36 Burst results for "South Australia"

Fresh update on "south australia" discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

00:32 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "south australia" discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

"Stuff. That's not how it works. But sometimes people think the point is this winter kind generous. It's an active love and whenever extra we have. We share with other people with refugees. Poor people ends up somewhere and is that act of caring. That of life is what we do. So it's not materialism if you know how to use these presence and these gifts and stuff what many people do just can see the board over there. Instead of buying presents for people we just do a donation safe to the bangladesh for neutral to somebody else s at the end back over there. Every year this time of year we do collection for these kids. Who can really make use of money. So you think of present to give to your husband or wife give donations to the bangladesh orphanage and we send a receipt to your husband. Your wife say husband. This is your christmas present. The donations the bangladesh often into the put a society which have given on your behalf quite beautiful. See doing out of love for the other person so everybody wins whatever. It is an act of kindness and that's of laugh that acts of generosity should really be respected and it's not just materialism it's not just not trying to get something more is just trying to love more tried to embrace more because best accent. Christmas is actually sending a nice present for someone you really hate. So maybe this christmas and maybe your ex it may be the boss workers you. It may be somebody really cruelly abused you. Cut them something you they like and send them. As a christmas present all beings be happy and will include them in your circle and see what they do. I remember years ago. We were having a this fight with klay trucks coming past. I'm honesty for those remember. Those times he's dangerous klay trucks coming past honesty and eventually we tried to protest about it and ended up going in core and a member just one of our monks. He had this wonderful idea. Let's send a christmas card so they is people. The buddhist society were fighting in court so we sent him a christmas. Card is wonderful thing. I said wow you. Put us really know about spirituality in even knows anniversary someone. The buddhist society was fighting for the piece of a monastery. The safety of the people in note still. We sent christmas cuts as a wonderful little thing to do as he puts our world in inter perspective kindness. Generosity love by making guesses like that is wonderful things too because sometimes when you know where it's coming from it's a kind gift is so hard to resist so we use the idea of gifts at this time. You know for way of getting more people in our circle having peace in goodwill and trying to find some ways to have circuit breakers to the. Hey the ill will the carrying on from the past misunderstandings. The the terrible things. We just make our lives just so miserable. How'd ideal spirituality is not to divide the world but trying to unite the world trying to mend such problems which separate people so it's wonderful thing that buddhists celebrate christmas is chris should celebrate our waste anything which is good and wonderful. We want to set up by but we make it they of these traditions not this superficial rituals sometimes. It's the rituals which divide us the way you have to do it this way. You're where you have to do it that way and sometimes not even here. The you know you have all the etiquette for this in this whole below the most important etiquette when you come into a buddhist temple. It's not taking off your shoes. it's not not pointing the feet of the buddha's not been properly addressed the most important etiquette when you come in here is to be kind kindness compassionate most important thing because i remember one time a talk. Few years ago there was a woman in the middle of mytalk lay down fell asleep and started snowing in the middle of one of my talks and i was so disappointed when somebody woke up. I was because they woke up. We found out afterwards that this poor lady was having such a difficult time at home she wasn't sleeping janice there for days and this was one place she felt safe. Accept it and cared for. And i actually. I told off the people while the happens again to sleep was it was a point of these talks which the monks and nuns. Give it a taste to be kind compassionate. Open the door of your heart. People draw circles which conclude more and more people so if somebody is like that and they want to take sleet please right there. Maybe we can go and get a pillow from one of our rooms for you. That's compassionate. that's kind of spirituality. So yeah we have these rules. We have these etiquette. Try to keep them. Remember the most important antica. Sometimes i remind us here. This is the buddhist society western. Australia is buddhist. We put that one. I it's not the society of western australia and put. This is buddhist first of all first of all society. The country you live in the state you live in that comes afterwards so the buddhist society of western australia is not in competition with the buddhist society of victoria or the buddhist society of south australia. That western australia comes at the very end. That's not so important. Even society is not important with all its rules and regulations and constitutions yet is important but most importing is a buddhist part of it so we try and be put is and what do we about being buddhist religion. Even the religion comes before even that even before religion true spirituality. Kindness comes first so always saying that you know what's the most important. The highest priority and of course is to be kind to be compassionate to be inclusive which is why that someone like jen. Cia as soon as he saw christmas. Put us mexico. So i can include the kind that can be kind if it's peaceful. Yeah i love peaceful word for pieces and party. Word for peace in party is center. You know in sanskrit shanty now. What people in india which one another shanty peace and center is a word for peace in pali. So of course santa claus peaceful mr klaus. You must be a buddhist. That's that's where you got the word for saint for no the word for site. Even sanctity comes from that. Old indian were because all of these languages like latin even english indo aryan languages now. They came from from india. Now this is why we have many indian words when some of the words which are learned as a buddhist. You understand where these words came from the ones. We have now either like lucky. No of the english word lucky comes from from lucky. He which was a goddess of good fortune. An indian catis to luckiest. We know part of god of good fortune. So it's amazing when you go into these ancient cultures and done west some of these ideas and concepts of we have today come from so center. What she's saying he's a peaceful one. So of course. No santa claus going home. He's not peacefully enough. Get rid of the bell. Get rid of the ho ho ho meditate locker manca now you're real center piece of goodwill have an idea what pieces religions should worship piece more than dogma and i should have goodwill compassion as i part of their creed not to say we're the best and better than other people but compassion is the best and compassion is better than hatred and will including this is better than excluding having a big circle is better than a small circle and the bigger that circle can be then the more spiritual we truly are the more we can't change if you can't stop people mistreating you abusing mistreated people. You've abuse people yourselves and we've all done that so we can't stop that what we can do is included into the fabric of our life. Not to say it's wrong but it's part of a part of life which gives us the opportunity to really test our wisdom and to strengthen our.

India English Mexico South Australia ONE Few Years Ago Christmas Today Bangladesh Latin Chris Western Australia JEN Sanskrit Australia Santa Claus One Place Indo Klaus
Interview With Dan Westergren

PhotoBiz Xposed

05:07 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview With Dan Westergren

"I was recently exchanging emails with today's guest. A bad he's premium membership and it turns out he has a love of sauk cling lock. Do he used to rice and he even spent time in south australia from the us. I while on assignment for white for national geographic now is picked up and i poked a few more questions by any told me on the nat geo and commercial travel photographer stock at home trying to decide how to make money with that getting on an airplane right now putting my towards commercial real estate architectural things but honestly don't know what's going to work out a cape listening to the podcast about facebook marketing for portraits etc thinking. Maybe that's the way to go. We exchange and other email to and i post a few questions and he said for more than twenty years. I was director of photography for national geographic. Travel up magazine. I had an editor who let me find the graph. A couple of stories a year usually adventure top stories and i was lucky enough to photograph stories to the magazine. Such as climbing mont blanc the matterhorn and skiing to the north pole now following that exchange. I invited him on for this recording. I'm talking about dan west to grin and i'm wrapped to having this now. Dan welcome andrew so good to talk to you. Do you still pinch yourself when you hear an intra liked about the things that you've done in the past. I do i do. It's it's kind of funny. It's a hard act. Live up to for many many years. I would tell my photographer friends who seemed to have up and down lives. You know the freelance yoyo. And i would joke to them. Well you know. I'm addicted to my paycheck. And i have the chance to send you guys out into the field my editor lets me go out every now and then you know. This is working pretty well. Well you know the media marketplace changes and so now here. I am not working on the staff at national geographic anymore doing some projects for them but just trying to figure out how to make this thing happen as a photographer. Yeah the tables have really turned. I think not only for youtha for all of us. Haven't i this year. Oh yeah yeah. I mean and it's a double whammy with a travel photographer because i don't even of course you can imagine after all those years. I have this huge rolodex of all these photo editors of magazines and things like this but nobody even pays money for magazines to take pictures anymore. It's like the rug was pulled out from under my profession. The one savior for me. The last few years has been you could either call it native advertising or content marketing or partnership projects. That's the kind of things like last year. I got to go to canada. Three times for national geographic. To do ten day long stories about places and so i did prince edward island nova scotia new brunswick last year and british columbia and those were my favorite Trips to take. Because i will talk to my producer at national geographic since i had a background in doing the photo editing. At national geographic. The photo editors really acted like a regular editor at most magazines. If we thought that a story was not sufficiently visual we would tell people. We didn't think we should do the story. And a lot of magazines. The phone will editors are just kind of in their corner in somebody throws them a manuscript is air pictures to go with this so when they tell me okay we wanna to do an online piece about adventures in new brunswick ten adventures in new brunswick will then i get to study new brunswick i pull out a map i get defined tended ventures. I contact all the people that i think might lead me to those adventures and then make pictures that i hope people find interesting and then when we get back in my case usually i sit down and they know that i've chosen the photo subjects with story line and so they don't even send a writer. They have a friend of mine. Who i get on the phone marielle. And is her name. And she sorta ghosts rights for me. And i just tell her what my experience was like and why i went to particular plex. And that's just that's what i love about. It all is to do the research into a place and then actually go take those pictures myself in sounds amazing and said the way you described this right now the role you had. Oh have you familiar with the movie. The secret life of walter. Mitty of course. Yes you the walter. Meeting is at your role in national geographic traveler. It was a little bit different because he was more had a role that we would call film review which were the people that actually got to look at the pictures. I didn't have a big role in putting the magazine together. So you know that was kind of funny. It was interesting that i love that movie. You know he got to go out into the field. And i've just i've seen that movie so many times i was watching it and my kids. My son is twenty two. My daughter's twenty five and they're really into music and david bowie died. We had to listen to all the versions of space. Oddity that we could find.

Travel Up Magazine Dan West New Brunswick South Australia Skiing Andrew Facebook DAN Prince Edward Island Marielle Nova Scotia British Columbia United States Canada Mitty Walter David Bowie
What could Sydney's outbreak mean for Christmas?

Coronacast

02:09 min | Last month

What could Sydney's outbreak mean for Christmas?

"And when we created alison. Yesterday they were amid three cases. I think and that has blossomed over the past twenty four hours or sorry which really after several weeks of really really low levels in australia has come as a real bolt from the blue. I mean what do we know. And what don't we know about what could have happened here. So northern beaches. It's a peninsula that goes north from the harbour skirting with one side of the ocean. Size pit water. Goes up to a narrow point. Barron joy head at palm beach kind of starts runabout manley. So that's where it is and we talked. Yesterday the two people were up at avalon. What overnight and you as as people listen to corona cast. It could well have changed so we apologize if the numbers are not quite right but as we record corona cast there are seventeen cases in all twelve nuance that emerged during the day. And the where doing what they promised. Early on in the day was that for the five they knew about they were going to do genomic testing on them and get results back last night but as we record this we still don't have the results of these. What we know is actually quite a lot. Quite quickly is that they've identified a drummer. Who in a band and played in three to ourselves in one club. Penrith ourselves the kirby club. And i've i've alone our cell and three people who were part of this cluster. Apparently were in the avalon oursel- so they know quite a lot about where these people have caught this what they know about the twelve the extra twelve during the day as we speak. We don't know very much about so. This is a cluster. that's growing. It's a bit like south australia. In the sense that you can get really spooked by the fact that you've got big numbers quickly or you can be reassured that the contact tracing is pretty good and it's picking up things very quickly i choose to be reassured by it so i think it is going to get much as it's gonna get much bigger than it is but they're really tracking it down. A lot of people on the northern beaches are getting tested. How are long queues and when you look at. The pictures of people are wearing masks which is fantastic.

Barron Joy Alison Kirby Club Manley Avalon Palm Beach Australia Penrith South Australia
Here we go again? More problems with hotel quarantine

Coronacast

05:08 min | Last month

Here we go again? More problems with hotel quarantine

"I'm health reported teigen. Tayla journalists dr norman swan. It's friday the fourth of december and norman. Just as we felt like we were getting on top of the south australian outbreak and everything was coming towards what felt like it could have been an even keel in australia. We've heard that there's been another case of hotel. Quarantine being transmitted to someone who isn't in hotel quarantine this time a domestic worker at a hotel in sydney. How do we deal with these scholley. That just an inevitable part of leaving during a pandemic so how do we deal with them when they happen. So far starts new the caveat that the time of recording this corona cast. We've only got partial information. More information will know marriage but this is going to happen from time to time. Not just in new south wales but elsewhere initially. It sounded disorders persons working across two facilities. It may just actually look located facility. You'll remember in victoria. People are strictly working in one. They are going to genomics just to work out. Where exactly this person got up from. Is it hotel quarantine order. They get it from the community again by the time you just as we the answer to that question nonetheless when you test workers in quota quarantine regularly you will pick up positive cases and you might pick up positive cases that are relatively mildly symptomatic or symtomatic. The otherwise card. So it's a good thing that we are detecting them and hopefully we're getting onto very quickly and they are testing the context of this person so we just need to see what happens here. But it's going to a car and we're bringing people overseas with coronavirus. This is gonna is gonna occur in all jurisdictions and nobody can look done new south wales or victoria or anywhere else. This is now going to be part of covid life moving forward and presumably as long as we are surveilling. That really closely. There's no need to go into full lockdown mired if you're picking up those cases very close to the source that's right and you wills has had outbreaks and quite significant outbreaks managed to bring them back down to zero. So this is going to be the same thing i can't. I can't imagine that this is going to be a problem of the dimensions. Of say. The purview cluster in south australia. But who knows. We'll see that. Knock allowing the premier. Wis necessarily did say that he wouldn't hesitate to close the borders again. Norman you give up on your dream of seeing caucus no. I'm still hoping that Run a me hotel. Quarantine new south wales or not. Well the other big coronavirus news. It's that in the last thirty six hours or so is that the uk is going to roll out the final vaccine really exciting to have real life people getting real vaccine at the end of this really really long pandemic approval so it's not a proper approval obviously just on a dive to make sure there's no major safety issues and the risk versus equation given how many cases get the uk favors just using this vaccine. They reckon the risk is low but they they will not have really looked at the data from the trials in any great detail. This point so it looks as if it's safe will it prevent infection. We don't know that yet it. May it certainly will prevent covid nineteen disease which is great given. You've had so many deaths in the uk and for us. It means that we shouldn't be rushing at all. We're not in an emergency situation. We'd almost no virus in australia apart from hotel quarantine and we can wait and we can let the british to be blunt. The british and the americans make mistakes learn how to distribute it double check that it's safe when they've given it to millions of people over the next few weeks and we will will put us much better shape from when we implement so the approval for the visor vaccine. Maybe some of the others will be over the next six weeks maybe longer. And then it's that we will do it properly. We actually talked about that in a bit more detail in yesterday's episode of corona cost. So if you're interested go back and check that one out. The other thing. Norman that i could say a very popular new story yesterday about someone who'd had sips associated with covid nineteen and he seemed to have a really dramatic recovery because of a massive dose vitamin say. What do we make of this not march. We'd be my first response was fantastic for the patient. It's a one off. There's no randomize ation here. People will argue that. You don't need a randomized trial with a parachute in other words. Prove parachute works. You wouldn't do a randomized trial parachute works. You try it out. So here's somebody that they thought was gonna die. Didn't die from mega doses of vitamin c. They'll think that they know what. The mechanism is presumably. They'll say that it's because it says potent antioxidant and it's doing something for the free radicals that may not be the case. Very high doses of vitamin c are actually pro. Oxidant and i suspect that if this works they haven't got a clue why but it might be a signal that you would actually test this out in people over on a larger scale to see what's going on so

Teigen Dr Norman Swan Victoria Quarantine New South Wales Norman New South Wales Australia UK Sydney South Wales South Australia
Tu-whit tu-Whoo might be buying Wondery?

podnews

03:18 min | Last month

Tu-whit tu-Whoo might be buying Wondery?

