China Department Of Homeland Securit Treasury Department United States Office Of Personnel Management
Warning of famine, UN releases $100M to seven countries

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 5 months ago

Warning of famine, UN releases $100M to seven countries

"The United Nations humanitarian office is releasing one hundred million dollars in emergency funding to seven countries at risk of famine in Africa and the Middle East amid conflict and precious exhilarated by the cope with nineteen pandemic a U. N. statement overnight since eighty million dollars all the money will go to Afghanistan Burkina Faso Congo Nigeria south Sudan and Yemen well another twenty million has been set aside for anticipated action to fight hunger in Ethiopia where deadly fighting has erupted this month it's rebellious northern Tigray region meanwhile the office chief mark Lowcock says returning to a world without means all common would be obscene I'm Charles de Ledesma

United Nations Humanitarian Of Faso Middle East U. Africa Congo Yemen Sudan Nigeria Afghanistan Ethiopia Mark Lowcock Tigray Charles De Ledesma
Ethiopia's conflict spills over border as thousands flee

The World

04:03 min | 5 months ago

Ethiopia's conflict spills over border as thousands flee

"This week, he sent federal troops into a province of his own country. Hundreds are reported dead in the northern region of Tigre and refugees air spilling over the border into Sudan. So what explains the shift from peace to conflict? Michelle Gavin is a former ambassador and senior fellow for African studies at the Council on Foreign Relations. Ambassador Gavin We're talking about the Ethiopian province of Tigre, where the violence is happening. It's squeezed into the northwest corner of Ethiopia. Figure it straddles the border of Eritrea to its north. What is so important about Tigre relative to the rest of Ethiopia? Well for many years, the Tigre and People's Liberation Front that sort of dominant political and military entity in Tigre was really first among equals in the ruling coalition for all of Ethiopia so to Graham's played an incredibly prominent role in Ethiopian governance, politics, security But with the rise of the new Prime Minister Ahmed There's been a bit of a re balancing in Ethiopia. And this is kind of opened up contest station from ethnicities across this incredibly diverse country. And there has been kind of widespread feeling that for too long, a small minority from Tigre had too much control of the federal government. So there's political tension between Tigre and Addis Ababa. Are there also historical grievances between two grand central government that we need to mention? I mean, is there a back story here? Tigre is now fighting at us. There's a lot of back story Ethiopian and certainly to Gran's were and incredibly, they weren't just dominant, politically and in the security services for many years, certainly under the leadership of Prime minister malice, But they also suffered most in the long and very costly in blood and treasure war with your tria. So there is there's also you know, a sense of probably grievance in that sense. Abby's come to power they feel targeted by new personnel choices by new policy choices. What maybe others in Ethiopia see as a re balancing the Tigre ins can often feel like persecution despite the tremendous sacrifices that they have made for the country. There are reports from Tigre oven. Ethiopian air campaign heavy bombardment at times. I mean, what's at stake here as far as you can tell ambassador Is it a possible civil war between two grands and Ethiopian troops? There is Tigre saying. We've had enough. We want independence. How should we interpret what's going on? We should absolutely be worried about a civil war, which I don't think would necessarily be contained just Teo, the Tigre region, giving all of the other tensions and actors. So what's at stake? You know the wellbeing of over 110 million Ethiopians. Regional stability. Conflict in Ethiopia has a very high chance of drawing in Eritrea. Sudan, tipping the balance of Sudan zone very fragile transition. Ethiopia's incredibly important actor in trying to bring stability to Somalia to South Sudan distracted and weekend. Ethiopia is really quite devastating, Tio this entire horn region which is strategically really significant, and there are a lot of actors external to Africa. In the Gulf, the Chinese and from the West, all of whom care deeply about stability in this region, so the prospect of drawing others in of proxy conflict it's really a powder keg, and the consequence will not be confined solely to what's happening inside Ethiopia's borders. Michelle Gavin, senior fellow for Africa Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations. She also served as ambassador to Botswana from 2011 to 14. Ambassador Gavin Thank you very much. Thank you.

Tigre Ethiopia Michelle Gavin Ambassador Gavin Prime Minister Ahmed Sudan Eritrea Council On Foreign Relations Addis Ababa Graham Federal Government Abby Somalia Africa Gulf Ambassador Gavin Thank Botswana
Nobel Peace Prize recognition is an amazing day, saysUN food agency

UN News

06:12 min | 6 months ago

Nobel Peace Prize recognition is an amazing day, saysUN food agency

"The announcement that the UN. World. Food program or W P as one the twenty twenty Nobel Peace Prize is being described as an amazing day for its workers in the field. Put their lives on the line to help at risk communities. That's the message from Matthew Lyndale head of the agency's South Sudan operation in these interview with your. News Johnson. He's been explaining how the one thousand in two hundred strong humanitarian team there has been helping communities hit by the worst flooding in decades ongoing violence. So we're thrilled today to have received the Nobel Peace Prize for Twenty Twenty there are a thousand, two, hundred, and fifty will food program start working in south Sudan. Relieve your hunger for and feed more than five million people a year and clearly south Sudan for the World Food Program is one of the most complex operations. A country that's face decades of violence. But it's also having to Manage Economic Downturn Cove nineteen locust infestation more violence which continues persistently and now more recently floods have affected more than eight hundred, thousand people. So for all of WFP in south Sudan a country where we were very hard to to demonstrate the link between violence and hunger and try and stop that link rake that that relationship so that we can actually change people's lives for the better future for us. This is just an amazing day. It is certainly excellent use agency for the more than twelve hundred workers on the ground. You say, maybe you could give me some insight into what they're doing not just in terms of the emergency following the devastating flooding that had which has been the worst in decades. I remember you briefing is just a couple of weeks ago on this, but also in terms of the development projects on the ground to help. Resilience for these communities can go home. So in South Sudan Kaley, there is a massive emergency failure of work given the enormity of the food insecurity problem that the country faces and only in the last five years we faced thirty one pockets of famine. It gives you an idea about how significant the problem is here, but it's not the only problem that we need to face and it's not an emergency response is not the only tool. In all too. But obviously what we're also trying to tune in south Sudan is really the poster child for bringing Emergency Response Development activities and this building activities together as warm and part of that obviously is to change the fundamental problems that are faced by so many south Sydney citizen's issues of isolation, the issues of inequality and yet criti- and marginalization all of which creates the breeding ground or conflict and violence. So through our programs where we`re Supporting rural farmers to be more productive to have enough food for their own communities. But more importantly to create a surplus that they can trade with other communities to link those communities together to link farmer's markets and other markets and thereby creating a positive relationship across ethnic divides US Mutiti divides. Can Act they bring people together these. These that we want to invest more. Easily. Recognized I think in this these fries today and it's not just south Saddam redoing these things but also fundamentally desperately trying to show but those that would manipulate burst the time and have manipulated in the past I held accountable so that this change in south Sudan, it's a country that frankly we've been in for fifty years too long and we aim to make sure that we are not needed in this country. We've talked to make those linkages between development aid and is go and obviously we wish you very best to that and your teams in very difficult circumstances millions have been experiencing displacement and conflicts just last week the Human Rights Council highlighted a report that talked about the use of starvation. As a weapon of war, we've heard even worse than that soldiers being offered the chance to rape women in communities in you of payment I mean, you just can't imagine the kind of conditions. But when you go into a community with the WFP Bana, what is it that the agency brings? What is the agency's added value? So in South Sudan because we've built relationships with communities of the decades of presence here because we are, you know twelve hundred plus strong organization with presence across ten states and a deep relationship with the communities we serve where known entity and we have the logistics tools in our toolbox to be able to access areas. We the helicopters, planes, all-terrain vehicles, canoes, bogs, boats you. We have an enduring sir. We're able to meet people's needs when they're the worst, but we're also able to support organizations other organizations as well as community leaders themselves to make a difference in their communities. So what we are. From perspective able to do is anyone really Priam? Times as a facilitator to bring you a organizations to bring communities together that typically have had problems coming together in this country since twenty eleven since its independence country who vicious periods of civil war and has persistent national conflict local conflict walk WFP has is now trying to do is trying to ensure that our food security presence. Can Be used by other partners because we in this on our own to really facilitate a change in this environment, a fundamental change in what is causing an enabling violence to contain one

South Sudan South Sudan Kaley WFP Twenty Twenty UN Matthew Lyndale United States Human Rights Council Johnson Rape Sydney
Everything you need to know about human rights in South Sudan

UN News

01:15 min | 6 months ago

Everything you need to know about human rights in South Sudan

"The first report of its kind by a U N panel. The Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan reported on Tuesday that government forces through most of two, thousand and seventeen and two, thousand, eighteen intentionally deprived IOT and Luo communities living under the control of the opposition in western Bahr Gazelle state of resources amounting to collective punishment and starvation as a method of warfare government commanders also authorized as soldiers to reward themselves by pillaging items deemed indispensable to the survival of these rural populations the report adds. Since gaining independence in two, thousand and thirteen. The brutal conflict across South Sudan has caused incalculable suffering to the civilian population resulting in staggering levels of acute food insecurity and malnutrition noted the commission with seven point five million south. Sudanese. Currently requiring humanitarian assistance we have found food insecurity in western Bahr, Gazelle Jonglei and central. Equatoria states is linked directly to the conflicts and therefore almost entirely human induced said, commission chair has been super. It's quite clear that both government and opposition forces of deliberately used the starvation of civilians as a method of warfare sometimes as an instrument to punish non-aligned communities as is the case Jonglei she added

