35 Burst results for "South Asia"

Ballot blocks: the squeeze on Hong Kong

The Economist: The Intelligence

17:45 min | 6 d ago

Ballot blocks: the squeeze on Hong Kong

"The squeeze on political freedoms in Hong Kong is ramping up and fast. On Friday, the territory's Chief Executive Carrie Lam announced September's planned elections would be postponed for a year and poss- sediments. I've always had to make difficult decisions but then the announcement I have to make today is the most difficult decision that I have to make in the. Insisted, the delay was only to avoid the spread of COPA, nineteen. The decision to postpone them the training train t electrical election has nothing to do with politics has nothing to do with a likely outcome of this round of. PRO-DEMOCRACY PARTIES, AD HOC for success in the poll riding a wave of discontent at Beijing's recent imposition of sweeping national security law. The legislation broadly defines and harshly punishes subversion sedition collusion with foreigners. Nathan law one of Hong Kong's most prominent pro-democracy activists recently spoke with our sister podcast economists asks why? Phones. Movement is still really strong though there have been protests against the new law. The millions of people who wants surged onto the streets have largely stayed home is police have cracked down harder just try to imagine if you live. In a country place that that is no freedom of expression freedom of them fraiche ethan freedom of thoughts. Then definitely, like protests does not exist or will be lushly quashed earlier last week, twelve pro-democracy candidates were banned from running whenever the elections happened. On Saturday, on Kong's police issued arrest warrants for six political activists living in exile in the West. Since the promulgation of the national security nor on July the first of the scope for political expression has been very much. Dominic Ziegler writes Banyan, our call him on Asian affairs. And because of that, there haven't been any street protests. of any size since July the first because of the consequences. For those taking part. But nevertheless, there has been widespread concern about postponing the election by a year, the Bar Association, representing senior barristers and other lawyers in the territory has expressed what it called grave concern and it said that a decision to postpone September's elections for the Legislative Council, which is known as Mexico was undermining a vital constitutional rights and so what does that mean in practice? What happens with the sitting lawmakers? There are all sorts of implications about what it. Means in practice because hitherto Hong Nor has been very clear you have to hold elections for this quasi-democratic legislature every four years. So the government of Kerry lamb, the chief executive is in a bit of a pickle about how it justifies this. Although she said, it was for reasons of the pandemic several other jurisdictions have been able to carry out elections, and that includes recently elections. In Singapore, there are certainly suspicions that the decision was taken not because of. The pandemic, but because Democrats had a good chance in fact. Gaining for the first time a majority in this rather gerrymandered council and indeed even obstructing a government policy or criticizing the government has it has been suggested by the authorities the risk of falling foul of the new. National Security Law. So this decision is absolutely shot through with politics, but nevertheless to take some finessing by the government. To show that the move is legitimate, the chances are that how it will manage that is to get a ruling from on high from Beijing saying that this is the appropriate course and it's worth bearing in mind that Beijing has always since Hong Kong's return to China. Has Always had the authority to intervene in Hong Kong's has the understanding would be that this would happen only rarely. But in the last few weeks, we've seen it happening time and time again, I think this is going to be the practice for the future. But what about the the the candidates who were banned from running here is, is there a risk that that Beijing will start to essentially stack the LegCo with with loyalists there in this interim year? This certainly is a risk Jason the bear in mind that all the moves around legend. have been made in order to ensure that the pro democratic camp does not secure a majority in the legislature. Now early last week, the authorities did this by disqualifying a dozen also candidates caming that even for criticizing the National Security Law that gave the government grounds for not allowing them to run. Now, a few dozen candidates actually sit in the current Legislative Council. So one big question that the authorities have to find an answer to is whether those four legislators continue to sit in a council session is is now being extended by a year. The chances are that the government will find means to disqualify. Those four and Beijing's moves go further than that. Recently, they're speaking of arresting pro-democracy activists outside of the territory, which is also unusual. That's right has happened in the past week on July the twenty ninth four students were detained for supposedly inciting secession. This seems to have had something to do with facebook page and shortly after became clear that the police had put on a wanted list, a number of activists who are currently in exile. So, there is an example for instance of how China intends for this new national security in order have jurisdiction beyond the borders of the country itself. These people were in the United States, the UK and elsewhere. One of them was not even a Hong Kong citizen better taken up US citizenship and so as as Beijing's hands gets heavier in Hong Kong Antoine Indeed all over the world. How are people coping normal life goes on so far as both the virus