"Will wonder is new owner. The amazon the wall street journal in gadget report that talks going on valuing wandering around three hundred million dollars. It might all fall apart. Both apple and sony looked into buying the company last month the released version. Two point one of their podcast measurement technical guidelines for public comment. There's no change log so we've made one for you. There's some recommendations of user agent structure apple watch and a statement about ip version six. Brian bar letter from an ad tech newsletter sounds profitable is disappointed telling us at the press release absolutely overstates the promise of client confirmed ad plays ultimately fall short on all of its other goals spotify as large twenty twenty wraps for podcasters with a personal. Look at the data your podcast. You'll find it linked from the spotify for podcasters dashboard. Steve wilson has left apple podcasts to joined los angeles podcast network q code as chief strategy officer. Poltrak has published top. Us publishers for november. Iheart radio is still number. One wondering has jumped from sixth to fourth and incomplete rancor it measures participating publishes only congratulations to jim collison. Who celebrates ten years of home gadget geeks. Today there's a special live show tonight at nine pm eastern anchor powered more than one million show launches in two thousand and twenty. According to the verge spotify says anchor shows account for more consumption in terms of time spent listening than any other third party podcast hosting or distribution provider on its platform. Well specifies made a big jump in. Us app store charts over the past few days. Joe rogan became an exclusive show this week but it also coincides with the release of year in review. An algorithm can highly viral products. That is all to brag about. Excellent music taste. Spotify made a similar jump in app store rankings. Last year when they released here reviews well anyway. Investors liked what they saw all the stock jumped by twelve point six percent yesterday. Metronome is a new landing page for podcasts. Willing to an example today. Thomas g martin was a private investigator has investigated podcast booking agencies and things. They're all rubbish in response. Somebody called designed by creatives reckons. That thomas's article is nonsense. We don't have a horse in this race. Although a bit bored of the automated emails from people wanting to be a guest on this podcast. Which is you can notice. Doesn't do guests on the seventeen bucks a month plan which is always plan. Everyone gets private feeds. Everyone gets two hundred and fifty subscribers private subscribers. That's captivates mark. Asquith in portland. A new weekly podcast about the world of podcasting. Which don't today with some sethi and with me you'll find pod land in all of your regular podcast apps probably and in australia. Rupert murdoch's news corp has teamed up with lachlan murdoch's nova entertainment to produce a set of daily news headlines. Podcasts called news feeds editions for new south wales queensland south australia and victoria or you know the murdoch's control of the media is one concern of the media diversity inquiry so there's that to

Brian Bar Apple Iheart Radio Jim Collison Spotify Steve Wilson Wall Street Journal Amazon Thomas G Martin Sony Joe Rogan Los Angeles United States Asquith News Corp Thomas Lachlan Murdoch
Why are health authorities still struggling to communicate?

Coronacast

03:48 min | Last month

Why are health authorities still struggling to communicate?

"I'm helter for teigen. Tayla and opposition journalists daughter. Norman swan tuesday the first of december and this time a year ago there was a virus circulating in hubei province just starting to reported probably sprayed from mid-november and things are just gathering pace under the radar one year ago. We'll have to deep dive into the early days of the virus. But not today norman. Okay hold myself back well. The last couple of days have been a role ride again in adelaide. Norman we've heard about a man who was out and about with covid and there were question marks about whether he should have been an isolation or not and the communication seems a bit messy. And it's been a bit hard to know what he was expected to do. Or whether he understood what he was expected to do. And even now i can't really make sense of what he was expected to do whether he knew it or not. How do we make sense of these sorts of things and if we can't communicate it well then. How do we know that people actually know what to do. Yeah i think what you're seeing here is an early forgetfulness. If you like of the key message from this pandemic throughout deploy doesn't matter really what country you're in is that if you've got consistent messaging from the leadership in other words political leadership and your public health dealership then people trust that and the follow it and hopefully that advice is solid and australia by large. It has been solid. So that from prime minister to brandon murphy and from dana andrews and brett sutton and alan chang and so on so in other words. You've you've had your good synchrony. We've had very policies in australia in terms of lockdown okay. They've been controversial. But communication has been fairly consistent now in toria the data looked they were transparent but the actually weren't that transparent sometimes very hard for us to make sense of what they were actually saying. And i think that reflected robin name being deliberately obscure. It just reflected the fact that they're contact tracing was in a bit of a mess and therefore the really have good data to pass on. So now you've got this situation and it's very important to remember this because support for the next pandemic important if the coronavirus comes back in australia. Such as you've had in south australia is that surfaced jones behaviorally well differently. They've come forward to be tested however a wobble like this does create a problem for community understanding because the temptation here of course is to victim blame. Oh there's this guy and he's out in a boat and probably even imply that yesterday on corona cast. He's been out of the boat. What a decayed during this and so on and so forth it turns out. He's actually behave quite well. And if there was confusion over communication that confusion has been all levels the understanding. We seem to have got yesterday. Was that he in fact was a casual. Contact was told to wait until he was tested. He was tested. And i said we got the result. The result was negative so he wasn't in quarantine and then he was told to get another test at eleven days which apparently was positive and it was while he was positive that he was out in a boat. I'm not sure that the nudity was positive but he was out in about roundabout that period of time. So it's just another example where you're creating danger when you're not sure of your facts and and you jump in people us we jump into and but we are assuming that the information is accurate. Not making any excuses about this is just another lesson that how the authorities communicate is essential to the control of the pandemic and to this one. Because it's not over yet

Teigen Tayla Norman Swan Brandon Murphy Brett Sutton Alan Chang Hubei Australia Dana Andrews Adelaide Norman Robin South Australia Confusion
Borders are coming down. Were they based on science or politics?

Coronacast

05:06 min | Last month

Borders are coming down. Were they based on science or politics?

"It is thursday the twenty sixth of november. And we're approaching the festive december norman. Which at least for me in queensland means that board is reopening to almost the rest of australia entirely which is a first for months now which is really great especially families who wanna get together For christmas and new year but were the borders. What do we know about border closures. In terms of how useful they are in stopping the spread. Is it more about science or is it more about politics. It depends on the date. So if you look at the victorian second wave new south wales the clusters in new south. Wales did originate in victoria before they closed the victorian border the where some people who turned up in queensland who would be in victoria so borders do work when you've got a fair bit of virus circulating there but the question is once you get almost no virus circulating. Do the borders need to stay closed. And if you remember queen opened up for a short period before closing gone again before the second wave occurred westminster. There has never really opened up. Although it's it's saying it slightly less onerous now but it's really effectively closed the moment if a borders closed and it's really now from now on wwl i think really effect most other places are open. South australia will eventually have access to states. Once they get over this pick up with the current outbreak. I think from now on is just politics because the risk is so low question is. Are we going to slap a border on again. If there's a cluster outbreak in new south wales or accuster outbreak in victoria me. The probably will be customer outbreaks because we're bringing people from overseas. The provia customer outbreak can in queensland because bringing people from overseas. I we're going to keep going backwards and forwards well propeller. She says no. She's not going to do that well. She's not gonna do that then. Why would she do it. Not in other words. She could do it in the future. Why has she done it in the past. I think that's no that the queensland election is passed then poltics becomes less of an issue. The west australian election is still to come. And i think quite honestly even though the risk is incredibly low if not nonexistent w borders will probably remain closed. Because there's an election coming you can see why states want to protect the resources of the health department's and protect the people that leaving there but it does seem like quite a blunt instrument to control spread. When you think about the size of the states that we have in australia blunt. It may be but it's probably been fairly effective when you had a lot of virus circulating but now is almost non and we're pretty much well in control. The problem you've gotten w for example is people have gone back to virtually back to normal and the virus comes in then you got a problem because it could spread but their risk is much more and the primary mcgowan has said. This martin mcgowan said this much more from hotel. Quarantine then is from new south wales victoria and they would have to do what south australia's done. Which is reboot contact tracing when the get outbreaks. So they're not ready for it and that's part of the problem as well so like you say we're coming into the end of the year with almost completely open borders across australia. What do you say the first half or the. Let's let's start with the first half of twenty twenty one looking like well. We're still waiting for vaccine rollout. Well i think that what will happen is that will continue to bring back people from overseas. Australians from overseas. I suspect we'll see a bubble open up with new zealand. Maybe the pacific islands as well. So there's no quarantine between us because we've got almost no cases so the new zealand to keep on quarantining us going there. We would almost cases. I suspect they will relax and open it up to us. The need us is poorly more than we need them. But that would be nice. Pacific islands pretty low low risk then got singapore which is a bit more awkward because the it being a transportation hob so i think you start to see. Some international bubbles opening up and. I think that you're going to see the odd outbreak here or there in australia but kept under control and we'll get back to some kind of normal life throughout australia and circulating normally no then the question will be at. What point. would you open up our borders to international travel and that will depend. I suspect on digital vaccine passports in other words except you people from overseas if they'd been immunized and of course that will depend on whether the vaccines prevent infection or just covid nineteen disease because if they don't prevent infection then you could be bringing people in from overseas who are carrying covid nineteen and could spread it here but if they prevent in which is going to take a little wild into the twenty twenty one to discover. You may not see vaccine passports being used in australia until we're sure how effective the vaccines are preventing transmission. But i think that you could see international flights starting sooner than many expected. Well

Queensland Victoria WWL Australia New South Wales Martin Mcgowan Norman New South South Wales South Australia Westminster Wales Mcgowan New Zealand Pacific Islands Nineteen Disease Singapore
Is COVID-19 seasonal after all?

Coronacast

06:48 min | Last month

Is COVID-19 seasonal after all?

"Hello this is corona cost a daily podcast all about the corona virus. I'm health reported teigen tyler. I'm physician and journalist alter norman swan. It's tuesday the twenty four. Th of november cinnamon one of the questions that we've gotten a lot from people about over the course of this pandemic so far is whether it's seasonal and on one hand yes. The melbourne second wave happened in winter. But it's hard to really taes out. What's the difference between seasonality and a new virus in globe of susceptible people but in the states which is going into its wind up and also in in other parts of the northern hemisphere was seeing a really straight upwards curve a really scary looking curve. so what do we know about the season -ality or otherwise of coronavirus were joining the first wave. It was said that there was so much corona virus around swamped the effects of seasonality. Although most people expected this to be a winter virus a seasonal virus but they couldn't guarantee it and you just weren't necessarily seeing the effects of it on this week's health report podcast. I've been talking to chris maureen maher. Who's these of health metrics and evaluation in seattle and they've been doing global modeling now on the covid nineteen pandemic which has turned out to be pretty accurate so for the world for different countries and for the united states and they say that when they look at the big data they do find a seasonal effect and they. It's actually quite strong and the fascinating thing is that they predict that the virus in the united states will start to peak deaths from the coronavirus will peak roundabout inauguration day and tail off towards the end of january into february without any vaccine. You'll see a natural peaking and tailing off. We won't go down to zero but it will start to ebb away so in the joe biden was like trump. he would take four credits on day. Two of his presidency for turning around the pandemic. but it'll be natural. What's the driver for it to pay them. Is it that people interacting with a set number of people and you just kind of run out of context. How does how does that pay. Start to come down again. No it's obviously a little bit of an effect of natural museum that but even by january you still not going to see the majority of americans infected with the covid nineteen virus so a little bit of an effect because what they say. Is that even twenty percent coverage of immunity associated with some social distancing cooed tailing off. Now i think they it's simply how their virus response to temperature and although it's still in the middle of winter and pretty cold there are plenty of viruses that have most of their fates in autumn early winter and seem to die way in midwinter and influences a bit like that where influenza unistrokes tends to hit more in autumn than winter depths of winter. Not that we have much of winter. So yep they think it's seasonal tending often and if you are lucky with the vaccine the vaccine does prevent transmission then have an even more dramatic faked as the year goes through. Yeah i suppose they were some early nickname mention. It starts came out earlier in the saying that the virus survived longer at lower temperatures and in low humidity are. Maybe that's the season thing. But what does it mean for us australia. Coming into next year's winter if a vaccine isn't widely available by that time well if we've kept our international borders secure and we haven't had too many outbreaks and we're still social distancing to some extent when we need to enroll able to control then maybe not very much because the won't very much virus around but if there is a significant say outbreak from hotel quarantine for still doing it at that point. Then you could see a major takeoff and victoria. Tasmania parts of south. Australia would be vulnerable to that. So i'm trying to cross my mind that because we have talked about season on corona's before and i feel like we said that it wasn't safe no so will be wrong or is this just more information. I think you feel the wrong thing. T very different. I remember that people saying that probably was a season paper. You couldn't see it. In all the noise of an strength of the pandemic the pandemic was so strong it was masking a seasonal fake underneath the name what they thought was as the pandemic turned into an epidemic and the virus became endemic in other words. Steady in the community and keeping on recurring. Then you would see the effect of seasonality which might mean then you'd see a surge as the goats colder. I like that vision of memory. Yes yeah but no doubts kirk listeners. Who got a much better than either you. Army will fix us up. That's the lately and speaking of other research related things that we've talked about before and we now have more information about Antibodies on the only thing in our immune system and this nearly such out of monash university that shows that perhaps immunity to the coronavirus is long lasting than we feed. Yes so little bit of physiology. Here there are two elements to attack or threaten sweep elements to attacking a virus delicious. Talk of two of them for the moment. The first wave is really the antibody those chemicals in the bloodstream that attach to the spikes of the corona virus and stop it docking with tissues in our body and hopefully kill the virus as well and they're called neutralizing antibodies. now they'll come out of nowhere. They're produced by white blood cells white blood cells that produce antibodies b cells and some b cells have memory for the antibodies. They need to produce. It was a waste of energy then producing antibodies. All the time to a virus that they're not seeing but if avars enters the body they wake up and they say oh hello. I've seen this one before and they start manufacturing. Antibodies and this study identify found a way through using monoclonal. Antibodies to actually attach themselves to these b cells. Identify them they to twenty five people in march who had corona virus and follow them through to september looking at these b. memory cells and what they showed was that they maintain themselves in other words. You can still find b. Memory cells at the end of eight months so that suggests that the body retain the memory and the ability to produce antibodies to the coronavirus sars cov e to. This is not a peer reviewed study hasn't been published in a major journal yet but it is an interesting finding very sophisticated study and great needs to people who've had coronavirus but also for the quest for vaccine. That's absolutely right

Teigen Tyler Norman Swan Chris Maureen Maher United States Joe Biden Melbourne Seattle Australia Influenza Tasmania Corona Victoria Monash University Kirk Army
A donut day before the storm? Is six days going to be enough?

