35 Burst results for "South Asia"

Climate Change Could Push 200 Million People to Move by 2050

Newscast - Africa

00:53 sec | 5 d ago

Climate Change Could Push 200 Million People to Move by 2050

"The mall bank one that reduced agricultural production water scarcity weisensee levels and other adverse effects of climate change could cause up to two sixteen million people to migrate within their own countries by twenty fifty. The washington-based development lender had released a report in two thousand eighteen covering climate changes effects on migration in south asia. Latin america and sub saharan africa and projected one forty. Three million people could move in those regions by twenty fifty throughout bank vice-president for sustainable development georgian vote gala. Says is important to note that this protection is not cast in stone. He says of countries start to reduce greenhouse gases closed development gaps restore vital ecosystems and how people adapt internal climate migration cook thirties by up to eighty percent to forty four million people by twenty fifty

Saharan Africa South Asia Latin America Washington
The 20th Century Was Shaped by War

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:40 min | Last week

The 20th Century Was Shaped by War

"We'd witnessed the twentieth century. Shaped by wall is one individual. So wittily put it. The twentieth century began in the balkans and ended in the balkans it began with the facination of archduke ferdinand by governor low prank hip. An amicus serbian nationalist which through various ententes various arrangements of the earliest twentieth century diplomacy triggered will will won a war in which a whole generation was lost the fruit of europe america only involved in the last few moments of that war it was the european nations that lost the cream of the young men in the trenches of fair done in those no-man's-land filled with bob wire and machine gun nests with more than six million killed but it was the war of mechanized proportions in which predominantly the military's paid the brunt. It was the young men of the armies of each side. That were mowed down just a few years later. The great war the first world war was out don in a conflict that spans the globe. In which sixty million people killed and not just sold is in fact in most cities of that war it was the civilians that bore the brunt. Then came the cold war stasis if you will yes hot was. In the periphery and south asia in the middle east and africa but between the two polish sides between america and the soviet union between nato and the war so packed the birds never flew this strategic bombers never dropped their bombs on washington or moscow on london on paris.

Balkans Archduke Ferdinand European Nations Bob Wire America Europe South Asia Middle East Africa Soviet Union Nato Washington Moscow London Paris
Afghanistan: 20 Years of Mindless Mission Creep

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:39 min | Last week

Afghanistan: 20 Years of Mindless Mission Creep

"September. The eleventh was planned out of afghanistan. Three thousand people murdered in the space of one hundred and two minutes in a country. That was truly perfect to establish it. Training base is to house a mastermind. A of muslim fundamentalists never functioned as a nation on even during the monarchy that ruled it for a few years in the one thousand nine hundred seventy s no the nation whose genetic warrior bloodymindedness soul alexander the great defeated so the british empire at its height defeated so the soviet union which dis- deployed helicopter gunships against civilians. Landmines disguised as plastic toys to main but the children of that benighted nation. None of them could defeat the afghan tribes and our elite after deploying the best of the best special operators special forces. Cia pamela trees in october the month after september the eleventh in an amazing mission the quintessence of irregular warfare unconventional warfare. With just three hundred guys literally on donkeyback with laptops and laser-guided munitions leveraging twenty-one thousand indigenous anti-taliban northern alliance took down a tyler ban. This tried the out kind training camps and forced been laden to run and hide in likewise fundamentalist pakistan that amazing mission october. What happened twenty years of mindless mission creep. Twenty years of cretans. Who'd been to harvard and yellow convincing us and themselves because they believe as well that we're going to create democracy in south asia. The girls will go to school. Music will be legal again. And they'll be hospitals across ghanistan and civil society and gender studies. At the university. In kabul cretans imbeciles all of them

Cia Pamela Trees Afghanistan Taliban Northern Alliance Soviet Union Alexander Pakistan Harvard South Asia Kabul
Boris Johnson Warns UK of Terror Threat Amidst Afghanistan Pullout

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:32 min | 2 weeks ago

Boris Johnson Warns UK of Terror Threat Amidst Afghanistan Pullout

"Unrest has continued in afghanistan while the united states is rushing to complete. Its treat withdraw from the country tomorrow. Us anti-missile defenses intercepted as many as five rockets. That were fired at kabul's airport earlier today. Meanwhile in the uk prime minister. Boris johnson has warned that the country faces its biggest terror threat for many years. He's even suggested offering the taliban diplomatic recognition if the group promises to prevent attacks launched from afghanistan. Well let's get more on this now. Joining us on the line for more as paul rogers author of irregular war isis and the new threat from the margins. Good afternoon to you paul Let me ask you just first of all about. We heard that little extra to the top of the show. From boris johnson. There what did you make of what he's had to say about the fact that you know they haven't been any attacks launched on the uk in the twenty years since the afghanistan campaign started From afghanistan is he being slightly disingenuous with the way that he's representing that information. Holden's likely yes. i mean. the reality is that there'd be many attacks in britain. They've had a lot to do with the kind of what you might call this. The inspiration that you've had from what has happened afghanistan and the development of the wars in iraq and elsewhere so yes attacks organiz specific from afghanistan very few and far between at least as far as world outside of south asia concerned within afghanistan. It's a very different case. But in a way i mean mister. Johnson is a mousetrap physical rhetoric. I think this is what we're seeing in this statement.

Boris Johnson Paul Rogers South Asia Iraq Paul Twenty Years Johnson Five Rockets Afghanistan Britain Tomorrow Prime Minister Kabul Earlier Today UK United First
"south asia" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

05:46 min | Last month

"south asia" Discussed on The Big Story

"And i believe the taliban would have noted that because they have become far more savia and smarter especially in the public domain nowadays. So i think that the chips are down no doubt about it but there is definitely not that everything is lost. We have a lot with the iranians to what with the russians and try to minimize the damage. That can because augustan than chinese excess. What increases india's this out. Pakistan and china china for the past decade has been leveraging its fast enough economic resources to gain influence and strategic advantages across south asia especially in countries like pakistan. Sri lanka belt invested billions and constructing economic goydos inputs. But when it comes to afghanistan it has in the past few years very carefully step into the country with investments in mineral resources but has largely been silent given the heavy us presence in the country however since us announced withdrawal of troops in april beating was quick to engage the taliban china's foreign minister ultimatum. The high level taliban delegation on twenty nine july to discuss future but alterations what jonah stand to gain from investments and coniston. What geopolitical interests. Does it have missing doughnut. Visit pakistan china. This adam trent whether it is pakistan against the sanctioning of its Muscle dodgers and all that you know. Terrorists the unc so this has been all been standing from behind pakistan. What is on static objective. It uses pakistan notre as a tool to contain india. Right that is that is also. it's one of the deck and now the new thing is open. A data's of afghanistan is the most destructive nation in this will it is it is central. Asia does would south asia west asia this connectivity wise. Into one of the most from gonna feed that we have in a very difficult job. If china ultra name of aghanistan speculation and in the indian where we have the legal problems in china out illegal muslim center costano slavic movement which is very much on this side of palestine in afghanistan. So the the chinese biggest what he is that these two should not get combined and you know become one eleven that type of so it has engaged with taliban say surely seek the assurances that taliban will not allow These groups to operate against china from you. Alabama's promised that many of them but whether it will succeed or not we made to be seen in luton what. China is giving them designees extension of china pakistan economic corridor towards Got his continent cobbled showroom and also the honda from xinjiang into aghanistan into central asia is another roads and all these.

china taliban pakistan south asia adam trent afghanistan india Sri lanka aghanistan jonah us unc dodgers west asia Asia palestine Alabama luton xinjiang honda
"south asia" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

03:39 min | Last month

"south asia" Discussed on The Big Story

"It's future of the country. Depends on how acts necks as india caught that it has created tremendous people than the fact that today every time they been made by even the western countries indians and india have been found to be the most popular among the afghans so it wanted to work on that although there might be some context with the taliban in one way or the other this is normal diplomatic discourse which is not always but i personally believe that the policy that followed was right of an accent. What van saw that. They have rondo by the taliban talking. When we saw that the americans who are supposed to be the custodians and security in the country talking to them when they were seeing the russians and chinese were talking to them but has been spawning them all along so we had an opportunity of opening some i would say takes in that and be mentally. It looks like that we not take funded. When the agreement was being signed indian ambassador represented their external ministers spoke from India online. So there have been preferred and more. Recently we have seen the iran and russia that india has been involved in this and even attended destroy competing in the meantime immense. Really very fast. And you know it was not expected and most of the world i think relied spicy. The western world and india relied on the us intelligence as and that is where you have been caught into this spread mile now. India in my view is that everything is not lost in that sense of the trump. You may not have that kind of imagine. One as pakistan or china has but we definitely have the grassroots devils support for india. You have plenty of fence here. They have been there. There have been solved. The taliban leaders who have been trained and studied in india also right so they would be in addition. We think that if there is an inclusive government That street be some people who have been exposed to india better in the more president frame of mind turdly if we were to believe that taliban has actually as it says it has changed as it says that it appreciates india's a that has been given as one they are to complete those four hundred projects in has not austin to leave. It had nothing. There have been no direct conflict between india and taliban so can we work together on that but ballymun each to also build. Its maybe there. They say they'll come in might come there but at the same time. India is one of the biggest capacity building in the world. And that's what one knows very well. And i think that there'd be pragmatic about it at this. Biggest concern has been terrorism emanating from there which they're trying to address to the world. You know they have. They have told that they will not allow this. I doubt the capacity to control it because it is pakistan based terrorist. Groups are more harmful to us than the albany groups by themselves. That is this fights. I feel that the moment at least during this month sharing the nfc as security council have already done to meeting centered on ghanistan and brought into focus. The key issues. That are there. And i personally saw the statements and i think that the statement was voted. One day. That'd be did not mention taliban by name dot toll statement of window that means the along wanting any blame or responsibility on.