South Sudan Bahr Gazelle Gazelle Jonglei Bahr Malnutrition Equatoria
Flooding leaves South Sudan facing threat of ‘catastrophic’ hunger levels

UN News

01:15 min | 7 months ago

Flooding leaves South Sudan facing threat of ‘catastrophic’ hunger levels

"Catastrophic flooding and rising food and health costs in Sudan have driven up the number of people in need the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs or Archer said on Friday authorities declared a three-month state of emergency in early September after the worst flooding in thirty years to date more than eight. Hundred and sixty thousand people have had houses destroyed or damaged and more than one hundred, twenty died hundreds of schools and thousands of health facilities have also been affected especially in North Darfur, Khartoum for and Sana. The response by agencies and partners has reached more than four hundred thousand people so far which shelter and essential items for more than one hundred and. Eighty, thousand flood-affected refugees and around one point nine million internally displaced people and communities amid growing needs searching inflation reaching nearly one hundred and seventy percent in has caused a shortage of basic commodities and increase prices of some locally sourced supplies by up to four hundred percent. Here's ultra spokesperson Jens Locker in some cases by the time the procurement process finalized the. Supplies have increased prices so that the original body it's no longer valid agencies have to restart the process from scratch while there's no guarantee that by the time that that process is done, the prices will not have risen once again and they can start all over

North Darfur Jens Locker Coordination Of Humanitarian A Khartoum Sudan UN Archer
AstraZeneca pauses coronavirus vaccine trial, shares slip on rollout doubts

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

00:39 sec | 7 months ago

AstraZeneca pauses coronavirus vaccine trial, shares slip on rollout doubts

"No Work? No pay no food coronavirus lockdowns have forced many people all over the world to wonder where their next meal's will come from according to Matthew True. Scott Oxfam International's head of Humanitarian Policy About one hundred and twenty one million people have been pushed to the edge of starvation. This year not of course is across the main hotspots you would expect Yemen Democratic Republic of Congo of Gunston Venezuela, south. Sudan we're also seeing hunger coming up in otherwise middle income or developing countries. India South Africa Brazil CETERA. Look at a situation in the world where you have about sixty sixty, one percent working in the informal economy when that denied that daily income forced to stay at home they no longer get that income and that forces them into some of the negative coping strategies and that's what makes this crisis so unique. People. Couldn't travel to work which meant they couldn't make money and they couldn't buy food but this isn't just a short term problem. Is it Yeah and it has sort of long term impacts where, for instance, if you take people who are living day to day selling milk, if they can't sell milk for a few days, it gets point whether then have to do something to have food and income then have to sell their means of income. So selling the cow which had been providing them and then conquered back to generate income and same happens instead of urban areas where people who had been, for instance, taxi drivers after. So long of not being able to take fares and give taxi rights eventually then have to start selling off assets to cope and that's where we're really. Seeing potential long-term structural breakdown, and as you say, this is a problem that existed before the pandemic. So how do we tackle it this time around does it require new solutions? It does with sort of proposing three solutions. The I of course is that we need to increase humanitarian aid drastically the U. N. Global Humanitarian Appeal has called for about ten point, three billion dollars in humanitarian aid. But only about twenty, four percent of that is funded. So less than a quarter, the second thing that we can do is cancelled some of the debt that could free up up to a trillion dollars, and then of course, the final thing is. Exactly, as you say, we do need to change how system works. We need to build a more fair and more robust food system. We need to build a system that's ready to deal with the climate shocks that's able to produce sustainable food. One that supports a small-scale Farmers Informal Workers, Matthew Scott head of humanitarian policy at Oxfam International. Thanks for your time. Thank you so much

Humanitarian Policy Scott Oxfam International U. N. Global Humanitarian Appe Matthew True Farmers Informal Workers Gunston Venezuela Oxfam International Democratic Republic Of Congo Matthew Scott Sudan India Yemen
Sudan Signs Peace Deal With Rebel Alliance

Larry Elder

00:47 sec | 8 months ago

Sudan Signs Peace Deal With Rebel Alliance

"Than 17 years of conflict. These hope that peace will be restored incidences of full region on the southern states of self code of fun and blue nightie. An alliance of the main rebel groups. The Sudan Revolutionary Front signed a comprehensive peace agreement with the transitional government in Juba, the capital ofthe neighboring south Sudan. But the deal has been welcomed with caution. Previous peace agreements failed to hold and to keep rebel groups did not take part in the signing off the new deal, BBC correspondent and soy reporting, Federal and state officials are on the ground in Louisiana to help residents cope with the

Sudan Revolutionary Front Sudan Juba Louisiana BBC
Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

Untangle

03:48 min | 9 months ago

Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

"Siebel Villa. Thank, you very much. Ariana family me and thank you. For joining us, it is my sincere pleasure and honor. I would love to begin with you telling us a little bit about your own story and the inspiration for your current work. Thank. You very much. Really. I grew up in effeminate that was highly politicized and our shaved. By the history of the Feminine so-fi as its involvement in the struggle against apartheid resume colonialism in south, Africa, and in Africa in general and in the fight for the. Liberation of the black masses AFA people against the shuttle's off. Appreciate up on. Racism and all forms of injustice that degeneration of Mandela waged against our shaped by that kind of history and our shaped by those material condition, and it is the involvement of my family and my involvement of my great grandfather, Nelson Mandela that has inspired me to anti into the food dolf intensive relations particularly focusing on issues that were made peace confluence, Aleutian and human rights in South Africa. Andy. Africa's when the world more generally, and at the moment, my final stages of my doctorate studies which averages stepped on that Nelson Mandela University in Africa and partly, half of my research was done in the United States at George Mason invested to scorn of conflict, resolution and analysis. Dot Potential Training has opened opportunities for me. I'm currently based in Juba South Sudan where I work as a team, lead the country director for the Subsidy Program for an organization whole geneticist for human rights. So that is the way that I'm currently doing in south, Sudan. Patent puzzle supporting the Peace End. Development Agenda since the end of the civil war in this part of the was. So that's the kind of work that I'm doing, and that's what I'm engaged in at the moment. I'm sure people are curious about a little bit of your direct experience with your great grandfather. What is a memory that you might have and a piece of wisdom that you've learned from him that you'd like to pass along? A very few memories of. Microsoft. Grandfather Nelson, and among those memories was always division that instilled to all of us and something that we all learned from him and even the past generation the past it to him that. Occurred to importance to treat people quantity godless of their social status in society when you begin with rich people. Equally. You begin to understand and begin to know who people are for people would be willing to talk to. And people will be willing to listen to. That Nessin did. If you look at the entire store, you would have conversation with his prison. And he was highly regarded and respected by his prison for he treated that particular individual symptoms spent that they will lead to the president of Salafi, Cadet and. Someone that comes from. Hubble, begins. And when you begin to imagine from the kind of a background is individual new, get to recognize that we are only important it regardless of social status in society,

Grandfather Nelson Nelson Mandela Africa Juba South Sudan South Africa Nelson Mandela University George Mason Siebel Villa Nessin Ariana Microsoft Andy United States President Trump Director
Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

Untangle

04:32 min | 9 months ago

Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

"This week I have a special guest, sea. Ebola Mandela. WHO's the great grandson of Nelson. Mandela. Lilla is a PhD in peace and conflict. Studies, in continues his grandfather's legacy of advocating for human rights and shares his perspective on the stomach nature of racism with us. He recently wrote a chapter in the book for the sake. Of Peace. African perspectives, on. Racism? Justice. And peace in America. Sibylla will also share with us his perspective on what we can each do to decolonize our own minds and the lessons that he learned from his grandfather's character. He speaks to us today from south, Sudan where he works. Welcome Siebel Villa. Thank, you very much. Ariana family me and thank you. For joining us, it is my sincere pleasure and honor. I would love to begin with you telling us a little bit about your own story and the inspiration for your current work. Thank. You very much. Really. I grew up in effeminate that was highly politicized and our shaved. By the history of the Feminine so-fi as its involvement in the struggle against apartheid resume colonialism in south, Africa, and in Africa in general and in the fight for the. Liberation of the black masses AFA people against the shuttle's off. Appreciate up on. Racism and all forms of injustice that degeneration of Mandela waged against our shaped by that kind of history and our shaped by those material condition, and it is the involvement of my family and my involvement of my great grandfather, Nelson Mandela that has inspired me to anti into the food dolf intensive relations particularly focusing on issues that were made peace confluence, Aleutian and human rights in South Africa. Andy. Africa's when the world more generally, and at the moment, my final stages of my doctorate studies which averages stepped on that Nelson Mandela University in Africa and partly, half of my research was done in the United States at George Mason invested to scorn of conflict, resolution and analysis. Dot Potential Training has opened opportunities for me. I'm currently based in Juba South Sudan where I work as a team, lead the country director for the Subsidy Program for an organization whole geneticist for human rights. So that is the way that I'm currently doing in south, Sudan. Patent puzzle supporting the Peace End. Development Agenda since the end of the civil war in this part of the was. So that's the kind of work that I'm doing, and that's what I'm engaged in at the moment. I'm sure people are curious about a little bit of your direct experience with your great grandfather. What is a memory that you might have and a piece of wisdom that you've learned from him that you'd like to pass along? A very few memories of. Microsoft. Grandfather Nelson, and among those memories was always division that instilled to all of us and something that we all learned from him and even the past generation the past it to him that. Occurred to importance to treat people quantity godless of their social status in society when you begin with rich people. Equally. You begin to understand and begin to know who people are for people would be willing to talk to. And people will be willing to listen to. That Nessin did. If you look at the entire store, you would have conversation with his prison. And he was highly regarded and respected by his prison for he treated that particular individual symptoms spent that they will lead to the president of Salafi, Cadet and. Someone that comes from. Hubble, begins. And when you begin to imagine from the kind of a background is individual new, get to recognize that we are only important it regardless of social status in society,