Coronacast

02:31 min | 2 months ago

A donut day before the storm? Is six days going to be enough?

"I'm health reported. Teigen tyler an assistant journalist author norman swan. It's friday the twentieth of november water week. What a week in date especially for people in south australia. And if you listening with thinking of you in lockdown at the moment but norman as well. Yesterday there were no new cases in south australia there in super hard lockdown if that finding more cases over the next couple of days can i just go straight back to normal as soon as lockdowns iva well. That's possible i suspect that what The authorities will do is give themselves another four or five day window just to make sure there aren't any because the six days is predicated. They think this is a short incubation period. Virus and we talked about that in yesterday's krona cast. It's unlikely that's true. It's probably just virus coronavirus like any other and it's going to be five days and therefore might wanna wait another few days just to check it out. They'll probably release people and a bit more and allow people to go out for more exercise and so on so it's going to be much more like a stage. Three i would imagine would be fairly safe to do. Going back to zero is probably politically a bit. Risky. because you don't want to reimpose it if if more cases reappear but you might relax and let people to go out so i suspect you might be on a ten day cycle in south australia. But what do i know. It's fantastic news. There are zero cases with a lot of testing being done and is a lot of testing. It's in in proportion. It's about the same. As victoria was at the peak of their pandemic. And we've been in touch with south australian health trying to see if we can get some more information about this strain that they were talking about that that the public health officer was saying how short incubation period and was mild. But they haven't been able to release that genomic info yet so we actually nar if it's materially different to the other corona virus strains that secular around the world. It's not. You can't really be unless some mutations. has occurred this is virus. That's come in from with somebody from brisbane. It's going to be one of the circulating viruses and britain. I'm not aware that the british are saying that they've got anything peculiar but their viruses are behaving. This was said at the beginning of the new south wales when they got somebody coming in from victorian you got the crossroads motel say that they were noticing very short incubation times. It was a different kind of fires. You didn't hear much more beyond that. Because i think it was just an artifact of the cluster where you just got intense spread during the cluster. Which makes you think that. It's a different virus. But in fact a different style of virus but in fact it's not

South Australia Teigen Tyler Norman Swan IVA Norman Victoria Brisbane Britain South Wales
"south australia" Discussed on From The Newsroom

From The Newsroom

02:19 min | 2 months ago

"south australia" Discussed on From The Newsroom

"Stripped bay. <Speech_Female> Panic buys cold traffic <Speech_Female> delays. After <Speech_Female> the has looked down <Speech_Female> nouncement yesterday afternoon. <Speech_Female> Now you can <Speech_Female> fully updates on the south. <Speech_Female> Australia looked down <Speech_Female> on news dot com <Speech_Female> or <SpeakerChange> download. <Speech_Male> bay. <Speech_Female> Panic buys cold traffic <Speech_Female> delays. After <Speech_Female> the has looked down <Speech_Female> nouncement yesterday afternoon. <Speech_Female> Now you can <Speech_Female> fully updates on the south. <Speech_Female> Australia looked down <Speech_Female> on news dot com <Speech_Female> or <SpeakerChange> download. <Speech_Male> Our app right now. The <Speech_Male> other news and <Speech_Male> an bio and takes <Speech_Male> coronavirus vaccine <Speech_Male> has been found to <Speech_Male> work even better than <Speech_Male> previously thought. <Speech_Male> The pharmaceutical <Speech_Male> giant said that its vaccine <Speech_Male> was ninety <Speech_Male> five percent effective <Speech_Male> against the bug. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> It will be sent off <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for emergency government. <Speech_Male> Health approval <SpeakerChange> was in the <Speech_Female> us and europe with indicts <Speech_Female> news sport. <Speech_Female> Now in queensland <Speech_Female> have come up victorious <Speech_Female> against the blues in <Speech_Female> last night's epic. <Speech_Female> Origin design <Speech_Female> with captain daly <Speech_Female> cherry evans becoming <Speech_Female> the very best queensland <Speech_Female> skipper to hoist <Speech_Female> the origin shield <Speech_Female> since cameron smith <Speech_Female> in two thousand seventeen <Speech_Female> now. The marines <Speech_Female> were considered the biggest <Speech_Female> underdog since nineteen <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> ninety-five <Speech_Female> but they fought incredible <Speech_Female> fought to outlaws <Speech_Female> the blues. Twenty <Speech_Female> two fourteen enough <Speech_Male> thrilling <SpeakerChange> grandstand <Speech_Male> finish. Hug <Speech_Male> it was jerry evans <Speech_Male> dig backup blues. <Speech_Male> Great poll gallon <Speech_Male> off the gallon <Speech_Male> code his coins <Speech_Male> team. The worst <Speech_Music_Male> ever have listened <Speech_Music_Male> to this <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> on behalf <Speech_Music_Male> of the west. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you very much. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> We'll be back. <Speech_Female> After these. <Speech_Female> In showbiz have listened <Speech_Music_Male> to this <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> on behalf <Speech_Music_Male> of the west. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you very much. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> We'll be back. <Speech_Female> After these. <Speech_Female> In showbiz news <Speech_Female> and australian actor hugh <Speech_Female> sheridan was set <Speech_Female> to star in the musical <Speech_Female> hedwig and <Speech_Female> the angry inch however <Speech_Female> the production has <Speech_Female> been canceled. <Speech_Female> After transgender <Speech_Female> activists <SpeakerChange> criticize <Speech_Male> the costing <Speech_Male> the musical was <Speech_Male> removed from the two thousand twenty <Speech_Male> one sydney festival <Speech_Male> rod after an activist <Speech_Male> group roasted <Speech_Male> the producers of the <Speech_Male> iphone costing the actor. <Speech_Male> Play a trans <Speech_Male> character in an <Speech_Male> open letter. The queen <Speech_Male> artist alliance. Australia <Speech_Male> said it was offensive <Speech_Male> that sheridan <Speech_Male> had been cast as the <Speech_Male> lead role of hedwig robinson <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> instead <Speech_Female> of a transgender person. <Speech_Female> I becky <Speech_Female> what is the most amount <Speech_Female> of cash ever <Speech_Male> given someone as <Speech_Male> a president or hush <Speech_Female> money dear. I'm not gonna <Speech_Female> go. Well i'd say. George <Speech_Female> clooney is up there <Speech_Female> with one of the best friends <Speech_Female> you could possibly <Speech_Female> ever ask for <Speech_Female> the fifty nine year. Old actor <Speech_Female> has confirmed that he <Speech_Female> wants gave one <Speech_Female> million dollars <Speech_Female> to h of his <Speech_Female> fourteen closest <Speech_Female> friends <Speech_Female> as a token of appreciation <Speech_Female> for all they've <Speech_Female> ever done. <Speech_Female> Yeah cleaning <Speech_Female> business partner randy <Speech_Female> good but said that. The <Speech_Female> oscar winner invited <Speech_Female> all his

So what's the deal with this new coronavirus strain in Adelaide?

Coronacast

04:30 min | 2 months ago

So what's the deal with this new coronavirus strain in Adelaide?

"I'm health reported taken tyler. Opposition and journalist author norman swan. It's thursday the nineteenth of november. Big day yes. Big day especially for people in south australia where yesterday we were hearing that. Not only have a south. Australians going into an incredibly tough lockdown but a short one. we're also hearing the chief public health officer nicholas spirited talking about how this strain that circulating at adelaide ease different. It's shorter incubation period. People with it don't seem to have as many symptoms. What do we know about this strain in adelaide and it truly is different or if it's just looking like it's acting differently. This was said during the crossroads motel outbreak. In new south wales when the virus spread from victoria it was said there was a shorter incubation period. More likely to spread E- symptomatically and explaining why there was a really significant superspreader event in that hotel in new south wales. Now we've not heard very much about that since that was certainly at the beginning. Now the saying the same thing here. Now i've i've spoken to a couple of people who kind of know how this virus behaves and they wonder whether or not in fact what's going on is that you've actually got super sporting events and they're so significant the super spreader events. You start to wonder whether or not the incubation short and could be true. It's still not clear what the virus is. What the subset of the covid nineteen viruses. The has been a stream code in for three nine k which has been picked up in south australia. It's not entirely clear whether that's the form that circulating not that's one that's growing uk europe and really quite common there. It's on the spike. It's where it looks the so-called h two receptor which is how you get the lock and key mechanism going into the The cell and people have looked at various strains and wondered whether or not there are significant characteristic. So what what are they talking about here is to use technical terms a short replication cycle. In other words it replicates very quickly but it infects people and the more like. It's more likely to cause a symptomatic disease upfront. That's the kind of picture that i suspect. The chief health officer in south australia was Was communicating whether that's going to bear out when you look at this and when you compare the data from europe i mean clearly it's coming from the uk. Certainly this in forty nine k. is coming from the. uk. The have been suggestions in the uk that they're getting some short incubation periods viruses with a symptomatic spreads. Certainly you've got a lower mortality rate but hospitals are filling up. So i think this is a story that had to pan out but it's clearly spooked the authorities now. The you cannot separate the lockdown from the belief that this is a short replication cycle more infectious virus could spread he symptomatically. That's what they believe. You got to try and extinguish this virus. You've gotta get outside australia and the only way to get this virus outer and extinguish it. 'cause you don't have any anti viral treatments is by lockdown and stopping people from mixing and stop them sharpened quickly and stop the virus spreading. That's the way to extinguish the virus. I'm reminded you had james hatfield back in march if you can remember back. That far on the health report norman. And he made the point that the golden rule of networks basically the family trays viruses. is that if it looks like the virus is behaving differently. Ninety nine percent of the time it's actually because of the epidemiology or the way that the humans the house of the virus are interacting with each other so could not be possible that it's just the way were behaving rather than the virus itself. Yes exactly that's the point. I was making a few minutes ago. Which was that could be. Just had some really quite dramatic super spreading events that were worried about. Its pizza parlor. Four thousand people for goodness sake are in isolation although now it's the whole population that's an isolation you also could. Well be the the behavior. Rather suddenly an appearance of a new strain that scott these characteristics particularly when the strain that hit from victoria into new south wales there were saying the same thing and they went quiet on that because in the end i don't i'm not so sure that the virus that they got into new south wales was so terribly different from the one in victoria and i don't think people were arguing victoria that it had particularly unusual characteristics.

South Australia Norman Swan New South Wales Adelaide UK Tyler Nicholas Europe Victoria James Hatfield Norman Australia Scott
Why South Australia's outbreak isn't going away anytime soon

Coronacast

05:07 min | 2 months ago

Why South Australia's outbreak isn't going away anytime soon

"So norman. let's talk about south australia again today. And we know that they are dealing with an outbreak there at the moment. It's really early days and it's sort of hard to tell how it's going to go Yesterday we heard that didn't seem to be much in the way of community transmission which is good to hia. But it's a bit too early to go awesome new community transmission. We're outta the woods isn't it. It is and just need to remind cast listeners. Not they need to be reminded because they're no world authorities on the corona virus but this virus can go underground it can go underground with younger people asymmetric spread and then just pop sometime later and it can be some weeks later and just remind you. In washington state at the beginning of the pandemic it went underground for about weeks and this has been going now for over a week. Some suggestions even back to the seventh of november rather than the nine th of november. Which is what we thought the day when we started this discussion about south australia. That's a long time for the virus to be out there and circulating. And you just don't know where it's gone and there may be another sub cluster or spread somewhere else which just will pop up in a few days time or even in a couple of weeks time so you just cannot relax and it means that testing numbers should be really high. Should be looking at sewage and They maybe even should be starting to think about asymmetric testing as well. So that you you you. You getting mass testing of communities because the numbers of tests actually luke low pro rata thinking of south australia's about a quarter of the size of melbourne population wise. They still feel low. And i don't have the numbers to hand but when there was breaking shepherds and a lot of people came forward disproportionately far more than the coming forward inside the straight and it's not just people who are asymptomatic it yes it can go under the right out people who have low or no symptoms but in addition to that. There's these few days lag between when someone's exposed to the virus and then when they start showing symptoms or test positive for it so that life cycle of the virus kind of can play on. How complacency if we let it. That's right so five days is average but it can be longer than that and the near you get to win. Symptoms would have come out but you start to become positive more and more positive five to eight days into the infection. Then that positivity rate declines and just having one test for example may not be enough. You may have to go back for more so this is something that you just cannot relax about you. Just go to be on now for the next couple of weeks. At least so. What do we know about the numbers of south. Australians who are trying to get tested. Because i'm hearing anecdotal reports that people are trying and turned away. Yup about happened to be totally in the early days where they just hadn't got the pop up testing and the increased capacity. So hopefully that's going to improve dramatically but it was pretty unimpressive on day. One in terms of the response to the numbers of southeastern is kind of coming forward for tasting. We hear krona. cast listeners. Have been telling us that they got the results. Pretty quickly as indeed shoot and in any event you don't know how many people left the lines because they got fed up waiting. It's really important that people do come forward. There was a disturbing survey from the bureau statistics which they'd survey people and find that about half one and two. Australians would not come forward for testing of the only mild symptoms they would have more would come forward severe symptoms but not mild symptoms. Such remind people that mild symptoms are problem too. But we put the call out yesterday to you listeners. Especially those of you. Who are living in south australia to say what's happening with you. And how you feeling. And a bunch of you responded. Thank you so much for that. And kate saying she waited for three hours yesterday to get her child tested but the result came back today negative thankfully in less than twenty four hours a long time to wait to get the test but pretty quick turnaround of the results. You it's really a communist. Spirit there to actually do that and get into that lines. Stick it out because you're you're thinking about others as well as yourself so that's fantastic and then we got win. Who's sort of at the other end of the spectrum saying gwynn's pretty ticked off at a massive overreaction was is she's calling it too every time someone sneezes. She was looking forward to traveling to queensland to see her parents. Nash go without being forced into hotel. Quarantine that she can't afford and she's saying that the new south wales leader is the only one being sensible about all these of course. The state is not knowing how much virus there is in south australia but that should become clear over the next few days. It probably is an overreaction to close the borders the risk is low. They could do what they did before. Which is that we know. This is a para fueled cluster and the The clusters reasonably localized at the moment. They could limit the people coming in from those particular areas but adelaide is a small town. And so it's much harder to divide off the suburbs as easily.

