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Parents!

The Past and the Curious

03:37 min | 5 d ago

Parents!

"Exploration is dangerous work. There are unknowns challenging landscapes severe weather to contend with, and that's just the tip of the iceberg at extreme locations or just factual, non metaphorical icebergs and everything gets much more difficult. Early. Expeditions to the Arctic and Antarctic circles near the north and South Poles were some of the most incredible undertakings in history. Of course there were plenty of failures, but every time someone tried. It helps the people who came after. Learn a little bit more. By the early nineteen hundreds several different parties from many different places had succeeded in exploring the frigid areas and returning to tell the tale. Eight! Adele Tuck was born not too far from this brutal cold, She I opened her eyes in eighteen ninety in Alaska, not far from the city of nome, which is on the West Central Coast at one time. Alaska was known to Americans as seward's folly because Secretary of State William, seward purchased the land from Russia for seven million dollars in eighteen, sixty seven. People thought it was a terrible mistake and a waste of money, but when golden were discovered, there seward was like who's laughing now y'all seward's folly more like seward's stroke of genius that you all were super wrong about L. K. man. We get it. Anyway Alaska would still not even become an official US territory until Ada was a teenager, she was initiate one of the indigenous groups of people native to land. But growing up, she never learned the survival ways and traditions of her tribe. She was raised by missionaries people who moved to the area to set up a school in order to convert people to their religion. It's a circumstance that happened to many native Americans and as a result, many traditions were lost for generations some forever. In school eight learned to read and write English read the Bible and learned cooking and other domestic skills, the reading and writing served her well, but as you might have guessed in a story about exploration, these domestic skills would not go near as far in helping her as more traditional skills like hunting, tracking and survival might have. As a young adult! Sixteen! She married a man named Jack Black. Jiang. Yep. You heard that, right? Jack Black Jack. No. He was not a cartoon outlaw, nor was he a professional poker player. He was a dog musher hauling freight across Alaska on a sled pulled by dogs. Together! They had three kids. Sadly, only one survived a boy named Bennett. But one day, Jack Blackjack left the family high and dry. Up and left her in the middle of nowhere which in Frigid Alaska can be a pretty serious predicament. Though he was not the greatest of guys she did keep his greatest of names and earned her future fame as Ada blackjack. When Jack blackjack deserted her. She was forty miles from their home in known, and she and Ben Walked the entire way back in the bitter Alaskan cold to make matters worse than it was very sick with burke. And infection of the lungs, so ada quite a small woman carried the boy much of the way.

Alaska Seward Jack Black Jack ADA Jack Blackjack Jack Black Adele Tuck Ben Walked Russia Nome West Central Coast Burke Bennett L. K.
What's next for Solar Orbiter after its historic launch to the sun

BrainStuff

03:35 min | 3 months ago

What's next for Solar Orbiter after its historic launch to the sun

"Hey brain stuff lauren. Boban here a newly launched spacecraft promises to broaden our understanding of the sun called solar orbiter or the Solo for short it left Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Central Florida on Sunday February. Ninth at three PM. The new probes part of an international collaboration between NASA and the European Space Agency or ESA both parties contributed to its arsenal of scientific instruments. Some of these gadgets will remotely image the Sun It's atmosphere and the materials it spews forth others are built to keep tabs on the spacecraft's immediate surroundings during the wee hours of February tenth. Two Thousand Twenty European Space Operation Center in Darmstadt Germany got a signal confirming the orbiter's on board solar panels were functioning correctly so begins a seven year plan mission the orbiter is supposed to take to paraphrase. Robert Frost the route less traveled. You see all the planets in our solar system revolve around the sun on the same General Plane. Give or take a few degrees called the ecliptic plane. It's like a giant invisible disk a one that very nearly lines up with Sun's equator most of our space fearing devices are gravitationally confined to this plane but the so low is meant to escape it by exploiting the gravity of Earth and Venus the probe will orbit the sun on a unique and tilted pathway. This unique trajectory will give the solo twenty two close approaches to the Sun as close as twenty six million miles or thirty five million kilometers as well as bringing it within the orbit of Mercury to study the sun's influence on space. It will also give the solo the chance to do something no craft has ever done before take pictures of the solar polls looking down from above or up from below just like Earth. The Sun has a north and South Pole in two thousand eighteen the ESA used data from the probe to satellite trying to determine what the northern pole looks like. But probe to couldn't photograph this region directly. If all goes according to plan the solo will do just that. It's I close pass by. The Sun will be twenty twenty at about a third the distance from the Sun to Earth. And that's just the beginning. Another mission involves SOLO PARTNERING UP WITH BE Parker Solar probe launched in two thousand eighteen. This space craft is able to fly much closer to the sun and the solo ever will comparing the feedback from both probes. Ought to tell us. A great deal about the mysterious phenomenon called solar wind which are streams of charged particles. Any color pictures that the solo gives us should provide relevant insights to the sun's polar probably have a big effect on its atmosphere as a whole along with the winds unleashes. The Solos unique travel plans will put it in contact with intense heat and extreme cold. The new probe is going to revolve around the Sun. Very long very narrow oval shaped orbit as it nears the Star. Things will get rather toasty. And that's why designers fitted solar orbiter with reflective heat shield coated in titanium foil according to NASA this shield stand temperatures as high as nine hundred seventy degrees Fahrenheit or five hundred and twenty degrees Celsius. It's also got

SUN Twenty European Space Operatio Nasa General Plane Cape Canaveral Air Force Stati ESA Central Florida Lauren European Space Agency Robert Frost Germany South Pole
"south pole" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

Atheist Nomads

02:10 min | 3 months ago

"south pole" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

"The South Pole? I did not now. You're you're pretty much just base personnel right. Yep and after hearing the stories of people from poll. I don't think I WANNA go. Oh really got off a cold. There are well. Yeah but you're already like so freaking cold. How does get the average temperature in the summer? There is in the summer is like native twenty-five negative thirty okay and then in the winter you can hit native sixteen nine negative seventy. That sucks right. You're where you're at is basically sea level Yup and seven hundred miles north of the South Pole whereas the South Pole station is like eight thousand feet above sea level literally on the poll that Oh wow I didn't realize it was that high on two miles of ice. That's awesome so more like ten thousand feet. Yeah Oh that's like nine ninety seven hundred feet something like that noise. Wow that'd be frigging that'd be cold in a temperate region. Yeah wow what's interesting is at the South Pole. Hardly get any real wind because of the way that the Polar weather works. The wind comes down at the poll from the atmosphere right so brings cold air. But it's moving very fast. It's only when it passes the Transit Antarctic granges when it picks up speed. Oh as it's going across the plateaus it picks up speed interesting. Yeah so we'd have fifty sixty wins in the polls got like seven. I hate you guys. You know. But they're still colder fifty sixty knot winds so we're talking like hurricane force. You know because not a big deal. Fifty knots really liking it. It's pretty windy out right. And what was your job like? They're so I'm electricity. There and our job was to make sure that things didn't break got fixed when they broke our.

South Pole South Pole station
"south pole" Discussed on FT News

FT News

03:21 min | 4 months ago

"south pole" Discussed on FT News

"Lot. More people visiting Antarctica as tourists rather than scientists. Did your trip tell you anything about the way? The continent and it silence a responding to the influx of tourists. And how that needs to be managed. I did see a couple of big cruise vessels while I was down there. And there's a lot more ice capable cruise ships under construction. So there's just been real explosion in tourism numbers this season this season being November Twenty nineteen through March twenty twenty. There's about a forty percent increase in tourist just from the previous year. I think that when it comes to governance of Antarctica it's not only tourism. That's a challenge. There's also fishing and there's also resources there. There could be oil or coal under the sea and the combination of tourism fishing and a region. That's becoming more accessible as the ice retreats basically just means that. There's a lot more pressure on the area so geopolitically how do you think it should be managed in future? Ooh That's a big question. Well it is managed by the Antarctic Treaty System which is in place and we'll be placed for a long time and the Antarctic Treaty which was signed in Nineteen fifty-nine by all the countries that lay claim to Antarctica. Essentially was a bit of a truce. They said the dedicate this continent to peace and science. No one will do any military exercises on it. No country will assert or expand its claim so everyone agreed to just get along and that's more or less worked out pretty well over the last sixty years but it's becoming harder and harder perhaps to have really hard and fast rules like should there be a firm cap on the number of tourists that visit into each year. That's one of the really hot questions right now and the Antarctic Treaty doesn't really have enough teeth to implement that type of really strict rule. So there's some questions that have arising about whether the Antarctic Treaty is fit for purpose for now. It's still sort of more or less working. I like to end by going back to your own personal impressions. What was the strongest feeling? You have in retrospect about the trip I think my strongest takeaway is that. Antarctica is a continent that never had an indigenous human population. And perhaps it ought to stay that way. It felt like a place where the human presence. It's a real imposition first of all. Because you can't really survive there unless you're inside. Some sort of highly insulated building or insulated bowed or inside. A you know a boat suit so it's the closest. I will probably ever experienced in my life to being on the mooner on Mars and having been there which was a real privilege. I can't say I'm eager to go back. Thank you Leslie. And we'll play out with some of the non human sounds from the penguins that you recorded on the trip. We'll put a link to Leslie's magazine Article. In our show notes and remember if you missed our recent episodes on the Gulf oil money flowing into sport Iran's flawed elections or Donald Trump's interference in the US judicial system. You can subscribe and listen on all the usual podcast platforms.