Grandfather Nelson Juba South Sudan Nelson Mandela Mandela South Africa Africa Nelson Mandela University Nessin Lilla Sibylla George Mason Siebel Villa Ariana America Microsoft Andy United States President Trump
Coronavirus crisis could double number of people suffering acute hunger - UN

UN News

01:28 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus crisis could double number of people suffering acute hunger - UN

"More than a quarter of a billion people could suffer from acute by the end of twenty twenty because of the impact of the new corona virus. Pandemic that's according to the World Food Programme. Wfp and other UN agencies. Which on Tuesday warned that caveat nineteen could almost double the number of people who are already critically hungry now in fifty five countries according to the global report on food crises produced by WFP and fifteen other humanitarian and development partners. Seventy five million children were stunted and seventy million suffered from wasting in two thousand. Nineteen the forecast. It's spike in the number of people at particular risk of curve in nineteen relates to one hundred and eighty three million people who were found to be on the cusp of acute hunger last year faced with the new corona virus. They're unlikely to withstand the shock to their food insecurity. The report suggests regionally more than half of the one hundred thirty five million people covered by the report are in Africa. Forty three million live in the Middle East and Asia eighteen and a half million from Latin America and the Caribbean. The key reasons for food insecurity are conflict where the extremes and economic turbulence in order of severity the ten worst food crises last year Yemen the Democratic Republic of the Congo Afghanistan Venezuela Ethiopia South Sudan Syria Sudan northern and Haiti together they constituted eighty eight million acutely food insecure people and accounted for sixty five percent of all people in acute need

World Food Programme Pandemic Middle East UN Yemen Haiti Democratic Republic Caribbean Africa Asia Afghanistan Latin America Ethiopia Venezuela
Melissa RoyDreams From Her Father

Counting Countries

09:13 min | 1 year ago

Melissa RoyDreams From Her Father

"Hey now I am bureau host ric and this episode with guest. Melissa Roy was recorded back in late February while there was ample concerned in regard to cove it at that time especially in a place like China in much of the world. Business went about as normal in fact. I left Bangkok on March. Second to start an eight week trip. That would take the Berlin for two conferences West Africa for a month and then a couple of weeks in Yerevan for my annual visit. All these plans were made in vain. My to conferences and Berlin were cancelled including travel massive form. As I was on my flight after Bruin then went and met my friends. Indycar for the start of our road trip on March fifteenth on her first day Gambia. We had a team dinner where we decided to cancel the trip into leave. Banjul the following day. While I was really disappointed in just several more days this look like in the stupid decision borders inflates began to close and cancel like dominoes. I'm now in Bangkok self quarantining. And of course social distancing prior to the STREP trip I recorded and finished episodes April May and June but made sense to re record this opening introduction to be more attuned to current situations. So I'm wishing everyone safe health. I encourage you to listen to fact Bay signed and I hope for a quick end to this virus which threatens many as well as the global economy speaking to like minded people like you. This is an odd time for many of us so often we're on a trip and if not planning for the next one this passion for expiration is part of our DNA and many for many of us. It's a tremendous personal frustration to be walked at home or even stranded in a foreign will cow. Whatever you can do try and make this time fruitful and productive in reach out to your loved ones friends and even strangers to lend a hand and now back to our regularly scheduled interview. I reached out to Melissa. Shortly after she announced her complement of traveling every country in the world social media traditional media began reporting that she was the first woman of South Asian heritage to complete this quest on cannon countries. I'm always looking for diverse voices whether that's nationality ethnicity religion or any other differentiator and it's great to get other perspectives. A reminder my monthly reminder coun- countries is part of Petri on you can be a great supporter like Steph road. Ted mims be some miles Ryan dashed or Stephen Rothwell and Adam Hickman. They get to listen to extra content like the extra interview. I did with Melissa only for them. Untamed borders is the sponsor of counting countries focuses on challenging locations for those chasing one ninety three James and I decided to replace the interview. We had previously recorded in regard to my visit to Afghanistan within updated interview on the current situation. Please listen then to James Wilcox founder of untamed borders James. Welcome back to counting countries This time we are having you back to give us an update and more challenging in dire times with Cova. Nineteen in your intro goal. Part of the travel community stream travel community. You're taking us to places which are really challenging locations so first of all I want to check in with you and see you're doing and how things are in the UK May personally I'm fine. actually been Last week so who knows what that actually What that actually is but as far as Healthwise the team The guy on the stuff that we use the countries who many people may have met whilst in in other circumstances of fine and obviously the you know the reality of the world has changed kind of shown travel leisure To be as important as it radiates in the in the grand scheme of life which is which is not that important but generally weight. Well I hope you'll your cash flow vic. Thanks James Yep am self quarantining and social distancing as we speak so this covert thing just seemed to really accelerate very quickly When things really started hitting the fan were any of your trips In action at that point. Did you have to close trips out early? Evacuate People What was the situation? Yeah exactly what I think. The the weekend of I think it was the fourteenth fifteenth of March around that weekend Things inching to accelerate very quickly. We had a good trip to Syria Which was due to start on that weekend and we we with. I think about thirty six hours before it started really had a couple of guests had arrived in Lebanon on that trip. We had a good trip to south. Sudan was finishing event that we can. We had one guest Continuing onto a national park in the far south of South Sudan and we had to call him back early to make sure he could leave Juba Juba F. O. Had a tip from someone from the UN that the EPA was going to close on Monday night so we had to get that person out at one of our team who was on that trip Is is accusing self contained in South Africa at the moment So yet that we can things did seem to. Things did accelerate Very quickly and as soon as we sold that we we did anticipate that travel was going to be restricted due to coke in nineteen With with total guests trips coming up at the we had concerned we wanted to in this situation but that we candidate accelerate very fast. As I'm sure you will what How was it with you around that time it? Yeah somewhat of a similar circumstance timeline wise. I was in Senegal Gambia. Over March fifteenth or so Sunday In after we crossed into Gambia on the evening of the fifteenth Me In the fellow. Travelers IS WITH. We kind of had a team dinner and we cancelled we build on our month trip to. West Africa and flew home on the sixteenth Monday and got a directly direct flight OUTTA Gambia to to Turkey and onwards to Bangkok James so just give us kind of a brief update of the trips that were already in place so to speak but How's this affecting untamed borders right now. What's what's this mean to the business. I mean the May decide Travel any description in the show. Possibly to medium-term is just not going to happen and when travel begins it will be you know. People start traveling again Who knows when that will start at who knows when that will stop being to some of the areas that we We guided so for the moment We people with upcoming trips. Having given the option to to cancel to move their trips to late nights. We've got people who've moved onto trips towards the end of twenty twenty meeting trips into twenty twenty one so we're planning We're hoping that we will be able to resume in the in the medium term but we Planning the tangle this will be solid enough and resilience enough to take a long pause out and ready to go it again. Um whenever trouble begins as you know. I've got extremism connection especially with Afghanistan Pakistan and when travel begins again will be will be guiding again It might mean that. Have to do some other. Bits and bobs and make ends meet and things like that in the meantime But we back. We will be guiding assumes. We're able to

Bangkok Melissa Roy Gambia James Wilcox Berlin Afghanistan Yerevan RIC Banjul Senegal Gambia West Africa Strep China Bruin Lebanon UK Steph Juba Juba F. O.
Sudanese defense minister dies of heart attack

BBC World Service

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Sudanese defense minister dies of heart attack

"Breaking news it's been announced that the Sudanese defense minister has died of tenant general Germans denial ma had been in Jupiter in neighboring south Sudan to peace talks with Sudanese rebel groups according to officials at the talks the minister died suddenly at the pyramid hotel in Juba the Reuters news agency is quoting a Sudanese army official as saying the general died from a heart attack expecting more details at a press conference shortly but there is one immediate consequence that we know of those Sudanese peace talks have been put on hold for one week more on that as we

Juba Official South Sudan Reuters Sudanese Army
East Africa's huge locust outbreak threatens regional food security

UN News

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

East Africa's huge locust outbreak threatens regional food security

"To east Africa. Now where a wave of desert? Locusts is forming new swarms in Kenya Ethiopia and Somalia and threatening the main crop harvest in May and June the warning from the World Food Program or WFP follows an upsurge in Lucas colonies. That started in two thousand nineteen the worst in twenty five years for and Somalia and in seventy years for Kenya swamps have also spread to Eritrea Tanzania and Uganda and W P is especially worried for South Sudan the UN agency is trying to reach a five million people in need that this year but is two hundred eight million dollars. Short of the resources needed to mount an effective response according to WFP more than half of South Sudan's at twelve million people will face severe food insecurity at height of the annual hunting season from May to July and as many as twenty thousand people particularly in the worst hit counties of Duke and Kobo in Jonglei State face catastrophic food shortages between now and April.