South Australia Norman Melbourne Washington Kate Gwynn Nash Queensland South Wales Adelaide
"south australia" Discussed on Coronacast

Coronacast

05:06 min | 2 months ago

"south australia" Discussed on Coronacast

"So norman. let's talk about south australia again today. And we know that they are dealing with an outbreak there at the moment. It's really early days and it's sort of hard to tell how it's going to go <hes>. Yesterday we heard that didn't seem to be much in the way of community transmission which is good to hia. But it's a bit too early to go awesome new community transmission. We're outta the woods isn't it. It is and just need to remind cast listeners. Not they need to be reminded because they're no world authorities on the corona virus but this virus can go underground it can go underground with younger people asymmetric spread and then just pop sometime later and it can be some weeks later and just remind you. In washington state at the beginning of the pandemic it went underground for about weeks and this has been going now for over a week. Some suggestions even back to the seventh of november rather than the nine th of november. Which is what we thought the day when we started this discussion about south australia. That's a long time for the virus to be out there and circulating. And you just don't know where it's gone and there may be another sub cluster or spread somewhere else which just will pop up in a few days time or even in a couple of weeks time so you just cannot relax and it means that testing numbers should be really high. Should be looking at sewage and <hes>. They maybe even should be starting to think about asymmetric testing as well. So that you you you. You getting mass testing of communities because the numbers of tests actually luke low pro rata thinking of south australia's about a quarter of the size of melbourne population wise. They still feel low. And i don't have the numbers to hand but when there was breaking shepherds and a lot of people came forward disproportionately far more than the coming forward inside the straight and it's not just people who are asymptomatic it yes it can go under the right out people who have low or no symptoms but in addition to that. There's these few days lag between when someone's exposed to the virus and then when they start showing symptoms or test positive for it so that life cycle of the virus kind of can play on. How complacency if we let it. That's right so five days is average but it can be longer than that and the near you get to win. Symptoms would have come out but you start to become positive more and more positive five to eight days into the infection. Then that positivity rate declines and just having one test for example may not be enough. You may have to go back for more so this is something that you just cannot relax about you. Just go to be on now for the next couple of weeks. At least so. What do we know about the numbers of south. Australians who are trying to get tested. Because i'm hearing anecdotal reports that people are trying and turned away. Yup about happened to be totally in the early days where they just hadn't got the pop up testing and the increased capacity. So hopefully that's going to improve dramatically but it was pretty unimpressive on day. One in terms of the response to the numbers of southeastern is kind of coming forward for tasting. We hear krona. cast listeners. Have been telling us that they got the results. Pretty quickly as indeed shoot and in any event you don't know how many people left the lines because they got fed up waiting. It's really important that people do come forward. There was a disturbing survey from the bureau statistics which they'd survey people and find that about half one and two. Australians would not come forward for testing of the only mild symptoms they would have more would come forward severe symptoms but not mild symptoms. Such remind people that mild symptoms are problem too. But we put the call out yesterday to you listeners. Especially those of you. Who are living in south australia to say what's happening with you. And how you feeling. And a bunch of you responded. Thank you so much for that. And kate saying she waited for three hours yesterday to get her child tested but the result came back today negative thankfully in less than twenty four hours a long time to wait to get the test but pretty quick turnaround of the results. You it's really a communist. Spirit there to actually do that and get into that lines. Stick it out because you're you're thinking about others as well as yourself so that's fantastic and then we got win. Who's sort of at the other end of the spectrum saying gwynn's pretty ticked off at a massive overreaction was is she's calling it too every time someone sneezes. She was looking forward to traveling to queensland to see her parents. Nash go without being forced into hotel. Quarantine that she can't afford and she's saying that the new south wales leader is the only one being sensible about all these of course. The state is not knowing how much virus there is in south australia but that should become clear over the next few days. It probably is an overreaction to close the borders the risk is low. They could do what they did before. Which is that we know. This is a para fueled cluster and the <hes>. The clusters reasonably localized at the moment. They could limit the people coming in from those particular areas but adelaide is a small town. And so it's much harder to divide off the suburbs as easily.

australia norman swan Teigen tyler officer asymptomatic norman. melbourne washington krona.
Why South Australia's outbreak isn't going away anytime soon

Coronacast

05:07 min | 2 months ago

Why South Australia's outbreak isn't going away anytime soon

"So norman. let's talk about south australia again today. And we know that they are dealing with an outbreak there at the moment. It's really early days and it's sort of hard to tell how it's going to go Yesterday we heard that didn't seem to be much in the way of community transmission which is good to hia. But it's a bit too early to go awesome new community transmission. We're outta the woods isn't it. It is and just need to remind cast listeners. Not they need to be reminded because they're no world authorities on the corona virus but this virus can go underground it can go underground with younger people asymmetric spread and then just pop sometime later and it can be some weeks later and just remind you. In washington state at the beginning of the pandemic it went underground for about weeks and this has been going now for over a week. Some suggestions even back to the seventh of november rather than the nine th of november. Which is what we thought the day when we started this discussion about south australia. That's a long time for the virus to be out there and circulating. And you just don't know where it's gone and there may be another sub cluster or spread somewhere else which just will pop up in a few days time or even in a couple of weeks time so you just cannot relax and it means that testing numbers should be really high. Should be looking at sewage and They maybe even should be starting to think about asymmetric testing as well. So that you you you. You getting mass testing of communities because the numbers of tests actually luke low pro rata thinking of south australia's about a quarter of the size of melbourne population wise. They still feel low. And i don't have the numbers to hand but when there was breaking shepherds and a lot of people came forward disproportionately far more than the coming forward inside the straight and it's not just people who are asymptomatic it yes it can go under the right out people who have low or no symptoms but in addition to that. There's these few days lag between when someone's exposed to the virus and then when they start showing symptoms or test positive for it so that life cycle of the virus kind of can play on. How complacency if we let it. That's right so five days is average but it can be longer than that and the near you get to win. Symptoms would have come out but you start to become positive more and more positive five to eight days into the infection. Then that positivity rate declines and just having one test for example may not be enough. You may have to go back for more so this is something that you just cannot relax about you. Just go to be on now for the next couple of weeks. At least so. What do we know about the numbers of south. Australians who are trying to get tested. Because i'm hearing anecdotal reports that people are trying and turned away. Yup about happened to be totally in the early days where they just hadn't got the pop up testing and the increased capacity. So hopefully that's going to improve dramatically but it was pretty unimpressive on day. One in terms of the response to the numbers of southeastern is kind of coming forward for tasting. We hear krona. cast listeners. Have been telling us that they got the results. Pretty quickly as indeed shoot and in any event you don't know how many people left the lines because they got fed up waiting. It's really important that people do come forward. There was a disturbing survey from the bureau statistics which they'd survey people and find that about half one and two. Australians would not come forward for testing of the only mild symptoms they would have more would come forward severe symptoms but not mild symptoms. Such remind people that mild symptoms are problem too. But we put the call out yesterday to you listeners. Especially those of you. Who are living in south australia to say what's happening with you. And how you feeling. And a bunch of you responded. Thank you so much for that. And kate saying she waited for three hours yesterday to get her child tested but the result came back today negative thankfully in less than twenty four hours a long time to wait to get the test but pretty quick turnaround of the results. You it's really a communist. Spirit there to actually do that and get into that lines. Stick it out because you're you're thinking about others as well as yourself so that's fantastic and then we got win. Who's sort of at the other end of the spectrum saying gwynn's pretty ticked off at a massive overreaction was is she's calling it too every time someone sneezes. She was looking forward to traveling to queensland to see her parents. Nash go without being forced into hotel. Quarantine that she can't afford and she's saying that the new south wales leader is the only one being sensible about all these of course. The state is not knowing how much virus there is in south australia but that should become clear over the next few days. It probably is an overreaction to close the borders the risk is low. They could do what they did before. Which is that we know. This is a para fueled cluster and the The clusters reasonably localized at the moment. They could limit the people coming in from those particular areas but adelaide is a small town. And so it's much harder to divide off the suburbs as easily.

South Australia Norman Melbourne Washington Kate Gwynn Nash Queensland South Wales Adelaide
Lockdown early or wait and see? The big questions facing Adelaide

Coronacast

03:58 min | 2 months ago

Lockdown early or wait and see? The big questions facing Adelaide

"And norman. We're watching this outbreak in australia. With real cane interest it feels like it's blossoming into quite large numbers before is When we're recording these swi- talking about at least seventeen people. The numbers might have increased by the time people listening to corona cost. What sort of action to south australia needs to be taking now. And what have they announced intensive action sipho range of interventions limiting to some extent pubs closing down gyms and other recreational facilities and sports training outdoor activities can continue fifty people that have funeral. Pops have one hundred but one person per four square meters so they've kind of done a bit of a control here but no pubs are high risk areas as our gyms. They haven't restricted weightings beyond what was allowed beforehand. So it's it's kind of a bit of this and a bit of that over. We have gone in harder than victoria did. At the same stage people are saying. Is this the second wave in south australia. I don't think that you can say that yet. It's a cluster outbreak. If they lose control of it and you get exponential increase than you would say that. It's the second wave but at the moment it's a cluster outbreak as we speak the numbers had an increased during monday. The interesting thing is that it looks as though it's been going for a week and therefore you've got this virus that's been brewing and what you're seeing now is probably an incubation period away from the first infection so you're starting to see new infections emerge where people have become infected so the so the question then is have they tracked down every contact here and really getting it down to wear people might call from are still people incubating over the last week or so because sometimes it can take eight to ten days for it to come out and then they've passed it on to somebody else and that could take another eight to ten days. It does take a couple of weeks to really understand what's going on. That's right evicted. Some of the health advice to the night of november. The states with people who've been in south australia are asking people if they were there from that date onwards to to oscillate and so forth. So when did this start then. If if the night of november is the date that the health authorities are talking about where one assumes remembers when it got out but they've not been clear about so where to from he is. Is it just. Should they go into a full lockdown like melvin deed or other measures they're taking now sufficient given the the still relatively low numbers. They sort of feel like they've growing quickly. But is it overkill to to lock down an entire state. I've a also cases. So there are two or three variables. Here one is how fast the numbers growing of in growing faster than contact tracing can cope with them and are any cases turning out where you don't know where they came from so those are kind of the variables that you're playing with here and if they're growing pretty fast and contact tracing starting to get stressed. Then you really do want to lock down to stop people moving around so that you can get this under control and for every day that you wait to do that when it's really starting to increase. It's a week of the other end so short. Sharp total lockdown can really get this under control and other the contact tracers to find out where everything is coming from but if they're finding day by day you're only getting one or two extra cases where they're coming from contact tracing is okay there in terms of knowing where things are then. You probably don't need to change things too much. But if there's any indication this is slipping out of control out of control of the testing and the contact tracers. You've just got to go to law down. Even if they are aren't very many mystery cases or any at all.

South Australia Norman Australia Victoria Melvin
"south australia" Discussed on From The Newsroom