Antarctica Leslie Donald Trump US Iran
NASA is hiring new astronauts to go to the moon

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 4 months ago

NASA is hiring new astronauts to go to the moon

"Ten weather here's your chance everybody to prove you have the right stuff and no we're not talking about auditions for the new kids NASA started accepting applications today for their next class of astronaut they say they want to get to the South Pole of the moon by the year twenty twenty four and for the first time they want to trip the trip to include a woman those interested need to be an American citizen have an advanced degree in a stem field and at least two years of quote related professional

Nasa
Josh Taylor Links Up With Ben Davison After McGuigan Split

TKO with Carl Frampton

14:04 min | 4 months ago

Josh Taylor Links Up With Ben Davison After McGuigan Split

"Take a call off. Imagine this week for Especially very pleased to welcome to the show. Just could thank you yet we give. Thanks for joining like price-fixing more this is about. We're not seeing you guys phones. Justin comes first because you've adds an amazing eighteen months class equation for. Why did you leave safe home? Promotion Day just. They actually going to do that yet. My first congratulations on amazing. Twelve months you sit in the unified. Wbrc F ring magazine Super Low in the world. I imagine that still a bit weird area sounds good for years. Since oh boy dreaming become chopping. Never for a minute margin that'd be unified in Ring Ring magazine a something. Just dreams of dreams come true but I never met for rain magazine. World champion the rocky. Bill uncle is just amazing. Everybody of Bell. It's just been like superstars of this book. You know not just from prison in Scotland Jo. Say is crazy. Yeah ever start. They're like you've added. Obviously. Don't concedes things that happened outside the ring of Split with Wiggins Cam but the show has to go on and oversee you have responsibilities multiple belt holder one of them being humanitary challenges and from the touristy strict on those you've been ordered by the bathroom ready to defend the thing so they was pressuring you regardless of of the split actually find a China but general new maneuver was WANNA go anywhere. How to for a long time and a new team? That was going to be leaving Shane. Mcguigan jus just was very unhappy. First choice was so an. We've come over one hundred weeks trial and a and Dubai enough. The second session was fluent. You know just can click new. Wanted to to go stray away but in a book and a week rather than other booth as well with what to do to make up their name. After about Bannon I come here. I just think in the spelt just jail. Because obviously trains Billie Joe Israel on La Custodial his speed and combination and food work. You know so. I thought it'd be a good match up and feel comfortable in annex eight further. She hopes I was glad. You Want Obama. Wilton it over the of the war you were going to go to Uber doing recession with with autumn trial as well. I just think that ban status John is more suited. Do not take anything away from on Burke's coach but a lot of failures have a certain standard yeah. I don't think you'd better. Yeah but I'm not no automatic coaches. Well it was. It was very good. I haven't been seeing similar things you need to do. A Walk Cohen again was sort of shoulder stale. And it just wasn't my style until you go rape a couple of teams a job and stuff fell real good but just two different from Aachen and style and billy Joel and South Pole and seeking combination fast punches with good feet walk so under the weakening going to stay in the second week. I'm going to train here. This is what I'm going to go. We'll Ben Weapons. Take out. Congratulations on this new partnership. Also want to say a big congratulations for the weekend. Because of course you're in the Corden last by that but I think anybody watching these knows anything about. Boxing understands the totally invaluable contribution that you made progress and twice in achieved on Saturday night and so low you for from us. Congratulations must be a great fien. Yeah of course you know tossing a fringe as well when Keep putting these right because it does simply bow down to that just because I'm not financially benefiting from a situation doesn't mean he's not my friend anymore. I've always the French. It was completely fake. And of course I wanted to win an annuity to do good number because fame to be able to do what he done. That tops fifty percent in the I knew it was gonna be. What are they now? He's going to be as dominant as that news going to dominate and get good win. We'll come on to that because I know you toss fury fantasy. We'll come into the fight. Second offer the show for those of you watching and listening. We don't often hear about the side of the train is experienced. When there's a split with the fights over they retire or whether you part ways Tyson. Speaking stay co about the void that was left when Belgium hung them up last year. And how that's been a big adjustment period for him over the last twelve months for you. Obviously we've talked for years and years and years but journey was so intense and so hands on and so committed from both of your sides that when that comes through in our magin takes a bit of adjusting for us. Well Yeah of course. She knows it was a twenty four seven job literally twenty four seven three hundred sixty five days a year so it took up a Omar. Tom The last couple of years and I was walking again. We believe in being contacted about the judge situation as well and it was. Actually that wasn't nice to part ways we talked and it was nice to have a little bit of towns myself over the Christmas period as well because for the last three years. Christmas is both days all of that of always been away so it was Nice Avenue bad time to myself as well call you know yourself. You're in a similar situation to Josh where he left the train. But you're the peak of your career. So uconn yeah. We see prospects changing coaches nearly stages of their careers trying to work out. What's best for them? But at this stage of your career when you're changing trainers there's very low margin for error because you're essentially going into big fight off the big fight. There's no easy ones from from this point and the stakes. Obviously a high they she if you particularly and I know you had the same when you left and found. Jamie more you have to fit that has to be has to be someone that you work well with and you agree with their methods and their approach to Faden and the approach they take to fight and training camps and everything else and even just as well so I had a few trainers in mind when I when I joined Jimmy Mira when I left the mcguigan. Sorry Jimmy was the first one that I want on. It just felt a real quick and someone. I didn't do the Josh John Was. He went to show morale's I really. I felt like a fitted in well not jim elect. Jimmy was saying and that was enough for me maybe another two or three guys and manned and everything's a lot of contacting a member of the thing that just just well Jimmy. You obviously need that time to Joe did you. Fought for the Horatio Garcia. I'll say the thing short camp and the approach gender did for a faith and I had six weeks and it wasn't like wasn't forced and the woman felt like the right decision for me to make but it was fast approaching my return defect and again. I knew I needed a coach as well so it was kind of half blood that he was the first guy. Because maybe if I'd have went with someone else with a short space of time I made a one of them because I was getting close. The approaching afraid of in my head. Peter has one solace was one because he was given. Hey and autumn booth was in my head as well as a potential trainer but gave me was the first one to. I'm glad that by the time he then had to build towards the thought. You need that nine months together to Joe was a pairing the two big Of You guys will have the same thing when you come to. Maybe that fight with Ramirez. If he's later this year were next year so in it in a sense. Who's this happened? On some of that you've been mandated for these fights. The ones that you want to have as your first one together. Because you don't really ben one walk into a fight with Joseph Ramirez after you know working with someone for for fourteen sixteen weeks yet your son degree but I feel like she's a similar character to us. Latino Arkansas of quickly understand what type of person he is emotionally how he's mentally and you can see in the build up to previous fought speak fuzzy's had how approaches those flights in that mine and stylistically. I understanding on the standard shrimps on the season. He's the level of far to where you can make adjustments. And of course you can improve them. I do believe even without those adjustments. He's good enough to beat Ramirez in my opinion. Okay but I mean the criticism that you had when you first came on the scene was always baseness your age and your relative inexperience coach and obviously ninety nine percent of thousands. Of course after that I say while to fight for you was the way the Ben led the corner that night and the call. Mri showed on the the highest lakes possible. Was that one of the things that made you think he could guide meter in these big before. It was so a clips trained Tyson. An over the belly. Joe's will stay there. Were walking on the combinations of movement head movement and the speed and the feet were really similar that we can boxing can train. You know. So he's going to move up. Can I WANNA go with an officer? The Way Komo boat and then you hear his vase in the corner breaks the FE and just this knowledge of this book is broken these on the twenty seven. Yeah SMARTS WAY I. How actually apologized when he billy Joel was an was fighting. Someone in eastern. And you're in the corner and it was the first real appearance from you. Remember thinking it was a bad reform from billy Joel but remember thinking urgency in the corner but enhance sake. We nine Billie Joe wasn't fed and there was no word because every fucking if you'd have been too on top on the corner of Blue Gosden. Yeah you may have lost a fake. I have apologize for for what would be joe quite a few years before that and new obviously spend that training camp with him along with Jimmy Tibbs couple of weeks before five ways we Jimmy and I knew what was in the tank and I knew that we had to efficient in getting around management was very in Poland. Now what might be Joe take some out take and I know what doesn't so I knew when to push him on because the bill judge J fogg told him you'll stay around he was gonNA thank you ever to win the next round. We couldn't afford to do that. She was just about around. I think people always associate age of experience but I was lucky enough to spend time around people Jimmy Tubes and very knowledgeable guys which I gained a hell of a lot from a non round management. They something picks up from Jimmy tibbs unquote. That's the best about will the faces a new face on the managing high profile fights is that had it been Jimmy Tibbs in the corner. People would've assumed they obviously there's something going on with because it's you the first people reach for is does this guy know is doing and they look at your age and then say that's the about faces of training. I would like to think the performances in the corner over the last couple of years of giving people realize the what you're about the same as forty one performance and people jump on until fully. Understand that it's the same for everybody and anybody in high high profile situation. There's going to be downstairs. This'll your options for this year. And so this apponaug on some who's been mandated by the whole hangs told me there's there's no much online a couple of eight and it's only a few Ranjha so it does vary toll but it looks like he punched his heart but very wailed in so it raw keith. My on the ball. Nothing I don't think I can handle and I'm sure we'll get him and it's GonNa be if Shedu lineup is going to potentially a week or two before Pasta and Ramirez do you think about what's Outgo. Yeah it'd be for going and build for Boeing and I am to life and then pick up tips and hopefully put myself a fight after the end result and get myself a fight for their unification of the belts. It's good to be there as well as trying to make and just to be present. Boca players and people started talking about the more that Josh and say. I don't even know manufacturer with Sixteen Sixteen years. He's been completely undisputed author. Maybe a teen fakes. Yeah on real. It will take a little bit affirm- playing out. Because they're oversee mandate she's on both sides. Wbz will be cool next the winner of Possum Ramirez the WBO. I think we'll be called. Tau Closest amount in your Camp Castro. Do feel like he's been mandatory since time began and he's been waiting very patiently for quite recently sunny front war and said in an interview that John Wooden necessarily step aside. Fay So would mean that. Potentially you'd have to face. He would have faced winner. Puzzle Ramirez Wbai Mandatory. Which could be Whitson? If you Kinda plan this out and you're listening to oversee. Ideally I'd WanNa go forth Ramirez fake and obviously Kado take a step back and make the shot for all the marbles but please you know Jack Jack. Idaho's wait that long thing for today's short has been mandatory for a good while. No so is Joe. Short so happens I then so be it. They don't have to Ma other mandatory against a written or someone you know so I'm about what we goes day. I'm confident in every single.