and the new political restrictions allow what is certainly happened is that the street protests that so colored and royal the territory last year are now very much a thing of the past. So the act the concerned the worry that. Has. Taken hold in the territory is one that is not always voiced publicly but in private conversations and the concerns really are about Hong Kong's long-term future. One of the possibility is certainly that many people discussing is immigration and a number of countries have. Roots towards long term permanent residency or even citizenship. Those countries include the United Kingdom Australia Canada, the United States. But many people are not in a position to leave immediately. But what happens now with all of the momentum that was behind the protesters but this whole movement now that protests themselves have died down to the protesters are moving abroad. What happens now it looks like well, over half of Hong Kong's population is in favor of democratic change but the possibilities for that through politics and through the ballot box have been very sharply restricted in in recent weeks. So there's a conversation emerging. About what form opposition should take? So people are starting to draw parallels with the Eastern European bloc during the Soviet era too many people here the national security nor is starting to look like the Ray quick building of the Berlin Wall in the early nineteen sixties and people are drawing comparisons with opposition in the decades following that in eastern Europe and that opposition took perform of underground dissident, it took the form of dissident writers and The church played a big role in eastern. Europe. Some hope that it may do here in Hong Kong one positive sign has been taken from last year's protests is an extraordinary. Creativity in in the form of protest art in the form of. Video making. So the hope is that maybe these avenues might at least allow a civil society not only to to hang on by its fingertips but also to grow. Don Thank you very much for your time fact Jason. For. Inciteful pair of interviews about Hong Kong's politics. Look for our sister show the economy asks my colleague and mckelway spoke to activist Nathan Law and to Regina Yip a Pro Beijing member of Hong. Kong's cabinet who said it's the activists themselves who bear responsibility for the mainland's latest moves. It's their choice they had. A goal on the provost part to self-destruction you. Choice. To want to commodes a separatism. From China I. Feel sorry for that. All the problems that they face now are of their own way. No. In fact, they are true young they are too young to commit judgments on these fundamental issues. Why should they be involved in promoting separation from China? Why should be that look for the Economist asks wherever you find your podcasts. Today more than ever. It's essential that we do all the right things to keep our bodies healthy inside tracker is the ultra personalized nutrition platform that analyzes your blood GNA and lifestyle to help you optimize your body from the inside out transform your body's data into meaningful insights and a customized action plan. Back recommendations you need to reach your goals. Are you ready to take control of your health and wellness journey unlock the power of your potential with inside tracker get twenty five percents off today at inside track or dot com slash listen. America's recent protests against racism and police brutality have drawn much interest in the Middle East. Some people have reacted with shock some with Schadenfreude. For others though America's unrest was an opportunity to discuss the problems with race in their own countries. Most Arab states have a black minority, each of which faces its own discrimination. The worst treatment though is reserved for migrants. There is a scene that played out almost every day for weeks for months outside of the Ethiopian embassy here in Beirut he would see cars pull up and drop off their passengers if the OB and women who were carrying their possessions and suitcases are in bags. Great girls from is our Middle East correspondent based in Lebanon these weren't women catching plane or catching a train. They had nowhere to go actually word maids, domestic workers whose employers. Could no longer afford to pay them because of the economic crisis here in Lebanon also couldn't send them home because the airport was largely closed because of covid one, thousand, nine, hundred, and so they dump them off outside the embassy they simply left them there to be someone else's problem. You would meet women who said they'd been sitting there on the curb for days on end using their bags as pillows simply left the fend for themselves. And isn't that kind of a general comment on how Lebanon treats migrant domestic workers? It is even before cove in nineteen. Before the economic crisis, there was widespread racism and harsh treatment of migrant workers here there are a number of cases where Lebanese have advertised their maids on facebook as if they were property, there was a post back in April that offered a Nigerian made who was described as being very active and very clean and she. was being sold for one and a half million Lebanese pounds, which is worth about a thousand dollars at the official exchange rates. There was also a clip that was circulated widely here in Lebanon in June it was from a television channel in Ghana that covered the return of two hundred or so Ghanaian citizens from Lebanon most of them. One, hundred, eighty of them were women working as domestic workers here, and they described horrendous conditions and treatments. Fit. After that sexual harassment. They bit s like animals. I have videos of this. I went through in that country and they also warned other people not to follow them to Lebanon not to come here to work. No. Doubt Music and go back to Lebanon is not a country