From The Newsroom

02:52 min | 2 months ago

"south australia" Discussed on From The Newsroom

"Apologize has <Speech_Female> declared only <Speech_Female> those visiting from <Speech_Female> adelaide. We'll have to <Speech_Female> light in. <Speech_Female> Stark contrast <Speech_Female> new south wales premier <Speech_Female> decline has <Speech_Female> declared. <SpeakerChange> She will <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> not be closing the board <Speech_Music_Female> out <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> with covert <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and every time. There's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> an outbreak. you can't <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> shut down. Boorda's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> disrupt lives <Speech_Music_Female> disrupt <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> businesses <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Female> at the end of the day <Speech_Female> when a to leave <Speech_Music_Female> with jimmy. <Speech_Female> And that's why i <Speech_Female> say to every state <Speech_Female> have competent in your <Speech_Female> system open up <Speech_Female> so that <Speech_Female> if there is an outbreak with <Speech_Female> support each other. <Speech_Female> And what together <Speech_Female> robin <Speech_Music_Female> shutting <SpeakerChange> borders which <Speech_Female> is no way to leave frankly <Speech_Male> to the us. <Speech_Male> Now in full of president. <Speech_Male> Barack obama <Speech_Male> has attacked donald trump <Speech_Male> for fusing to <Speech_Male> concede the election <Speech_Male> to joy baden. <Speech_Male> Mr trump has claimed <Speech_Male> that the election was wreaked <Speech_Male> but often up no <Speech_Music_Male> evidence to support <Speech_Music_Male> his claim. Here's <Speech_Male> what mr obama had <Speech_Male> to say on sixty <SpeakerChange> minutes. <Speech_Male> The president <Speech_Male> doesn't <Speech_Male> like to lose <Speech_Male> and never admits <Speech_Male> loss. <Speech_Male> I'm more troubled by <Speech_Male> the fact <Speech_Male> that other <Speech_Male> republican officials who <Speech_Male> clearly know better <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> going along with <Speech_Male> this are humoring <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> him in this fashion. <Speech_Male> It is one <Speech_Male> more step in <Speech_Male> de legitimizing <Speech_Male> not <Speech_Male> just the <Speech_Male> incoming biden administration <Speech_Male> but democracy <Speech_Male> generally. <Speech_Male> And <SpeakerChange> that's a <Speech_Male> dangerous path. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> Don <Speech_Female> our next year <Speech_Female> new <Speech_Female> names that have been <Speech_Female> announced the redskins <Speech_Female> and chico's <Speech_Female> opt activists poop <Speech_Female> pressure on netflix. To <Speech_Female> get rid of the controversial <Speech_Female> names <Speech_Female> now redskins will <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> now be known as <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> red rippon <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and shakers <Speech_Female> will become cheeky. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Nestle <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> products <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> will appear on shelves <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> early next year. We'll be <Silence> <Advertisement> back in just a moment. <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> Entertainment now and tom <Speech_Female> cruise is former. Bodyguard <Speech_Female> is <Speech_Female> up about the time he accidentally <Speech_Male> penelope <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> cruz in a <Speech_Male> headlock billy <Speech_Male> billingham. He's actually one <Speech_Male> of the instructors on. Sas <Speech_Male> australia at <Speech_Male> the moment was trying <Speech_Female> to get the top gun. <Speech_Male> Stop through a crowd <Speech_Male> into a hotel <Speech_Male> in rhyme in two <Speech_Male> thousand and two <Speech_Male> but as he told <Speech_Male> fitzy and by he thought <Speech_Male> he spotted a potential <Speech_Male> attack wearing <Speech_Male> blue. Who was getting <Speech_Male> a bit too close to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> tom. Curry's <SpeakerChange> listen <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> champion and that's <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> about stepping for <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the proofread. I'll just show <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> blue come into woolas. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> May under torture even <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> look so wrapped in <Speech_Male> to get control of him <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and grabbed <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> displaying. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Grab this thing <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on the three of us fall <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> into the rotating. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Doorway <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> headlock <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> up. Go <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> ahead lock. Looks <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> really <SpeakerChange> meet penelope <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> mobile friendly <Laughter> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> peak. <SpeakerChange> Her <Speech_Music_Male> grow <Speech_Music_Female> just bought. <Speech_Female> Now and ozzy cameron <Speech_Female> smith finished second <Speech_Female> in the masters. <Speech_Female> He <Speech_Female> was five mobile friendly <Laughter> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> peak. <SpeakerChange> Her <Speech_Music_Male> grow <Speech_Music_Female> just bought. <Speech_Female> Now and ozzy cameron <Speech_Female> smith finished second <Speech_Female> in the masters. <Speech_Female> He <Speech_Female> was five shots behind <Speech_Female> the winner. American <Speech_Female> dustin johnson <Speech_Female> who became the first <Speech_Female> player to ever reach <Speech_Male> twenty <SpeakerChange> at <Speech_Male> the tournament. Tiger <Speech_Male> woods was in contention <Speech_Male> until he had <Speech_Male> a mid round meltdown <Speech_Music_Male> on the par-three <Speech_Male> twelve. Th hole taking <Speech_Female> at ten <SpeakerChange> shots. <Speech_Female>

ozzy cameron president Barack obama redskins donald trump smith adelaide south wales dustin johnson Nestle us Boorda biden netflix jimmy cruz Curry australia chico
Australia has a coronavirus outbreak. What happens now?

Coronacast

02:20 min | 2 months ago

Australia has a coronavirus outbreak. What happens now?

"Norman as we've been celebrating darnall days left right and center in ustralia over the past week or so. We've now heard that. Three people have tested positive for coronavirus in south australia. Outside of hotel. Quarantine an eighty year old woman. Some of her close contacts. And then there's other people in her circle that have symptoms and they're expecting more cases to come forward. I mean are we ever gonna know this thing. Well the answer is maybe not going to be with us forever. It just depends on how we control it. So i mean just you know. It's not good for south australia. This happened But we have said on. Chronic has many times now. It's not a question of pride that we've said it but everybody knows it that we're importing people who deserve to come back to australia. Australians living overseas who want to come home and the coming home from high prevalence area so the coming home with the covid nineteen virus and sometimes covid nineteen itself and quota quarantine has got to remain secure for the virus not to escape and we'll only find out as time goes on maybe later on today. What exactly happened inside the stereo and confirming the disney escape from hotel quarantine. The testing people emergency department and elsewhere. So they've just straight go to really move and they are really moving into major containment excise as the queensland for example when cases came across the border and as the due south wales when there was a major coster victoria through the motel and southwest sydney so south australia's chief public health officer nicklaus spirit has called it. A up. call is asking people in south australia to get tested if they've got symptoms but it's not really just a wake up call for south australia. Is it everywhere. I mean people coming into every state. I'm not sure that they started yet. In pretoria think we have but for every state. It's a wake up call and hotel. Quarantine is only as good as the security around. It must be quite easy for the virus to escape if people's vigilance relaxes so it's you. It's a system problem. It's probably not a bad egg or anything like that. It's just hard to maintain day in day out. We can we out and this will probably happen more often and the west australian premier mcgowan. Yesterday's press conference was saying the biggest threat to western. Australia was indeed hotel quarantine and here. It is in south australia.

South Australia Ustralia Norman Nicklaus Spirit Australia Disney South Wales Queensland Sydney Pretoria Mcgowan
What will happen to oil & gas?

Clark Howard Show

04:36 min | 2 months ago

What will happen to oil & gas?

"There was a strategic move specifically by the Russians to try to undermine the oil and gas industries in the United States and they. Started flooding the market with product and then the Saudis for their own reasons started flooding product in the market. And the whole idea was to try to harm the The. Energy Industry in the United States well, then corona virus came along and devastated the energy industry around the world. and. In the United States. The number of active wells has declined significantly because of that, but this is. That's all temporary and when we get our arms around corona, virus. The oil and gas industries will recover in the United States. But the long term trend is pretty clear. The sources of energy in the United States. As. Well as other places in the world or going through a massive transformation. And so. OIL AND GAS WILL TREND LINE DOWN GRADUALLY Over multiple decades, there's no politician there's no political move that any president or party could do. Oil and gas suddenly be a much bigger player or make evaporate because it is part of how we supply energy in the states and that will content and worldwide and will continue to be regardless of the advances in technology and in particular with transportation. The long term trend though is completely clear and that is the role of oil and natural gas. Or going to decline as the way we fuel vehicles going to electric possibly some with hydrogen is. It's GonNa Happen. There's nothing that's going to stop it because everything follows the money. And that is something beyond what any politician can influence take so. So we're now. In much of the world including much of the United States is the cheapest form of power that exists. And so whether a politician wants so were or not. It doesn't matter because the marketplace ultimately rules when is growing steadily, coal is shrinking and natural gas as a very important role to play. In the energy supply of the United States for industry factories and homes office buildings as well, and that will continue for years to come, but the way we get energy. Is For all types Gradually going to steadily change, and it's one of those things that can slips up on us. I think about what's going on in Australia. which had been really the home of King, Cole? And now. In the state of South Australia, if you know you're Australian geography, South Australia. Recently has been getting one hundred percent. Of. Its energy. For homes and businesses from solar. and. It's because it's the cheapest way to generate energy and in that part of Australia more than one in three homes have solar on their homes because it saves them so much money. So anytime, you talk about a big shift and how society works. It's always about following the money in our case, following the dollars and cents, and the way we produce energy and what form of energy we. Is going through a very clear transition. And it means that we have to make sure that the workers and the industries that will gradually shrink. Are. Not left stranded that they have really solid job training available for them for the jobs of the future. As the jobs of the present and the past steadily shrink.

United States South Australia President Trump Cole
Anchor is hosting pirated podcasts

podnews

02:40 min | 5 months ago

Anchor is hosting pirated podcasts

"Anchor is hosting large number of pirated podcasts from other publishes. Today thirty percent of all the pod track talk twenty podcasts currently being pirated on anchor according to our searches the new podcast from the New York Times and cereal. Nice. White parents has a further five pirated copies hosted on anchor using the original artwork. None of those plays will be credited back to the original owner and ads will not earn the publishers revenue. You'll find more details in our show notes and newsletter today. PODCAST host Lipson has published some positive news if Larry Fantasy chief operating officer. We continue to report growing revenue numbers and profitable results in the second quarter during a period that was certainly very different than expected. The company posted good news total podcasting revenue up by ten point six percents in the second quarter. Laura Simms has been promoted to see. Oh and the company. Now how seventy four thousand PODCASTS podcast those transistors launched an API for developers. Captivate has addy Ghana as a destination. They claim it's India's number one audio platform and link with Paul Corn in their new resources sanction I'm on their advisory board. Booth Eight podcast studio based in Adelaide in South Australia has moved to larger premises and filmed the building process of their new studios willing to that from our show notes newsletter today, and also a link to house spotify revolutionized podcast discovery. It's an in depth look spotify is user experience comparing it to apple podcasts. Always have unveiled a set of new features to make podcast. -tising buying better they say including brand safety contextual targeting and add sequencing on awards hosted. The true crime podcast reveal snowball is to leave his day job as content director of Australian radio station triple. J He's to focus among other things on television drama series inspired by the podcast and Impalas News Sir. This is a Wendy's podcast. It's a new podcast from Wendy's US fast food retailer to bit of a weird listen it appears to consist of a sponsor message funded by the same offer read slightly differently. At the late seventies, early eighties, band talking heads. This must be talking heads is an album by album exploration on their work hosted by Rodney Gordon and. Fan of the seventies, early eighties, bands, talking heads, you talking talking heads to my talking heads is an album by album exploration of that work hosted by Comedians Adam Scott, and Scott or common, and

United States New York Times Spotify Wendy Adam Scott Rodney Gordon Addy Ghana Laura Simms Adelaide Lipson Chief Operating Officer India Larry Fantasy Apple Paul Corn Director South Australia Advisory Board
The Australian Wastewater Treatment Plant Powered By Leftover Beer

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

02:17 min | 5 months ago

The Australian Wastewater Treatment Plant Powered By Leftover Beer

"When lockdown hit much of the world in March forcing bars and restaurants to close a lot of them were huge supplies of food and booze. They couldn't sell here New York City where bars are just put in big orders for Saint Patrick's Day. They released able to fulfil delivery and takeout orders for several weeks. Many bars added entire cases of beer at steep discount to their delivery menus. It was actually pretty awesome. But in Australia, they got even more creative in the state of South Australia local breweries sent millions of leaders of stale beer to the Glenn l wastewater treatment plants just west of Adelaide and that beer has been converted into renewable energy to power the plants quoting CNN the plant mixes organic industrial waste with sewage sludge to produce biogas, which is then turned into electricity to power. The whole facility usually generates enough bio-gas provide about eighty percent of its energy needs. But the recent influx of beer has boosted its energy generation to new levels reaching six hundred, fifty, four megawatt hours in a single month Lisa Hannigan manager of production treatment at Sa Water, said in a statement beer worked. Well for the plants digesters, hat said referring to the large sealed concrete tanks where sewage sludge is heated in an oxygen free environment and decomposed to produce methane rich bio gas. The booze is high calorific value. The amount of heat released during combustion makes perfect for anaerobic digestion process she added and quotes and add further said that the three hundred thousand, some odd cubic meters of bio gas being generated month now is enough to power twelve hundred houses and is also a joker saying in the statement quotes honorably, our thirsty digesters have been doing their bit for the environment by drinking themselves silly and was such a horrific diet. It's no wonder they produce so much gas and quotes. And this is just the latest example of people creatively innovating on what was previously thought of as waste beer is particularly difficult to dispose of in any environmentally friendly way. So finding a sustainable use for it like this is beyond awesome and I hope there is a way to make a continue even when breweries don't have as much extra beer line around as they did this past spring.

Lisa Hannigan New York City Saint Patrick Australia CNN South Australia Adelaide HAT Sa Water Glenn L
Is the Tasmanian Tiger Really Extinct?

BrainStuff

07:30 min | 9 months ago

Is the Tasmanian Tiger Really Extinct?

"You've no doubt heard of the Tasmanian Devil or seen an animated version the whirling dervish in looney tunes cartoons. But what about the Tasmanian Tiger? It's actually not even a tiger at all instead a marsupial known as the Thilo seen and it's thought to have gone extinct almost one hundred years ago but did it really. While many experts believed the last known thylacine died at. Australia's Hobart Zoo in nineteen thirty. Six others ardently claimed that the animals still exists because they've spotted one or more in the wild. We spoke by email with Kathryn medlock. Honorary Curator of vertebrate zoology the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery. She said the international Australian and state definition of an extinct species is that there has been no reliable evidence of the species for fifty years by this definition. They are officially extinct species although designated as officially extinct. It's difficult to prove that something is not there as opposed to proving it is. There are many cases of species being rediscovered. Many years after supposed- extinction we also spoke by email with Rick Schwartz an animal ambassador for California's San Diego Zoo. He explained that quote since the Nineteen Thirties. There have been a few claims Tasmanian. Tigers have been seen for brief moments in the wild however no substantial evidence has proven they exist at this time we also spoke by email with Neil waters of the thylacine awareness group of Australia. Who started disagrees a quote? Do I think the animals extinct? No because I've seen too and been coughed slash barked at by one in South Australia. In two thousand eighteen. There have been more than seven thousand documented sightings of Silas scenes or animals that appear to be Thilo scenes but the majority of those sightings on Mainland Australia. According to the scientific formula applied to mammals though it is extinct and has been since nineteen thirty six for fifty years. The animal was considered rare and endangered. This fact inconveniently keeps the animal as a recent extinction rather than an ancient one. We should lose hope over and forget about. Let's step back a bit. What exactly is Tasmanian. Tiger? Schwartz explained that it's not a big cat at all. He said the name. Tiger most likely was given to the animal by the European settlers due to the light stripes that went from the spine down each side on the hind end of the animal. Most people agree that the Tasmanian Tiger looks like a medium sized short haired dog with subtle stripes on hindquarters and the base of its tail. Tail was thick and muscular at the base. More like a kangaroo's tail than a dog's tail colorations were described as light brown and Yellow Brown with Darker Brown stripes. These animals weighed about forty five to seventy pounds. That's twenty to thirty kilos with a body length of forty to fifty inches or one hundred to one hundred and twenty five centimeters with that tail. Adding another twenty to twenty five inches or fifty to sixty centimeters most stood about two feet tall or two thirds of a meter at the shoulder. Schwartz said in our modern times we usually think of marsupials and Kangaroos however the Tasmanian Tiger had a number of unique characteristics being dog like medium sized carnivore. That's also Marsupial it. Size and features were more similar to that of a small wolf or large Fox. Combine that with the striped pattern on the hind end and thick muscular tail. Similar toy kangaroo. You've got a pretty unique animal and water said when you had a close look at the prince we find. You will see time and time again. The broad S- play of the toes and the Claude drag impressions from the massive fixed clause on the animals four feet. The reason they're split wide and not like a dog is because they don't have webbing between their toes their front feet also still acts similar to hands as they can both hop like a kangaroo or run on all fours as a result many of the prince appear that the front feet are literally grabbing the ground as they dig it on curves or high speed when pursuing prey when Europeans first colonized Australia. The Tasmanian Tiger was rarely seen the animals started to become increasingly blamed for tax on cheap however so private companies and the Tasmanian government attempted to curb population by establishing bounties exchange for dead violence scenes adding to their eventual extinction was the sad fact that Australia's colonisation eroded the thylacines habitat by the nineteen twenty s sightings of the Tasmanian Tiger in the wild became extremely rare and in nineteen thirty. A farmer shot and killed the second. To last known wild Tasmanian Tiger the final by Lesean was captured in the Florentine Valley in Nineteen thirty three and transferred to the Hobart Zoo on September seventh. Nineteen thirty six. The animal known as Benjamin died in captivity black and white footage recorded in nineteen thirty three would become historically significant as images of the final scene in nineteen thirty seven the Tasmanian animals and birds protection board a later to become the national park. Service launched a series to determine where thylacines still might be found. Medlock said unfortunately living animal was not discovered. The final search in the series was into the chain river area in Western. Tasmania on the search. Sometimes seen footprints were discovered and creek bed. The original plaster casts of these prints are lodged in the Tasmanian Museum. The Tasmanian Museum doesn't receive citing reports. And we don't have the expertise to assess them. This is done by the Department of Primary Industries Water and environment they continue to record reported sightings and take them seriously often however sightings films and photographs are released to the media through the people who are reporting them rather than a government body over the years. There have been several instances photographs and films purported to be thylacines in the wild but none have been verified as genuine evidence of an animal waters however contends that there have been dozens of credible sightings of Thilo scenes. He said actually hundreds of them too many to name one in particular was a bus load of tourists in Western Australia. Back in the nineteen eighties. Who All saw the animal at close range in broad daylight whilst on a wildflower tour the fact that we find headless Kangaroos. All over. His failure is a key piece of physical evidence that these animals still persist. But nobody to know about it. Because it's always blamed on either hunters or Satanists by. Ill informed people who don't understand how these animals feed waters has been working tirelessly to raise public awareness of this animals continued existence for the past five years meeting dozens of witnesses and collecting thousands of statements regarding sightings of this animal in. Tasmania and across mainland Australia. His work appears in the two thousand seventeen documentary living the thylacine dream which follows waters travels throughout mainland Australia. Collect evidence of predation as well as stories of sightings from witnesses who are adamant seen the thile seen both recently and historically