Billie Joe Joseph Ramirez Josh John Jimmy Billy Joel Jimmy Tibbs Tyson Ring Ring Magazine Billie Joe Israel Bill Uncle Ramirez Wbai Boxing Rain Magazine Justin Dubai Barack Obama John Wooden Mcguigan Jimmy Tubes
NASA's Artemis program will return astronauts to the moon and give us the first female moonwalker by 2024

Innovation Now

01:16 min | 4 months ago

NASA's Artemis program will return astronauts to the moon and give us the first female moonwalker by 2024

"Was the twin sister of Apollo and goddess of the Moon in Greek mythology now artemis is the name of NASA's program to return astronauts to the lunar surface by twenty twenty four. This is innovation now when we land American astronauts on the moon again the first woman and next man will step foot where no one has been before the Moon's South Pole working with US companies and international partners NASA will push the boundaries of human exploration as a result of artists NASA will be able to establish a sustainable human presence on the moon just as Apollo inspired a generation fifty years ago. Artists will serve as an example of what humanity can do when it comes together to achieve a common goal. The moon is a treasure chest of science. Water is that may be held in the polls represents fuel and a source of power lessons we can learn about using local resources will help us prepare for exploration to farther locations and with NASA's goal of sending humans to Mars. Artists is the first step to the next era of

Nasa Apollo United States
U.S. on track for warmest winter on record

KCBS Radio Weekend News

02:37 min | 4 months ago

U.S. on track for warmest winter on record

"Well there are concerns that we are on track to have one of the warmest winters in recorded history the national oceanic and atmospheric administration now says this past January was the hottest since record keeping began one hundred forty one years ago for more we're joined now on the KCBS ring central news line by doctor Patrick and solace climate change scientist at UC Berkeley thank you so much for taking the time to talk to us do you think we're on track for the warmest winter on record this analysis from the national oceanic and atmospheric administration shows that January temperatures without the hottest in the hundred forty when your record and this month was actually for on the highest a departure from average ever and it's too early to say we still have two months left in winter but this is a hot start to winter twenty twenty so let's break down what this means is when we say that January was is with this past January was the hottest since record keeping began in the in the grand scheme of things what does that mean and why should we be concerned well this temperature departure the heating was one point one degrees Celsius above the long term average that's two degrees Fahrenheit that might not sound like a lot but if the privilege of pushing a mountain down a hundred eighty meters or six hundred feet more than the height of the Washington Monument some cooler areas above to warmer areas below is so small increments of temperature can mean major changes on the ground and in fact January snow cover across the northern hemisphere is is currently five hundred thousand square kilometers or hundred ninety thousand square miles below average the size of the state of California and in turn we've also we talk about impacts on the ground apparently an article also recorded record warm temperatures what kind of impact did you see this having this winter or these temperatures having on glaciers and sea ice this the record warmth has also melted polar ice around the north the north and south poles and overall long term this melting of land ice and the warming of sea water has raised sea level around the world and here in San Francisco its rays sea level to about halfway up your knee on the east coast it's actually raise sea level all

Doctor Patrick Washington Monument California San Francisco Scientist
A Tiny Satellite Revolution Is Afoot In Space

Short Wave

08:38 min | 5 months ago

A Tiny Satellite Revolution Is Afoot In Space

"Okay Joe we're talking. cubesats where shall we start. Well let me start by introducing you to Hannah Goldberg. She's a systems engineer at a company that makes cube sets but in nineteen ninety nine. She was an undergraduate at the University of Michigan Majoring in engineering. And she. She saw this flyer on a bus stop. That said want to build a satellite and so I joined a group that ended up making small satellite as part of a larger NASA program. Capanna says that This class that she took was a way for students to build a simple kind of satellite. Now this was pre cube set but clearly it would be valuable. We'll have young. Aerospace engineers have a chance to build something that was really intended to go into space and that hunger lead to something called the Cube set which was an idea idea from two engineers one at cal poly San Luis Obispo and the other at Stanford University to build this standardized platform for building space hardware. Okay Joe so. Let's get into this a little more. We've got this standardized platform now for cubesats. What makes cubesats cubes that well there's a manual and it just spells out all the details? I mean how big it'll be ten centimeters or four inches on aside at has to have this kind of screws of this kind of Wade has to have all kinds of specific things and then there are different form factors so it turns out at the Basic Cube. Said is called a one you but there's also a to you and at three U and six U is the one. That's the cereal box size. And what can you put inside Well a ham sandwich or no. You could put anything you like. But that's the brilliant part you can put any kind of scientific Communications technology kind of hardware in them. And you know these exactly GonNa fit and it's going to go into space that way. Okay so when I think of cubesats. They're like the legos of Satellite Adelaide. They're modular there customizable. They're small on smallest really key here because one of the things that makes the queue set program work is the people who build cube sense. Don't actually worry about how they're going to get into space. They hitch a ride with somebody else. WHO's already going into space? That's the real money saver because it's getting into spaces expensive all right. So how did the aerospace field respond to all these low-cost cubesats hitching a ride into space and embarking on this research. I think at first. They were kind of dismissive in the beginning. In the early days of cubesats they kind of had a bad reputation and more of the the classical aerospace. So people didn't think you could do much science or much much engineering benefit with them. So how'd cubes. That technology evolved to the point where it earned respect among scientists. Well there's an example of the technology that made made it possible probably in your pocket right now gum wrappers yes no actually gum purchase a great idea but no. I was thinking more of cell cellphone mobile phone. This is the evolution of the ability to miniature is electronics down to very small footprints. Very little wait and suddenly when when you had an impossibly small space to squeeze all your stuff into well it was possible now. So that's why people started paying attention to what you could put into a cube set. Gotcha Yeah I've I've read. There are hundreds of cubesats that have been launched over the years and I wanNA know about a few missions. That have caught your attention. Well we're really got me started on this story. Was the two thousand. Eighteen Cube set known as Marco. Actually Asari gone okay. You'll be a lot of fun in space ace Actually the word two of them. So you remember insight that was the mission. That's currently sitting on the surface of Mars. Well somebody had this idea that maybe they could could build cubesats that would act as really stations that would send signals back as insight was landing on Mars. It didn't have a strong enough Radio Antenna to send the single all the way back to Earth. So it send it back to these Marco satellites which sent it back to Earth and so for the first time ever there was real time telemetry ask has inside came the ground. It was all possible because this little tiny satellite was sent into deep space. So suddenly you're not just thinking about cubesats in Earth orbit you're thinking about cubes cubes heads in deep space. And so I think that's really cool very me. And when you say relaying Telemetry Marco was playing a role in telling people down on earth. What was happening on Mars with the insight mission? Is that what it is right inside saying. Hey I've just deployed my parachute or I've just got my Rye Retro Rockets on or I'm this far above the ground and all that information was coming back to Earth through Marco through this cube set very neat so the world of space exploration is clearly seeing these. cubesats keeps US useful yes a cube set can be very handy. It's a miniature spacecraft. That's actually the way we think about it. That was Barbara Cohen. She's a planetary scientist at NASA has Goddard Space Flight Center. She's part of a team. That's using one of these six you cubesats about the size of a cereal box that is for emission called lunar flashlight. I'm assuming this mission has something to do with the Moon. No it has to do with Luna Moth. No you're right. Is the moon lunar one. Yup that's true. Lunar flashlight is designed to look for exposed. Water Frost in the permanently shadowed regions of the moon so once lunar flashlight is in orbit around on the moon the spacecraft will shine a laser into those regions which are the South Pole of deep craters. That never see the sun so those are the places that that never see the sun so those are very very cold regions. They are as low as thirty five. Kelvin that's colder than the surface of Pluto. They want to know what what kind of stuff is down there. Maybe there's water or methane or mercury and they wanna know how it got. There and lunar flashlight is going to help. Tell them but to do. Its work once. It's deployed deployed. It actually has to adjust its orbit. Yeah how does something the size of a cereal box change orbit in space. Well again. This is the problem you have to news. Almost a third of the mass of this cube set for fuel so changing direction is the really expensive part of flying around in space in terms of weight because the fuel is very heavy. But there's one more cubes at mission. I want to tell you about. That has a really cool. Lightweight propulsion system called a solar sail. Deal oh I already loved the sound of this mission. Tell me about it okay instead. It tiffany Russell Lockett explain. This is actually her first coop set mission. She's an engineer. as-as Marshall Space Flight Center. A solar sail is a large thin-film reflective surface. Think of Like a sailboat route or a large kite but instead of using wind to propel itself is uses sunlight of. That's pretty brilliant. And that's how they're able to get the cube sat to change directions. I mean but how to sunlight propel cubes at well the Sun is always pushing out photons and that causes solar radiation pressure and that pressure is constantly constantly pushing against anything that happens to get in its way in this case. The lightweight material the solar sail and it acts like a sale. And that's how you get thrust and the sale by the way his square in shape and about each side of this sale is about the length of a school bus. And if you want to see a really amazing video go watch as this thing. They've they've unfurled at a couple of times and oh my goodness it's huge because it packs into this tiny little space and unfurled to this huge thing about the size of a tennis court actually more properly half a tennis court. This whole solar sail is packed inside. This cube sat amazing. And what's the mission for this. Solar sailed cubes. Well this one. What is going to head to a near Earth asteroid and take pictures and they want to learn more about this asteroid shape it size it how it rotates? What colored is what it's made of and to do that? We're planning on getting to within a kilometer of the asteroid for our closest Fly By and then we'll just keep going after that so this cube sat will fly off into the sunset on the power of the Sun. Well metaphorically I don't think we have sunsets in space. There's nothing I think for the sun to set over but I take your point. Joe Win. Are these missions likely to happen. Well that's an interesting question because the two last last ones I mentioned this lunar flashlight and the asteroid one are supposed to go on this project called artists one which is a rocket that's going to carry area capsule that's going to go around the moon and come back and that's been delayed and delayed and delayed so the cool thing. Is You get a free ride into space. If you're a cube set the bad thing thing is you've got to wait till your driver's ready to go