India taliban rondo van pakistan iran russia devils china austin us albany nfc
"south asia" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

03:06 min | Last month

"south asia" Discussed on The Big Story

"Of ghanistan is likely to ship the geopolitical crippled diabled with immediate implications falling on its neighbors india china and pakistan now pakistan has been largely accused of arming training and giving shelter to the taliban and pakistan prime minister ron condo speak also said that the taliban have quote unquote broken the shackles of slavery which has board raise eyebrows and we also be interpreted as countries supporting them while china has publicly stated that it is willing to develop couldn't could friendly relations with the taliban india on the other hand which has poured billions and trained in afghanistan has remained mum on the entire show the only clear response game on nineteen august when excellent feds minister jackson stated that india's approach towards afghanistan will be couldn't go guided bites relationship with you have gone people experts pointed out that india has placed itself in a tight spot since it does not engage the group in the past and has largely condoned and with china and pakistan but whom india has untold border tensions willing to engage with the taliban how will it impact in recent identity has india missed the bus when it comes to engaging with the taliban in previous episodes of the big story on the afghanistan gaston crisis we are trying to break down how the taliban took over the country so easily what you might in crisis would signal for president joe biden government and the freedom of of government now that the taliban have taken over the country if you have mr pursued you can find a link to them in astronauts for today's episode we will discuss the geopolitical implications of taliban's entrance in the region and its implications for this spoke with unaltering unite former an envoy to jordan libya and malta joined into the big story the podcast baby toxic the headline making news for you and i'm your host and let officially india has always been opposed to dobbin and even after the ouster it helped afghanistan rebuild itself remind aaron and economic. It's in fact it has been one of the largest contributors humanitarian infrastructure lead to the country but investments reportedly in billions of dollars in projects like schools dams electricity grids and even a new parliamentary building. But india may have to reassess its strategies. Now it's strategic interest has been limited in kosovo which also prevented it from being invited to reason. Security talks for example. The most recent quad summit organized by the us was held between the us pakistan. Afghanistan bickerton but india was left out however there are also signs at india's outlook towards the terror group maybe changing there have been recent hints diplomatic corridors of communication between india and taliban but some media reports stating that indian officials did speak with the taliban when minister deshaun good visited on june but there are also mixed signals with the taliban who recently called out new delhi and asked to complete its infrastructure projects if individuals to for group which india has formally denounced in the past and has had no formal diplomatic engagements with doesn't have any leg to stand on when it comes to initiating a dialogue with the taliban former diplomat tonight believes that given the goodwill that india has established in afghanistan. It has not missed the bus doors..

taliban india pakistan ghanistan afghanistan prime minister ron condo china president joe biden jackson dobbin libya malta mr jordan aaron deshaun good kosovo Afghanistan us new delhi
China's Ambitions Toward Digital Colonization

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

02:27 min | Last month

China's Ambitions Toward Digital Colonization

"I started my career in the. Us army back in two thousand five back then. I thought for sure. I'd be learning arabic and going to iraq but The army had other plans for me. They sent me to learn mandarin. Chinese at the defense language institute and i served for several years at the national security agency on the china mission so i was analyzing intelligence and translating chinese into english there and that led me to cybersecurity. Eventually i went over to private sector. And i've worked for You know some enterprises and some startups. And i absolutely love working for intelligence companies and Last year Great position opened up a recorded future with insect group. So i found myself Working with insect group on strategic level intelligence and analyzing cyber threats and pretty much. Anything related to china. Well that is what we are talking about here. Today we're talking about the report that you and your colleagues at the insect group recently put out. This is covering china's digital colonization Can we just start off with. Maybe some descriptive stuff here. What prompted the creation of this report. China's been very busy with cyber espionage campaigns over the past decade but especially over the last few years and i started doing some research on some of their digital silk road projects. The digital silk road is a part of the more widely known belt and road initiative. It's basically a private sector agenda that aims to extend china's digital presence abroad and enhancing its commercial and political influence so as i started researching some of these digital silk road projects. I found some interesting findings around how they were using. These projects to influence regimes in certain regions of the world like africa. Latin america and south asia. So that's what prompted me to do a little more digging and find out exactly The scope of these projects. What they're being used for. And what type of influence. China is Gaining in those

China Defense Language Institute National Security Agency Us Army Iraq Army South Asia Latin America Africa
Dilip Kumar, Bollywood's Great 'Tragedy King,' Dies at 98

BBC Newsday

01:00 min | 2 months ago

Dilip Kumar, Bollywood's Great 'Tragedy King,' Dies at 98

"Dilip Kumar has died at the age of 98. He started off as a script writer but moved in front of the cameras in 1944 in the film noir butter. Oh, Jeannie Vaidyanathan reports from Delhi. Yeah, I've got a job to keep. Dilip Kumar was the face of an emerging Indian film industry. And an emerging India Morning Peshawar in 1922 in what is now Pakistan. He changed his Muslim name use of con to the Hindu Philip Kumar when he entered the film industry. In a career spanning six decades, he starred in some of Bollywood's most iconic films. He was the first ever recipient of best actor that India's equivalent of the Oscars the film Fair Awards and still holds the record for winning the honor the most times. And acting megastar in South Asia. He was awarded both India and Pakistan's highest civilian honours.

Dilip Kumar Jeannie Vaidyanathan Philip Kumar Peshawar Delhi India Pakistan Oscars The Film Fair Awards Bollywood South Asia
Devising a New Social Contract for Fashions Garment Workers

The Business of Fashion Podcast

02:08 min | 5 months ago

Devising a New Social Contract for Fashions Garment Workers

"This week marks the eighth anniversary of the collapse of rana plaza an eight story garment factory housing thousands of workers making clothes for some of the world's famous brands which led to the death of more than one thousand people. It seems like an appropriate moment to look back at our professional summit. Closing fashion sustainability. Got where we had an in-depth conversation with a group of leading experts to address issues around workers rights in fashion supply chain ananias bhattacharjee is international coordinator at the asia floor. Wage alliance of trade unions and labor rights activists focused on addressing poverty wages and gender discrimination. He joined us from bangalore. India based in los angeles aisha barren plot another sustainability council member and and chief executive of remake the advocacy group behind the pay up campaign which highlighted brands that refuse to pay for completed orders when the pandemic hit and to set is an expert on south asia traditional arts crafts and textiles based in new delhi. She's the founder trustee of the craft revival trust these three leaders in the space around workers rights spoke to our london editor. Sarah kent at the b. o. f. professional summit before we dive into what the industry needs to do to tackle so many of these labor issues. I wanted to talk a little bit about why we're still facing. Systemic problems of labor abused an annual. I wonder if i could start with you. You know you spend your career advocating to try fix these issues. Why is fashioned still failing to protect. Its welcome fashion fast. Fashion industry or one can say really fashion industry as a whole because even when they're not fast fashion. They're mimicking the fast fashion business model. The fashion industry business model is really at the heart of the problem. And so deal that business model. It's unlikely to unlikely to see fundamental

Rana Plaza Ananias Bhattacharjee Wage Alliance Of Trade Unions Aisha Barren Sarah Kent Bangalore Asia South Asia Los Angeles New Delhi India London
How vaccine inequality is endangering the world

BBC World Service

05:23 min | 6 months ago

How vaccine inequality is endangering the world

"With that anniversary one year ago today when the World Health Organization officially declared the covert 19 outbreak, a worldwide pandemic when a year on and 2.6 million people have died worldwide, and the economy is in tatters. There is also hope, because Kobe vaccination drives under way more than 100 countries with more than 300 million doses of ministered, but who gets vaccinated, for example, there around 80 million refugees, asylum seekers and displaced people worldwide. Will they be included in vaccination plans where they live? Filippo Grandi is the U. N High Commissioner for Refugees and his current in Uganda. When I spoke to him, he started by telling me what impact the pandemic and lockdowns have had on refugees. Where I think the impact is severe and will be even more severe is more on the economic side and in lockdowns, which prevail all over the world. We've seen an escalation off poverty if you wish in refugee and displaced community all over the world from Lebanon, Toe black in America, the Venezuelans toe Afghans in South Asia and so forth, So this is really the key challenge that we have to face now. We know that the key to getting out of the pandemic. His vaccination aren't refugees at the end of the list of people who are going to get vaccinated or too often, well, that was very much our concern, especially refugees. Refugees are not nationals off the country's they're in, and we were worried that because of that they would be marginalized. You know, there's been some good developments. I am in Uganda is speaking to you from Kampala and here, for example, today the vaccination begins. I was with the acting prime minister this morning He was going to be vaccinated and he was keen to tell me refugees will be included. There's no question about that. You can the host 1.5 million refugees. Almost the pandemic has the underlying the inequalities that disparities Throughout the world on one of those is that the richer Western countries of vaccinating at a much higher rate than poorer countries, and yet so many of the world's refugees, Aaron places Like where you are right now, you can do that slower roll out in places like Uganda is undoubtedly going to effect refugees, isn't it? You're absolutely right. George. Vaccination programs have to exist and to be rolled out to include refugees, and this is where really the enormous inequality of the international system has appeared. Very carries. The tent of March is the first day that you can to a nation of more than 40 Million people is receiving its first vaccine when in rich countries. This has been going on for several months. So this inequality is blatant. This needs to be corrected. We are active as an organization in those initiatives that aimed at securing a minimum amount of doses. For poor countries and our role there is to ensure that some of those does is go to the refugees as well. But frankly speaking, that effort is not enough to correct that huge imbalance which is really short sighted. It's not only wrong, it's shortsighted. It's a bit like refugees and nationals in the country if people in poor countries do not get vaccination. This is a global issue. It will backfire everywhere else so then more vaccines and needed and more needs to be done to deal with, as you say, the social impact of the pandemic on Refugees in particular. He's a difficult questions, and there aren't presumably easy solutions to them. But what are a couple of things that could should be done to make progress in this sense from the very beginning off the pandemic? I've reached out personally to the leadership of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. These institutions have led The establishment off economic rescue packages for countries impacted by Corbett and lockdowns, and my message to them has bean first of all to accelerate. The disbursement of those packages so that this country's are more protected, but also to ensure that vulnerable groups are included actually are considered as a factor to increase those packages. In other words, take Uganda again. Uganda is negotiating. If I understand with the I m F one such package and the message that I will pass through the eye, meth and other similar institutions is remembered. Uganda has what 40 45 million people. It's national population. It has almost 1.5 million refugees. These needs to be factored in, especially in countries like you can that that are very inclusive that include refugees in education programs in health programs that extend to them efforts to create livelihoods. This additional burden that these countries have needs to be considered when this economic packages are rolled out. This is not always the case. Look at Lebanon, for example, where one in four people is a refugee. This huge political tension in Lebanon over this refugee issue. I'm very worried that rescue packages being rolled out and Lebanon has many challenges may not include refugees, and this would be catastrophic for this huge, vulnerable population in that particular country, And this example is valid in other countries as well. So yes, More complex, I would say even then the vaccination inclusion.