Australia Tigers Tasmanian Museum And Art Galle Rick Schwartz Tasmanian Museum Nineteen Thirties Tasmanian Government Hobart Zoo Kathryn Medlock Thilo Tasmania Mainland Australia South Australia San Diego Zoo California Neil Waters Western Australia Yellow Brown Silas Claude
Flight Lines: The Heroic Story of Two Migratory Shorebirds

Published...Or Not

07:43 min | 10 months ago

Flight Lines: The Heroic Story of Two Migratory Shorebirds

"Have someone sitting opposite me just twitching to tell his story. The book is flat. Lines and the author is Andrew Dobson Andrew. Welcome to three C- I thank you. David I'm curious about the would twitching. I haven't really made a close study of twitching despite writing. This book. Twitching is a word that is used by dedicated. Some say obsessive Burgers and sometimes they detractors to Indicate their preoccupation with finding the next bird. An observing bird minded research. Because it's not actually mentioned in the book the twitching behavior of Howard Medhurst who was one of the leading birdwatchers in the nineteen fifties and sixties. But this book in other words is about birds or in particular one species of birds the grey plover a daoist wallflower of the shorter dance. It spreads thinly around the world's margins and is often overlooked. What's the fascination with the Gripe Lot? Well let's start by working our way towards the bird from what we are. Probably the closest bird that we know to this is the masked left wing. It's often colder plaza. But it's sexually left wing but that's what we know as a plot now go through that gate and think about the kinds of things that the left wing does transfer them to the tidal flats of the world the far-flung tidal flats of the world. And there's this small bird not much begun a blackbird gray when it's out of the breeding grounds highly colored up when it gets to the breeding grounds and it is commonly found with others in the group of Long Distance Flying Margaret lowrie shore. Birds the ultramarathons birds. Now when you say ultra-marathon sort of distance are we talking so the two birds that I particularly follow which were satellite tag in South Australia and flew north on the first flight. Each of them flew over the entirety of Australia of Indonesia the Philippines to land one of them in Taiwan and the other in southern China so each of them took a nonstop flight of more than seven thousand kilometers. Just to give us a sort of indication in layman's terms. When you're holding this bird. How much are you holding? Well you're holding about a cup of sugar not a big white. You're holding something that really can be quite placid in the hand. Despite its wildness. And you're holding. I guess the promise of many generations of optic life birdlife and they transcend boundaries in many ways in the journey. We've got apple tree boundaries as people on borders and they bicycling cross all of those hemispheres international borders and such like. It's it's quite a phenomenal feet. If you want to get carried beyond the trivialities of human life like borders then migratory long distance migratory birds are a really good way to start because there will pass through the margins of many countries but is not off one eye and they have total disregard for human borders. Now one of the things that the book sort of touches on as you look this journey other various forms of tagging that have occurred or the ability to follow from banding to rocket nets and now two satellites. The satellites would give you an inordinate amount of opportunity to try and be particular about what you say quite revelatory. They are Give you almost near real time information. About where on the planet this bird is and what it's doing even because if you have a lucrative say on a breeding ground you'll see it move from point to point to point as it fades and then goes back to the central point which is the nest So yes it can be unrivaled information and It really is hugely illuminating. As opposed to the banding which was more happenstance abandoning as the book suggests started in the lighting hundreds. But that would rely on. Someone actually catching the Buddha game. We'll exactly Either catching the again or killing it or finding a dead. The doyen of Australian Migratory Schubert's studies like Clive Minton when he lived in England. Has I band on? A migratory shortbread was on a lovely good coach spotted. Red Shank and he was really pleased to have it in hand really priest to put the band on it and some weeks later he got the band back because it had been shot by the mayor of putting your in France who returned the band with the address on to Clive. Now a couple of things fascinated me about. The birds are reading this book. I'm the song lines. There's a connection here with an indigenous song. Lawn is moving up. Moving from group to group and changing as guides and there's an equivocal mention of what the birds was well yes we'll I'm careful to not impose my description on indigenous cultures. But I hope that I have drawn out of the records of indigenous couches The great variety of names. This bird has as it travels not just from Australia. But through China up to Siberia and across to North America where? It's pretty circum Paula. It has a series of lovely nines. And the they are run there are really illuminating series. Too you know they describe often. I described the bird by its phonetic. Call sometimes they describe it by its coloring in Alaska where I went It was cold emphatic. And that means the scorched bird. But so there's a similarity through the sort of landscape in many ways. Yes depending on which part of the world now for such a fragile creature. They are quite a number of threats in this day and age the threats for the gripe the mind well. We've got a bird here. That has persisted down through evolutionary generations for about one hundred and thirty million years so it's not easily removed from the face of the earth. But while it's doing well other others. In the group of long distance migratory shore birds are not doing so well And as a whole the contracting in numbers. I'm this four that have been listed on Australia's critically endangered list in recent years. Because of the problems they face pardon the analogy but the canary in the coalmine. Well certainly you know I think migratory shore birds. We Stu people generally in Australia particularly and when we look at the coasts we should think about the health of Alco spy. The prison or absence of birds like

Australia Andrew Dobson China Long Distance Clive Minton South Australia David Margaret Lowrie Howard Medhurst Alco Burgers Alaska Paula Taiwan North America Red Shank France Philippines England
"south australia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:37 min | 1 year ago

"south australia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On Kangaroo Island on Friday in the state of South Australia have an auto Lois how good is unbelievable the mayor of the island Michael Payne Gilly told the Australian broadcasting Corp that the devastation is immense Jason Beaubien NPR news Sydney in Indonesia tens of thousands of people remained in emergency shelters in and around Jakarta waiting for floodwaters to recede a dozen cities in other districts became inundated by monsoon rains and overflowing rivers this week the national disaster mitigation agency has confirmed at least forty seven storm related deaths from Indonesia's worst flooding since two thousand seven I'm she Stevens and P. R. news in Washington support for NPR comes from the George Lucas educational foundation creator of as you topia an online resource dedicated to improving the learning experience for America students with information and strategies about what works and K. through twelve education learn more edgy Tobia down to work thank from NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm Elsa Chang and Ahmadi Cornish our top story today the killing of an Iranian military commander ordered by president trump last night at my direction the United States military successfully executed a flawless precision strike that killed the number one terrorists anywhere in the world Major General Qassem Soleimani was at Baghdad airport when he was hit by U. S. drones salamander was plotting eminent in sinister attacks on American diplomats and military personnel but we caught him in the act trump went on to blame sewer money for recent attacks on US targets in Iraq and for acts of terror across the Middle East over decades we took action last night to stop a war we did not take action to start a war Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali how men they responded in a harsh statement he said quote a forceful revenge awaits the criminals who have his blood on their hands the state department has ordered Americans and rock to leave immediately and the Pentagon said it's sending more than three thousand troops to the Middle East to bolster security in Congress reaction to the killing has been sharply divided Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell who praise the operation it knowledge as much in remarks on the Senate floor but I can play up in this political environment the operation that leads us all on his death may prove controversial or devices I recommend that all centers wait to review the facts and hear from the administration before passing much public judgment British speak now with Virginia senator Tim Kaine Democrat on the armed services and foreign relations committees he has spoken publicly about the U. S. move calling it quote a drastic escalation of hostilities and he's just introduced a war powers resolution to force a vote in Congress before further action against Iran can be taken senator came welcome to the program thank you I we've heard much criticism about the Congress not getting full notification about what was going to happen so when did you first get word of this operation I'm already I heard about it the same way they much of the congressional leadership did through newspaper and press accounts the president not only did not seek congressional permission he didn't even notified Congress and that's why I filed the war powers resolution today is is general Salah money a despicable Keller yes he was is Iran a bad actor yes it is and remains so but the question is whether the United States should be engaged in a war with Iran another war in the Middle East that in my view would be unnecessary under no circumstances should we be in such a war based on the president's whim that should have to be debated and voted on in Congress now as the president has said he believes that he was trying to stop a war not start one and there's also been reports that there were as alleged imminent attack coming from Slimani can you tell us what you've learned if there was an imminent threat from Iran's military leader posts the U. S. there has been no briefing of Congress that I am aware of and I said on both the armed services and the foreign relations committee about an imminent threat from general school money he has been a known quantity and a bad guy in the despicable person for decades but there's been no briefing about whether there is an imminent threat the administration has said that they will conduct such a briefing next week but the constitution is very very plain that we shouldn't be a war unless there is a vote of Congress and that is what my resolution resolution will force the kind of debate with the facts on the table so that the American public can see it there may be some of my college to think a war with Iran is a good idea but we should be having this debate from the public and and putting it to a vote not allowing this president or any president to take such a step on his own you know past efforts to claw back authority from the president have failed right what do you think is going to bring your colleagues around this time it is it is been difficult most recently in the in the Senate we passed a resolution was actually an amendment to the defense authorizing bill by fifty to forty vote saying the president could not initiate war against Iran without a vote of Congress but because that was a motion that required sixty votes we didn't get to the threshold but we're getting closer and closer this it also happened with Yemen as well right and even last year house Democrats voted to repeal the two thousand one authorization of use of military force and they tried to claw back the Iraq war authorization these seem to be non starters what's the reluctance ID when I started this when I came into the Senate in twenty thirteen as a member of the committee I could hardly get two or three senators interested in at the fact that we had fifty votes in the Senate a few months ago the fact that we passed a resolution in both houses trying to stop the U. S. activity supporting Saudi attacks in Yemen the number of senators in Congress men and women who are very very worried about war being waged by president with no consultation with Congress is growing and in this particular case I warn the president two years ago that if he tore up a diplomatic deal with Iran he would blunder us into a war and the Pentagon has been advising the White House for well over a year that the maximum pressure campaign of the trump administration economic diplomatic and military is raising the rest every day to retaliation against Americans that's what's happening and it's time for Congress to step in and the mechanism that I've used will force us to have that debate and vote whether the votes will be sufficient on whether president trump might veto will have to get to that down the road but at least Congress cannot be silent about this we have to put everybody on the board I want to jump in at the last moment here because you mentioned the maximum pressure campaign on Iran you've said that the US should do it recently can't to punish Iran's bad behavior the US is already in CD tough sanctions that have heard Iran's economy haven't brought them to the negotiating table final moments what are the options well the president should try the one thing that he has refused to try he remember was this president that tore up a diplomatic deal with Iran over its nuclear program that our ally said was working at the international atomic energy agency said was working and that secretaries teller sin and madness and general McMaster president's original national security team said was working the president might want to consider diplomacy rather than blundering us into a war that's not necessary that's democratic senator Tim Kaine of Virginia thank you for your time absolutely Iran's Major General Qassem Soleimani was on the U. S. is radar for years the American military says the money commanded Iranian forces and worked with Iraqi militias that killed hundreds of US troops so how did he escape Washington's reach for so long here's NPR national security correspondent Greg Mary US government designated Iran's Qassem Soleimani a supporter of terrorism way back in two thousand seven at that time US general David Petraeus was battling insurgents in Iraq who are being guided by soon money from afar and they were often killing American troops he was very very significant and formidable adversary but there was no real way for betray us to act against to a money back then I can note that during that time as the commander rock custom so money certainly never dare set foot in the country however in recent years so money had become a periodic visitor to a rock and shortly after his plane touched down at the Baghdad airport on Friday morning a U. S. drone strike turned his car into a fireball it killed the man who's been the architect of Iran's military operations throughout the Middle East the trainer says his death deals a serious blow to Iran I think it is impossible to overstate the significance of this action he is in my view the second or was he was in my view the second most important person in a while and second only to the supreme leader Salah money age sixty two sported silver hair a neatly trimmed beard and popped up across the region and well pressed military fatigues he's been almost his entire adult life engaged in Iran's regional conflicts in since the late nineteen nineties he commanded Iran's could force comparable to US special forces he came to symbolize Iran's effort to be the leading power broker across the region from Iraq to Syria to Lebanon the US watch is is influence grew out of this custom so the line was nodded in ministrations cross hairs to the last two administrations rob Malley was a Middle East expert on the National Security Council during the Obama administration he's now head of the international crisis group they were opportunities in the past no doubt to assassinate him the decision at that time was made not to do so because the assessment was that the risks outweighed the benefits clearly this administration president trump has changes calculus trump has waged a maximum pressure campaign in repeatedly threatened the country Malley meanwhile believes Iran will now retaliate perhaps in a big way killing him is for all intents and purposes the declaration of war but secretary of state Mike Pompeii told CNN the administration acted because it had intelligence that sewer money was planning another attack he was actively plotting in the region to take actions a big actions he described it that would have put dozens if not hundreds of American lives at risk Hey declined to provide details in recent years so money had gone from a shadowy figure to someone who is increasingly visible on the front lines of conflicts like Syria where he played a critical role in propping up president Bashar al Assad gained a lot of precision around because he went on the battlefield and was not a general stayed behind but who went sometimes with the risk was and I think that contributed to his image in a strange twist he found himself on the same side as the U. S. a couple of years ago a rocky malicious under his guidance and American troops were both battling the Islamic state again David Petraeus used to himself he's on the front lines with a walkie malicious fighters but that alignment didn't last earlier this week trump blamed Iran for killing a US contractor in for orchestrating the attempt to storm the US embassy in Baghdad defense secretary mark asper dropped a hint of what was coming saying Thursday that quote the game has changed rob Malley is skeptical that still monies death will change Iran's behavior they've already named his replacement and one should expect to run in foreign policy is not going to change in any significant way as a result of his death hours after school money was killed Iran's supreme leader vowed to continue.