Cubesats Marco Joe Win Nasa Basic Cube University Of Michigan San Luis Obispo Goddard Space Flight Center Hannah Goldberg Systems Engineer Marshall Space Flight Center Stanford University Capanna Tennis Scientific Communications Wade
Miami: NASA Launches Probe from Cape Canaveral To Study Suns Affect On The Space Environment

KYW 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 5 months ago

Miami: NASA Launches Probe from Cape Canaveral To Study Suns Affect On The Space Environment

"NASA launches solar orbiter from Cape Canaveral last night it begins a journey to get a close unprecedented look at the sun first one is Scott Kerr says it'll take about two years to get into the right orbit the joint collaboration between NASA and the European Space Agency plans to be the first ever mission to provide images of the sun's north and south poles using six specialized instruments having a visual understanding of the sun's polls is expected to provide more insight about the sun's powerful magnetic field and how it affects earth of particular interest the sun's corona essentially its atmosphere the polls and the solar disk Alonso measure the sun's magnetic fields and solar wind the space travel flies past Venus to maneuver into a unique or but that'll take it over both

Nasa Cape Canaveral Scott Kerr European Space Agency
Solar Orbiter blasts off to capture first look at sun's poles

NPR News Now

00:49 sec | 5 months ago

Solar Orbiter blasts off to capture first look at sun's poles

"And the European Space Agency launched device from Florida Sunday night designed to give scientists and his new look at the Sun. NPR's James DUBEC has more scientists. Want to learn more about how the Sun's North and South poles effect space weather but up until now we've only viewed the sun straight on at its equator. The solar orbiter is set to travel around the Sun at an angle to view the two polls NASA scientist Horizon Evanston Shia says the mission will also help protect satellites and astronauts and space or call with. These mission is to understand our our son. I'm going forward to be able to predict by. Bt and protect solar orbiter is scheduled to make twenty two orbits around the Sun on its ten year mission mission James DUBEC NPR news Washington.

James Dubec European Space Agency NPR BT Florida Nasa Scientist Washington
Solar Orbiter launch: what is it and what's it going to do?

KRLD Sunday Morning News

00:42 sec | 5 months ago

Solar Orbiter launch: what is it and what's it going to do?

"News a late night launch from Cape Canaveral is expected to send a NASA spacecraft to deep space to study the son of a solar orbiter is about the size of a compact car even though it will be some twenty six million miles away from the sun scientists say they expect to learn a lot NASA astrophysicist Alex young says it'll measure the sun's north and south poles we want to both image and measure the magnetic field in the these polls because they can affect solar weather and solar flares that disrupt our ability to communicate in the worst case power grants but also our ability to send people out in the space safely it's a joint mission with the European Space Agency if all goes as planned solar orbiter should be on station in about

Cape Canaveral European Space Agency Nasa Alex Young
Antarctic base records hottest temperature ever

WBZ Afternoon News

00:44 sec | 5 months ago

Antarctic base records hottest temperature ever

"A research base in the Antarctic records of the hottest temperature ever for the continent CBS news meteorologist Jeff Vera Delhi says climate change's the culprits huge planes why they're so concerned about these rising temperatures near the South Pole we're worried about destabilization of the Antarctic glaciers which could happen sometime in the next couple of decades it could be centuries we're not exactly sure when it's going to happen but when it does happen it could very quickly racy levels by a couple of feet which would be disastrous for anybody living along coastal communities the mercury hit a record sixty five degrees on the northern tip of Antarctica

Jeff Vera Delhi South Pole Antarctic CBS
Illinois governor clears thousands of marijuana convictions

The Al Malmberg Show

00:11 sec | 6 months ago

Illinois governor clears thousands of marijuana convictions

"Fuel illinois' rather than governor liquid is already fuel or granted more than it eleven could be thousand an orbital pardons bombardment for low level system marijuana convictions the kind of thing ahead they could of the state's fly over new the marijuana South Pole it's legalization really law really hard to predict in one at becomes this point the eleventh but state the north Koreans to legalize are made pretty it clear for people that whatever twenty

Illinois Marijuana
A Shortwave Christmas Carol

Short Wave

09:08 min | 6 months ago

A Shortwave Christmas Carol

"Hello anybody there so matty. Yes ma'am last week Brit and I connected to a radio station she's visa. I am radio in Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania have a conversation with space physicist and electrical engineer Nathaniel result. Thank you very much. It's a pleasure to be here and in two two thousand fourteen. His research took him to Antarctica cool. Yeah home to the South Pole and hub of scientific activity with research stations and field camps spread across the continent. New Zealand has a station down there. Several European countries due to scientists are asking questions. You can only answer in Arca and the Southern Ocean this time of year about wildlife wildlife like penguins. Yeah sure like penguins microbiology. tectonics the northern lights. Daniel was down there to look at the earth's magnetic field and polar regions. I picture this whole space. Mattie like science summer camp but spread across a desolate icebound landscape. What a dream? Yeah you're kind kind of summer camp and these people. They're far from home. which can be really tough? During the holidays so nathaniel when he was down there took part in a musical tradition tradition. That cues up every year on this day December. Twenty four South Pole station. We're ready and standing by thinks the Antarctic a Christmas carol basically the different stations in Antarctica. Sing to each other over shortwave radio. Oh my God this is legitimately the cutest thing you're seeing over the radio Transmission was from the Amundsen Scott South Pole station ahmanson shadow yacht ought. Here's a Christmas Carol from the Italian station. Mario's a Kelly singing an Italian Christmas Carol. I really liked service. I firmly believe this cute Nathaniel would have to agree with you and it's a beautiful thing and you know the different stations and people they have to have to watch out for each other because it's it's difficult environment down there and annual listening at McMurdo Station in a Blue Penguin Hoodie. Sure I'll add wondered if this caroline could be heard beyond Antarctica by shortwave listeners. And other parts of the world he wanted to know how far can these transmissions Israeli travel so how far away were people able to listen well. Before the Caroline Begin thin you'll put out an alert to shortwave radio listener saying hey if you I can hear this email us a lot of snow and people did. They were able to tune in. He got emails from the Netherlands. South America places far away from Antarctica. Some people were able to catch snippets of this singing at the bottom of the world so today. On the show shortwave. podcasts looks at shortwave radio how it works how it travels. And how anything of result is leveraging. A community of shortwave radio listeners for science. Emily Kwong are short. We've expert is nathaniel. Yes he's an assistant professor of physics and Engineering at the University of Scranton in Pennsylvania. Okay so obviously I know shortwave the charming daily science podcast. But tell me about shortwave. As in shortwave radio so since since the nineteen hundreds we've been using radio waves to communicate. The waves are all different sizes the lower the wave's frequency the longer the wavelength one. Of the unique characteristics. Of shortwave shortwave. Radio is that it can travel. The radio. Waves can travel long distances very long distances around the world because there are three to thirty megahertz hurts in frequency they travel through space to this electrically charged part of our atmosphere called the ionosphere and are reflected or refracted back down to Earth. If we didn't did not have the atmosphere these shortwave signals would travel off into space and not be able to travel around the globe but luckily for us. They can travel around the globe. They they propagate far distances and those with receivers on earth are able to listen. Nathaniel loves shortwave. Because you don't need a lot of equipment to send and capture one of these transmissions oh it can be incredibly simple. You need a transmitter on one side and a receiver on the other and a decent antenna and when I say A transmitter there. There are some people who they make their goal to talk as far around the world is possible with that as little as equipment as possible as low power as possible so maybe using a quarter of a awas and ten dollars worth of parts people are able to send signals that. Get the go all the way around the globe. This is the ultimate Lo fi form of communication gathering. Yeah and that communication could be anything broadcast propaganda spice stations emergency information weather reports rag chewing which is a term mm to describe people just talking about their daily life so radio twitter. Yeah the transmission just has to fall within the right frequency range to count ashore wave and there's an international community of hobby radio operators who seek out a special license from their respective governments to do this. That's called Ham Radio Ham. Yeah that's the hobby Of using this radio so nathaniel discovered that community on a boy Scout Jamboree Ham radio operator had set up a station in the middle of the woods and just turned all his crackling and buzzing sounds coming out of a radio and I heard him talking to these faraway places and and that was just really fascinating fascinating to me and he was hooked got his license in Nineteen Ninety Eight. Just a teenager transmitting to whoever's listening in the northern New Jersey New York metropolitan area area so just pure bruce springsteen propaganda it was mostly just his call son and seventy three. This is W. Two and AF whiskey to November Alpha Foxtrot threaten seventy-three means best regards. It's a pretty common ham. Radio sign off eventually he upgraded to a better transmitter through a wire out the window of his bedroom and attached hatched tree in his front yard and he managed to get a hold of a station in Hungary and it was just a very short contact. But you know that was pretty neat you just throw a wire out your window. And you're able to talk to guy in Hungary and and it worked in these moments stayed with him propelling his scientific methodology and his his career cool. Okay so tell me a little bit about that. How his nathaniel used shortwave for science in a lot of interesting ways because disturbances happening in the ionosphere on a sphere space weather solar wind conditions? All of that would affect radio waves so in Grad school he was able to show how a solar flare caused aradio blackout so cool. Yeah and during the big two thousand seventeen solar eclipse which I missed because it was cloudy. Tragedy so sad but Nathaniel hosted a community science experiment through his group Ham side. The group measured how the eclipse affected the transmission of medium and high frequency radio waves. And the way he's using radio for scientific inquiry is so innovative that this year the National Science Foundation awarded him a one point. Three million dollar grant deign to do what well he wants to bring. Universities and this network of Ham radio operators together to track. What's going on in the ionosphere where short waves propagate in a more day to day way which we we don't really do right now? No not really. We don't really understand what happens on short timescales like why is the fear doing this in New York City but doing doing something else in Pennsylvania overhead and Pennsylvania and. Why is that important to understand the ionosphere to that level of detail? Well we as a planet Senate are really dependent on things happening in space and disturbances in the ionosphere do affect communication satellites global positioning systems. which are used to land planes all these tools? We rely on to keep us safe and connected and so it's very important to try to understand how everything is is is connected together in order to make this systems more robust and and in order to make them work. And in order to you know transmit Christmas carols around the world essential I think a lot of Ham radio for me has always been about connecting people from different parts of the world together. And and you know if you if you even look at like why Ham radio exists if you actually look in the the laws I believe. It says that it's for international goodwill and It's important to try and promote this international goodwill kwon. Do you think our podcast connects people all around the world. I mean we don't have three million listeners. That's how how many people listen to him radio now yet. Not with that attitude okay. I know world domination is your project but I will say I got into radio because I enjoyed tuning in and not knowing what I was going to hear our podcast definitely. Does that help so I think so so from our team to whoever is out there listening in in the world happy holidays. Happy Holidays