Uganda Filippo Grandi World Health Organization Lebanon Kobe South Asia U. Kampala Aaron America George International Monetary Fund Corbett World Bank
Myanmar coup: 'We were told to shoot protesters', say police who fled

BBC World Service

03:56 min | 6 months ago

Myanmar coup: 'We were told to shoot protesters', say police who fled

"For me Amar have talked to the BBC, saying they fled across the border into India. After refusing to carry out the orders of the military, which seized power in a coup last month. In some of the first such interviews outside the country. More than a dozen defectors told us they escaped, fearing that before stew, kill or harm civilians. Security forces in the country accused of killing protesters into democratically elected government was overthrown in February. Are South Asia. Correspondent. Virginia Virgin, Nothin, reports. Way given for quite a while. And Avery, dusty and bumpy road on We've come to a border town. I'm just looking out across The river, the river TL and that he's basically the border between India and Myanmar's. I can see a very colorful washing line with clothes hanging out. Well, that is in Myanmar, where I'm standing right now is in India and he's across this river. That dozens of people in recent weeks have fled the military crackdown in Myanmar. Coming to India for safe passage. It's in a small town along the border. We need two dozen of the policemen and women who are now hiding in India. The group all in their twenties, say they're terrified. They say they ruled it by the military in Myanmar to use violence against their own people. The first time name whose name we've changed to protect his identity is sharing his story, Son. Don't let that happen. The cut as protests were taking place. My boss ordered us to fire at the crowd. I refused to shoot them. I said I'd rather side with the people later I told him I was going to visit my family. That's when I ran away to military is becoming more and more brutal. As we speak named, pulls out his phone to show me photos of the family he left behind a wife and two daughters, 15 years old, the other just six months. Made me Don't make us come on. I'm worried that may not be possible to meet my wife and Children again named in the police officers. We met shared photos of them on duty on their ideas. The BBC is unable to independently verify their stories is pro democracy protests escalate across me and mark Security forces in the country have been accused of killing people. Mobile phone footage shared with US by activists shows protesters dragged to the ground and beaten. Some of the footage is distressing. His 22 year old police constable told me he witnessed brutality firsthand insight in coma coma, Viv went out with the military threatening toe harass peaceful protesters. People were beaten up. I had sleepless nights when I saw innocent people bleeding. My conscience wouldn't permit me to take part in such evil acts. Authorities in the animal have asked India to return any defectors toe up hold friendly relations. Offices. We talked to say they can't go back. Grace his name. We've changed. He's one of two female officers we met who's defected. She said she saw the military use sticks and rubber bullets to round up protesters. And on one occasion, salt tear gas being fired into a group, which included young Children. Once I'm officiating, they wanted us to arrest our friends. If you continue to remain in Myanmar, a life would be in danger. We want peace to come quickly to the country and for the military to be defeated, moving 100. People have now taken refuge here in the mountain, a state of misery arm Since the coup, local politicians say they'll provide temporary help to those arriving from Myanmar. These people flee to this northeastern corner of India. The national government has yet to decide what happens to the next

Myanmar India Amar BBC South Asia Avery Coma Coma The River Virginia VIV Grace United States National Government
Interview With Former Air Force Officer, And Motivational Speaker Toolika Rani

A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

05:59 min | 6 months ago

Interview With Former Air Force Officer, And Motivational Speaker Toolika Rani

"Hello and welcome to another edition of a dc woman. Podcast i am your host sonia ago play and today in honor of international women's day. We are so excited to welcome. Retired indian. Air force officer mountaineer motivational speaker research. Scholar and travel writer to ronnie deluca is the first woman from uttar pradesh india to climb mount everest and the first indian woman to climb the highest volcano of asia. Known as mount. Dama avant in san to look i served in the indian air force for a decade and was squadron leader an outdoor training instructor in the prestigious indian air force academy in hyderabad india and she was even involved. The physical training of hundreds of feature officers including india's first three women fighter pilots with twenty three mountaineering expeditions and tracks in india nepal bhutan iran africa and russia under her belt. To look at is now working on her. Phd continuing to train for future tracks and she serves as a motivational speaker which includes a hugely popular. Ted talk and she has been featured widely in mainstream media india and south asia. She is a staunch advocate of women's rights and human rights. Globally juelich out. Welcome to the show. Is sonia thank you for having made you to look i. I wanna say that the messages you received from your family and especially your mother growing up or such a tremendous example of female empowerment and a genuine belief in human spirit. You were taught that you only have this life to pursue your dreams and goals and that nothing can get in your way so long as your mind believes it you can achieve it while if every young girl or woman receive this message growing up. What could be accomplished on planet earth. So really really impressed by that. And you've talked a lot about your spiritual beliefs and faith. And i wanna ask you. What is going to remind as you ascend a mountain. do you go into a meditative state. Will you rely on your deep spiritual beliefs and constantly have to retain mindfulness in assessing the physical challenges. Along the way i would imagine. There's a variety of protocols and situational awareness. That is needed. But i'd really like her more from you on that. Because in my estimation this mindset is what separates those who make it to the top and those who unfortunately do not on different stages of climbing i have a different kind of a mindset. I would say that. If i fain like there there might be avalanche. There might be a route wash. That might be bad weather. Something which has detained my plans to climb a mountain. I get into a buddy confrontational mode. Because i am. I'm trained as a soldier. And i had to fight my adversity so at times i started seeing the mountain. Asthma adversity. it happened to me on mount everest. I had to in my second attempt. Also i had to turn back from three thousand feet twice before i made my tent and succeeded so in those two attempts i started challenging everest. That either you can give me death or injury you can go ahead and give me that and i will keep on doing what i'm capable of doing. So sometimes i get into that kind of confrontational mode. Where i see that. Yes the mountain in front of me. Is the obstacle that i have to overcome he. It is an enemy. And i have to fight it with all my might that i have sometimes from vivid me. There are certain sentences accord or something but have support him that just springs up bent. The conditions are really tough. I'm climbing exhausted and the going gets very very tough. I have seen these flashes. Coming from within a volume by Kipling everybody had about displaying very famous swim. If so there was this lions from this point if that some everything is finished and nothing is left to new that still a wasting your head which says hold on so at one time this would hold on just a up in my mind and i just continued. I just held on and kept my foot one foot after another in front official. So that is how it happens sometimes. It is ready spinach with because london's are so beautiful. I get into that meditative state also but i contemplate the nature of life seeing a mountain see a mountain the stance alone so anybody who is strong mighty and wants to rise high. Perhaps in life would be like that alone solitary having his own battles and also facing all kinds of storms videos rain gold snowfall everything but still standing very tall and after that i absolve that seed they also the cloud at times at times it is just sunny so this is how life also is on. Mountain's what i love the most about is that i don't have that usual crowd around me.

India Ronnie Deluca Climb Mount Everest Dama Avant Indian Air Force Academy Sonia Indian Air Force Uttar Pradesh Hyderabad Bhutan Air Force South Asia Nepal Asia TED Iran Russia Fain SAN
Bhutan lawmakers vote to decriminalize same-sex relations

Morning Edition

00:47 sec | 10 months ago

Bhutan lawmakers vote to decriminalize same-sex relations

"In Bhutan have voted to decriminalize same sex relations such mito Pataki reports. It's the latest South Asian country to do so. Activists are celebrating after Bhutan's lawmakers voted overwhelmingly to amend a law that penalized what it called unnatural sex that's widely interpreted as gay sex. The amendment will become final after Bhutan's King approves it, but that's considered a formality. Mood dance move is the latest in a series of legislations recognizing LGBTQ rights in South Asia two years ago, Bhutan's neighbor, India decriminalized homosexuality by striking down a colonial era law. Next year. Nipple, another Himalayan country will count LGBTQ people in its senses for the first

Bhutan Mito Pataki King South Asia India
PUBG Mobile Announces Massive Prize Pool for 2021

Esports Minute

02:02 min | 10 months ago

PUBG Mobile Announces Massive Prize Pool for 2021

"Pubg mobile is heading into its Global championship for 2020 the pmdc to welcome fans. They made an announcement for the upcoming season, which promises to be a huge one for fans of the mobile Battle Royale and twenty Twenty-One pubg mobile have a total prize pool of fourteen million dollars the highest total prize pool for a mobile a sport in one year in history month that price will be spread across a much larger ecosystem than we saw in twenty-twenty this year pubg mobile operated two leaks the pubg Mobile Pro leagues in South Asia and Southeast Asia off next year. They will add 7 more regions. Those regions are turkey Western Europe Arabia North America Latin America and Brazil. The final region being added is the Commonwealth of Rome. Dependent states, which is basically the old Soviet Bloc with Russia, Ukraine Yugoslavia and other countries in that region, the actual format of the year will be similar to fans of League to split beginning in January and am waiting in a global championship in Fall. There will also be major invitationals held over the summer pubg mobile is seeing record-breaking growth and viewership and fans who want to buy in ahead of next season as the Regent enters the pubg mobile Bots world can watch the pmdc from now until December 20th. The current pmgc is competing for a prize pool of two million dollars. The new pubg mobile format is really important for a couple reasons, It's the biggest mobile Esports structure. We've ever seen attached to one game and it's also the most fleshed-out format for Battle Royale Esports we've ever seen well fortnite has put down more money and prizes. They don't operate Regional leagues and you are close to level. We're going to be seeing from pubg Mobile in 2021. And in other good news for pubg mobile. It seems like the game is on track to be reinstated by the Indian government. India was the name. Growth region for pubg mobile for most of this year and the government banned the game along with a lengthy list of other apps with connections to China a few months ago according to a leak reported by Indian Publications over the weekend. There is a place to bring pubg mobile back to the world's second most populous country sometime soon, but we don't have much more information than that.

Pubg Mobile Pmdc Ukraine Yugoslavia Pmgc South Asia Southeast Asia Arabia Latin America North America Brazil Rome Russia Europe Indian Government India Government
World Week Morning Shahzad

Chompers

02:21 min | 11 months ago

World Week Morning Shahzad

"Good morning it's time for choppers your morning and night tooth brushing show today our friend Jasmine is here with an interview. Gentleman take it away. Thanks start brushing on the top of your mouth on one side and here's Trumpian Idris speaking Japanese to counter saw. How It's World Week and today our Friendship Zahed is here to tell us about Pakistan, the country where his family is from. High She's odd. Families from Pakistan and they speak earlier there. Okay and where in the world is Pakistan. Pakistan is right next to India and China. And South Asia. Switch you're brushing to the other side of the top of your mouth and brush your front teeth to. Have you ever been to Pakistan I've indo-pakistan many, times? I used to go I used to go in the summer the kid to see my family especially my grandparents. Would fly to Karachi trustee is the big city in Pakistan And it's a city that has twenty, four, million people. It's one of the biggest cities in the world you might never have heard about it. Switched to the bottom of your mouth. And brush the molars all the way in the back. Okay so used to fly to Pakistan to visit your grandparents. So how would you say grandmother in early? So. Early, do with family members is very specific in. Titles. So you don't say grandparents really you say, my grandmother, my Mom's side or my grandmother on my Dad's side. So the data and Daddy are on your Dad's side and the Nana and Nani on your mom's side. The Nana Nani. Secure brushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth. And give your tongue up brush to. What do you call your mum? I'd call her mother a me or Mama a me or Mama what about your dad call my Dad Baba. And I could also say a boo, a lot of families say Abhu we say Baba. Mahba. We just like how that sounds.

Pakistan Nana Nani Trumpian Idris Baba Jasmine South Asia Nani Karachi Trustee Nana India Daddy China
Bangladesh to allow death penalty for convicted rapists

Democracy Now! Audio

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Bangladesh to allow death penalty for convicted rapists

"And Bengladeshi. The approved the use of the death penalty for convicted rapists. This comes following widespread protests over several high profile rape cases including a gang rape and a remote village which circulated on Social Media Human Rights Watch US South Asia director knock. She ganguly noted that most cases are not reported or prosecuted and conviction rates are low and the government should instead focus on reforming Bangladesh is justice system.