Kangaroo Island South Australia Lois Michael Payne Gilly Australian broadcasting Corp Jason Beaubien Sydney Indonesia
"south australia" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"south australia" Discussed on KCRW

"And flavors of the season with seasonal produce holiday desserts and chef created menus whole foods market color the classics and from the listeners who support this NPR station it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin I'm Steve Inskeep how exactly did China allegedly tried to put a spotlight in Australia's parliament Australian authorities say China funded a candidate for office a candidate who later turned up dead in a Melbourne hotel room Jamie terribly as a correspondent for The New York Times based in Australia she's covering this story either Jamie hello Steve and some people will recall your voice from when you're an NPR correspondent it's good to have you back on the air now who was this man Nick Chow this this purported to Chinese spy we do that much about him what we do know is that he is he was from Melbourne in this sort of South Australia and he was a luxury car dealer but he was also someone who a federal appellate using here described his right foot cultivating he was in ivory's had financially he had been accused of having some sort of fraudulent activities and he was essentially according to this this clock being offered a million dollars by a Chinese intelligence group that they would pay for his political campaign to run as the member for our and electorate in Melbourne on the he was and he was a member of the Liberal Party which is the coalition in Australia and and they really wanted him to run for state there and and and pay for his campaign and paid his way into the federal parliament wow now was it correct then that he approached Australian intelligence officials with this apparent plot and then mysteriously died is that do I have it correct that's yes I mean this is exactly what movies are made out of in a so about a year ago and he went to a easier which is really a spy agency and and told them about this alleged approach and he also identified the man that he said had come to him with this it with this proposal and then and earlier this year in March he was found dead by a cleaner in a motel room and his death is being investigated right now because considering all of the issues that were going on with him it could have been anything so no one's compared to sort of say weather was found fail yeah I'm just thinking Australia is a close US ally it's intelligence agency works closely with the United States it's a neighbor of China I can think of a lot of reasons China would want to know more about what's going on in Australia but is this alleged plot part of a wider Chinese campaign to gain influence on us to it certainly isn't the first time that Chinese political interference has reared eats its head I guess in Australian politics we've had at least one so the very fact Amos example of a federal employee who who was based basically given me a political donations by a very influential businessman and and and really should have changed his rhetoric and his political position on things like the South China Sea or you know the sort of the status of Taiwan in direct contravention to seize on political pawns platform and you know in the eventually sort of came out that he had been sort of funded by by this person so this isn't the first time and it's like I cleaned out to be the lost on it's a it's very sort of strategic for China to to position itself in this way extremely it came out with foreign interference lows a couple of years ago it to really try to circumvent this so it's definitely a a an issue that this country is very very aware of Jamie always a pleasure talking with you thank you Dave that's Jimmy terra bank of The New York Times joining us via Skype from Australia.

million dollars
"south australia" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"south australia" Discussed on KTRH

"News weather and traffic station newsradio seven forty K. T. R. H. it weighs a mere GNC dot com see we all professional right the time now is the time of testing is now faces on the border Uranian threat North Korea people are hearing for the first time newsradio seven forty Katie our age all the time five thirty eight now you're in Houston's morning news all right this is a different kind of underwater kiss kiss the rock band going under water in Australia today it's for a few lucky fans eight lucky fans to be exact we'll talk about private concert according to USA today they're going to be put on a private submarine and they're gonna go out to enjoy the great white sharks this is Australia eight fans will get to be a part of the promotion is through Airbnb the concert is today they're leaving at port Lincoln in South Australia by boat and then submerging to a submarine where they can not only enjoy live rock music from kiss but also enjoy some up close and personal views of great white sharks the band itself will not be under water we'll be on another vessel nearby they're gonna put the speakers under water so that the fans and the great white sharks can enjoy kiss so my question would be what happens if the music from kiss disperses all the great white sharks who don't think they like kiss after all that could be a big bust if it turns out to be that way mostly go maybe the baby sharks don't wanna rock and roll all night party every day you don't know five forty divert traffic and weather together let's get you caught on Dr once again Julie darting as well as a matter well we cleared up the accent downtown on southbound forty five at McKinney so that's looking much better if you're trying to travel the inbound side of sixty nine the southwest parkway downtown right now run about twenty four minutes also if you're trying to travel the inbound side of two eighty eight cylinder filling stages doing okay though as you move from five eighteen to downtown it's close to fifteen I'm Julie hardy in the Gulf coast windows dot com twenty four hour traffic center from our KJRH non schooling gaining twenty four hour weather center time to check in with meteorologist Terry Smith of the weather channel all right what is is eighty degrees stop raising one extreme Lenexa we are definitely will see some warmer temperatures the next couple of days I don't know full hit eighty will have to wait and see.

K. T. R. H. Houston Australia USA Airbnb port Lincoln South Australia McKinney Terry Smith Lenexa North Korea Katie Julie hardy Gulf twenty four hour twenty four minutes eighty degrees seven forty K
"south australia" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"south australia" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"So the Australian desert is the number four largest desert in the world. Yeah it's subtropical. It's about two point seven million square kilometers or one million square miles of Australia. That's about eighteen percent of Australian mainland and it's primarily hi Mary the Western plateau in the interior lands of the country now they have split up into a couple of different ones of just talk about from here so the Greek Victoria Dessert is the largest desert on its own in Australia. It's located in Western in South Australia in it consists of many small L. sandhills grassland planes areas with closely packed surfaces of pebbles called desert pavement or Gilbert planes as well as Salt Lake's. It's the part of Australia with the most populous and most healthly indigenous population in eighteen seventy five British explorer or Ernest Giles became the first European across the desert and he named it after the then reigning British Monarch Queen Victoria sure well next you have the Gibson desert which is located in central Western Australia. It's between the saline lake disappointment and Lake McDonald along the tropic of Capricorn south of the Great Sandy Desert in east of the little sandy desert it was named by Explorer Ernest Giles after a member of his party Alfred Gibson who became loss and presumably died in the desert expedition in eighteen seventy four now. They're like no where we're we're GONNA this desert after you another quick sidebar Australia. We haven't talked a lot about Australia like the weird creatures episode or Yeah. Maybe a couple things here there but for for our listeners listeners who were not in Australia show has six states their New South Wales Queensland South Australia Tasmania Victoria and Western Australia and they have to major mainland territories the Australian Capital Territory in the northern territory so these two territories basically function estates except that the Commonwealth parliament has the power to modify or repeal any legislation passed by the territory parliament's so basically going clockwise here so if you started the nine o'clock position of your clock you have Western Australia then going up the Northern Territory Queensland New South Wales Australian Capital Territory <hes> Victoria Tasmania and it has <hes> basically South Australia like the six o'clock position of o'clock from nine o'clock to six o'clock in that or where they are okay so what the heck does grow in the desert because some stuff does oh okay don't stuff has to imagining so plants animals living in the desert needs special adaptation survive in their harsh environment seriously so plants tend to be tough and wiry with small or no leaves water resistant cubicles and often spines to deter <hes> people that are you know plants animals that are gonna eat them sure so.

Western Australia Great Sandy Desert South Australia Gibson desert Northern Territory Queensland Australia Ernest Giles Victoria Tasmania Monarch Queen Victoria Commonwealth parliament South Wales Alfred Gibson Salt Lake saline lake Lake McDonald seven million square kilometer one million square miles eighteen percent
"south australia" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"south australia" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

"A solar power took across all of Australia Julian Shaef, founder of unbound and solar tuck Julian thanks for joining me today. Huge welcome. It's great to be here. Great to chat and just so ever knows Julian's up at six AM because he's only other side of the world. He's over there and Melvyn in Australia's so big applause for that. My man for getting up and starting your morning with us. I appreciate it. And we are going to talk about a lot of stuff that we're gonna talk about your education program unbound, which focuses on hands on learning entrepreneurs by getting him out and working in projects in the world. Not just in the classroom. We can talk. About the Guinness record. Your Sal solar power took dick journey across a stray alien where that crazy idea came from. And of course, going to talk about some of favorite travel spots and miss apps. But first question that I think I'm interested in everyone listening interested in everything you're doing around travel. So where did this love of travel? Come from. Why is travel the main or one of the main parties in your life? I it's just this secondary tertiary thing for most people. Yeah. And it didn't come as late. So I grew up in remote, South Australia. So I lived around five hours drive to the nearest traffic lights United this type of part of the world that that really is disconnected. It's not like, you know, what strategy is an island nation. It's not like there's other countries and cultures super clients. So it didn't happen naturally. And my what now is valves taking university students on trips around the world that I wasn't that person. I didn't leave the country wants from the moment. I started Uni to the day that I graduated industry of the whole time. So it kind of has made a slowly crepe in a slow build. But to me the thing that really shocked me to say, hi, this is what I wanna do. This is what I want to spend my time doing was kind of when I took in at a grownup gap era when I transitioned from working as an engineer to doing this work in international development now is kind of a year of traveling exploration. And then. I decided yeah. I wanna make this my career. So what brought about that adult gap year? Because like you said, you're someone who grew up far from anything you didn't travel. It wasn't ingrained in you as a parent or by your parents. But then all of a sudden you're like I'm going to take on this big trip. What was like what was egging you on? It was it just a nagging nagging nagging over years at your finally think either I do this or this is going to drive me bonkers. Look, I think a lot of people realize when they moved from university to the workforce that they go from someone who might have a lot of time and no money to has a bit of money now and no time, so I can you out working full-time in the United different cultures different number of weeks pay year. It isn't easy to take take a lotta time off. So I think mentally you start to make notable the things he'd like to do in the mode. So when I transitioned from that for working as an engineer, I think I had to have a long list of things that I'd love to do. And it is a bit of. Thought of the Estrada and culture too long term travel to to spend a year while six months away. I think the reason is is that it's not easy to to leave the country. Leave the continent that you'll be flying alone. Why I live in beautiful Melvin and. Yeah, the first three hours of the flight four hours of the flight, you look down and you're still very much verse dry. So what does that mean? It means that when you travel you'll often spend a bit of time and do some kind of overlending, and that's exactly what I did. So I wanted to change my work and rather than do the normal thing like jump on a job search website. I'm yeah. Kind of Quinton bought a one way flight to south East Asia and let let the journey begin. What did your friends family work colleagues were what was their reaction to that of saying? I don't know what I'm gonna do. I don't know what my job is going to look like, but I know that if I get out of here.

Julian Shaef Australia engineer Julian Melvyn South Australia founder East Asia Quinton Estrada three hours five hours four hours six months
"south australia" Discussed on Future Thinkers Podcast

Future Thinkers Podcast

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"south australia" Discussed on Future Thinkers Podcast

"The crisis is filled we'd need the status quo to naval to change the status and so. That's not to say that they're amazing things that can be done to open up spaces for civic engagement on their many experiments round the world one of my favorite experiments. And I would I love the is the seat. Ascend juries that South Australia's experimenting with that are runs on this selected groups of citizens that informed on C in South Australia. And so it's the same concept just jury like do share to reduce the but for policy what I like about this, particularly is they randomly selected. Representatives are in this in this case, or or citizens, they have randomly selected covenants is fascinating to me on the richness that if think about it this way, if you have a system that it's only concerned about those professional citizens that are representatives right never analysis expected to complete raw to their own private lives than than we are always going to have like this situation where it's inept is in the system's interest to just have to just are to be concerned with only those in power rights, but he suddenly you change that anyone can be power. Even if the mutations with short period of time on whatever wrecks at you. Suddenly our system needs to kind of shift years to make sure that everyone can participate. Right. If you have like deliberative democracy process is like you need to start. The system is just thinking how will? Can inform. You know, every every citizen what.