that we should be. How does this situation come about? Where for instance, an people find themselves trapped with arguably abusive employers often starts with unscrupulous recruiters are agents migrants who come here to other countries in the middle. East. Are often promised good salaries, respectful working conditions and they arrive and find out that it's anything. But but then they find themselves trapped for two reasons. One is they often have to take out loans to pay fees to these recruiters and the loans can run thousand dollars two. Thousand dollars which when you're making only a few hundred dollars a month and you're trying to send much of that to your families back home it can take many months if not years to pay off those loans. So they find themselves trapped by debt. They also find themselves trapped by something called the Catholic system, which again exists here in Lebanon and many other countries in the Middle East whereby migrant workers are bound to their field or their sponsor, and so they can't simply. Changed jobs because their residency in their work permit is connected to their sponsor, and if they leave that job, they have to leave the country. So you meet migrants who say despite the awful conditions they're making more money here than they would make back home, and so they're willing to they're forced to continue to put up with US conditions because they're blocked from finding another job, and so all of this is a function of how the Lebanese feel about migrants or is this. Strictly a racial thing. It's hard to separate the two because almost all of the migrants here are either from east and South Asia or from Africa. So it's often connected to race as well as their status being migrant workers but the racism here it cuts across socio-economic lines I spoke with a black diplomat too says been pursued through upscale shopping malls Lebanon by security guards thought she was a housekeeper and they wanted to know why she was shopping without her madame without her employer. So Racist, certainly a problem here and in other countries around the Middle East and not only when it comes to migrants states across the Arab world have black minorities. You have Egypt for example, the Nubians who have been there for thousands of years you have in the Levant and the Gulf states black communities that are often the descendants of slaves taken by Islamic empires or the descendents of African Muslims who made pilgrimages to places like Saudi Arabia and decided to stay again, those communities face various kinds of commission as well. Would you mean by that? Will you hear some of it? Simply in the language that people use darker skinned people referred to with terms like opt, which means slave Anwar Sadat was president of Egypt darker skin than his predecessor was sometimes referred to as his predecessors black poodle you turn on the television in the Middle East and black face is fairly common sight on Arabic language television and no doubt that kind of racism manifests in in everyday life in lots of ways, it does you see it in areas of life. March choice of partner you have families that will see skin color as a marker for Associate Comic Status Lighter skinned people seen as being wealthier and more educated. You see it in the workplace as well in Iraq, for example, where there's a black community that has been there for at least a thousand years they to this day struggle to obtain government jobs and they're often relegated to doing menial work and living on the outskirts of society. You see it as well in the Gulf states where there's almost a racial hierarchy to employment. If you walk into a Nice Hotel and the Gulf you might see black migrants from Africa working as security guards or as porters. You will see them far less often in jobs that require interaction with customers. Waiters hairdressers, things like that those jobs which are better paid than less taxing often go to lighter skinned workers from Asia or from Arab countries I mean racism has been very much on the agenda over the past few months because of the the killing of George Floyd protests that erupted across the world did that wave of protests hit the Arab world as well? The protests themselves. Didn't reach the Arab world. This is a region fortunately protest often a criminal offence of we didn't see much in the way in street demonstrations either in solidarity or around the region's own issues with racism but it has certainly escalated the conversation that's taking place both online and offline. There was a video that circulated quite widely earlier this summer was shot by a Palestinian actress condit's. Who recounted some of the just casual bigotry that she's heard and day-today Life Semis Ben Aston Headache. Mariam. People often argue that it's harmless. It's just words. And allow. Them. One of the points that she was trying to make in this video is that it does hurt people and that it does have an influence not only on the targets of it but on societies broader attitude towards Black Arabs, and do you think having these kinds of discussions on social media and the like will make much of a difference? Is it enough having a conversation about these? Things is certainly better than nothing. But one thing that we've seen certainly in America through years and years and years of protests against racism and police brutality is that just having a conversation doesn't actually bring political change or social change. That's something that takes a long time and it also takes concerted effort in politics and education, and unfortunately one of the problems in countries across this region. Is that there are few avenues to do that, and so it's good to have a conversation about these things but. The ways that you actually go about making concrete change. Unfortunately, those ways are often blocked in the middle. East. Thanks very much for joining US greg.