Rape Ganguly Bangladesh Director Asia
Dogs Can Be Trained to Sniff Out COVID-19, Studies Suggest

TIME's Top Stories

07:28 min | 1 year ago

Dogs Can Be Trained to Sniff Out COVID-19, Studies Suggest

"Are now emerging in refugee camps. Why did it take so long for the virus to reach them By Melissa Godin. For a number of months, the world's largest refugee camps appear to have been spared the worst of the coronavirus pandemic but human rights groups now say cove nineteen infection rates are on the rise in the temporary. That house millions of the world's most vulnerable people with alarming consequences both for those vulnerable groups, as well as the world more broadly the United Nations high. Commissioner for Refugees reports that globally twenty one, thousand of the world's thirty million refugees have tested positive for the virus across ninety seven countries at the end of September. Thirty two new cases were reported in the refugee camps. In Cox's Bazar. Bangladesh home. To seven hundred, forty, five, thousand Rohingya an ethnic minority fleeing violence and discrimination in. Myanmar. In Greece, more than two hundred, forty refugees have tested positive for the virus on the island of Lesbos, and in Lebanon, Syria and Palestine. Cova nineteen outbreaks have occurred at several camps over the past month though UNHCR reports the numbers rose sharply in September. The true number of cases remains unknown because of limited testing. Aid agencies had long expressed fears about the potentially devastating impacts of the virus for those living in crowded camps where medical services are sparse yet for the first six months of the pandemic case rates remained far lower than expected while low testing rates in refugee camps could explain why so few cases have been reported experts say camps isolation from host communities, as well as the imposition of strict laws down measures curb the spread of the virus even if refugees have so far been spared the worst of the pandemics immediate health impact, the outbreak has taken a huge toll on refugees lives. The global economic recession has led to major cuts to humanitarian funding for refugee camps, causing food shortages, and. Employment Opportunities for displaced people with the Norwegian Refugee Council estimating three quarters of displaced people have lost income since the pandemic began lockdowns have also further restricted refugees mobility with countries like Greece placing tighter restrictions on refugees than the rest of the population. Moreover, many experts say governments are using the pandemic as an excuse to violate refugees rights. Governments are using covid nineteen as a pretext to block people from the right to seek asylum says bill freely the director of human rights watches. Refugee. And Migrant Rights Division. It runs roughshod over the basic principles of refugee protection. He says now, as the virus begins circulating in camps around the world experts worry that refugees who have already suffered so much from the pandemic may not get the medical support they need. If the disease gets introduced into more refugee camps, it would be a tinderbox says freekick noting that the virus would spread rapidly the low case rates we have seen so far free lick says are just a lucky break. Why have cove nineteen rates been lower than expected in refugee camps? covid nineteen rates in refugee camps or unexpectedly low in part because the camps tend to be isolated from surrounding communities limiting the odds of the virus spreading into the camps camps are situated often in the most desolate unwanted land that a country can find free like says, no one casually goes in and out national lockdowns also help protect refugees from the virus in Jordan, for instance, which hosts seven hundred. Forty seven thousand refugees mostly from Syria the government implemented. One of the world's strictest lockdowns, shutting down airports for several months and jailing people who broke quarantine. There was tight lockdown that was put in place towards the Third Week of March including the shutting down of all the borders and airspace says, Juliet Toomas. UNICEF's Chief of communications for the middle, east, and North Africa, about Jordan this help she says. Additional restrictions placed specifically on refugee camps also helped limit viral spread. Many camps have reduced the number of people entering and exiting. For instance, in Bangladesh's Cox's Bazar only twenty percent of the usual number of humanitarian workers were allowed to enter during the first few months of lockdown and deliveries were made less frequently in order to reduce potential transmission according to Saad Hamady a south. Asia campaigner for Amnesty International many of the operations except the essential ones were carried out remotely Hamadi says, these are the measures that might have reduced or delayed the spread of the virus. There are other factors however, that could explain low case numbers. Half of refugees worldwide are under the age of eighteen according to the UNHCR and their relative young age may make them less susceptible. To having a severe infection with the virus if young people are ACM dramatic or have mild symptoms, they may also be less likely to get tested. It's also possible that there have been cases of course at nineteen that have gone undetected and camps. While some testing is available, it's hindered by shortage of testing supplies and medical personnel to carry out the tests. Some refugees also don't. WanNa get tested for fear that they may have to self isolate and therefore be unable to carry out any income generating activities they rely on for survival in Cox's Bazar the world's largest refugee settlement in Bangladesh less than one percent of the population has been tested. The lower case numbers could therefore be a result of low testing rates. The actual number of cases could be higher. But experts say that despite low testing rates cove in nineteen infection rates in camps still have not been as bad as expected. Even if you carried out a large number of tests, it still likely to be a low number of infections says somebody if Cova Nineteen was spreading through camps undetected camps would witness rising numbers of people requesting medical attention or rising numbers of deaths neither of which have been the case in several camps according to UNHCR data I do think there's a hidden outbreak to an extent, but we're not seeing other indicators showing a massive outbreak says to Jacobson cares country director in Syria were not seeing a host of people falling ill or dying.

Unhcr Bangladesh COX Norwegian Refugee Council Syria Government Cova Greece Jordan Director United Nations Melissa Godin Commissioner Myanmar Migrant Rights Division Juliet Toomas Asia Unicef
Khan Academy: Sal Khan

How I Built This

06:58 min | 1 year ago

Khan Academy: Sal Khan

"Most of the products and services we've talked about on the show have been innovative or disruptive in some way. But some of them and you've heard me say this before have fundamentally changed the way we live I mean lift AIRBNB starbucks. Shop Affi-. wayfair. These brands have transformed the way that many of us shop and travel and work. But every now, and then a founder comes along that seems to want to do something even more ambitious, even more transformative like remember. Pat. Brown, he founded impossible foods to create meet out of plants meet. So meet like that even the most die-hard carnivores would want to eat it. Pat Wants to put a stop to meet production period because of the damage, it's doing to the planet and essentially and I don't think I'm overstating this. He set out from day one to change the world. But still. Pat Brown stands to make a lot of money from his company same with most of the founders who've been on this show and I don't think any of them are motivated primarily to make money but it is part of the story they make a product or offer service, sell it to you and me, and they also get rich perfectly fine. But what about someone who makes a product or offers a service that is equally transformational maybe even more so but makes it one hundred percent free To do that, you have to make personal sacrifices starting by earning a lot less money. which is just part of what makes Sal Khan. So incredibly remarkable. Over the past twelve years, he's built Khan Academy into a powerhouse, a massive online learning platform that offers free tutorials to anyone anywhere. And from the very beginning South sided, his academy would be a nonprofit that it should never be tempted to compromise on its values. But before he launched Khan, Academy Sal didn't anticipate any of this. He was just trying to help a younger cousin with her sixth grade math lessons at the time he was working for a hedge fund. But from those early days of doing one on one to toils sal gradually built a platform that offers hundreds of classes in dozens of languages. Nearly thirty million people use Khan Academy. Every month to learn math science arts even sat prep all four free and Khan. Academy has inspired the launch of many other online learning platforms, but many of them are for profit operations that charge money. But we'll get to all that moment first. Let's back up just a little bit sal Khan grew up in metairie Louisiana his mom was from India and his dad was from Bangladesh and the marriage ended when sal was pretty young. My parents. Had issues and so they separated when I was probably about eighteen months old two years old and then I had really never seen my father and I saw once four an evening when I was thirteen and then he passed away the next year so it was really might. mother who raised us as as a single mother. While was there a community of South Asian families in imagery? Growing up. Yeah my you know when my parents separated. We actually live with my young at the time they were in their twenty s, and so they all were kind of like father figures and almost like older siblings to to me as well and and a lot of ways they were not your stereotypical you know. Just come to the US study. Get a job save money kind of prudent immigrant story they were. They were much more embracing of New Orleans. Culture. And I would say they're the most new ORLEAN South Asians. You will ever find it in your life. I had a very colorful childhood. You know late night parties, people, singing, and dancing. For me it felt like a I remember my third birthday that my uncles got a belly dancer. I still remember Habiba you know So it was definitely a different type of childhood, but it was a in some ways a really rich one. So what did your mom do for a living? The first job that I remember her having she she was the person who takes the change out of the vending machine at the at the local hospital actually the hospital where I was born and she took me to work a couple of times 'cause she didn't have childcare and I thought at the time I remember watching her do that. I think it was like the coolest job on earth because you have the key that you can open up the vending machine and like quarters just pour out of it. So she did that for a little bit and then essentially was a cashier at a series of convenience stores is kind of doing you know one minimum wage job after another and then I was in high school she had remarried her my Stepdad at the time were able to. Kind of cobble together to get a a small convenience store in. Your book you write. Louisiana was as close to South Asia as the United States could get. It's spicy food. Giant cockroaches in the corrupt government which is both funny but somewhat true true. I guess right I mean. You grew up at a time when. Like David Duke was the. The representative in steel her. The part of Mary where we had our store, it was called seminole convenience store on Seminole Avenue, and it's called a parliamentary called on that was kind of the heart of David Dukes base. So to speak I remember in a right outside of our our store across the street was the largest David Duke for president signing I've ever seen and so it was A. You know the the folks who lived in the neighborhood who were frankly know Super David Duke supporters in some ways it was lucky. This is pre nine eleven They didn't really know what to make of my family at at the time We've had a few conversations I remember with people the store where they they openly told us that they were trying to decide whether we were white or the N. word to you know we were confusing them but you know growing up I was the only Brown kid in in the classroom. But I never felt in school at all like folks were in any way biased or racist against me. If anything I have to give the the school system to Jefferson parish school system, a lot of credit you know I think a lot of what I am today is because they gave me opportunities there were teachers that believed in me. I had a really good friend circle So so I have no. You, know I I don't feel like it was a a tough childhood.