South Australia
"south australia" Discussed on Casefile True Crime

Casefile True Crime

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"south australia" Discussed on Casefile True Crime

"Easing the stations only talk. Brought oh. The search for the missing Beaumont children quickly escalated into a statewide frenzy. Police roadblocks were established on all major South Australian hallways and outta lights. Port draw weistein were put under heavy surveillance. Members of the public volunteered at Tom to whiting the search including taxi drivers who had previously worked with Jim Bowman. They cruised the straits in that cabs while members of Jane, Beaumont's, brownie pack, ride that box around the surrounding neighborhoods searching for them missing front. Trey kids matching the ages of the Beaumont children was sawed at seven PM on the naught the siblings vanished. The children were saying standing by the water's edge at the Padova Longa bowed Ivan and marina just one kilometer north from Cali reserve. A woman spoke to the children briefly. And I had informed her that I didn't live in the area. Given the heart pry fall under gency of the Beaumont children case police tightening now chances. The marina which had a surface covering seventy acres and a depth of seeks fate was drained for the first time since its establishment in nineteen fifty nine. In what would become one of the largest single searches for the Beaumont children Sipho eighty young police cadets dragged themselves through the thick black fast-melt mud at the bottom of the empty, marina using broomsticks by product the mud for any song of the missing children. But to no avail. Despite these efforts noticed single pace of evidence was like headed to indicate whether children had gone. It was determined that the ceilings left time carrying around seventeen or so autumn's with them including bags close tales as well as Jane's book and purse. None of these autumn's were recovered at any of the K. Like, the children were expected to have traveled nor whether I spotted on the show lawn of Glen on bake this made the possibility the tree I had drowned all the more unlikely given that belongings would have been left behind on the sand and delighted discovered. The search for Jane, Ana and grant by Mon soon became the most extensive missing person search in South Australia in history. Within the first forty eight hours of the Beaumont children's disappearance. Police had received hundreds of calls from PayPal claiming to sane the three young siblings. One woman claimed to have seen a man and three children, enter vacant house opposite her Hymie, not lights as than suburbs. But the group was mysteriously gone. The next. I'd. Another believed she sold the three children accompanied but to men sitting at a bus, stop, multiple suburbs away in semaphore park. Most reported sightings let Noah who were ruled out completely. But with the help of several reliable corroborating witness titans. Detectives where I would have pace together. What was luckily to of Bain, Jane, Ana and grant by month's movements prior to that his appearance. While reports from witnesses who believed they saw the children on the morning of January twenty six very specifics. That was enough information provided for police to establish a fairly reliable Tom on and authentified several potential aids. And approximately ten fifteen I am, Jane, Ana and grant Beaumont Boorda public transit bus to Glen oak from the diagonal rights stop as confirmed by the Drava. An old a couple traveling on the bus recalled Jane Beaumont sitting on the backseat. Grading Little Women, while honoring grant messed around cheekily putting their arms out of the windows just to get a rise out of there. Oughta sista. The bus arrived to Glenn how just a few minutes. Oh, and the siblings disembarked on Moseley straight several straits back from the safe run. Local postman tone Paddison who knew the Beaumont family from his dialing my route. So Jane, honor and grant walking along nicely straight holding hands into laughing. Tom heard one of the children Elliott to the others. Look there's post the and little grand wiped Ella. Thome struggled to recall the exact tone. He sold the by on children uncertain. If it was in the morning, or after noon, but police believed the sorting occurred as the children, I headed to the beach. Several witnesses observed the Beaumont children playing in the shallow waters, just north of the Gano Jedi which formed the busiest section of the beach. Was the same area. That had swam in die before when they follow dropped them off before he's worked trip to snare town. Honor in grand Bareilly countable splashing in the shallows and never ventured beyond to Weiss date. Shortly after eleven I am the children finished, swimming and made the short walk from the jetty to call reserve..

Jane Beaumont Beaumont Tom Ana Beaumont Boorda PayPal Jim Bowman Padova Longa Trey grand Bareilly Cali reserve Glen semaphore park Elliott Noah Ivan Thome South Australia Moseley
"south australia" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"south australia" Discussed on The Science Show

"In the aim is to encourage more people to put on Sala, but then also out distributor, essentially energy is going to put in a large battery to allow us to model how all of that will work. So that we using less energy brought in from outside relying on the energy generated internally and everybody can model how the savings eventuate out of that to win that will come from. Well, agreed is already the connecting everybody. So it's a case of using software that enables us to do that sharing and measuring and metering so it involves smart meters. But it also involves just clever software to allow you to do the trades and solar technology come in. While the solar obviously can be the panels on the roof. I mean, it doesn't have to be solar. It can be weaned could be bio, but we are talking in this instant Sola and. And when energy is generated normally, it just goes back to the greed what we envisage is that will be going to storage if it's not being shared by those uses. I I'm what about the battery or batteries, plural. So batteries, obviously can be domestic size or they can beat large. It's is possible. And we have modeling a virtual power plant in the sense of having individual households with solar and battery which they wouldn't need to own. It could all be owned by us. They would simply get all of their energy at a lower price. And we would use those multiple batteries to feedback into the grid at peak times because there'd be surplus that would have been built up during the day. So it's a way of smoothing out the peaks for the retailer, it's having energy the to be used by the distributor to offset any particular needs that they have. And it also is a way of of sitting the peak times for the households. So you can do it with an array of say. One hundred or I think they were talking in South Australia of many more.

Sala South Australia
"south australia" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"south australia" Discussed on Conversations

"The rose family since two brothers to war. But there was another family from South Australia said even more within the lean family five brothers and seven Suns signed up for the great wall and a bunch of them found themselves in Posey in one thousand sixteen Wendy Frew is a journalist and a descendant of the lane family, and these men included her great grandfather and several great uncles when he's written a family memoir called lane times. How many lanes family we're at Pasi winning? I think from what I can count that all of the twelve in this immediate family who enlisted across the whole of the war seven of them seven day seven was this huge investment of lane family manpower noticed and picked up by the general public. It was and our voice being struck about the lane women or what they thought about nearly all of them in. Going the matriarch of the family Alice lane. She would pay my gripe. Great grandmother, she was interviewed by journalists. And it was just after she'd received a telegram that her youngest son had been injured, and she was quite proud of them. And I think probably privately she would have been very frightened thinking about so many of them of the, but she expressed kind of Judah full Santa about them going off to war. And this is the thing to do and all that. And that story was in syndicated around a stray Leah when I've searched for it in the newspapers, it pops up all of the place, and I were held up as kind of post a family for recruitment and being describes the official history of of the war is the most famous family of soldiers in a styling history. What kind of stories did your mom tell you about the lane family her family during the great wall? I think the one that sticks in my memory. Most was a story. My mother tells about her mother, my grandmother, Doris and how one day this is during the war, Doris came home to the the Hymie in Sydney and she came into the front garden, and she saw her favorite brother Allen. He was a year or two younger than Doris. And now very close and she was shocked to see him. He was in full military uniform, and no one was expecting him home from the wall, and she was so excited as you rushed in and. Returned to shut the guys in turn back to to ready to go and embrace him. And he was gone. And she thought what's he done? He's he's played a trick on my own typical Allen. And she ran into the house, which was yelling out to mom and two sisters now, Allen's back islands back, and they all got incredibly excited, especially the mother they all running around the house, and I ran out into the backyard. And I thought oh he's hiding. He's Harding's is ridiculous. And then he just wasn't there that kept looking he was gone. Dorris was not a child. She was about Twenty-three. Her mother got incredibly angry. Because of course, she she. She wanted to see her some and I said to doors what are you doing? He's not. Why would you do this to us to dine day my grandma the blade? She'd sing brother that die. But obviously she hadn't seen him. She was thinking about so much that she conjured him up. We don't know..

Allen Doris Pasi Dorris Wendy Frew Suns South Australia Leah Posey Harding Judah official Sydney Santa seven day one day
"south australia" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

The Cycling Podcast

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"south australia" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

"Was watching the the daily hall. Lots. We had an Astrid at the time of the two of the France, which was only thirty minutes long, and I just sort on TV and I was glued to a couldn't stop watching at the time. It was God's lock Yano, Rick and Lance Armstrong, and I just nagged nag parents for for black, and I was pretty obsessive with my things and I was a kid, and I think they just thought it was going to be another obsession that had pasta after a month or so, and they've never pass, and I saw it on the track. And then soon after that go to roadblock as well and always did the to track and road use until I finish prisons not hasn't got a massive suckling culture in terms of mistrial cycling. So I think probably South Australia with two, Dan under his and also Melbourne Victoria. Where Cadel Evans is from probably the two most prominent sorta stating in Strahl facade cling, but we certainly produced some good socks from Queensland as well enemies. The Davis brothers Markle pen, God's like that. So it certainly, it certainly also is pretty popular in Brisbane, but I don't think caught the same extent as. When I was younger, I was actually more interested in the track. I was really into points rice, the tanks shooting vigil. Shoot. I was actually quite a lot bigger than I am now. So I sort of more of a ruler actually not a bad sprinter at the time as well. I'll I was pretty reasonable at finding my wife through upon housing good position on happily have have a Gallup, but I've really evolved into more of a, I guess, to a two o'clock, my die. I'm in Iraq gonna and that just came from from rising in France. When I went over there, I was probably about. Six kilos heavier than I am now, and I couldn't make it to the finish of nearly any rice lock where to confront sprinters were at climbing may on the second climate. The dice I had a lot to improve on that front and it was a long process, especially with the adapting to another culture as well. You know, the the first thing I had to to sold out was leading to leave in applies for couldn't initially speak. The language will I'd never lived out of high before and I went and leave data Hyman another country in of all countries live at home in. I think France was probably one of the one of the toughest at first. I really disliked it. Now I love the French. I really embrace it. And also I think the French love nothing more than a foreigner who can speak their language. I also embrace may and I've got some amazing, amazing friends. They're almost like family where where I spent three years and that will never go. Why in that cynics -perience that is priceless for the rest of my loss, not just for softening just as personal development. I guess always based in a town called on about eighty k. from Leon. Which is beautiful city where I was, you know, all right city or town, you could say about not much going on and especially with the the language barrier being quote, a small town. There was literally no one that spoke English..

France Cadel Evans Lance Armstrong Yano Brisbane Strahl Melbourne Victoria South Australia Davis Hyman Iraq Queensland Dan Rick thirty minutes three years Six kilos eighty k
"south australia" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"south australia" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"And i don't think they said tips that name but they this this'll be some pushy exchange student you know those pushy british exchange students they're the worst they surrounded poor mrs toy like poked her in the shoulder and like blue cigarette smoke interface hey platter angel yeah smack demille right out of her so that's how became meals on wheels in the united states and then over the next twenty and thirty years in the us they started popping up all over the place they did and here's what you're kind of referring to earlier so that was nineteen fifty four that same year in september in south australia which were adelaide it's shut out to adelaide where the summer two minutes from writing woman named doris taylor came up with the same exact thing and from what i understand called it meals on wheels as well is that correct yes she was something else man he was she was disabled the best i can discern she had a fall when she was seven which gave her a limp and then another fall when she was eleven that paralyzed her from the waist down permanently look that was that was it she was wheelchair bound from that point on yet from that point on and despite the fact that as an eleven year old in a wheelchair for life she had a big heart in and realize that there was a need to provide for people in her community just like was was going on in american britain and said hey what about bringing a meal the people and then in september nineteen fifty four like you said meals on wheels of south australia which i had to look up on a map of figured it was in the south and in australia it is but it's a big chunk a big chunk of land at least i don't know populated as.

demille united states britain south australia adelaide doris taylor australia thirty years eleven year two minutes
"south australia" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

Reasons to be Cheerful

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"south australia" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

"And bringing it to the national level this is happening you'll overseas celebrating what's happened in ireland is there any other good examples that you'd point us to in particular our finger very interesting what is what happened in south australia last year i was told by people who organized the event in south australia there was a big discussion whether south australia with its limited economic resources was going to become the global storage place for nuclear waste i mean obviously that role in quite a bit of money but it didn't help some dangerous and their two australian politicians where like irish politicians and saying that well this is too touchy fourparty politicians through to solve and it's too divisive for a referendum this do it differently they brought together three hundred citizens from south australia they asked the citizens who are the experts you trust to solve this issue the citizens came together for a number of weakens it given time were given information there were giving a space to deliberate and at the end of the day the recommendation of the south australians was that although in the short run this may bring a lot of cash to south australia in the long run this is not a clever idea because we do not know the geological consequences so this is again a very good example to see where regular citizens can basically go faster and be smarter than elected politicians last question david we've got something called the house of lords in britain i re i recently shared the lift with somebody who had the of sandwich on his name badge and i thought corruption you're left with the greatgreatgreatgreatgreatgrandfather someone who invented the sandwich the it's not by virtue of abetting a sandwich that he got into the lord's but you don't it says something about our situation here here ward you do with the house of lords on mature about the british system we also have a senate and build your mind based in brussels it was also the room the assembly room of.

ireland australia senate brussels david britain abetting
"south australia" Discussed on WGSO 990AM

WGSO 990AM

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"south australia" Discussed on WGSO 990AM

"Of signing a contract or it would be free and the battery needs to be operational that means by early december to meet them deadline how 'bout that they say they they have this worked so hard to make this happen there's been so many energy shortages there so it would restore power generated by a wind farm in south australia and released during these high times of massive demand which means south australia would be big and renewable energy if they have that kind of battery storage and they'd ha i seriously they'd have been the top five who else's who else can boast of the hat so south australia's population what what would it be somebody asked me this question please think the population and i think i shot kind of highest tickets to two million it's one point seven million they say people who suffer from power cuts and energy shortages like late last year most of the state was left without power after storm damage trans mission lines and then there was another big blackout in february when there was the heat wave and the demands spiked and so they outages there can last for seriously lille much longer time it's not like summon drives down a truck pouf they fix it any your sweating it out for an hour knows some some of these really last ridiculously long in so it's dangerous that's why tests offered to be in the middle of this than build that battery for australia and of course that the more successful that is the more people want the same thing and imagine how how big that would be for a lot of different places that could afford it anyway what it would mean to them instead of having loss of control scrambling around trying to meet the demands that are ridiculously high these days i think he lon musk is brilliant at that what do people need and how can i a key innovative and provide that form he is that guy all right thanks so much to the tools hand of mckenzie's sutton and and the the lead dude or one of the many way for me me me i'm really trying to get his ban on the back they are on the map but even bigger besides his technical prowess he's kuwait on the stage as well stay with us.

energy shortages australia mckenzie renewable energy lon musk kuwait
"south australia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"south australia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Come and can supply thirty thousand homes in south australia for an hour so unlike the model three which he's having tete with think he described as manufacturing how he could actually built this put it on site make it work and he's piece the australians it sounds an extraordinary thing and really is going to make a big difference in terms of electricity supply well not bigger than eight and basically if it goes down his is the backup so so it's it sort of proves that either he does say i am you i am at the forefront of battery technology in the world and i guess this is this is him saying look see what i can do so it is interesting because he has had his detractors recently i mean particularly because the model three that was supposed to be built and he's having terrible tropisms actually building it and that's quite important because he needs the cash play from sales because he's he's i think he's burning something about half a million a dollars every hour this is bloomberg numbers out there so he needs the model three to actually beep beep be in the factory being producing six having terrible problems with the model three so this is sort of like yabu guys i can't do it really let's move on to bitcoin lots and lots of publicity about bitcoin at the moment lots of warnings about it and of course it's very much on the rise will add uttered about you get an awful lot of emails about by coin clearly everybody is jumping onto this bandwagon my twitter feed is full of bitcoin look it only was created seven years ago in 2010 then it was only.

australia bloomberg twitter seven years