Hong Kong Lebanon Beijing Middle East United States China America Kong National Security Law Legislative Council Chief Executive Facebook Jason Nathan Law Carrie Lam Africa Hong Nor Copa Hong Kong Antoine
One in three children have unacceptably high lead levels, study says

BBC World Service

00:28 sec | Last week

One in three children have unacceptably high lead levels, study says

"New research indicates 1/3 of all Children have high levels of lead in their blood, putting their mental and physical health at risk. Study warns the concentrations can be so high that they'll stop the development of brains, heart and all the vital organs lead comes mainly from inadequately recycled waste like batteries and industries, such as mining on open air smelters. Africa and South Asia are the worst affected regions.

South Asia Africa
"south asia" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

08:07 min | 3 weeks ago

"south asia" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Second Nilanthi Samara Nyaka she is the director of the strategy and Policy Analysis Program. At CNA with expertise on Indian Ocean and South Asia security. Finally Judd government. He's the director of the Africa Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and a former national intelligence officer for Africa. It's the law. Fair podcast July thirteenth. Cove nineteen, and it's national security implications in the middle. East South Asia and Africa. Mona. Let's start with Iran and then the wider Middle East in terms of. Covid arrived and how it spread this spring. How did it? I affect the Levada in the wider Middle East, so Iran was the first country in the Middle East to experience covet, and it was quite early as early as mid February that there were actual reports of it started in the. Religious City of calm, but then very quickly spread throughout the country. It was notable that a number of senior Raanan officials contract the disease. There was one. Memorable anecdote when I think it was. Maybe it was the deputy health minister who was giving a press conference sweating profusely and was not note. This has been stabilized. That really is no outbreak and the next day is reported that he's come down with covert. So Iran was really one of the earliest ones in remains the regional epicenter of the pandemic other countries that are now experiencing more significant outbreaks are Iraq. Some of the Gulf countries and Egypt. Now, the attention that was given at least in most of the international press was really to the Iranian government. There wasn't as much attention to the spread among the population in Iran and even less soda populations spread in the other countries, but did it did it follow a similar pattern too much of the rest of the world where everybody was focused on flights coming in from China, and then eventually the flights coming in from Europe and other locations got attention. Well I think it was absolutely a the Islamic republic's ties to China that we're fingered initially, but we should also note that the government really downplayed the pandemic attempted to hide the true extent of it. There are still questions about how extensive testing was, but there were videos and other things coming out on twitter and other social media platforms where it became very clear that the country was fairly quickly overwhelmed and I should know they did respond, but with some lockdown measures gradual ones through April and May. And then started to reopen in June, and now they're in the midst of essentially a second surge that has seen including the last few days, the largest single number of deaths in one day and Iran has in the top ten list for numbers of infections of Covid not a top ten list you WANNA be on right between Italy and Spain. Right. Along. Let's turn to you. How about South Asia did cove it arrive, and what was it like in that first month or two? Sure India and Pakistan for their part they acted early in terms of imposing restrictions, the lockdowns suspending era travel bus travel, but I think one of the criticisms was that it was implemented quite