Nathaniel Pennsylvania Antarctica Amundsen Scott South Pole Stat South Pole Station South Pole New Zealand Assistant Professor Of Physics Italian Station South America Pittsburgh Southern Ocean Hungary Mcmurdo Station University Of Scranton National Science Foundation Mattie Daniel
NASA Finds India's Vikram Moon Lander Crash Site

AP 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 7 months ago

NASA Finds India's Vikram Moon Lander Crash Site

"NASA says it's found the debris from India's moon lander which crashed on the lunar surface in September US space agency which released a photo showing the side of the lenders impact and the debris field is crediting Indian engineer Sean McGrath a Brownian for helping locate the site is theater presents India's space agency lost touch with the lunar lander after crash landed during its final approach to the moon's South Pole to deploy a rover to search for signs of water a successful landing would have made India just the fourth country to lead the vessel on the lunar surface and only the third to operate a robotic rover there somewhere I mean who's thirty threes as he examined and earlier NASA photo to locate the debris and says it took days of work to find the crash site NASA says he first located the debris about seven hundred fifty meters or half a mile northwest of the crash

Nasa India Sean Mcgrath United States Engineer Seven Hundred Fifty Meters
Effects of the Solar Wind

NASA ScienceCasts

03:13 min | 7 months ago

Effects of the Solar Wind

"The wind speed of a devastating category five hurricane can top over one hundred fifty miles per hour hour or two hundred and forty one kilometers per hour. Now imagine another kind of wind with an average speed of zero point. Eight seven million miles per hour or one point four million kilometers per hour. Welcome to the wind that begins in our son and doesn't stop until after it reaches the edge of the Helius fear the solar wind. The Corona is the Sun's inner atmosphere the brightness that can be seen surrounding eclipsed sun and home the continually annually expanding solar wind right now. The Parker solar probe a NASA mission launched in two thousand eighteen is orbiting the sun. And we'll get as close as three eight point eight three million miles or six point one. Six million kilometers of the Sun's surface Parker is gathering new data about the solar particles and magnetic fields. Also that comprise the solar wind more specifically two of its main goals are to examine the energy that heats the corona and speeds up the solar wind and and determine the structure of the winds magnetic fields while many theories described the solar winds history. This is what we do know. The solar wind impacting Earth's magnetosphere is responsible for triggering those majestic Aurora's typically seated locations close to our north and South poles in some cases it can also said off space weather. Storms that disrupt everything from our satellites and space to ship communications on our oceans to power grids on land. Nikki Fox is the division director for helium physics at NASA headquarters. She explains in more detail. How the solar wind disrupts are magnetosphere as the wind and flows toward earth it carries with the sun's magnetic field? It moves very fast than smacks right into Earth's magnetic field. The blow causes a shock shock to our magnetic protection which can result in turbulence. NASA also has another reason to study the solar wind and its properties. The solar older wind is part of a larger space weather system that can affect astronauts and technology as Fox notes we not only have to ensure our astronauts are protected from the harmful effects of radiation. We have to protect our equipment to so we've already found aluminum to be a good shield to protect our crafts from many energetic particles us but there are also faster particles that travel at eighty percent of the speed of light which can cause havoc with parts of spacecraft. They can smash into damage. Solar alert panels disrupt electronics or affect electric currents that flow along power grids so we're currently conducting tests with small pieces of technology to study. How well they can survive? In intense radiation areas knowing more about the effects of the solar wind is not only important to those of us who live on earth it will be critical to know how to mitigate its effects once our astronauts travel back to the moon and beyond for extended periods of time. Fox concludes my feeling is if the the sun. Sneezes earth catches a cold because we always feel the impact of what happens on the Sun. Thanks to the solar wind

Nasa Nikki Fox Parker Aurora Division Director Four Million Kilometers Per Ho Forty One Kilometers Per Hour Six Million Kilometers Eighty Percent
How Did the Ancient Land Blob Called Gondwana Become Today's Southern Continents?

BrainStuff

05:50 min | 8 months ago

How Did the Ancient Land Blob Called Gondwana Become Today's Southern Continents?

"Lauren Bogle bomb here sometimes. Good Science Science can happen just by looking at a map of the world and letting your mind wander for instance observe how Africa and South America seemed to have been very recently cuddled together even though there are currently a couple of thousand miles of ocean between them similarly Madagascar fits perfectly into a little nick in the eastern edge of Africa and the Middle East seems seems to be pulling away from the top of Africa like a corner being pulled off of a hot cookie with a reasonably good representation of the shape and arrangement of the world's continents in front of them. Anyone could easily assess the earth's land masses have definitely been speaking around the name for the southern landmass that once was is Gondwanaland and also known as Gondwana but it wasn't just the shape of the continents that clued researchers into its former existence. They've also looked at similarities. Among plants and animals that live across the modern separate continents from those clues. Gondwana was an idea long before anybody figured out how or why. It worked the secret of course being plate. tectonics and idea that didn't really start gaining steam. Until the mid twentieth century but a nineteenth century Austrian geologist named Edward Seuss put a name to the concept of the supercontinent in his book. The face of the earth the first volume of which was published in eighteen eighty. Three SEUSS didn't come up with many completely novel ideas ideas. But he did a great job of synthesizing. A bunch of the research of the day to conclude that the southern continents and landmasses we now know as South America Africa Arabia India via Sri Lanka and Madagascar had at one point in time been connected because one well just look at them and two. They contained the same rocks and the same fossil's from an extinct feathery leafed tree called gloss of terrace Austria and in Arctic. Oh would be added theory. Thirty years later Gondwana on what was named for a densely forested region of central India where the first fossil evidence of the supercontinent was found in the nineteenth century. WanNa is a word for forest in Sanskrit and the guns are tribe that European explorers. I found living in the region. Even though we now know a lot about the mechanism by which Gondwana China was formed. It's extremely complicated and still being investigated. There's at least one. Peer Reviewed Scientific Journal devoted entirely to the study of the supercontinent. It's it's called appropriately Gondwana research however. There are a few things that we're pretty certain of I got Wada wasn't built in a day. The the making of Gondwana was a long process. Most likely through three major mountain building events driven by the movement of Earth's tectonic plates we spoke spoke via email with Joseph Merit professor in the Department of Geological Sciences. At the University of Florida he explained during the interval from about six hundred fifty to five hundred in fifty million years ago. Various pieces of Africa and South America collided along an ancient mountain chain called the Brazilian belt slightly older but overlapping with the Brazilian. Oh seven seven hundred and fifty to six hundred and fifty million years. AGO is the east African Oregon or Mozambique Belt that resulted from the collision between East Africa and Madagascar India Tree Lanka and parts of East Antarctica. The final collision was along the Kouanga Oregon between all those assembled pieces and the rest of Antarctica and Australia between five five hundred eighty and five hundred and thirty million years ago so it was a couple hundred million years of extremely slow continental car wrecks the created this Beta Ada version of Gondwana. But it wasn't done yet later about three hundred million years ago other landmasses join forces with it to form the giant ball of land. We now no no as Panja. But one continent rule them all couldn't last and sometime between two hundred eighty and two hundred million years ago. Hingis started started disintegrating as magma began pushing up from beneath the mega supercontinent creating rifts in the land that would later become seafloor as Penn.. Jia cracked the top part was pushed to the north creating the continent Laura Asia and Gondwana headed south back when Gondwana was just a baby supercontinent between five hundred and fifty and four hundred eighty five million years ago it hosted some of the very first complex life forms like trial abides bracket pods but since it continued to exist I didn't the drastic period lots of plant and animal. Evolution went down there merit said Gondwana contains evidence for evolutionary changes in the very first complex complex animals. The very first fish amphibians and reptiles the most famous fossils are the gun doina flora such as the loss of terrace fern a freshwater reptile called. Messo Soroush Soroush in a land. Reptile called Lyster Soroush Gondwana existed as a single landmass for more than three hundred million years because of its humongous assize by covered an area of one hundred billion square kilometers or about thirty nine billion square miles and because the continents moved a lot during that time Gondwana experienced many different climates said during the Cambridge. When Gondwana I formed the earth and Gondwana were in a greenhouse state in the late order vision? Four four hundred fifty million years ago gun was moving over. The South Pole and the climate was very cold. Gondwana continued to move through variety of latitudes and depending on where you are located hated. The climate might have been quite warm or more temperate. The continent was so large. That one part of Gondwana might be located at the quarter while another might be located at the poll. It's true it would have been cool to see Gondwana in its prime and although you won't personally get to see its victorious return. That doesn't mean that it's not possible. Possible the continents are always moving and scientists have a lot of ideas about what our next supercontinent is going to look like.