South Sudan WFP Somalia Kenya East Africa UN Eritrea Kobo Uganda Tanzania Jonglei State Ethiopia
"south sudan" Discussed on African Tech Roundup

African Tech Roundup

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"south sudan" Discussed on African Tech Roundup

"I no. We're really have a lot of people outside. Their South Sudan is there and everyone is watching. What is going to happen? I know why cannot decide for you but the truth is we should never give up the hope for our country you know when most people are running into refuge they said I'm not going to the country. I'm not going back to the country but when I talk to them now everybody's saying can our leaders really understand John Distribution and we go back because I mean home is a home so it may take time for you to think about going home Tom. But change is inevitable. We hope that our leaders will really Seton understand. And then it's as who have to go and develop that that country I always look at the example of Rhonda and you cannot believe when you go through and then you see how patriotic everybody is. I've been to render you. See see to their and everybody's talking about developing the country developing country developing the country. Where we'll say there but I know that in twenty twenty inti? We'll definitely reach a point where we start thinking. Can we go back and start building that country together so miss maintain the hope nope and less never give up the country is I was whether we have lived out of eight twenty years or whatever we still belong they are and we can only build it if we do it together so maybe flight home spend a month or so a few weeks even as is not a bad idea. That's true because we can rely on the news you on CNN BBC or whatever nor when you go home there you can have a different perspective and you can see a niche that you can try to be able to do something missing in whatever it is you can do it from your experience or whatever. They are different ways to develop the country and this hope that February brings the peace we want and then after two six months commun- and as you say two or three weeks two or three days it'll change your perspective because we'll and see how people have tried to survive and make sure that that country regains the hopeless. Mr Young Look Hula. Thank you so much for giving us your time. Thank you for sparing the time to be an here from the perspective of South Sudan and development in that country.

South Sudan Mr Young Rhonda CNN BBC Seton John Distribution Tom
"south sudan" Discussed on African Tech Roundup

African Tech Roundup

11:00 min | 1 year ago

"south sudan" Discussed on African Tech Roundup

"And your mission as an organization. Fees strutted into southern. Anita's say when the piece was sign and everybody was into the aesthetic trying to participate in the development of the country. So around that time mm-hmm five enterpreneurs came up and putting their resources to start a solution understood very well by twenty thirteen. We already had four branches But unfortunately that's when the first conflict broke out and by two thousand sixteen we were forced to close three. Three branches were these. All in south Sudan Sudan all those south Sudan it was really very disappointing period because I think we lost not less than three hundred thousand. US dollars at that time boss because of inflation and because because most of our plans to call to to refuge and that's when we sat with the board and said what do we do. Do we close this to show we we keep it going. And the idea finally came in that lists follow up our clancy into Uganda and see whether we can provide them also financial services in such a setting so i. I traveled to Uganda and followed up a stressful. It was not that difficult difficult and by February seventeen. We are set up. Our branch of costume was a bit apprehensive. Because I mean if you talk to finance institutions nations providing financial services to refugees is north something that everybody wants to do. We fear that they could just leave that country and go to another one or because they do enough security to secure a loan so most likely they met before and it's nothing nothing much you can do but we had event to that the refugees we are dealing with some moved them way our clams and most of them. We understood where they're coming from so so the new US in south Sudan we knew them from south Sudan so sort of there was a link and there was understanding between us and Franklin Wrangler new stuttered way a bit apprehensive but just after six months realize that it was a market niche of that was really in and need of service and we have to mobilize resources for a fuss to make sure we meet this. This market niche so. Oh from ten to seventeen up to now we have been working with their effigies and right now actually a lot of financial institutions begin to realize that you can serve the refugee and they pay even as well as the local pass on so we still maintaining that and also contending our activities in in in south Sudan because all of us have hope that one day peace will come and definitely people will need financial services so right now we're maintaining operations in the main town providing the common businessmen have been talking about financial services especially especially loans in such an environment and then they're Davantage Lazlo walking into countries that there's always linkage because because they come from south Sudan and the AINU Ganda so it's very easy for us to even use a collateral that they have in South Sudan for them to secured loans in Uganda and they also families along the way who want to send money from south Sudan into Uganda to their relatives in the refugee settlements. I saw parentally even before again. What we have not planned for is something that will realize this happening? We are becoming a very good link for families and refugees and for other relatives who are back in the country in south Sudan essentially remittance service. Now Yeah exactly. We are especially from Juba to one of the settlements in a place called Perot arena. We have really been very very wherever much appreciated by their fees and even the business people because some business people want to buy certain woods from South Sudan which I know. They're in Uganda. So they can easily remit the money from our settlement and then withdraw it from from south Sudan. So they're really found it a very important service. I'm I'm curious to know. What gap existed? That allowed you to come up with. This idea was not a formal banking infrastructure. That was serving the people and if did was there. Why wasn't it serving the kind base you? Currently so in Uganda or in south Sudan in south Sudan so when you first launched in south Sudan and what was the state of banking infrastructure and at what extent was it making lending available to I suppose the business people when when we set it in two thousand eight there was busy Kelly the very fuel okay. We had some bonds and most of these thanks. We are way of foreign banks and of course they are just in the town of Juba. So you find out if you go to some of the outskirts or settings things. There was no financial service providers. And that's why we found out that it was necessary. Then due to financial EST may at the microfinance microfinance level that we also in south Sudan but also realize they're just within the town but the service that started with took them to the outskirts. We we started in a place called Kaji which was about to two hours drive from Juba and the people appreciated it because yes. It was something that they've never expected coming in. And of course we realize people needed it because everybody was the mystic about building the development all developing the country so some of them needed money to be able to do that and they found that our service of trying to provide loans at that time was was raided. The truth is most of them had never heard before so it also involve desk trying to do some financial literacy for them to understand ending and times about security and all that but ultimately it picked up and actually because of that effort we put in. That's why when we came to Uganda down the understood that we have really tried to help them and frankly we when we came in the some of them asked us why didn't do. Just what is it that drives you. YOU HAVE MITT losses in south Sudan and again following trying to come and provide services in in Uganda so people didn't understand but we have calling which is like a social calling because realized there was also in Uganda. That was under sowed so it was basically trying to be part of the team that is building the country that really drove these five inte- preneurs to start and grow the company. Moving into Uganda was sort of like desperate. Move because You've lost a lot of money but you said okay list also throw some money there and see what comes out but surprisingly as we talk now is being well in Uganda. That was going to be my next question. Inscription is clearly have you recovered from that loss. And the limits to altruism contend here to what extent is this is this a calculated for profit entity and to what extent are you perhaps willing to sustain further losses in the name of of the boarding your people. No I don't think we are not. We are not ready to sustain more losses losses. That's why we we actually right now as I talk. We decided to maintain operations in new gun in south Sudan at only two branches inches. We don't intend to expand or open those branches reclosed until we see that there is permanent peace and then the south Sudan is Spohn has really gained some value always a bit stable against the foreign currency. Well in Uganda of course is and then they. They don't see link Israeli stable against the local on foreign currency so this is a very big chance of expanding because even now in both countries we are sustainable bowl. Yes in Uganda Norwood being better now. We have four branches. We have three branches opening their force in February. So we have a high hope that I I built aspects much as again we are dealing with refugees and also some host communities is so much more high in Uganda at the moment then in south Sudan so his profitability in sight. Nice insight since I. How many people do you serve with right now? In Uganda we have who two thousand three hundred and fifty clans that we we are working with and the about seventy five percent of these refugees and then we have forced communities communities we not entirely targeting refugees but because we work mostly in the settlements the new final that a lot of our work is also going going towards serving serving refugees then in south Sudan. We have about one thousand eight hundred because most people move out of the country so as you said South Sudan Dan we are moving cautiously. We don't want to have our fingers bent for the second time saw really the strategy is to make sure the operations are continuing and then until final piece comes in. That's when we have ditch us now to expand and open the other branches that we're we're closed strategies also to make sure that when the refugees go back they can continue with the services that they have been getting from Uganda because when they come back they'll find NASA they and then we'll be able to continue to to provide them with services as an again them losing the services that have been getting and then taking go back to zero so we are trying to place that cross-border strategist to make sure that we provide the same services they go back. We're taking a quick breathe to tell you a little more about spark. The presenting sponsor of the series spark is a Dutch. NGO with a difference since being founded by two Dutch students a little over twenty five years ago the organization has grown delivered expert job creation services in fourteen of the world's most conflict affected regions including Libya Palestine nine and South Sudan. Spa Creates job opportunities for young people by.