harshly, so there were concerns from the outset about food insecurity, just access to basic staples, migrant workers and India who needed to walk for hundreds of miles to return to their villages, due to the restrictions on. On movements, so it was difficult for them, but Bangaldesh is an interesting case. Because the they saw returning migrant workers or so essentially in Bangladesh, a lot of citizens will go abroad to work especially, in the Middle East and then they will send remittances home, so it's really a top contributor to the the national economy so these workers were coming home from the Middle East from. From Europe and they they weren't really quarantining, so it was a different experience than Indian Pakistan and then there are descending on Daca, which is the most densely populated city in the world, and then they're returning to their homes in the villages of so that's how the the virus has been spreading in. Bangladesh, they're having a difficult time in terms of needing hospital beds and ventilators and Bangash is expecting. Expecting a peak in September Parkistan in the late summer, and then just this week, India surpassed Russia on the Johns Hopkins. University tracker, so it's it's right now after the you ask Brazil in terms of confirmed cases, so it's the the region going through a very difficult time right now. Absolutely, Judd, when and where did Africa get this coronavirus? I and which governments reacted best and worst early on. I, always like the president of Kenya's statement about this, he said this is a crisis that was not created on the African continent as so in sub. Saharan Africa Nigeria I in late February and takes all the way till mid mid-may for all forty nine countries. To have their first index cases, and it's a really very case only one case in sub Saharan Africa Somalia. Actually has a China Nexus. The majority of them actually reflect colonial ties, so you see a number of countries that formerly that are anglophone, having UK connections French with Francophone countries and then. A number of countries that have been infected by index cases from Italy given the really numbers Italy had. Was Pretty Slow at first took ninety eight days for the. Region to reach just one hundred thousand cases, and so it had the lowest caseload globally, but now things are picking up eighteen days to get to two hundred thousand now we're just reach the the half million mark. Let me ask you you are. How much of that is due to under testing that we've heard about across Africa. Yeah, I mean that's there's a number of different hypotheses on why the case load has been low and and the death rate is actually really low. It's about twelve thousand deaths so far some people point sort of the young population age medians about nineteen some talk about the the lockdowns and I can talk a little more about how swiftly those were implemented, but yes, under testing is a big challenge on the continent. They're largely just telling in cities. A report that came out earlier this week, said four thousand tests per million, which compares very poorly to wet. The testing levels are in say Europe. South Africa though I should point out is actually not bad when it comes to testing, it's the nineteenth globally in terms of the number of Tasir motion of population tested. Okay. Well, let's dig into the. Political and social consequences of Covid nineteen, these obviously will be profound, and in some places they already are dramatic Mona. Talk with us a bit about these dynamics in the Middle East and where they have been the most consequential. So I think in many ways it's going to be coverted second and third order effects that are probably going to be the most consequential for the region. We're GONNA see we're starting to already a reverberate in ways that are quite significant and I would note in particular is really the economic. Fallout from covid from the shutdown of measures. Put in place. That really poised to impact region in a significant way of the oil market, for example, witnessed a collapse in prices, April it has said somewhat recovered.