Sal Khan Pat Brown Khan Academy David Duke Louisiana Founder United States Airbnb David Dukes Affi-. New Orleans Jefferson Parish School South Asia Bangladesh Mary Representative President Trump Metairie India
Dream Boy And The Poison Fans

Rough Translation

05:23 min | 1 year ago

Dream Boy And The Poison Fans

"By the time that Emily Fangs reporting this story in March, the controversy around this actor at already gotten so hot that many of his fans refused to talk to a reporter others asked to speak in ways that would not reveal their true identities. NPR, by the way has very strict standard on this, you have to reasonably expect harm to your person or livelihood, and they met the standard there been retributive attacks and death threats. But we're GONNA start our story before all that back when Xiaojun was getting more endorsements than almost any idol in China is twenty eight tall and thin with Pale skin big eyes and understand the role he played in Chinese pop culture. You can look to the TV ads that were scripted with his image in mind. Mike Emily showed me this ad for Esti Lipstick So it starts in this. Hotel lobby most is really warm. Golden Sojourn appears the top of the staircase. He looks down and sees one beautiful woman in the crowd. She looks quite unsure of herself. He, sees this woman. And he can tell you quickens his steps who walks down the staircase briskly and it looks like he's about to approach her. But instead he grabbed golden balloon and he sends it her way with a package attached. The balloon didn't inside is surprise and estee louder lipstick which puts on an all of a sudden. She has confidence she struts out and she takes position on stage in front of a microphone. And you sojourn the crowd, he begins to clap for her and everyone else begins to clap her. As the woman smiles. They're selling the image of him as someone who helps others and to as helper of beauty he's too good to be human. But he's always there helping others be their best selves. Really Shapes. Shenzhen's millions of fans. See Him looks very clean. Looks. Very decent. He looks very gentle. This is an we're calling by her initials is E. IMA passer. Yes life I have never seen someone look at it. Is. E is thirty years old married. and. She was about to become the mother when I talked to her. So she has not the typical style Jonathan? Savage John Fans are usually single women young teenagers, teenagers likely in middle school or high school is e says that. This kind of connector to her friends because they always have something to talk about show. Good looks. And also there is a another reason is because I feel when people are pursuing I'll say when they're Authorian cert- can kind of celebrity they must have fun something in the celebrity that way don't have our self. So is he describes herself as very frank, a very frank and outspoken person maybe even a little harsh and one of the things she ended these most in South Asia is his gentleness so that I feel that is something I want to learn from him because John is portrayed a sweet person. He also needs protection because that gentleness can be taken advantage of in his fans need to. Be the ones who stand up for him here is where China's Fan Culture and actually Asian Fan Culture in general it kind of veers away from even the most intense fan behavior in the West because a lot of fancy it as their job, even their responsibility, not just to admire their idol and to support him but to go so much further. So is he talks about how in these? Media groups, some of which will have hundreds of thousands of followers. Each there are something called a child Wa. So sopra topic, what's called Super Topic or Toha, and which some of the lead fans who devote hours a day to organizing this fans structure, we'll give orders to. Fans beneath them about what they need to achieve for that day. So today, we're all going to click on this one music video and watch it or today we're all going to buy products from this brand because they've signed an endorsement deal with children. Say the broadcaster from the Child Watt who say today when you to do this today when you to do that so you remember that Estee Lauder ad for lipstick according to Chinese media estee Lauder Botox, pitched show in two thousand eighteen sold out not only within the first day of their release but within the first. Hour. Totalling almost six million dollars in sales, and then back on the fan club sites, fans would celebrate what they saw as their success. It's IMMA fine. You want to support your idol by making here she gets the most brand endorsements and makes the most money on behalf of these companies. I get I get what Xiaojun gets out of this he gets. And success money what fans get out of making him. So successful by being particularly influential fan of Superfan you also get a lot of power and influence the majority of his fans are going to be. Young girls in their middle school or high school years. So in real life, they're not going to have a lot of power in Chinese society. But by being a part of this fan group, you become part of this very powerful commercial

Mike Emily Xiaojun John Fans China Estee Lauder Emily Fangs Estee NPR Estee Lauder Botox Reporter Shenzhen South Asia Jonathan West Watt
Shaniwar Wada

Haunted Places

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Shaniwar Wada

"On the western side of the Indian subcontinent, there is a city called Puna with an estimated population of seven million people. It's the eighth largest population center in India. As the informational technology capital of the country known as the Oxford of the East due to many universities and technical schools scattered throughout the city. At the near center of the city on the Bank of the Muto River is a majestic eighteenth century fort called Shawnee war water. was home to some of India's greatest warriors and politicians as well as some of its most dangerous betrayals. The death and destruction tied to the fort has left behind shadows Phantom pushes and pulls and disembodied voices crying out for help. These spirits are the last remnants of the Fort's storied history as a series of fires have ravaged the building itself. In order to understand the loss experienced by both these spirits and the culture they came from one has to die far back into Indian history. If South Asia can be defined by anyone conflict. It's the region's ongoing religious wars between Hindus and Muslims long before the British and Portuguese arrived and exacerbated these problems the countries we now know as India and Pakistan were divided into smaller kingdoms who fought for religious and cultural dominance. During, most of the eighteenth century, the Indian subcontinent was dominated by the Mughal empire. Muslim. With its origins in modern day, bekker's can. In seventeen twenty the head of the Murata Empire appointed a twenty year old warrior named Bagio belong to succeed his father in the role of prime minister or pay Schwa-. Balji raw was determined to fight his way from Poona to Delhi in order to expel the moguls and claim all of the Indian Subcontinent Taza State. It. Is Nineteen Year career as a PATUA. He never lost a battle. As, his grew so did the power of the Pay Schwab US eventually superseding kings they were expected to serve in terms of power and influence. Ten years into his campaign to expand the Miranda Empire. Mogae row began building a seven story fortified palace called SCHONE WAR WADA or Saturday fort in seventeen thirty it was completed in seventeen thirty two and would serve as the seat of the patients power until European imperial powers forced them into decline when he wasn't in the field Balji row stayed with his wife, Kashi Pie and their sons at Shawnee War Wada the garden. So the Ford provided an idyllic place for children to play and the many halls of the palace were lot in the region for their decor. This included both intricate teak finishing San wall-paintings of the Ramona and the Mahabharata it is at this point that the historical record gets controversial. Body row married Mustang any the daughter of the Rajput King Shot Sal and his Persian Muslim concubine. Unheard of for both Hindu and Muslim rulers to take multiple wives. However. mustangs ties, Islam Islam, and the lack of official approval from both body Rows Family Yen Kashi by presented personal and political issues. Some claim that the marriage was a political match meant to thank podgy raw for saving the Rajput Kingdom. But legend has it that body route fell in love with the princess after she broke into his tent in men's clothing to ask him for military aid. The story says that podgy row gave Donnie a dagger perhaps not realizing that doing so was a sign of marriage in Rajput Culture. Whatever the truth was? Followed her new husband Ashani Wada or she faced a chilly reception from her new in laws. Macci rows mother and brother refused to acknowledge her and body row ended up having to build a separate residents for her. Believe it or not. This period was in many ways the most peaceful era and Shinawatra's domestic history.

India Indian Subcontinent Taza State Shawnee War Wada Ashani Wada Mogae Row Rajput Kingdom Muto River Shawnee Rajput Culture Murata Empire South Asia Miranda Empire Kashi Pie United States Shinawatra San Wall-Paintings Bekker Kashi Delhi Prime Minister
"south asia" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"south asia" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Second Nilanthi Samara Nyaka she is the director of the strategy and Policy Analysis Program. At CNA with expertise on Indian Ocean and South Asia security. Finally Judd government. He's the director of the Africa Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and a former national intelligence officer for Africa. It's the law. Fair podcast July thirteenth. Cove nineteen, and it's national security implications in the middle. East South Asia and Africa. Mona. Let's start with Iran and then the wider Middle East in terms of. Covid arrived and how it spread this spring. How did it? I affect the Levada in the wider Middle East, so Iran was the first country in the Middle East to experience covet, and it was quite early as early as mid February that there were actual reports of it started in the. Religious City of calm, but then very quickly spread throughout the country. It was notable that a number of senior Raanan officials contract the disease. There was one. Memorable anecdote when I think it was. Maybe it was the deputy health minister who was giving a press conference sweating profusely and was not note. This has been stabilized. That really is no outbreak and the next day is reported that he's come down with covert. So Iran was really one of the earliest ones in remains the regional epicenter of the pandemic other countries that are now experiencing more significant outbreaks are Iraq. Some of the Gulf countries and Egypt. Now, the attention that was given at least in most of the international press was really to the Iranian government. There wasn't as much attention to the spread among the population in Iran and even less soda populations spread in the other countries, but did it did it follow a similar pattern too much of the rest of the world where everybody was focused on flights coming in from China, and then eventually the flights coming in from Europe and other locations got attention. Well I think it was absolutely a the Islamic republic's ties to China that we're fingered initially, but we should also note that the government really downplayed the pandemic attempted to hide the true extent of it. There are still questions about how extensive testing was, but there were videos and other things coming out on twitter and other social media platforms where it became very clear that the country was fairly quickly overwhelmed and I should know they did respond, but with some lockdown measures gradual ones through April and May. And then started to reopen in June, and now they're in the midst of essentially a second surge that has seen including the last few days, the largest single number of deaths in one day and Iran has in the top ten list for numbers of infections of Covid not a top ten list you WANNA be on right between Italy and Spain. Right. Along. Let's turn to you. How about South Asia did cove it arrive, and what was it like in that first month or two? Sure India and Pakistan for their part they acted early in terms of imposing restrictions, the lockdowns suspending era travel bus travel, but I think one of the criticisms was that it was implemented quite harshly, so there were concerns from the outset about food insecurity, just access to basic staples, migrant workers and India who needed to walk for hundreds of miles to return to their villages, due to the restrictions on. On movements, so it was difficult for them, but Bangaldesh is an interesting case. Because the they saw returning migrant workers or so essentially in Bangladesh, a lot of citizens will go abroad to work especially, in the Middle East and then they will send remittances home, so it's really a top contributor to the the national economy so these workers were coming home from the Middle East from. From Europe and they they weren't really quarantining, so it was a different experience than Indian Pakistan and then there are descending on Daca, which is the most densely populated city in the world, and then they're returning to their homes in the villages of so that's how the the virus has been spreading in. Bangladesh, they're having a difficult time in terms of needing hospital beds and ventilators and Bangash is expecting. Expecting a peak in September Parkistan in the late summer, and then just this week, India surpassed Russia on the Johns Hopkins. University tracker, so it's it's right now after the you ask Brazil in terms of confirmed cases, so it's the the region going through a very difficult time right now. Absolutely, Judd, when and where did Africa get this coronavirus? I and which governments reacted best and worst early on. I, always like the president of Kenya's statement about this, he said this is a crisis that was not created on the African continent as so in sub. Saharan Africa Nigeria I in late February and takes all the way till mid mid-may for all forty nine countries. To have their first index cases, and it's a really very case only one case in sub Saharan Africa Somalia. Actually has a China Nexus. The majority of them actually reflect colonial ties, so you see a number of countries that formerly that are anglophone, having UK connections French with Francophone countries and then. A number of countries that have been infected by index cases from Italy given the really numbers Italy had. Was Pretty Slow at first took ninety eight days for the. Region to reach just one hundred thousand cases, and so it had the lowest caseload globally, but now things are picking up eighteen days to get to two hundred thousand now we're just reach the the half million mark. Let me ask you you are. How much of that is due to under testing that we've heard about across Africa. Yeah, I mean that's there's a number of different hypotheses on why the case load has been low and and the death rate is actually really low. It's about twelve thousand deaths so far some people point sort of the young population age medians about nineteen some talk about the the lockdowns and I can talk a little more about how swiftly those were implemented, but yes, under testing is a big challenge on the continent. They're largely just telling in cities. A report that came out earlier this week, said four thousand tests per million, which compares very poorly to wet. The testing levels are in say Europe. South Africa though I should point out is actually not bad when it comes to testing, it's the nineteenth globally in terms of the number of Tasir motion of population tested. Okay. Well, let's dig into the. Political and social consequences of Covid nineteen, these obviously will be profound, and in some places they already are dramatic Mona. Talk with us a bit about these dynamics in the Middle East and where they have been the most consequential. So I think in many ways it's going to be coverted second and third order effects that are probably going to be the most consequential for the region. We're GONNA see we're starting to already a reverberate in ways that are quite significant and I would note in particular is really the economic. Fallout from covid from the shutdown of measures. Put in place. That really poised to impact region in a significant way of the oil market, for example, witnessed a collapse in prices, April it has said somewhat recovered.