south Sudan Uganda Sudan Sudan Uganda Norwood US Juba Anita NASA Perot arena clancy Wrangler Kaji Libya Davantage Lazlo Spohn Kelly
"south sudan" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"south sudan" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Four four three one or go to CarShield dot com. Get covered today. And welcome back to radio Night Live Callum McCulloch. Glad to have you with us coming up in our number two tonight, Georgie Mormon will be in the ladies lounge. We're looking forward to having a very spirited conversation. With Georgie of which one thing that we might cover is why she's eight devoted Android user, almost two maniacal level. And I guess the same could be said about being terms of being an apple guy. So we'll see where all that goes. But she's also got some thoughts on millennials Jin's Z's Ilan, Omar and her new podcast. She's got a brand new podcast that we are. I know Nixon Android guy. He even though the computer. He's running our show with right now is a MAC, I'm just saying eight eight eight three four to ten ten is the phone number that I want you to call tonight. Eight three four to ten ten. It is the one that will help us set free people that have been human traffic and someone who cares. Much about this. Joe Vander speck of the Christian soldarity international. In fact, Joel runs the entire operations of the American footprint. If you will see us, I there's a couple of things they they have two different levels of operation one to target governments into appeal governments to say to the leaders of these countries. Can you help us with this wrongdoing? That's going on in these places. And then there's also the operation that's on the ground. That's actually helping those that have been treated badly. And Joel it's always good to have you. But tonight, I wanna talk about Sudan tell people what's going on in in Sudan. South Sudan, going back home, the freemen from slavery in Sudan, the Muslim partisan and they've been parted liberation efforts. So I'm going back. Just some Meeks time to welcome back three hopefully up to four hundred thousand six majority of them are Christian returning them. Back to their home villages, reuniting with their families after years in slavery. Some fifteen twenty twenty plus years being inflate in these Muslim families forced to work on a daily basis without any pay assaulted verbally sexually physically abused on a daily basis. Our slave retriever is on the ground right now in the Muslim area sedan going from village to village negotiating with the slave owners for the release. So we can pray for that. And we really want to ask your audience again to be involved in this as you said Kevin exciting opportunity a lot of negative. But this is. Positive because when people come back home, it's not just the life of that particular slave who's been ill will be transformed but entire families. And obviously just as they welcome back to their loved one. Missing for so long. A lot of people wonder how slavery still exists in a modern day in which we live in and for people that are new to this discussion. There was a war in Sudan was a civil war. When Sudan was just a a country, not the two countries. It is now, and it was it was these Islamic. Of forces in the north that when ride down into the south and takeover areas and March off the women and children, primarily to be slaves in their on their properties in the north in when the when the global governments got together and said, let's solve the civil war, and they stopped the war. They didn't they didn't add they didn't make the slave owners give up their slaves. And so all the time that the war's been concluded in south Sudan became its own country. There's there's was this peace settlement. Now, you have these people that have lived in this kind of disjointed piece so to speak, but they haven't had peace for themselves. And some of these women were taking it very young ages two three four five years of age, and they've been there for fourteen to forty years, depending on how long it's been. And it's it's just really. Heart wrenching to think that they've they've been stuck in that scenario. But the the solution is what CS is doing. So explain how the retriever works out. Does he find the slave? How does he negotiate the release? What happens? Right. Well, our sleeve retriever is from that Muslim community. He works with us. He's both sides. Obviously he has an in with the slave masters because of his his ethnic identity being from the same Muslim tribes Sudanese drive..

South Sudan Joel it Callum McCulloch Joe Vander speck Ilan apple Christian soldarity internatio Nixon Meeks Kevin Omar two three four five years forty years
"south sudan" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

05:30 min | 2 years ago

"south sudan" Discussed on World News Analysis

"Only fifty percent of the urban land was a properly used let's say is arable land is as large as the size of Mexico. So this country has a lot of potential and also is rich in minerals, but suffered from problems like decades of civil war between the north and south which resulted in the independence of south, Sudan, the independence has dealt have a blow to Sudan why we said that because most of the oil fields oil resources like seventy five percent of the oil resources located in south Sudan. So when south Sudan gained independence, Sudan, the Sudan government lost as men avenue of of income? Let's say then there's a big problem. There's have a blow to the country's financial incomes financial like a ability of to do to take care of the its own. People and along with that the sanctions imposed by the United States which lasted for more than twenty years and ended in twenty seventeen October twenty seventeen after the sanctions were lifted though were say, high expectation back in Sudan, a lot of people thought at that time since the sanctions lifted so they expected a lot of foreign investment, and then with investment that would be Christian of dogs. And then we're beer, of course, the the don't fall for the, you know, the flow flowing into this country was a lot of hot currency people's living standard will be wrist. But unfortunately, that was not destitution. So that expansion had failed to be materialized because of the century in June that twenty years like the banking sector. I think one French. Based Bank was a penalized by Washington heavy punishment. And then even after the sanctions were lifted. You know, feel internationally investors have shown strong interest in investing Sudan because the whole situation was not that stable that time I'm even today. Today's the worst actually so the sim time this country was still on the list of the nation's which so called in the accusation and acquisition by the United States sponsor for sponsoring a terrorist. As long as it was on the list. The IMF International Monetary Fund will not allow this country to biscuit, right off is foreign debt. So that's also a heavy burden on this government. So you see they have the potential in the middle resources. They have the potential in agriculture. But somehow there's a lack of investment there's a challenging external environment full the government for this country to develop the potential to tap the potential so the the living standard the economy remains more or less, I was problematic. So that's why you see. People like basically rose up again. And again, you know, twenty thirteen hundred sixteen twenty nineteen three years internals. You see the basically the violence the protests against the government. But he's not really the government. Probably whoever will be an empower the face similar difficulties. And there are reports saying that Russian mercenaries or participating in the government efforts to deal with to protests, which has been denied by the Sudanese government. How do you see the foreign factors behind? No, they're accurate, visions and contract traditions. Yes, there are you know, from the protest opponent view, even from opposition participant view of the government is cracking down on the protest or they're even hiring. So call the Russian. A foreign agents over there to deal with them. No. And the government is also charging the protesters say some of them are from Israel for agents from other countries to stabilize the country to topple the government. But ultimately, it's really about economic issues folks, ample income tomb like many months ago, I was there. Basically imagine a situation where the bread is expensive. There's not enough supply of bread, which is the most important dilly supply for people's living in the middle of last month. There's the increase of the price of a loaf of bread from one pond as DJ oh lead, you Sudanese pond. Two three Gs three punts. So the the number is small, but but the percentage wise is huge like three hundred percent increase of the price. And also, the fuel prices were also increased so people. Not happy that obviously if you drive, and if you need to review your tank, it go to the gestation, usually there's a long land, and in some point of time biscuit, there's no supply of guests imagine the anger so lack of fuel lack of a Brad. And like actress ity people are obviously very happy with that. If you want withdraw some cash from the ATM's often ATM's, I empty every to the Bank. There's a limit like only five hundred SDG's allowed. So in such a situation. It's totally understandable, people not happy..

Sudanese government Sudan United States Mexico IMF International Monetary Fun Based Bank Brad SDG Bank Washington Israel twenty years twenty thirteen hundred sixtee three hundred percent seventy five percent fifty percent
"south sudan" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