Middle East Africa Iran South Asia Europe Covid Judd India China Indian Ocean Nilanthi Samara Nyaka director Bangladesh Italy South Africa twitter Gulf Center for Strategic Mona
Shame, Healing and Transformation

Tara Brach

04:44 min | Last month

Shame, Healing and Transformation

"Noma stay in welcome. In, times of stress in her life, whatever the level! There is a tendency to turn against ourselves. We withdraw. We also lash out at others, but in some way we get smaller, we contract. I have a favorite little essay. Some of you might remember. This is an abbreviated version that if you can sit quietly after difficult news if you can. During financial downturns remain perfectly calm. If you can see your neighbors, travel and have fantastic adventures without a twinge of jealousy. If you can happily eat. Whatever's put on your plate and? Fall Asleep after day of running around without a drink or a pill if you can always find contentment just where you are. You are probably a dog. Some, you can sense why I like that so much. It's so true we are so reactive when we get stressful. We have our repertoire of how we react. And this is where we're. Be going more with this talk. Stress, adversity loss, they also can lead us to tapping our deepest resources to. Only adapting but really transforming and in a profound way. And this week what I'd like to do is focus on a key domain. Shutdown, that capacity transform. That shuts down that capacity awake, and and how by addressing it, we really free ourselves in that domain is shame, self judgment self aversion. Being at war with ourselves. So. That's how it will look at and. I find that the deepest truths or the ones that we most regularly forget. And one of those is. If we're at with ourselves, we can't truly open our hearts to the rest of life. Our hearts are tight. And I circle back to this regularly from way way back because it's a pervasive suffering turning on ourselves. And the story that to me is one of the most powerful guides or powerful metaphors which I want to re bring to our attention because I tried to. Bring it on a lot, because it's so helpful is story of the statue that was in Thailand, ancient capital of Sukhumi tie, and it was not particularly handsome or refined statue, Plaster Clay, but huge and people loved it just for its staying power had been through many changes of government, and through all sorts of weather, systems and invasions and so on. But, in the nineteen fifties during a Hot Dry season some cracks started appearing in this beloved statue, and when the Abbot of the monastery took a flashlight one night to kind of Puran in just kind of looking at the infrastructure inside the cracks. What Came back was a flash of gold was the glimmer of gold, and so they kind of chipped it away, and they found underneath this plaster clay, covering the largest solid gold statue in South Asia. What's interesting is amongst believed that it was covered over. With plaster and clay to protect it from invading armies. Much in the same way. That we cover over aren eight purity to protect us as we navigate through the stressors of life. That we all put on coverings and that's not a problem per se, it's just very natural. We have our ego of defenses and protections in ways that we can try to enhance ourselves. where the suffering comes is when we take ourselves to be the coverings, you know these different defenses parts of our personality, our emotional reactions police we take. The coverings to be who we are and we forget the gold. That's the core suffering, and this is the suffering. You'll see pointed out in some way and every contempt of wisdom tradition that we forget who we are,

Plaster Clay Noma Sukhumi South Asia Thailand
India's Burgeoning Crypto Scene with WazirX CEO Nischal Shetty