Middle East Africa Iran South Asia Europe Covid Judd India China Indian Ocean Nilanthi Samara Nyaka director Bangladesh Italy South Africa twitter Gulf Center for Strategic Mona
"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

Arms Control Wonk

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

"And then add the BrahMos, which is very very accurate very fast joint venture with the Russians at S four hundred and layered missile defenses. And it looks like. A sustained interest in damage-limitation and potentially counterforce. And so the Pakistanis pick and choose the capabilities seem to support that architecture over the last ten years, I think it was really picked up ten years and the move to see kind of the natural combination that match ration-, but it's just one piece of the larger arms race dynamic that I think is happening kind of under our nose in the western media. We've been talking about getting I've been talking about South Asia, you know, for for years, but it got nowhere near the attention to the North Korea. Got for obvious reasons. I think because North Korea and the US earner have an adversarial relationship it's easy to forget about South Asia. But I think we do so at our peril because I think that right now is probably the most active arms race in the global queer landscape. There's a positive to arms races is that we get to have lots of arms control podcasts about this. You always try we've caused growth industry, it's a growth industry, you know? And we always try and podcast on a happy note. And usually my happy this usually not very much be happy about at the end of podcast because usually it means that there's more nuclear weapons or more missiles. But that means we get to have more podcasts. So with that. I think that's a happy note. I also want to add before we wrap up plugging ARA or Trump JR. No, a lot of fun and Eric figure out what the Turks are doing. With those Augusta ninety bees definitely hit me up. I will I will actually gonna look into that. My guess is that they're in. This is doing a lot of Paul is just the whole maintenance than they're in. They're doing a lot of the electron IX, all let's not be coy. They wanna peak those slickened said that they can get a. Look at the twos. But you'll have Turks wandering around those things. I mean, it is interesting. I'm gonna have to look into that. You know, the Turkish Pakistani relationship is massing. Yeah. They actually very close close relations close ties in its it slides under the radar a lot, but they're closely allied in a long history going back there. So now, you wet my appetite now, I need to go actually figure out what the hell. The these two sides are doing. But with that thanks for joining me and Jeffrey is traveling on the east coast..

South Asia North Korea Paul Augusta Eric US Jeffrey ten years
"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

Arms Control Wonk

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

"The other variable now is to watch out for potential future. Chinese deployments into the Indian Ocean. Which the Indians have been worried about for a for quite some time now, so basically the Indian Ocean is is turning into a pretty big nuclear hot zone to watch. As far as the arms race dynamics. Go. I think what you think that. But I think I see a lot more of those arms race dynamics really playing out on land between the Indians of the park, sunny still. But I think certainly Pakistan's development of the of this sea-launched leg wasn't something that was really taken for granted, maybe in the mid two thousands. But really now seems to be something that they've really started to invest a lot of effort into. Yeah. Grew with that. I think what we're seeing is a match ration- of arms race that has existed in some form another for you know, since the nineteen eighties. And you know, now, we're entering basically the next cycle, which is things are clicking on the land based force for both Augustan, you know, in the early knots fielded the Nassir system which is a tactical nuclear weapon. Capability plus, you know, both are developing their strategic nuclear forces on land. And so moving to see his was kind of the natural culmination. I think from there, you know, again over determined for or organizational bureaucratic procedures Indian case. And I think there's a survivability logic in the Pakistani case. And so, you know, the the the question will be how these dynamics continue, and you know, the the arms race has really been driven. I think largely by my pocket. Stan so far it believed. It needed battlefield nuclear weapons turn Indian conventional attack than it was worried about survivability of strategic choice if India retaliated with nuclear weapons, so that kind of drove Pakistan to build up its forces, drove them to see and the question will be how India decides to respond, and I think a lot of this turns on, you know, whether India is interested in threatening the survivability of Pakistan's. Strategic nuclear forces. Because if they are then I think, you know, we're entering a new phase where India will have to maintain sustain numbers of systems and warheads to maintain somewhat a counterforce advantage and Pakistan will keep building up and moving them around and make targeting much more difficult. And so we could be entering if Pakistan, and it's enough that Pakistan might fear that that's the case. And until there's until unless there's an explicit Indian clarification about. Accepting the deposits secure second strike, Pakistan is always gonna fear Indian threats to the survivability of nuclear force. And so a lot of this on what India's interest is in terms of nuclear strategy, and you know, what kind of targeting of portfolio wants because along as Pakistan believes that India's interested in counterforce when you're going to have vertical arms race until or unless India decides to basically explicitly opt out of it and say, we have no interest in threatening the strategic your strategic nuclear assets. So I think that that's kind of where we are. Now, there are a lot of reasons why do you might be interested in this? But it does create very destabilizing dynamics on the arms race peacetime arms race dynamics. And then obviously anytime there's there are elements of counterforce targeting and any states strategy or believed to be then you start getting I strike instability problems, the need to go preemptively, go I in order devoid, losing and if your nuclear assets, and so, you know, they're both peacetime applications and crises implications. But I mean, I think we're squarely your Pakistan. He's, you know, well before the Indians started even obliquely talking about counterforce being afraid of any kind of hard because all the systems India has been acquiring talking about what you don't talk about. Accuracy so much of your only interested in countervalue retaliation..

Pakistan India Indian Ocean Augustan Stan
"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

Arms Control Wonk

04:22 min | 3 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

"So it was almost like any any notion that you could maintain a D mated state or S L B M back. See force is out of the question. But I think this point about the Pakistanis interesting because the warhead a smaller it's a horizontal to you may be able to figure out ways to do it. Although I would lean against them trying to do that at sea because it doing combined space all of the safety in, you know, security issues. Associated with it. It would be easier just wash them out fully made it, but it is a possibility available to them with the slick that isn't available. I think to the Indians with Nestle BM. Join up. No, I was actually that's actually exactly right mean, I think we actually talked about your book in the in the process of kind of writing this out. It was sort of an interesting thing with the Pakistanis having these warheads these missiles being small enough right to pull this off. But yeah, I mean, it is an incredibly risky for them. Right. And always have things go wrong. And it it's not something that the Pakistanis would really be eager to publicize again as you say they have these incentives to make the they're always ready to fill deadly. So it's probably something we're never gonna get to learn about whenever night. It's only something that kind of comes to mind with these smaller. Yeah, it's exactly theoretically possible. And I feel like Chris Chris Clarry who is my former student now co author is a is a ghost fourth member of this podcast because he and I are just finishing an article which will be forthcoming in international security on India's potential interest in counterforce against Pakistan's nuclear arsenal. In the seabass component is. This turns on AS w but one thing that we noted about d- SPN program. The art hunt and the Cape of teen in particular is how much emphasis India put on accuracy of the K fifteen and you know, if you think it's your survivable second strike accuracy in your targeting. You know counter value targets like cities, accuracy, it doesn't really matter. And one question is whether if India is interested in potential counterforce targeting, which is a big. But I do think that people have been thinking about it. The very least we you know, we argued that the K fifteen may provide some targeting advantages and redundancy to land land-based force doesn't and in particular. I I was just I noted and maybe it was a little amused by how much they care about accuracy of an SM, which is something you normally don't associate with kind of backbone to your strategic deterrent, which is normally for countervalue targeting. So I thought that was that's been interesting over the years. Developers. So we wanted to do out here is her pivot to the end. I mean, what would you guys hit the big picture is here? I mean, clearly there's some sort of esscalation dynamics horizontal proliferation in terms of numbers and clearly a step forward on the Indian side. And also the Pakistani side, though, even though that they have not launches from separating the him from submarine yet. Just from as pontoons where is this going 'cause I was really interested to in the missile defense aspect of this conversation because this is a priority of the Indians, no matter where it is in stage, which development either internally or with external suppliers. You know, there clearly seems to be the dynamics in place here for more robust arms race that continues largely outside of any trolls for I guess the top line numbers on how many systems these two countries can deploy. I wanna take your first shot. Well, I think the the bottom line big picture here is that Indian Ocean, nuclear dynamics are starting to really, you know, they're they're growing much quicker than I think a lot of people have aknowledged both in the, you know, off the Indian peninsula on the bap all side, Andy Arabian, seaside, you basically have in the NFL BM's Indiana's BN's now conducting deterrence patrols as we saw with the Arianna nouncement and the Pakistanis pretty soon. I think by the mid twenty twenties will probably give us evidence that the barber three is now ready for the prime time. Probably once they get these refurbished about back from the Turks..

India Chris Chris Clarry BN Indiana Pakistan Andy Arabian Arianna nouncement NFL
"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

Arms Control Wonk

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

"Just think the Pakistanis are terrified of the future missile defense capabilities that India has or may have and so cruise missiles may provide advantages to defeating missile defense and waste ballistic missiles down in Pakistan doesn't have yet, you know, the kinds of missile defenses that India's interest in acquiring the other piece of that. Is Indians just think the ballistic missiles more prestigious to and like for DR DO. He's ballistic missiles are kind of their identity, even though they've developed none of them. They're all graft off of the space programmes designs. The these two features. I think drive them it's over determine, you know, in in some ways Pakistan's go to slick which may be cheaper easier. And they don't have the prestige concerns that India does Android missile defenses. Whereas India has all these procedures organizational incentives, and as worried about the missile defenses in Pakistan's case, it probably is a combination of bureaucracy and working with what they have they're much better at miniaturization, generally. So that makes using torpedo to base systems much more appealing for them. Right. They know that they have these three French submarines to work with. And I think I think, you know, the actually received some pretty generous licensing and CMS details from the French when they bought these things in the early nineties and actually Erin, here's a. Here's a Turkey angle to all this the Turks rashly modifying these right now, which is a really interesting time to be doing this right after the Pakistani start testing, they're submarine launched cruise missile. I don't know. Exactly. What's going on with that? But it's something I'm gonna hopefully dig into a little bit more. But yeah, I think the second of the three on Augusta ninety Bs is is in Turkey right now, undergoing some kind of refurbishment on kind of tying things back to see to one of the things that Chris, and I got into in our paper, that's probably going to only find an audience on this podcast arms. Control long is really this bad podcasts. Great podcast something. I wanna talk about. This is the wanna talk about all the time. But nobody really seems to be interested, which is that there is in theory away, the Pakistanis could make things a little bit better. I and kind of ease people's nerves and debate their warheads at sea with the barber three. So the second test of the bobber three in April this year, the footage the Pakistanis released basically confirmed that this was a horizontally launch system via the torpedo. As we thought, but they gave us kind of video evidence of that from an underwater pontoon, they still have launched this thing from the actual submarine. But that opens up an interesting possibility where you can actually keep these warheads partially dissemble d- and debated on board the submarine and require somebody with technical expertise there to agree to made it and to launch it in a crisis. So that helps implement things like a three man rule in a crisis, and prevents the prevents the kind of nightmare scenario of these things just being ready to launch and out there at cedar crisis. But that's something that I think is a really kind of technical point. And the only other thing I'd say about this is that nobody's done this as far as we know I want to this is really interesting you look into the Pakistan because I looked at this with India when I was writing my my book many years ago. How would you manage command and control if you profess to have a mated peacetime stewardship procedure, and they're all these things, you know? About how you know. Like, oh, maybe India if the warheads are small enough, you can do it at sea. But I talked Gomer SBN officers in the US, and even, you know, Indian navy officers, and the notion that you would try to put a five hundred kilogram or thousand kilogram warhead, you know, and made it maybe it'd be unarmed. But it would wouldn't be it would be physically made it, but to physically made a warhead on an SAP n of that size is like a non-starter. Yeah..