13:02 min | 2 years ago

"south sudan" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"On Jan Johnson. Thanks. Is Ernie Brown on news. Now, your trending topics monitoring social media posts among our listeners in DFW these training topics right now, we start for training topic. Number three, not exactly a chamber of commerce moment for Facebook as a child bride was auctioned off the site. Oh, that's great good. Another another fine moment for Facebook. And other creative Beaumont that. I'm sure that Mark Zuckerberg thought would happen as he was putting Facebook together and his dorm room at Harvard. It was a sixteen year old girl in south Sudan. Some of those bidding were high ranking south Sudanese officials. I'm sure they were I have no problem believing that at all do you think in this exchange, and I have this answer. Okay. Is this a question they're asking story, but in the south Sudan, do you think you just exchange money when it comes to these type of transactions? I'm guessing there's a barter issue involved. Correct. The dad received five hundred cows. Three cars my God and ten thousand dollars. This is about a sad. Is it comes? That is the most pathetic thing. I've ever. Yeah. What do we have? Yeah. We have a beautiful sixteen year old girl. Let's let's auction her off for five hundred cows. And I'm sure people would tell me, well, it's a cultural thing, you know, what take your culture and stick it where the sun don't shine. That's disgrace another banner moment for Facebook. Wow. Yeah. They gotta be proud of that one Turney topic number two hover bikes are finally hears about time. But don't expect to get him on the cheap. Company out of California has been showing videos of this prototype of theirs for years. Now, I've seen it. Oh, yeah. This looks like it looks like a drone that has a seat on it with a motorcycle on kind of accept no wheels. It's a Quadra plane. Yeah. Guess how much it costs? I don't know hundred fifty big ones hundred fifty thousand that's a lot of money a lot for a bike that can only last twenty five minutes, but it can go sixty five miles per hour. And this is where it goes on comfortably high. It says it goes sixteen feet high. Yeah. That's a little too high. Sixty. That's a big fall. Go and sixty. That's a big fall. If you're just jumping. That's that's you're you're gonna break your leg. Yes. Sixteen feet going sixty. You're gonna die. Yeah. Game over. Yeah. I don't think I what if one of the and you got a picture, you know, what a drone looks like you got the four little four little rotors on it. Then they're spinning real fast that it keeps you balanced. What are those rotors goes down? Oh, one of the little engines goes Deanna, just you got to do something to say, I don't know if you can do that or not. Sure, you can I would imagine that it cannot hold you up on only three engines, you'll probably immediately hit the ground. Don't sixty miles per hour you'd face plant. This is the thing. You're no doubt and D bag neighbor purchase. Yeah. I don't I guy in the neighborhood. He you fear positive is white trash may own a car dealership out of those guys that guy he's buying these. Why would you pick out car dealerships? Just I say popped into my head day. All right. Well, there you go. Do you think do you think hover bikes if this is the only time I'm ever gonna get one if they can come up with an anti gravity thing? And I will get nobody's interested in these until they look like the hover boards and back to the future. And the second day make that everyone is in. Well, that's all we want. They've actually made the high seen that. But it doesn't look like the one on back to the future to. Well. No, you have it's it's is using his opposition, magnets, magnets. And then I wanted it looks like it has with dry ice has there's smoke coming out of it. That's probably catching on fire. I don't I don't know. I'm not sure, but you have to be you have to hope that wherever you're hover boarding on that that you're on your on a metallic surface that would attract or a magnet. If you get on the sidewalk, it's is gonna fall to the ground. See when I see those kids on those hover boards. You know? The there. Yeah. I know it's fake news. It really is. But those things just look like a death trap. Yeah. Like the second. I get on that I'm gonna lose my balance, and we're done with this is the problem with these lime scooters that were seeing outside the window. I got there's a big little stand of these lime scooters out near St Louis Brown manner. Now, I keep them everywhere. And looking at him and for me at one point in my life. I've gotten on one not thought twice. But now, I'm looking at it. I'm thinking, this is a death trap. This is this is a lure this is a Venus Flytrap, I'm the fly. I'm going to go in there and smelling the sweet, Honey. And I'm going to be eaten alive. I will guarantee. You. I face plant on a lot of couples tag team in one of those things really, you know, like Kevin a couple on a motorcycle. Can you do that with scooter? I wouldn't imagine it could hold your weight up. I mean one person would be enough. But I can't imagine put two on there. Okay. Yeah. Anyway, this is this is what's killing off those those bicycles anymore. They got rid of those. That didn't last long it really didn't last long. And I'm not sure why. Well, I think it's because of the scooter things you don't actually have to pedal. Just turn the thing that just does it for you. But I tell you what I'll leave the romaine lettuce of you'll hover bike both be entertained this program Bill, I decide who risk their life here. And I that. Topic number one. Football is being avoided by more young adults. They say it has to do with go figure concussion that's on America. So according to the national federation of state high school associations that is a dumb name it really long. What's see what's going on in f s h essay? Okay. I was hoping they accidentally spilled a profanity or something and didn't realize it the number of athletes played football has decreased by more than six percents two thousand nine that's a drop. A drop in seventy two thousand players. I can't believe that you know. I guess I shouldn't be surprised soccer has become a thing. Yeah. But soccer has more concussions. Yeah. I think what you're saying is fake news. You haven't heard what I've said yet. I said when soccer became a thing. Yeah. I kind of had a feeling that other sports. We're going to take a hit. Because of that soccer was not a thing. When I was a kid. You had a group of kids who played it. But it was never nobody paid any attention to it. It was kind of an offshoot little sport over here. Got like the biathlon. Yes. Your roller skate than you, BB gun something or ridiculous wrong. Nobody ever play is where you ski shoot. Okay. What? Which is one of the greatest sports this country has I've sure it is. But when soccer became a thing. It's not surprising. That people are suddenly pulling away from football. When I was a kid when we went to football games. A high school football games on Friday night. We had five six seven thousand people there. Now, you go the five six seven hundred people there, there's not drawing like it's not a big deal like at once football. Like, you said is not drawing, and it is in some schools. Not sure like south Lincoln Allen, they're doing just fine, but I played in high school basketball football. And although football, I think is more fun to play. I had way more fun bonding with my basketball team 'cause it's more intimate less players as you get to know each other better. Whereas in football during practice and stuff, you're not you're not a working together. Oh lines over here receivers over there. Then you just come together to play. But didn't you tell me though, that at flower mound, Marcus, you were the heart and soul of that team? You nailed it. And I would have best player hands down. I would have thought that they would have come to you lose your guidance. Yes. The long sap that they go to why I know. But no like, I think I think nowadays. And I think my doctor told me this, and I wish I would have listened to him. He said play a life sport golf, tennis, even basketball. Yeah. Things that you can play forever. You can always do a pickup basketball game. You certainly can play golf and tennis football. When you're done you're done. That's true. Mean you're never unless you're doing some weirdo adult tackle football league. Which people do? Yeah. That's it. I always think about that. When I'm watching like last year when I was watching the high school state championship game, you know, most of those kids they're not going to go. They will never put on pads ever. Again. This is in here we come down to the last second the last play. And this is the last time you're ever in your life. Yeah. Going to be on a football field in that kind of a position with pads on a team like that. By the way, I watch now. Religiously Fox Sports high school football with why am I going blank the guy who's always done it for FOX? He's the voice of the longhorns Craig way. Yeah. That show spent on since forever. Yes. On three hours. I y get to the cabin put it on. I knew you'd end up watching TV at the cabinet. I I knew there late at night. And that's all that's on. And they do such a great job of just covering everything from El Paso to long view. I mean, it really is just like you. And I talk about the show on channel three here that your buddies call the game they've done it forever. Yeah. Doug Anderson in ladera McLean. Yeah. The high school game of the week. They do an incredibly great. Yes. We really are. So lucky to be in an area that because when I played nobody was on TV ever except for the state championships. True. That was the only game that was on TV. Now, basically, the I guess everything from the quarterfinals on or something like that is on TV. And then every week the big rivalry games will be on channel twenty one or channel free. What have you and? Then Friday nights, I love Craig way. And they like I said they cover everything from north to south east to west in the state, which that's a lot of high school football. That man is the hardest working man in show business. I he is because then the next day is going to Austin or flying out to wherever. Yeah. To cover whoever to broadcast the game for them. But I will say football is just not what it used to be. It's clearly not you. And I talk about this all the time. I look at old footage of flower mound, Marcus games. They star would before that. Yeah. When they would play Lewisville rival battle the axe packed couldn't find a seat. Yeah. You watch Marcus Lewisville. Now, not even close. Maybe that's something. That's changed over time. Maybe the rivalries that once were a big deal. That's not withdraw change. Now. When flower mound high school was added to the area. Yeah. By the time. I left that was our biggest rivals no longer Lewisville. Yeah. It was when we played the flower mound Jaguars. So Dr released can change. But still nobody's going to games except for the parents seems like or unless you're team is dominant. Yeah. I wonder if there's too much to do I wonder I wonder if it means as much to kids, oh, we're playing there are hated rivals. I is a kid anymore. You think so what I'm in the middle of a game where the guy in Norway. Well, that and you could also argue that you know, let's say your generation you were maybe kind of talk to hate these people. And now we're all taught to hand. Now. Everybody's a winner. We're all more mature now. And you're like these guys are just like you. They just live over there. There's no difference. So nobody really hates each other anymore. We need to go back to hating each other. Okay. Oh, I think the world needs more hate. Yes. Yeah. The Jerry Lewis telethon used to be the world needs. Now is more hate more rivalries. More division. I preach division every day. We just never seen. Be able to. Make any progress on that. All right. Is that it trendy topics? All right. Thank God for that. All right. We have thanksgiving coming up here in a couple of days. There are some stories that are actually trumpeting the fact that we are not going to be open. I wonder if there's going to be a backlash that's next. Laura Ingram, lame lame duck. It seems like that's really going to be a bold faced and Attala. Is you're not gonna have the house in just a few weeks. You're going to be in the minority. Get this stuff done. Now, this has to be done. Until two on news and information, five seventy.