Messari's Unqualified Opinions

03:30 min | Last month

India's Burgeoning Crypto Scene with WazirX CEO Nischal Shetty

"Waza Rex is part of the Internet and Mobile Association of India is the largest exchanges exchanges in India. So lots of talk about. regarding both the Indian crypto. SCENE AND The. General! Performance of the quine in other assets. In emerging markets stop in particular India's interesting, because it is the largest democracy world they've had a number of interesting macro events of course last year couldn't demonetisation. Where many people were stuck in bank lines trying to redeem their cash? After the government's slashed the maximum size paper currency they have a cultural affinity for Gold's. Ritchie exactly. What that translates shoot terms of digital goals. And talked about quite a few topics that might be of interest as we think about emerging market interest in crypto beyond just China. And East Asia. South Asia perspective long overdue for this podcast and I'm excited to talk more about it. Shelter Yeah. Great great connect here. So why don't we? Why don't we start just by Having, introduce yourself and and talk a little bit about S-. While direction and some of the work that you've been doing. Over the last couple of years, maybe you start with the origin story personally how you fell down the rabbit hole. On a show so to give a bit of a background about me. I started my career as a software engineer. Writing Gold for a typical corporate job, and then eventually I quit my job and start it up. a social media management off. Guard crowd fire, and this is be back in two thousand ten of been event credible still new. Building on top of the API was like a really new thing. The API platform ten stuff The advent vital. Signed up millions of users on that and a wild. This was happening I was also the Hula zone or finding what was new? On the time reading every blog that spoke about new tax and stuff, so I came across Bitcoin, billy, then two, thousand, nine, I even bigger remember trying to mind bitcoin on my. PC BAGHDAD But it was just you know just coming across as trying it out and then mowing. then again, Gordon? Do a Bitcoin and twenty, two, hundred, twenty, thirty when a couple of Wallace started emerging in that space. again tried out a few of those early wallet. Sand sent. A bitcoin through my friends Some and then again I just lay. brainy seventeen years the whole. I got garden the Rabbit. Dole says that I've never been able to come out of it, so I would say my initiation into crypto happen and twenty seventeen. And eighteen built was. My my idea was to build sort of. Obey for people in India too easily on Crypto and when I experienced a global products and products that well being built in our country I saw a stock defense in the whole use it expedience, and that motivated me to build something which everyone in India accord easily on Border Crypto, and that's how I ended up bailing was he'd eggs?

India Mobile Association Of India Gold East Asia South Asia China Ritchie Dole Software Engineer Wallace Gordon Sand
WHO reports largest single-day increase in coronavirus cases

All Things Considered

00:50 sec | Last month

WHO reports largest single-day increase in coronavirus cases

"Of the roughly nine million coronavirus cases reported around the world one million were reported in just the last week the World Health Organization says a recent rise in cases as the pandemic takes hold in some densely populated areas may be to blame NPR's ping Wong reports to address a number every asus WHO's director general says the corona virus just keep spreading it seems that almost every day we reach a new and dream record yesterday more than one hundred eighty three thousand new cases of coated with reported to W. too easily the most in a single day so far the W. H. O. attributes the recent sharp increase to the corona virus pandemics hitting highly populated countries in Latin America and South Asia the Middle East and Africa all at about the same

World Health Organization NPR Director General W. H. O. Latin America South Asia Middle East Africa Ping Wong
WHO: coronavirus cases increasing in Central and South America

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

WHO: coronavirus cases increasing in Central and South America

"The emergence is chief of the World Health Organization says central and South America witnessing the most intense transmission of the corona virus but it's difficult to predict when the pandemic might pique their Michael Ryan says five of the ten countries recording the most new cases are in the Americas the US Brazil Peru Chile and Mexico he says hospitals are starting to strain under the pressure Ryan says in the WHL he's particularly concerned about places like Haiti because of the inherent weaknesses in their health systems he's clarified the outbreaks in South Asia and Africa well the difficult I'm not a stable Charles the last month London

World Health Organization South America Michael Ryan United States Chile Haiti South Asia Africa Charles London Brazil Mexico
WHO: coronavirus cases increasing in Central and South America

AP News Radio

00:28 sec | 2 months ago

WHO: coronavirus cases increasing in Central and South America

"Michael Ryan says five of the ten countries recording the most new cases are in the Americas the US Brazil Peru Chile and Mexico he says hospitals are starting to strain under the pressure Ryan says in the WHL he's particularly concerned about places like Haiti because of the inherent weaknesses in their health systems he's clarified the outbreaks in South Asia and Africa well the difficult I'm not a stable Charles the last month London

Michael Ryan United States Chile Haiti South Asia Africa Charles London Brazil Mexico
Official says suicide attack in eastern Afghanistan kills 5