Gondwana Gondwana China Lyster Soroush Gondwana Africa Madagascar Edward Seuss Messo Soroush Soroush India Lauren Bogle Middle East South America Gondwanaland Madagascar India Tree Lanka Terrace Austria Joseph Merit Professor East Africa Geologist Scientific Journal
NASA's new lunar rover will search for water on the moon

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 8 months ago

NASA's new lunar rover will search for water on the moon

"NASA is planning to send a mobile robot to the South Pole of the moon the rover called vipers the size of a golf cart and will take samples of the moon soil for about a hundred days to search for evidence of water or ice NASA first detected ice in two thousand nine when it crashed a rocket into a large crater near the planet South Pole and believes the moon could have huge reservoirs of ice the vehicle is due to land on the lunar surface in December of the year twenty twenty

Nasa South Pole Hundred Days
NASA: US will need water to return to moon

Magic Mechanic

00:15 sec | 8 months ago

NASA: US will need water to return to moon

"NASA hopes that a rover will help find water on the moon scientists have discovered frozen liquid on the moon's South Pole back in two thousand nine though they're not sure how much is there they plan to send the rover and twenty twenty two to drill the ice for samples as it prepares to send a crew there two years

Nasa Two Years
"south pole" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"south pole" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

Nasr NASA Rovers Goddard Space Flight center Stephen Clark ele- arro associate administrator Noah petro Apollo dot FM Dina Maryland Washington Landers fourteen degrees Fahrenheit five four degree five degrees five years
"south pole" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"south pole" Discussed on Science Friday

"There's the oldest terrain, and there's a big impact base in its two thousand kilometers in diameter. It's called the south pole a can basin and because it's so large. It's thought that it could have brought up material from the lunar mantle. So a lot of the scientists are keen to get samples from the south pole Achim basin, and I would put all my eggs in that basket if we were gonna send one mission to bring samples back excited about the the moon eclipse, the lunar eclipse happening this weekend. Absolutely, absolutely. It's very cold here, but I'm going to bundle up and try to watch. At least a few minutes of it. And the reason the totality lasts for over an hour. Does it does? Yeah. And that's because why. Well, the totally lasts about an hour. But it's also a super moon this time around it means that the moon is at its closest orbit around the around the earth. So we would get to experience it for a little bit longer. But we're also experienced a total lunar eclipse so that the entire shadow of the earth would be covering the moon. So it would give us a lot of time to go out. And check it out. I guess the closer we are to the moon closer, it is tested larger the shadow size. Yeah. So we it's a pleasure. Talking to you same. Thanks for having me. It's been great. And I wish you good luck in watching the eclipse. Thank you you too. Bundle up betcha. Sarah mas. Ruis planetary scientist at the university of Toronto. And speaking of which one last thing, speaking of the moon, and this weekend's total lunar eclipse, what's the best way to see it. Well, of course, we asked dean Regas of the Cincinnati observatory to give us a sneak preview the sun moon on earth will be lining up this weekend. We're going to be having a total lunar eclipse, but the big question is what day is it? A lot of media outlets are saying it's going to be on January twenty first well, a not. So if you're in the western hemisphere for the United States North America South America, it's going to be the night of Sunday January twentieth. So Mark your calendars. Don't go out on the twenty-first. You'll miss it. I wanted to share a couple of tips on what to look for have. A couple of favorite things to look for and favorite times. So here's the schedule. This what's going to happen? I contact the first time you're gonna see the shadow of the earth on the moon will be at ten thirty three PM eastern standard time. So adjust your time accordingly. I always liked this part because that's when they clip starts. And you're like, wow, it's right on time. I love the precision of it and starting to see the shadow and the shadow slowly sweep across the moon and totality begins at eleven forty one pm and goes till twelve forty three AM. That's when the moon is totally in the earth's shadow, interns, all sorts of cool colors, like orange and red and all sorts of bloody colors. And so that you can check it out and see how the light changes how the colors change from minute. Two minutes. Very cool and then the shadow wipes away and the moon returns back to its normal south at one fifty AM on the morning of the twenty first. But remember you gotta start watching on the twentieth. So Sunday night, get ready for this. Because the next total lunar eclipse won't happen until twenty twenty one. When let's thing is beginning the moon this weekend that clips that dean Regas have Cincinnati. Observatory is telling us about it's also a good opportunity. And as as we heard as Dr must Rui said gotta you gotta bundle up to go out and see it. But you can also use that opportunity to go see the other stars and the planet since the moon will be very dark. It'd be able to see the other planets and stars coming out to that's really a good opportunity to do some winter watching and in the cold weather, hopefully storms coming across the country will not upset I every time. I wanna go out and see clips is always a cloud there or something..

dean Regas south pole Achim basin Cincinnati observatory United States North America So Cincinnati Sarah mas Rui scientist university of Toronto two thousand kilometers Two minutes
"south pole" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"south pole" Discussed on Science Friday

"There's the oldest terrain, and there's a big impact base in its two thousand kilometers in diameter. It's called the south pole a can basin and because it's so large. It's thought that it could have brought up material from the lunar mantle. So a lot of the scientists are keen to get samples from the south pole Achim basin, and I would put all my eggs in that basket if we were going to send one mission to bring samples back excited about the the moon eclipse, the lunar eclipse and happening this weekend. Absolutely. Absolutely. It's very cold here, but I'm going to bundle up and try to watch. At least a few minutes of it and the reasoning the totality lasts for like over an hour. Does it does? Yeah. And that's because why. Well, the totality lasts about an hour. But it's also a super moon this time around it means that the moon is at its closest orbit around the around the earth. So we would get to experience it for a little bit longer. But we're also experienced a total lunar eclipse so that the entire shadow of the earth would be covering the moon. So it would give us a lot of time to go out. And check it out. Closer we are to moan closer is tested larger the shadow size. So we it's a pleasure talking to you same. Thanks for having me. It's been great. And wishing you good looking watching the eclipse. Thank you you too bundle up betcha. Sarah must Ruis planetary scientist at the university of Toronto. And speaking of which one last thing, speaking of the moon, and this weekend's total lunar eclipse, what's the best way to see it. Well, of course, we asked dean Regas of the Cincinnati observatory to give us a sneak preview the sun moon. Inert will be lining up this weekend. We're going to be having a total lunar eclipse, but the big question is what day is it? A lot of media outlets are saying it's going to be on January twenty first well, a not. So if you're in the western hemisphere for the United States North America South America, it's going to be the night of Sunday January twentieth. So Mark your calendars. Don't go out on the twenty-first. You'll miss it. I wanted to share a couple of tips on what to look for. Couple favorite things to look for and favorite times. So here's the schedule. This what's going to happen? I contact the first time you're going to see the shadow of the earth on the moon will be at ten thirty three PM eastern standard time. So adjust your time accordingly. I always liked this part because that's when they clip starts. And you're like, wow, it's right on time. I love the precision of it and starting to see the shadow and the shadow slowly sweep across the moon and totality begins at eleven forty one pm and goes till twelve forty three AM. That's when the moon is totally in the earth's shadow, interns, all sorts of cool colors, like orange and red and all sorts of bloody colors. And so that you can check it out and see how the light changes how the colors change from minute. Two minutes. Very cool and then the shadow wipes away and the moon returns back to its normal self at one fifty AM on the morning of the twenty first. But remember you gotta start watching on the twentieth. Sunday night, get ready for this. Because the next total lunar eclipse won't happen until twenty twenty one. When let's thing is beginning the moon this weekend that clips that dean Regas have Cincinnati. Observatory is telling us about it's also a good apper, tune ity. And as as we heard as Dr must Rui said to you got gotta bundle up to go out and see it. But you can also use that opportunity to go see the stars and the planets since the moon will be very dark. It'd be able to see the other planets and stars coming out. So that's really good opportunity to do some winter watching in the cold weather, hopefully storms coming across the country will not upset every time. I wanna go out and see clips is always a cloud there or something..

scientist dean Regas south pole Achim basin Cincinnati observatory United States North America So Cincinnati Rui Sarah university of Toronto Ruis two thousand kilometers Two minutes
"south pole" Discussed on Dreamland

Dreamland

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"south pole" Discussed on Dreamland

"This magma that is like warm jello. And if something happens in warms up that jello, the hypothesis is that ride that we live on with suddenly slip. And if it suddenly slipped than something like, the roundish continent of Antarctica might go from tropical or sub tropical down to what ended up being a very icy south pole, and it might happen. So quickly that trees would be flash frozen. Yeah. And this something like this might have happened. Very recently. A there is a. Scientists cold believe Lonnie Thompson who studies glaciers, and he has discovered at the base of a number of end, Ian glaciers flash frozen plant life. Weeds and and things that were. Part of a sub trop subtropical or temperate environment that were literally frozen in seconds. The ways you've you freeze food to go into in a of freezer section any carbon dating time line. Yeah. There it happened about five thousand years ago. And this is also the time in which would see the Ice Man was found died now seed died in an alpine meadow in the T role in northern Italy. He was then covered with snow. That's no did not melt until a few years ago. What happened that alpine meadow was filled with snow that then never melted. Meanwhile, in in.