Football Facebook football soccer basketball south Sudan Marcus Lewisville flower mound high school Jan Johnson Mark Zuckerberg Ernie Brown Beaumont Lewisville national federation of state h DFW Laura Ingram California Harvard
"south sudan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"south sudan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Countries i defended identities the industrializing i think countries i messed realizing and this creates a great opportunity i mean manufacturing just contributed small portion of id africa and in because generally speaking but it creates opportunities for manufacturing plants that trying to export semons to congo to south sudan to create at to feed into this big construction boom that is happening around the continent so they put unity is that i think the free trade area agreement says ninety percent of products could get free access right and and a lot of these including agricultural products create opportunities for many people love there's a lady who's been sitting around us for quite a while throughout this morning and i'm looking at are now as he does some digging it the garden wherever you set and they wonder what is the need for hover briefly i should watch will system to benefit from this deal miss ladies walking under hotel in nice hotel that you guys have brought us to it at the sheriff only the bbc kind of thing but you know the fact that the bbc and come bring a team oh i don't know how many people come by and pay him and the victim just to be clear to people and pay for the savvy says of this eurotower and these feeds into high income you know she's able to get a job at the sheraton because shirt on is able to attract people like you to talk about issues like this area that is something that she's benefiting it's free trade in goods and services you have to recognize i mean countries like rhonda that i've actually had a big push to create a savage economy benefiting from this i've walked in run for a long time three years ago they didn't have the kind of sadness industry that they have you know having all these big conferences they're creating jobs for their people so it is an opportunity that israel it's the to live from kabul and from london as well and recruiting to discuss the benefits that will accrue to this new deal signed in kigali this week allen kosuge's there in kampala is nine forty in the morning that ben james in london where it's six four we're going to spend some time now though in nigeria we're going to return to the story of the abducted dabke girls taken from their school in yoga state by haram militants who've been covering it a great deal on.

south sudan bbc rhonda kabul kigali kampala ben james nigeria africa london allen kosuge dabke ninety percent three years
"south sudan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"south sudan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"One country unwell when people who will continue to be friends send brothers with you just pulled a 50year war against these people and now you're admitting to me that khartoum in essence has control over your key industry because of the pipeline his bill at transporting audible you the port sudan and we will continue to use that pipeline you know politics is politics we dissect lead by the people of sudan and south sudan where the needs to be there that's why we have the allies has two countries we at the cooperate so that we can transport doryan it is i cannot go to benefit the people of south sudan and the people of sudan and these are the speed that we had i cannot pushing all the bottom line minister when you desperately appeal for international investment in your overall oil and gas sector the big players like exxonmobil took tolunda others they look at what's happening on the ground they look at the chronic curators they look at the relationship with saddam they look at the failure to deliver on infrastructure any semblance of real governance in your country and they say we don't want any part of that it exited the opposite from he had i will be playing to pass plus matt might president general selfaccumulated last month in juba and that interested in blood b1 and b two we are discussing together was tunnel is a britishbased company a non stateowned oil company over wage how ashamed area click i am explicitly said last year that they were putting any ambitions they had in south sudan on hold because of the insecurity annual country it is the opposite i was the one who told them that we need to reach an agreement as soon as possible oil no you want them the question is do they want you what they won me i'm the one with oil him all the one where the oil and you can only produce a quarter what you did produce before by a vast amount of the revenue goes to the sudanese government your government is crippled in date i liked the smile but you've nothing to smile about by the way you are forgetting that cnpc the chinese a state owned company isi inside sudan patron us malaysian stateowned company lord agreement israel i i'm not getting around also very aware that when people look at.

sudan south sudan exxonmobil saddam juba sudanese government isi matt president 50year
"south sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"south sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"This is one of these countries that is kind of the result of colonial border drawing generations ago which was a norring ethnic realities was at fair to say oh absolutely yes essentially the two british put together two administrative regions for their own convenience which shared very little in terms of a historic coach at the north is a very arabic influence place a with cultural influences from egypt and the middleeast whereas the south is filled with a much will bantu influenced culture that the look south so if we think of the most desperate struggling falling apart countries libya syria iraq sudan a lot of their problems do go back to careless selfish colonial line drawing century go don't they oh absolutely i mean i i think a lot of these places are are living through the consequences of decisions that will meda a long time ago so now we have this bold little country breaking away from the majority of the sudan because they are ethnically different and they have an affinity for shakespeare you know i would imagine you can take some of the themes of shakespeare's great plays swap out a few of them proper nouns and have something that provides for a communal identity is is that actually a part of shakespeare's purpose in south sudan is just helping people relate to the struggles they've had with colonial overlords just like combating forces did centuries ago in shakespeare's plays yes at one of the extraordinary things about this translation of of cymbeline which is really not very well known shakespeare play it's one of the the greatest hits was not only it's a story about the formation of british identity as britain's separates from the roman empire acid it's a story of rebellion the british rebellion against the roman empire so it's really a story that thinks about the violence of war and national identity and and and the relationship between the two but in putting this play on it was also beat an experience which allow.

egypt sudan shakespeare britain libya syria iraq
"south sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"south sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Dependence from the rest of the country in two thousand eleven and as one of the first acts as a country south sudan sent a shakespeare play performed by a troop from their capital juba to the globe the globe festival in london in 2012 having spent years looking at the meaning of the mixture between politics and history and culture through the lens of shakespeare in east africa i i was dying to see this happening in real time in the world's newest nation in south sudan so i i went out to meet the man who who translated cymbeline into ajuba arabic so you traveled to south sudan to researcher book normal tourist okuda south sudan do they were what did you find what was the like going there what does it take to go there yeah it was it was a pretty unusual experience in the south sudanese embassy was just a a rented office space in account of regional part of london and pretty much everyone else going was an aid worker or someone working for an embassy or a an ngo so when i got there there was almost no provision for tourists in order to be allowed in the country nor to get a visa you had to book into a tourist hotel but the tourist hotel was essentially a shipping containers uh with beds and air conditioning and satellite tv inside them again you'd have largely catering to to people who were there working for aid agencies and and development agencies so it certainly wasn't set up for your average tourist and you know juba is a town with very little infrastructure very few buildings more than a story toll one paved road and the the wounds from the civil war which had been being fought between the north and the south for decades were still very fresh in fact the only place you could buy a souvenir was a local croft project in which women who had suffered sexual violence during the civil wars made kroft products to be sold on and you wrote about how is actually in spite of how desperately poor the country is.

juba london real time sudan civil war researcher
"south sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"south sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Spirit cambridge he returned to east africa to explore how the writings of william shakespeare paid a defining role in the region from colonial times to the process of establishing new nations his travels included a stop in juba the capital of south sudan it's the world's newest nation born out of decades of civil war but whose challenges are far from over edward outlines what he found in his book shakespeare in swaziland edward wilson lee thanks for joining us thanks for having me on wrecked so tell us a little bit about your love of shakespeare in your connection with east africa so i grew up in east africa i went to boarding school in switzerland and then university in the united kingdom i fell in love with shakespeare during my teenage years nenette university in ended up teach in that but i didn't think until i stumbled upon the beginnings of this project that i'd be able to connect these two parts of my life growing up in east africa but um i found the beginnings of the project in this one of the earliest text presidents while he was a lation of charles and mary lambs tales from shakespeare so i went out to east africa to zanzibar to research that and just found from there that was a threat i could talk at an stories just kept coming and coming and it covers read the whole history of eastern africa from the mid nineteenthcentury to the present day in an has just an endless cost of colorful characters involved in it in your your book shakespeare in swaziland his reference to the language that spoken through most of east africa and sudan just barely makes that terrain talk about uh just briefly to set the stage the story of south sudan it's been in the news in the last decade yes o south sudan historically because of how the british divided the region up during colonial period and afterwards had been part of a single country with what is now just known as sued on but the northern part of the country is a very arabic influence an arabicspeaking nation whereas the southern part is much more bantu hsieh's much more with the countries to itself so the south sudan declared in.

cambridge civil war switzerland africa swaziland hsieh south sudan east africa william shakespeare edward wilson lee mary zanzibar
"south sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"south sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"After five years travelling overland to every country in africa francis tap on has some amazing stories when i told them i wanted to go there and drive across had no way you're you're going through a war zone basically coming up we'll find out what kind of journey he ha fit balanced my car on fixing canoe when edward wilson lee went to south sudan he found that a local shakespeare production has had a big part to play in establishing their new nation it was an experience which allowed a lot of different south sudanese tribes who had never been able to participate in any kind of joint activity as a nation to come on stage and to do something together in here why the region of normandy as one of the favoured countryside getaways in france you see cows everywhere happy cows so we have lots of cheese an epic journey across africa finding shakespeare in south sudan and the pleasures of normandy it'll just ahead on travel with rick steep it's a favorite we can get away from pierce in the region comes complete with great scenery important historical sites and its own tasty specialties we'll explore what makes normandy such a great destination a little later in the hour ahead on today's travel with rick steve's and adventure traveler and filmmaker francis on checks in with us from the end of the road in egypt he's just completed his fiveyear long quest to visit every one of the fifty four countries in africa has joins us from luxor where he's been celebrating with a cruise on the nile in just a bit first let's explore how shakespeare's been playing a role in the decolonisation of africa as the new nation of south sudan forges its own identity we're joined now by an english literature professor who found that all the world love shakespeare even in africa's newest nations he grew up in kenya with american and british parents who worked as conservationists there today edward wilson lius a professor of literature who teaches shake.