India Pakistan cedar crisis Turkey Gomer SBN Indian navy US Erin Chris five hundred kilogram thousand kilogram
"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

Arms Control Wonk

04:36 min | 3 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

"So basically there are two ideal type deployment strategies for SPN's one is a continuous deterrent patrol, which is what the United States adopts where we basically have. You know, we. Twelve SPN's there or however, many, you know, but we have four so on continuous deterrent patrol. And there we have one always at sea. So. Yeah. Dea is even if you lost your entire landmass. You would have a survival. Second strike at sea on the assumption that it is mostly survivable against AS w which is a reasonable sunshine. I think for the Ohio class and eventually the US Columbia class summary, but there are challenges with continuous to turn patrol need to have enough submarines people do it because it's three to one ratio basically for every three SBN's you probably have one out on patrol. The command control has to be extremely robust we've all seen crimson tide as much as it is. You know, there's there's a lot of truth to the command control arrangements for how we managed SPN's because you have to decide whether you want your system to fail safe or fail lethal, but the credibility of your secure second strike at see kind of depends on it failing lethal, if you have a decapitation strike, and you know, your entire see two falls apart. But that means you have. You know, the ability to release nuclear weapons vested with people on the boat, and that can create command control challenges and the alternative is the bastion model, which you may wanna select because you wanna easier peacetime normal command control pressures rights of your worried about seating physical physical ability released nuclear weapons to people in the boat personal reliability whereabout political inclinations like the Soviet Union. Did you may choose to keep your primary SPN's either import a closer to your territorial waters rather than the deep blue sea, and these deterrent patrol boxes in order to ease. The command and control pressures the disadvantage to the end. You can do it with your summary. So you don't need three sub SPN's for everyone wanted on continuous deterrent patrol. The disadvantage is. In as a crisis mounts. You know, well one other advantage, by the way, Bashar model is you don't get your adversary. A lot of opportunity to get coup signatures on the ESPN because you're not patrolling. So the problem though, is in a crisis. We have to flush things out, and they can be very vulnerable. If you have if your adversaries knows where they are in the bathroom model. So in the Pakistani case, they basically have to ports and Indians have been running practicing India in practicing as w in how to run blockades against Karachi with our for basically entire existence. So if a crisis erupts, and the Augusta's are kept in port and flush them out. The Indian navy can just be sitting there waiting for them, and they become very very vulnerable. So are trade offs both models. And you know, it's more likely. I would imagine for a state that wants to cert- maximum control over its arsenal. Like India does to prefer bastion model. At least for the future. Although they talk about continuous term patrol. They don't have the summaries to do it. The pakistanis. I would think are more concerned about India's w and we'll probably take their chances in a crisis and for them the Slim's at sea give them an advantage. If they're worried about survivability lambaste force and Indian missile defenses against ballistic missiles, a sea-based cruise missile actually might have some strategic rationale provided. You think it's revival in a crisis, and you can park it off the coast of Mumbai, for example, and hold it risk major Indian targets that way that you know, in ways that your land-based force can't I think that's exactly the rationale driving. The Pakistanis the other issue in Pakistan's cases as far as their command control goes before we knew about the bobber three. We knew that. They had commissioned. A Violeta Ray at Karachi and Kidwai the former director of strategic force command head. Made public remarks about the fact that Pakistan, basically, have real sea-based ambitions and would not only pursue the platform itself. Submarine with the delivery vehicle on board, but also would pursue development of command control infrastructure. So let me see those Farai start growing up going up..

India SPN Pakistan Karachi Dea United States Ohio ESPN Indian navy Violeta Ray Soviet Union Bashar Mumbai US Columbia Augusta director Kidwai
"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

Arms Control Wonk

03:37 min | 3 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

"Does have a lot more people can be a lot more limited on the kinds of anti submarine warfare operations that I can pull off in place like the bay have been gall and off the southern tip of India Arabian Sea is another issue. But yeah, I mean, I think I think with the with the China angle, you really have a very strong case for focusing your development efforts on land based forces. Like the five which will see what's in Agri. Yeah. I agree with that. Yeah. Was why I mean, this may be the time to segue into there have been concurrence moves from Pakistan, maybe not on the ballistic missile trajectory, but on the cruise missile trajectory that suggest that they want an at sea deterrent patrol at deterrent as well. Yeah. That's right. So the Pakistanis in January twenty seventeen tested a variant of their bobber cruise missile which was developed as ground launch cruise missile with a range of front four hundred fifty kilometers the bobber three. It was their first submarine launched cruise missile with an explicit nuclear mission that they described sort of giving explicitly a second strike capability and augmenting their overall deterrence, and they tested this missile again this year in April. So when you hear about the Pakistanis going to see immediately start to wonder about things like command controls Pakistan's been one. Of the problem cases, where we've worried a lot about command control, and as Vince sort of alluded to India, the the difficulties of command control, it see really shouldn't be understated, especially with a country like Pakistan that doesn't have much experience with this in a naval context. And the other thing that really concerns me in the Pakistani context, and this is something that Chris Clarry, and I talked about at some length and paper for the Washington quarterly published last year can link to that in the show notes. But it. One of the issues is that the park is any navy specifically has been targeted repeatedly by non-state groups. So we had the PMS Zulfikar attack where armed gunmen al-qaeda gunmen tried to effectively commandeer a Pakistani navy frigate and the subsequent investigation showed that they were assisted by insiders and Steve Cole actually in his most recent book fan, you know, he he reports that there was apparently some kind of co mingled nuclear assets, which I'm not too sure about given what we know about Pakistani forces. But again, I mean, you know, we know that there are non groups in Pakistan looking to get their hands on this stuff. So that makes this they're sea-launched cruise missile program of particular concerns outlined the four structure, maybe talk about a bit more. So they have three French Augusta ninety diesel-electric submarines around two thousand tons about a sixth of the tonnage of the hunt. So not that much smaller. The hunt is of small SPN, and these are small electric subs- that will be fielding. Short range nuclear weapons. So these are the three submarines on the Pakistan that appears we'll probably end up using a bashing model. The interesting variable, though is Pakistan's plan receipt of around eight Chinese type thirty nine A as twenty diesel-electric submarines. So they will probably get those in the late twenty twenties or early twenty thirties and those could also support their new Slim's. So that will put a lot of Indian targets along the west coast on very easily range. But yeah, command control. I think is really the big thing to worry about in the Pakistani context before you guys jump in go in the back and forth here just explained the listeners because you guys both used at now what the bashing models. Sure VIP, and you wanna take that one. Yeah..

Pakistan India Arabian Sea Pakistani navy China al-qaeda Steve Cole French Augusta India VIP Slim Vince Washington quarterly Chris Clarry four hundred fifty kilometers two thousand tons
"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

Arms Control Wonk

03:02 min | 3 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

"NSL B M with a range, and in our continental range of about six thousand kilometers eventually, but you know, with India, there's a lot of discussion about long term, future planning. I think four have been I don't have any kills have been laid. But I think they envisioned four's probably more likely, but then it gets to this question of, you know, your size your SPN or based on your envision deployment pattern. If you need a continuous turn patrol. Pour four probably do it. But you don't have a lot of wilgo wiggle room. They're five to six might get you, you know, confidence that you can put one on continuous deterrent patrol. But the alternative then is if you have you know, three or four SPN's you just run a bastion model. Instead the way Soviets said and keep them in port during peacetime in question mountain of crisis. But you know, that makes peacetime command control easier, but it makes crisis command and control very very very dicey. Yeah. I mean, that's a good point. 'cause you always have to sue at least one or two will be in drydock, or or at least in in the pens for maintenance. And so that you will you only have in the four one or two. That's right bailable right out the trolling. And then again, you have to factor in future projections on missile range to see who it is that they're actually are are targeting. That's interesting too about how long range missile acknowle, you'll fit four if I'm understanding correctly rather than twelve and saw this that'll on the on the air hunt. That's right. I think reports the can handle the saddle can handle or load eight K force cross the on camp war. So that's for the successor successor successor as I think is capable of eight K fours, and they don't envision it with the Cape the team, I believe that. That's right. Because you need you need different tubes. And saddles depending on what you're loading some. I guess is the hunt will only carry the K fifteen and. Then future. Submarines will try to carry the cake for which is the seabass version of the ugly. Three yen the range on that is roughly intermediate range a little For. down. Hundred. So what what targets could their hold in China at risk? I'm curious. This isn't exactly my area. If you'd appointed the bay of Bengal, you can hit Beijing the problem, then like, I think that's probably what they had in mind because you wouldn't want on your SPN venturing too far from coastal waters. If you have to turn patrol Brock's, you have some sanctuary in the bay have been Galler, maybe in the Indian Ocean. But it I think you'd have to deployed in the bay Bengal the reach Beijing. So in order to hit Beijing from waters further west, you may need a long range missile get any thoughts on how the you know that figures into their calculation on the range and developing long-range missile. So I think that's kind of where they're gonna go with that. Although I mean, not that concept just still again, I think the land base Aleutian makes much more sense with China got around so many more. And I mean, honestly as Pakistan's specific solution the SPN program..

Beijing bay Bengal China India Bengal Pakistan Indian Ocean Brock eight K six thousand kilometers
"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

Arms Control Wonk

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

"K fifteen and eventually I think they want longer range missiles, but right now, they're stuck with SVN that basically gives them range only against Pakistani targets. So we can talk about you know, what I think is decoupling between India strategies between Pakistan and China, it's long profess credible. Minimum deterrence as long profess. No, I use which was reaffirmed all today from the official Docker in two thousand three, but there's a lot of flexibility this. Introduced about you know, what minimum means and what I use would entail. And so, you know, I think we're seeing kind of South Asia itself as subsystem moving in a in a very dangerous direction on kit will jump in there. I mean, so the decoupling thing I just you know, brings to mind that these are pretty small SPN's rights VIP and talked about the capacities. You have either twelve cave of teens or four K for us. I'll be M's and India's going to have to provide a does get to the point where it has four of these which is the invasion for size for the SPN force. It's going to have to make some tough choices in peacetime 'bout how it's going to load these up if it is actually going to execute a continuous out Sita terms model for and that's really a tough not to crack. I mean, you really have to have some pretty good planning that I don't think, you know, the United States and the Soviet Union. Russia don't really have to deal with that China doesn't have to deal with that kind of ah process in terms of being a payload. So that's an interesting challenge that the Indians have to deal with on the rationale for the hunt programming. I thought was interesting the Indian defence ministers. Public statement on Twitter, which was the first thing I saw about this. You know, she's gonna talk about hey, we completed our first deterrence patrol and this puts us in this club of countries that can do this thing. So it's very much like a prestige driven Brian piece of data right there. And also, I think, you know, there are a lot of kind of bureaucratic factors. The navy's been pulling for this for a long time, and those I think also have played kind of role in keeping this program sticky and making sure that it does move on even though you know, we we kind see developments in anti submarine warfare kind of making breakneck progress to which leaves the haunting a much worse place now than it. Maybe wasn't nineteen ninety nine when they you know, really starts double down on this. How many SPN's do they envision the Benchley having? I mean to get this right that there was a official discussion of four in the planning process. But today, somebody Yogesh Joshi is a scholar whose followed union summering program for. For a long time in his historian noted five to six in the planning process and..