alpine meadow Lonnie Thompson Antarctica Ian Italy five thousand years
"south pole" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"south pole" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

"Success of you know, I always say, it's when you're on a trip than the next trip gets planned, and it was that sitting around in the tent, and then as excessive it will, you know, that St. something else, and so having sort of the north the sort of next that was head down south the on tall Tate, which we then focused on did a trip down there and in two thousand seven which put us on a different level. You tall initial? Let's go to the south pole. I've always been a little bit curious. I'm not sort of conformist light to look at different ways of doing things than I went out and did a little such the south pole has being dumb, many many times also shade. So full GMs. And in some archive, I found this weird place. Cool the poll of accessibility. And this was the exact sensor of Antarctic continent. So you can physically get further away from the oceans, so the clear sort of in the name, no one had ever been on previously from Soviet expedition back in nineteen fifties using track vehicles. I think it was a two year endeavor. And when they did get to this point, they left a statue of Lenin safe for me, this is a neat place to go to there's a statute of lending. You know, this is really weird and screwed up. It's sort of. It was also sense. If he this is this is cool, the appeal of this polling, accessibility lent sell to also slight strange of sense of Hema for this endeavor. It wasn't an organized sort of an event it was it was the three of us looking to do something in a very big very scary place. She to Canadian guide co polandri on bold. He's not QC well known of, but he's he is probably one of the most experienced travelers in modern history amazing. King guide very modest. And we really lucky to have him have been with us. We wouldn't even begun to attempt without him the consensus was that Lennon wasn't going to be that this is fifty years ago. You know, the south pole station, they have he's great American based on mach three now and the other two buried so little statue of Lenin. Everyone's like, no chance not the case. He was sitting that just just remembering that moment right now Shiva's up my spine the last week the long achieve that the Russians the Soviets had left was was only the owls in the minutes. It didn't have the second. So it didn't give a precise location. We had a very large area to search. And as we arrived close to this point. We've actually been skiing nonstop for twenty four hours because we were losing our window to get there before we could get picked up and taken out and then the season ended. And then you start down that six months before the sun comes back and just saying this little black dots on the horizon and stopping and shouting to my teammates. Can you say it, and they're like fear? Thing and you'll mind starts playing tricks EV just been focusing on this point for last two years, and you'll just making it up, but we closer and closer in this this black dot grew. And then suddenly saw the silhouette of of the man that was was leading just sitting that two years of planning fifty three days seventeen hundred kilometers with a really incredible feeling. But like all these things, suddenly it's over. There was an amazing experience of live and the Arctic. We actually went back to South Africa on an icebreaker that just left me thirsting for more and always hurt for me. This is what I wanna do the rest of my life, my call as they went back to their their today's I sent myself out to Alaska learnt, probably the things before a devasting all this stuff in the first place. I mean, literally arrive with backpacks and hiking boots still with the price tags on it because we'll might experience being polar cold weather stuff. And there wasn't Alaskan kayaking. Hiking and whitewater rafting, but learning the sort of the the rudiments of guide training, and I thought for me the rest of my life will be taking people ice across ice caps and not mountains, the expedition type stuff that wasn't to be hence now we have a company based in London twenty staff, and we do trips will ever the planet and it's not necessarily cold. It's not necessarily hot is to stuff, which is interesting. It's stuff, which is experienced rich..

Lenin King south pole station Alaska Antarctic South Africa Lennon London two years seventeen hundred kilometers twenty four hours fifty three days fifty years six months two year
"south pole" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"south pole" Discussed on KCBS All News

"The stars at the leading edge of the dippers bowl and follow that line to the upper. Right. The first moderately bright star you come to is Polaris the pollstar or northstar earth North Pole aims toward it so Polaris forms, the hub of the northern sky all the other stars appear to rotate around it. And it's always at the same point above the horizon night and day all year long, a star marks the south pole to it's not nearly as prominent as Polaris though. In fact, it's barely visible the southern pole star is Polaris Australia's. It's also known as Cigna opportunities because it's in the constellation Ogden's. Which depicts a navigational instrument known as an accident Pereira. Australia's isn't as impressive as Polaris. Maine. Only because Polaris is huge, and brilliant, and especially impressive specimen compared to most stars though. The southern pole star is impressive to it's more than half. Again, the mass of the sun it's expanding as it nears the end of its normal lifetime. So it several times wider than the sun and its outer layers puff in and out. So it brightens and fades a bit every couple of hours on average. It's about forty times brighter than the sun. But it's also two hundred eighty light years away that keeps Polaris Australia's from being a good pointer to the celestial south pole, and we have more sky watching tips and much more about the universe in start. Eight magazine subscription information that start eight dot org..

Polaris Polaris Australia Cigna Ogden Maine two hundred eighty light years
"south pole" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"south pole" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"There on time newsradio eight forty w h a s burks what do you think of admiral byrd's book and writings about the inner hollow earth i mean something happened yeah i find the whole mission you know very fascinating where he you know being a navy ation hero is was was something very risky in those days they didn't have gps they didn't have advanced instrumentation so when he took his airplane apart is is fokker airplane apart and took it up to spitsbergen on a boat they really only had about a three hour window to get this plane off that boat and onto the shore there was no peer there was just like a makeshift floating pier to get the plane actually on the ground in spitsbergen so once they get it on the ground they put the plane together and loaded up with fuel and he takes off to try to reach the north pole and he reports that he flies over lush green areas where i guaranteed none should have been and this kind of started this is this is in nineteen twenty six this started a a wild speculation by the rest of the world that maybe there was an opening into the inner earth up there well we we don't really know exactly what course he flew we know that he arrived back a little bit early but he claims the head heading that he took should've let him right over the north pole and then back at twenty five hundred feet which is which is why aviation hero and not a statistic right that's pretty much impossible to do up in that area no one will do it today that's for sure to we we know that your first mistake is your last at that altitude but now we have come a long way since nineteen twenty six he went down in nineteen twenty nine flew over the south pole and then a series of great television interviews which are all matter of record you can go watch on youtube if you want now about his speculations about what he flew over and he was a fairly reserved individual he wasn't as crazy as you know we make him was he told to be quiet i don't i don't know if he was the kind of personality did you tell to be quiet he was an admiral he was a war hero he he didn't take orders from anybody and he used his own money to do a lot of the things that he did he wasn't a kind of person that went went out and raised flamboyant amounts of money and profited off these things was it true explorer we don't have many of those today well i think we do but i think there's a lot of competition you know we we tried for what eight good solid years to raise the money to make this expedition by sea to this where we think this opening might be in the crushed into the inner earth that it's millions of dollars it's like three and a half million dollars just to get the logistics to get the ship to get the scientists on the ship get the equipment to to be able to go up and make some decent measurements there are ships that are specially designed for this like the oak and shifts like this but they're not icebreaker stay can't go above the eightieth parallel this is a boat that can go you know to the ninety six parallel way up there could break eight feet of ice it's made for it but there's only one and it's very expensive to rent so why don't we ever get pictures at least us of the openings well there are a couple of reasons in two thousand six there was an international law that was passed called.

admiral byrd twenty five hundred feet million dollars eight forty w eight feet three hour
"south pole" Discussed on NewsRadio WHAM 1180

NewsRadio WHAM 1180

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"south pole" Discussed on NewsRadio WHAM 1180

"Ever work the next day it stopped playing music and i never worked again they never get it to work work again there these these there there's so many things about the world because explaining georgia we i touch people in the book to live in the mystery live in the possibility when your brain can shut down and say i know the way the world is challenge those beliefs because we we never know what secretly but simplicity might be possible for us so i have lots of stories like that in the book dawson what is science doing to back this up anything well science is now doing some remarkable studies but i cover toward the end of the book and they are looking search is looking at the earth's magnetic field so i didn't he feels a very powerful they aren't obstructed by objects they pass through things and the earth has these massive massive feels like a by the north and south pole versus north and south pole and there are these huge line about any flux around the planet researchers have been studying these now for close to century and the finding that these flux lines have properties and they regulate biological processes they're like they're like carrier ways and all these awaits all kinds of biological processes happen to to to to to shift with them and they on looking at what happened to even being as their ships in these huge fields that it turns out that has these big feel shifts shit we shipped a lot as well so is this brand new size there's tons of research on brainwaves human brainwaves there are six basic brainwaves and how those brainwaves has shifted and regulated we're on the verge of just a golden age of understanding how conscious works how the brain works and how the to interrelate so the science in the book is it just so new and so startling in its ability to show us that beacon shift on the we we can ship out brainwaves radically and was our on urological and genetic function well is is it our physical brain that manifest these things or is there something outside of the physical properties that makes these things happen that people somehow have the ability to tap into but it has nothing to do with the physical side of it depends on you talked to a seventy twenty year old sizes 'cause 'cause famously said that science advances one at a time so the view is that our conscious arose from complex brains as him or complex of the course of three point four billion years about pollution eventually those complex material objects through these phenomena in kolkata says and that's the relationship of mind brain mind is what brain does what now realizing is that's not that way at all talk to younger scientists you'll discover that the picture we now have is that the brain is like a transceiver hostas edited in touch with these huge nonlocal fields nonlocal awareness at in synchrony with them in some cases so people who have lots of for example they literally have brain synchrony at heart synchrony with these huge feels around the earth and so what now is much more accurate picture of the way we function is up rains are a transducer up singles from the field and then a project her all that into external reality and the way they use our brains affects what appears in external reality that's amazing work dawson you really have done some amazing work i've got to ask you about this fellow by the name of rick gadji who had clogged arteries what the heck did he do yeah rick tiny rick for for a long time and did a big follow up with them so rick rick rick saudi is so clogged you went in for hugh medical test and he was female the shoulder breath when it for he medical tests and they scheduled him for an immediate connery bob bypass operation in fact when he gave the treadmill test they made them stuff the treadmill tests they if i die on the treadmill is artemis we're so clubs oh my god and so he was he was put put in a the most rapid possible cue for immediate con research me and the morning of the surgery he was he was prepared for surgery as shaved they made markings on his chest there's would take place and they did one last angiogram before winning the operating theater and.

seventy twenty year four billion years
"south pole" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"south pole" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"South pole you can't tell yeah money good sure fears where we got it party b finally talked about those pregnancy room where you can see what she said wild and eighty four nine dot com did you get to listen to her new album invasion of privacy ooh that track.