france sudan rick steve francis luxor english literature professor kenya professor edward wilson lee normandy africa shakespeare edward wilson lius five years fiveyear
"south sudan" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"south sudan" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"Civil war is emptying huge swaths of south sudan the violence has uprooted four million people including two million who fled to neighboring countries in the last year more than a million south sudanese have poured into northern uganda alone crossing makeshift bridges like this one to flee fighting hunger and brutal attacks on civilians dis contribued fighting british rule midafternoon disputed our properties to defraud when similar pies family went to one of the refugee camps initially he stayed behind to look after the families most precious commodity their cattle he hit for a year to escape the violence the refugees carry whatever they can salvage mattresses parts clothes note folks remnants of once peaceful lives turned upside down pat's checkpoints ugandan soldiers searched their belongings for weapons before the refugees proceed to reception centres after entering uganda the refugees sign in a smaller way stations for many it's the first night spending safety after walking for days to escape fighting levy etiquette fled with his wife and four children new did not run aground sort started we lead under a tree with the former because there was nowhere else to hard we waited for the forty two style and then we gotta started walk into your garden uganda now shoulders most of the burden of africa's biggest refugee crisis managing a constellation of camps which require food water health care and policing at in that be camp now home to more than one hundred twenty thousand south sudanese new arrivals receive vaccinations hot meals and basic items such as seoul and plastic tarps to build a house the government also gives each refugee families a small plot of land about a twentieth of an acre where they can build attend shelter and grow crops to eat or cell but the land often proves to rocky for farming after completing the registration process the new arrivals will receive their plot of land.

Civil war sudan uganda pat seoul africa
"south sudan" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"south sudan" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Country particularly theo pia we were noticing that a lotta doctors were there are more ethiopian doctors outside of ethiopia the inside he said were more wet ethiopian doctor right in botswana even in washing revelling in los angeles yes washington dc so the issue countries what do you do and so we learn from the us program emts and had a do basic ent work and having basic healthcare providers in so they're low low cost a lot of contributions and private sector support and so that helps to address a lot of the basic maternity and melody issues donald model with acting assistant secretary of state when we had a hearing the uh the deputy secretary testified before the full committee regarding the state department's redesigned plan which really seems like it's a mess i mean you might be able to talk about that all of the combination of programs but in particular i asked about uh especially i shall on boy uh specifically the south sudan and the deputy secretary thought that the special envoy was uh put in statute by congress and that's not the case apparently so what we have been told is is that um the department of state believes that the responsibile these can be administratively realigned to be covered by the dass within the bureau of african affairs and so i wanna know if you can provide additional details about the dash that will cover this in how we think especially given you know again i mean it's the shortsightedness so we pass close to a billion dollars for family and then we remove the special envoy to south sudan it's it's so from your travels in visit to the region uc see very much the the promise denali one point three million refugees from south sudan going to gone down other problems what we've done on the front the decision made by secretary is that we have the on void back into the bureau and so we still have those f to eat position so in other words the the positions so we wanna do is is really kind of refocus and we've been coordinating with ap threes in our donor colleagues particularly the special rats.

theo pia ethiopia botswana los angeles healthcare providers deputy secretary south sudan congress washington us donald model acting assistant secretary department of state bureau of african affairs billion dollars
"south sudan" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:13 min | 4 years ago

"south sudan" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The best of my knowledge i mean maybe maybe you know chris hedges there's somebody like him who's like you know kind of the thinking globally but you know i i don't see anything in the media that his connecting the dots on china is expanding all over the world when i was in south sudan with ellen rat or china's all over africa we saw we saw chinese business people you know cutting deals naga we we saw the met met some of them in a can kenya we stayed overnight roby in juba in the capital city of south sudan uh you know one of the poorest countries in the world but right in the middle of africa right in the middle of the continent there and the northern part of the continent and end early north central whatever and and there's a lot of resources i mean south sudan has oil norwegians are metering it and the chinese are buying it and and you know they're the chinese are doing right now in a very careful steady methodical way what the united states did added more of a blundering gunboat diplomacy way back one hundred twenty years ago of of basically finding undeveloped countries are underdeveloped countries underdeveloped as a weird worded it's ingests the country should be developed and and that's a whole 'nother topic i suppose but in any case we found these guys we go to guatemala honduras or hawaii even modern twenty years ago the united fruit dole go to hawaii go to go to honduras or go to el salvador whatever and and basically buy a bunch of land and mynatt if there's men roles or grow things if it's a good good decent soil and use local cheap labor and basically you know extract wealth from the country this was a major piece of us foreign policy for the better part of otter deers and arguably do as a to a certain extent still lives well it is virtually the entire focus of china's foreign policy where it only they're doing it a whole lot more smart than we did i mean we went in and we said give us your stuff a real blow you up or we bribed the the the senior leadership you know we put we put people.

chris hedges china ellen rat juba south sudan united states honduras hawaii foreign policy africa kenya sudan africa guatemala el salvador one hundred twenty years twenty years
"south sudan" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"south sudan" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"And the quality of your diplomacy is undoubtedly matta's you set the benchmark full global attitudes and engagement peep everyone else wants to know where the americans on issue abc and if there isn't a position then that creates a vacuum and that's the danger davila's the the the fact that there aren't assistant secretary of state for africa the moment means that where where is the american position on the south sudan rent rent question and i know that the new administration has said national security is gonna be the defining driver so the dangerous at somewhere like south sudan doesn't qualify because in the end quote unquote who cares what happens is ousted on as the danger if they're not national security justification my point would be that the implosion of one paul the world in the end is going to spread and as nld african saying if your neighbors house is on fire your house on fire and ina if you believe the world's global village than fire spreads and it's a stretch to say national security from south sudan comes to the us but the northeast nigeria boko haram or affiliated to dash the isis and so you've got a more direct link nasimul say will why should we care what goes on with is not here well there's a strategic interest not just a moral interest nothing that diplomacy will leave a vacuum if if it's if if their own people to who are experts in rabaul to to do and america does matter because the european external action service is building up slowly is building up has not yet there to be the anchor in places like us on saddam and i think that it really does matter the america texas diplomacy seriously and there's this mattis quote which i'm sure you've said if you don't spend on diplomacy i have to spend more and bullets ray and he's basically right you think we listen to him.

matta davila sudan us rabaul saddam america assistant secretary africa south sudan texas
"south sudan" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:17 min | 4 years ago

"south sudan" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"United states and china so if you do both well you can get good results and indeed president trump did suggest there was a possibility in the future that the us would return though that wasn't his base case i think if i can just trump in one second told me that that david said about ta characterizing our french friends comment about what the united states was doing i wouldn't say that governors mayors companies in the united states aren't treating their engaging many of them are in the case of climate living up to the target set by that in doing it for good business reasons good political reasons to protect the in the air and the the water and the planet that they care a lot about so i i think we spent so much time on shows like this and everywhere else talking about the current administration with good reason i think it's important we don't lose sight of the progress happening and other place and david in terms of the g twenty meeting at the weekend jude wrote going into it that the g twenty was set up to address pressing growing problems and the refugee crisis was crying out for such leadership did the refugee crisis received that leadership of the weekend from the g twenty in a very limited form those important german initiative in respect of aid for africa is important is massively on the funded their full famines that have threatened in africa the moment in south sudan somalia of northeast nigeria and yemen mhsaa quinn africa but four famines the for the first time the un said it's the worst humanitarian catastrophe of for sixers sixers i'm and was interesting is that these famines the products of lack of food but of political divisions and conflict is rule ooh that's producing the conditions that mean that people don't have access to food than able to grow crops and people in humanitarian in fashion sharetsky committee cone region there's an important g twenty initiative around support for africa if you compare the scale of the german initiative to the scale of the marshall plan off the munching 45 off to the second world war there's no comparison related takes american engagement to really turn what could be a marginal initiative into some is really going to power for.

United states china trump david jude somalia nigeria yemen un marshall plan world war president africa sudan northeast sixers one second
"south sudan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"south sudan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Owners is is is very strong and the the opposition is no longer just riak machar it's also broken into other groups and so it's become a lot more complicated than it was before going backwards is not really an option it's about going forward now in terms of where we go to in a piece of green are you talking too much on yourself personally not my my offside in it who's risk is the on voice for sudan and south sudan has been down the speak with him about five six weeks ago nuts i'll pick up on south sudanese politics leaked let's just think deeply about the way you handle your mission the mandate it's fundamentally changed in 2013 it was all about very ambitious plans to help the formation of the new state to help build a civil society of functioning democracy that's what the un appeared the believe could be done in south sudan in the last couple of years much more focus on that you court core job of protecting civilians in a time of terrible civil strife the problem as your forces do not appear to be able to do that job palm a because to quote one un official in south sudan admittedly anonymous said the truth is no one wants to die for south sudan in the on this the the un force and that is a brutal truth isn't it will nobody wants to die and i don't want anybody to die let's let's get that absolutely clear no he's done what i made the point forces when it pushes come to shove whether it be in that terrible incident in juba last year when your forces stood by as government fogs went around camps killing not just liens but ngo workers as well you're forces stood by in another case in a note a different camp in 2015 as civilians were killed.

south sudan un official juba five six weeks