India Yogesh Joshi China official South Asia Soviet Union Twitter Sita United States Pakistan Russia navy Brian four K
"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

Arms Control Wonk

04:11 min | 3 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

"You know, it's always the question of who it is that they're deterring, you know, 'cause been I think on your your sort of tweet storm day that we can linked to down to the show notes is is that the the range of the missile would suggest that it's it's not aimed towards China so much but more towards Pakistan. Yes. So the history of the submarine purple star with the. The history of the triad. I guess in India they have nuclear submarines have have been. I think in India's mind in general for since the nineteen seventies, but mostly nuclear attack submarines the idea of a nuclear arm submarine dates back to the draft nuclear doctrine, the nineteen ninety nine a year after India tested nuclear weapons, and it has always been part of India so called the hallowed nuclear doctrine, which is officially adopted in two thousand three after the nineteen ninety nine draft. And so India has long been committed the triad, but the submarine leg is obviously, you know, like most countries, the the slowest to develop given the difficulties of the reactor design, your S L BM's warheads that can be fitted. And India, it was always, you know, with the land-based airbase force the kind of stewardship in command control procedures that India preferred. Which included either dispersed in D mated weapons fully actually disassembled weapons. In some cases, initially in the program would be very difficult with an SPN over the last decade, we've seen India become as SPN program has developed in parallel seeing India become more comfortable, I think with a more with a higher state of readiness on its land based force. They're moving to cannibalize systems, which are sealed one has to. There's a decent probability that the warhead is made before the hermetic seal is placed on the longer range uglies, we know that they've put gravity bombs in the same. You know, co located those with aircraft all of that happened as yes SPN programs developed, so it's possible that command control for the SPN has enabled a higher stay writing as on on land. But it's taken a while to develop the hunt it which was a prototype with Russian assistance for the reactor, at least design assistance, but. You know, it had this accident. It was developing the S L VM's, which are kinda grafted off some of the land based missiles that indie hip been developing. But so this interest in the trial had been from the beginning. And now we're seeing I think it come to fruition and going to see has its own challenges. There's long been a discussion I've questioned, you know, from the beginning what the point of the triumph was because you could argue that from survivability perspective, given India's geography and the lack of counterforce capabilities from China, Pakistan. India's survivability is actually probably pretty good on land. You You have. have a variety of places to disperse the family of missiles, and the privies and command control is easier. And there's always this question about whether the strategic juice of the SBN is worth the organizational financial in command control squeeze that imposes on on the nuclear force, but India's always been committed to it. And you know, there's a there's a variety of hypotheses out there because you know, the major nuclear powers have it it does maybe impart survivability of you think. Yes. SPF survivable of their questions about whether of the hunt, for example in its successor the dominant. You know, had the signatures to really impart the kind of survivability that we normally socio with an SPN. And there's this question about the missiles like you said the range of the first prototype here. The missile the Cape of teens is seven hundred fifty kilometers, which means to have any impact on China. You have to sail the sing out over to basically the East China Sea in South China Sea. And you know, that's that makes the SPN extreme affordable seven hundred fifty kilometers is really Pakistan's specific there's really not much you can do against China with necessary end with just the.

India China Pakistan East China Sea South China Sea seven hundred fifty kilometers
"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

Arms Control Wonk

04:59 min | 3 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

"For the Middle East. On fellow American. Rings. On what strategy version? Is this your first? Before back in the guys all hype peg. North korea. Of the of the mushroom clouds face here. It's good to have some South Asia back. Jeffries at an undisclosed location on the east coast. So he's left his hermetically sealed containment level, you know, something we don't. I just tried to set it up. He's just he's I'm on the east coast. I have to do this Thursday. So you just go ahead with this. We could do that. I think he's out in these coast, and I will chat later this week. But there's there's some news, right? So launch deterrence patrol. Yeah. Big news out of South Asia today. India announced its first deter patrol of its maiden SBN the Ari hunt. And there are a lot of questions about what exactly they did. And they announced the conclusion of the deterrent patrol. And we have to assume that that means that they loaded the BM's the Cape fifteen which are seven hundred fifty kilometer. To stage. Ballistic missiles, I think the r hunt on Kirkman. I'm Ron twelve Cape. Fifteens? Right. Yeah. Is the load and the alternative is four longer Inchcape force. But this k- four is still in development. And so when they say deterrent patrol. I have to assume that you know, they loaded nuclear weapons on the albums, and this would be the first publicly admitted peacetime deployment of nuclear weapons in India's history that they've they've announced. So it's a big day for India. Well, yeah, I mean, it is a big day. The only alternative that's kind of playing around in my mind right now is that they might have been a little bit generous with the wording here on this was made. Yes, this was maybe validating see two and crew procedures before they load the big things that go boom on their submarine. Yeah. I entirely open that possibility they could be playing fast on loose with deterrent patrol. And normally that implies that it's a fully loaded fully armed system. But there would be it's possible. They've done see trials in the past the hunt. The last couple tests of the K fifteen believer in August. They did a three tests within two days. So wouldn't surprise me. If the Cape fifteen's were on board, but it would be a big step. If India actually loaded nuclear warheads on the SOB put they put it out to see. And then the other question, obviously is how long this patrol lasted that reports uncles had mentioned in August. So that would mean roughly a three month two to three month patrol potentially. Or was it just a a shorter? Test of the hunt in this particular case. So we don't know the answer several questions about what they did in. How long did it for the Indians are known for keeping a pretty good lid, especially lately on their nuclear activities in the RA haunt program gets special treatment, except with some notable exceptions like I think last time I was on arms control on Jeffrey. And I talked about the snafu with the propulsion chamber filling up with seawater which happened last year. But a. Yeah. So otherwise, otherwise, we don't really know how long this patrol was. But we have sort of an idea about the upper bound limit. I mean, I think two months sounds like reasonable to me, but it would be that would be a long time. I would think to have a relatively noisy SPF SBN out there, especially if they actually loaded nuclear weapons on it. And given that the hunt that had this major accident with the propulsion unit. I would be nothing is out of the Roma possibility when it comes to the Indians. But I would be very surprised if they're willing to raise such a long term patrol in give adversaries a chance also to, you know, get acoustic signatures on this thing for two months. My guess is actually I would think if I were them I would do it for much shorter period of time. You wouldn't want it out to sea for this long? I think on its maiden patrol. Let me jump in here. Just just just just for the listeners benefit that. Maybe you guys want back up a little bit about sort of the history of this submarine program in why this represent such a milestone, and.

India Ari hunt Jeffries Cape fifteen South Asia Middle East North korea Kirkman Ron Jeffrey three month two months seven hundred fifty kilometer two days
"south asia" Discussed on Travelogue

Travelogue

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on Travelogue

"Why did the everest base camp track solo with a sherpa i mean yeah no with a very balanced not awesome yeah i just i was in nepal for two weeks and you know that's just what i wanted to do so i hooked it up real quick and it was great i wrote about it it's on the site gap anyway i i've been to sri lanka about three times so low and i had a great time i mean there's just the usual like sideways glances sometimes the odd comments i mean i've actually gotten worse than italy than i got in sri lanka so it it just you know dress 'race respectfully um i would agree with india i'm not a fan of india but i've only been to delhi and i've been told that i have got to go other places the hoeli if before i form an opinion on india uh elsewhere in south asia i have not been did bangladesh the mall dev's as south asia but it's fantastic here uh yeah i i agree southeast asia is great pretty much all around accept that you will get questioned so the taxi driver is the waitresses the bartenders they'll say oh where's scher where's your husband or are do you have a boyfriend you know they'll be very upfront and so i never say oh no i'm alone you know i always have a backup story and a use a damn about to meet a friend in a minute or on i'm you know i know couple people in the city and we're going to meet up for dinner later but i never onion i never say like have a boyfriend her husband because they don't wanna outright be like saying 'i'm dependent on a man right i don't wanna reinforce this idea that they have so we yeah i never say i'm alone do you no no no i i i think it's like a revisit derision capping by yet generally like effect taxidriver is like driving me back.

italy sri lanka south asia asia scher everest nepal bangladesh two weeks
"south asia" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"You can either take the blue pill and stick to your comforting delusions or you can take the red pill learned some moral psychology and step outside the moral matrix we can say that liberals have a kind of a to channel or two thousand asian morality conservatives have more of a five foundation or five channel morality we find it in every country we look at here's the data for 1100 canadian soldiers flip through a few other slides the uk australia new zealand western europe eastern europe latin america the middle east the east asia and south asia now what he's saying is that can serve there were more moral categories by which conservatives view the world in which they see the world different different ways to value our place in the world and others around us and the things around us for the left it's narrower it's more myopic and so when someone on the ryder a conservative sees someone on the left doing something stupid they might say well that's pretty stupid you clearly don't see the world in its full picture or enough full enough picture but say lovey that's that's how these things go whereas when on the left sees a conservative doing something because they don't understand these other moral categories they don't have as broad a moral vision of the world they assume malice they assume illintent or some nefarious plotting on on the part of the conservatives now this kind of language is really disconcerting we see throughout the culture listened to the doublespeak that we hear from other gubler's other managers grew.

europe east asia south asia uk australia
"south asia" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Linguists say that more than half of the languages spoken in india may die out over the next fifty years and according for concerted effort to preserve them if you're wondering what they sound like his a flavor of three of them addi academia and poto renault a monarch of the remember mother or muderer out color murder or crippled prempeh color murder no not anymore corner converter kalamaria monday gone on the highway abdeel power before peter that etc correct who kill emma set on pasta coupled with us zilic what he said if you're working for separate upon dinner worldwide out longer literally sunday won't meet on him once they saw one on those on all our south asia editor is unprecedented erosion the majority of the languages which are under threat are mostly along the coast to lines and in the northeastern part of india which is quite remote also in central india which is know many indigenous communities live in states like maharashtra on monday predation and many of these languages than not have it returned form but we do have a crammer in the way they speak because the people there do not live in communities anymore because people are being moved when a dam is being built ethnic communities are moved out the fishing communities are losing their own profession they're not able to go to the seas so they're moving towards inland so when the move that's one of the reasons why people lose touch with the mother tongue so what can be done if anything to reverse this process the first of all you know these languages they should be spoken at home the mothers and fathers they should speak to the children in their own language and it just just not at family you know you need to speak it within your own community because when people.

india renault murder emma editor maharashtra south asia fifty years