"south pole" Discussed on KCMO Talk Radio

KCMO Talk Radio

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"south pole" Discussed on KCMO Talk Radio

"The jim bohannon show at larson our guest he has written to the edges of the earth published by morrow is quite a a thrilling set of stories and as we go to the next call here how personal were these rivalries i mean these were people who wanted to make their place in history there would be many people go to the north or the south pole there will only be one who was first to get there how personal did it get they could not be more personal they the great great comment you had in the south pole the the animosity between shackleton earned shackleton and robert falcon scott in england both aiming for the south pole they gone together once they tried to reach it the first time together tremendous animosity america it was between frederick cook and and robber and perry tremendous animosity and among mountaineers there was a competition it was pherson that added to the excitement of course the press might have even exaggerated the animosity but it certainly was what people followed what people people were either scott men or or or shackleton men they lined up on one side or the other and and what we follow with these people what what i'm fascinated by beyond the sheer struggle that these people went through the noble struggle and how that was a major of the heroic the leadership skills the different the differences in the type of leadership skill of a scott shackleton perry amundsen they were leaders in very different ways and we have a lot to learn even today as a from these people 'cause they were they were truly leaders of human beings and and thrust in the most dire of situations trying to survive when you know you read these stories and you simply do not know how anyone could survive here's a call from anthony in auburn new york for edward larson author of to the edges of the earth hello anthony hello jimbo great new night tonight.

morrow england frederick cook auburn new york jim bohannon robert falcon scott shackleton perry amundse anthony edward larson
"south pole" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"south pole" Discussed on WLOB

"One hundred point five greater portland's new fm jimbohannonshow edward larson our guest he has written to the edges of the earth published by moro is quite a a thrilling set of stories and as we go to the next call here how personal were these rivalries i mean these were people who wanted to make their place in history there would be many people go to the north of the south pole but there will only be one who was first to get there how personal did it get they could not be more personal they the great great comment you had in the south pole the the animosity between shackleton earn shackleton and robert falcon scott in england both aiming for the south pole they'd gone together once they tried to reach the first time together tremendous animosity in america it was between frederick cook and and robert and perry tremendous animosity and among mountaineers there was a competition it was and that added to the excitement of course depress might have even exaggerated the animosity but it certainly was what people followed what people people were either scott men or or or shackleton men they lined up on one side or the other and and what we follow with these people what what i'm fascinated by beyond the sheer struggle that these people went through the noble struggle and how that was a major of the heroic the leadership skills the different the differences in the type of leadership skill of a scott shackleton perry at amundsen they were leaders in very different ways and we have a lot to learn even today as from these people could they were they were truly leaders of human beings and and thrust in the most dire situations trying to survive when you read these stories and you simply do not know how anyone could survive here's a call from anthony in auburn new york for edward larson author of to the edges of the earth hello adeniyi hello jimbo great night tonight.

portland moro england frederick cook scott shackleton perry auburn new york robert falcon america amundsen anthony edward larson
"south pole" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"south pole" Discussed on WEEI

"Flagpole in the south pole bot very tells four tom brady on boston's number one morning show kirk in tallahassee sports radio 937 weei duck vaas did all right it's jamie progressive number one number two employee leave a message at the high jamie it to you jamie don't be alarmed but i think there's a guy following you maybe we should get that 'guarddog we talked about nothing to scary maybe like a be sean with an attitude progressive collision insurance covers injure dogs and cats and no extra cost so wait the guy stood up when i stood up he's on the phone he's looking right at me lien as does my reflection don't tell anyone about this progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates pick up it's not available in new hampshire in north carolina drive home is just better with seattle arnold to my michael holly rich key maybe all these guys network are done at pouf we never see him again that's likely but we don't know right now ben roethlisberger kobe bryant look real bad for both those guys right away it now it's not even brought up with them that's right the federal way five hundred yards we recall it brian was ornithology retired botha to numbers ever tiring guy appointment listening in new england dale and holly with richie sweeties from two to six pm sports radio weei it's navies after christmas sale with twenty five percent off dresses that rarely till unveiled men's under land ty one get one at fifty percent off plus when you buy to browse you'll get two three now let me fees introducing the new and improved nee ccr reward denver rewards program starring you with exceptional knee waste as saying bush.

kobe bryant ben roethlisberger seattle sports boston denver tallahassee north carolina michael holly weei radio tom brady new hampshire christmas insurance company england south pole
"south pole" Discussed on USA Today

USA Today

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"south pole" Discussed on USA Today

"A plane returned from the south pole on wednesday completing a daring rescue mission to save the lives of two sick workers who were trapped at one of the hardest places to get to on the planet i'm charlene washington and i'm here with dole price high doyle a good afternoon yet today we're talking about quite an adventure are the just happened down there at the very bottom of the world when uh as the dangerous rescue mission was undertaken in what's the middle of winter down there so why are these workers here at the south pole station what exactly are they doing with this particular station at the rim in american uh the amounts anson scott of south pole station which is i believe the only one that right at the south pole at the very bottom of the world and what they do there is a scientific research they're all either uh uh there either employees of the us government or their contractors the couple folks that get sick uh this week were a employees of lockheed martin and they do a lot of a scientific research so i mean there are no permanent inhabitants human inhabitants of of the continent event artika i send out owned by any one it's just step managed by a several different governments of the world and several other governments have these the research stations down there i know there's a british one and a russian and i believe canadian and then the the one at the south pole as americans are these these were researchers and scientists studying a artika in her long exactly do they stay here at the south pole station for the w the folks who were you are over winter and that's what they call the group of people who were there on over the winter others forty eight of them uh they're year uh they are for this particular winter and in their summer people can come and go of you can take flights in and out all summer uh it's not a big deal is as much as it is in the winter and the reason it's very hard to get there in the winter pitch black and its allies on i yet unimaginably cold i mean.

charlene washington south pole station lockheed martin anson scott us
"south pole" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"south pole" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Eight four four five hundred forty two forty two it's halloween evening in the new york is uh reeling from the latest the muslim terror attack eight dead in the lower manhattan a uh they refuge e or emigrants from ma was back kazakhstan who got a picture of of up now us cbs news god it these he's gotta he's got a full fear the in this picture his twenty nine years old south fool all a bull of south pole is he was the one who who killed a people jumped out of the truck screaming allah law who akhbar and the according to the new york daily news that were visible tyre tracks on the bodies of two the victims as the truck continued to path carve a path of carnage along the bike path officer mark says i'm sure this young man was returning from his volunteer relief work in puerto rico of course yes yes indeed eight four four five hundred forty two forty to seventy one should the democrats in virginia be blamed for the new york terror attack for planting the idea because of that ad in the same way that sarah palin was blamed for targeting gaby gifford that's a good point i i don't think he i don't think we'll see the same comparisons being made the to the democrats in virginia this terrorist attack as though were were roth after us sarah palin had randall the little add with the the the lad that had nothing to do with a gaby gifford's other than the fact that that she was being targetted for defeat not for being shot mark you're next with how we cargo ahead mark are you cry why i i love this country i really do but i i wake up every morning and i and i wonder what stupid garbage iraq again and uh the payment camp do we had after pearl harbor.

manhattan ma kazakhstan new york daily news puerto rico virginia sarah palin gaby gifford iraq halloween officer randall mark twenty nine years
"south pole" Discussed on USA Today

USA Today

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"south pole" Discussed on USA Today

"A plane returned from the south pole on wednesday completing a daring rescue mission to save the lives of two sick workers who were trapped at one of the hardest places to get team on the planet i'm charlene washington and i'm here with dole price high doyle hey good afternoon yet today we're talking about quite an adventure are the just happened down there at the very bottom of the world when i was too dangerous rescue mission was undertaken in what's the middle of winter down there so why are these workers here at the south pole station what exactly are they doing with this particular station at the rim in america the allman said scott south pole station which is i believe the only one that right at the south pole at the very bottom of the world and what they do there is scientific research they're all either uh there either employees of the us government or their contractors the couple folks that got sick uh this week were a employees of lockheed martin and they do a lot of a scientific research so i'll be there are no permanent and inhabitants human inhabitants of of the continent event artika it's not owned by anyone it's just managed by a several different governments of the world and several governments have these the research stations down there i know there's a british one and a russian and i believe canadian and then the one at the south pole is americans so these these were researchers and scientists studying a artika and how long exactly do they stay here at the south pole station will for the the folks who were you they are over winter and that's what they call the group of people who were there over the winter others forty eight of them uh there year of their for this particular winter and in their summer people can come and go of you can take flights in and out all summer uh it's not a big deal is as much as it is in the winter and the reason it's very hard to get there in the winter pitch in its on your unimaginably cold.

charlene washington allman scott south pole station lockheed martin america us