BBC World Service

02:03 min | 3 months ago

Official says suicide attack in eastern Afghanistan kills 5

"The Taliban have claimed yet another deadly attack in Afghanistan at least five people were killed in an attack on a military base in the eastern province of Paktia on South Asia regional editor John the giving joins me now so Joe just tell us what happened in today's attack one official site there's a drive in a truck which is apparently full of explosives were approached the gates of the military compound it's not every weather facilities and also Medici court it sounded as though the god stopped the driver somebody opened fire and then that the drives a blue at the the truck up so most of the dead and injured were just local people who were milling around civilians also a few military personnel amongst the injured as you say the Taliban says they carried out the attack and they say it was a response to the announcement by the Afghan president Ashraf Ghani lace on Tuesday that they were going to return to offensive operations against militants including the Taliban and he made that announcement in response to an attack on a maternity hospital and suddenly the savagery of which Afghans are still trying to process absolutely I mean you know we used to reporting of death and destruction and blasts and someone from Afghanistan this was just a scale I think a lot of people are gonna be very how to process I think that's partly why am I struck down he felt that he needed to stand up and give a response even though the Taliban has said they distance themselves from that attack but was still hearing stories coming out about the I witness is talking about the government going from room to room through the hospital searching out the maternity unit and then opening fire at close range on pregnant women women who had recently given birth and even on your phone status there were two babies who were killed under the stories as well women now who knows that that they deserve died babies who have survived but are now motherless so I think that was something that the authority is very much needed to respond to but it's also lead to an unraveling all hopes of a growing peace process that seems not very distant thank you very much for that still recovering

Taliban Afghanistan Paktia South Asia Editor John JOE President Trump Official Ashraf Ghani
UN releases emergency funds to help vulnerable countries

BBC Newshour

02:54 min | 3 months ago

UN releases emergency funds to help vulnerable countries

"The U. N. is hoping to raise six point seven billion dollars the undersecretary general for humanitarian affairs mark Lowcock told me about the situation the poorest countries are facing what is true source of problems ready the fastest what we're seeing the gradual spread of the virus noticed foster's some people fool but nevertheless a growing exhilarating spread them the disease it brings and of course the poorest country have the weakest health systems theorist Dr is the thirty seventh lowest ability to respond to disease but in fact they even bigger calamity is the economic collapse which is leading to a spike in poverty huge increase in hunger the specter of famines unfolding on the horizon reducing immunization services and I don't know what we're doing now new plan is responding said that second sort of problem give us some examples that it would be useful to get some sort of focus on you mentioned firemen all this specific groups in in crotch all countries that are at risk more than others of course this problem now affects every country on the planet and pretty much every person on the planet said our plan deals with about sixty four countries but we didn't that group of countries the ones that the light you see the largest loss of life if we can get a good response to the ones that are already the most vulnerable said places like Yemen the Central African Republic Afghanistan Democratic Republic of Congo I'm within those countries the most vulnerable groups to pay the whole tend to be the youngest in the family the oldest basically and women and girls in particular now because the disease seems to have the biggest effect on older people and one thing about the countries where humanitarian agencies work is a populations tend to be younger said the disease itself may not be the biggest problem that we are facing for the rest of this year and into next year in terms of life saving activity okay so so in a way you're agreeing with the World Health Organization when they say that the numbers in western Europe may be falling they're saying that that may not be the case in the rest of the world the you'll see you'll saying something different you're expecting it to be pretty devastating in the months ahead in project entries our our assessment is exactly the same as W. a case that first P. teams to be passing in Europe and North America but there's an accelerated if slower than lots of people full growth of cases in the poorest countries but the poorest countries have more than one problem cavities help her have any problem these are the consequences of economic collapse are very much on our minds as well but we do think that you know we can C. S. rapid growth of cases in Africa policy South Asia Latin America all the valuable reasons as

Yemen Afghanistan Democratic Republi World Health Organization Europe North America Undersecretary Mark Lowcock Foster Africa South Asia Latin America
Pakistan court overturns convictions in killing of American journalist Daniel Pearl

BBC World Service

02:09 min | 4 months ago

Pakistan court overturns convictions in killing of American journalist Daniel Pearl

"And a Pakistani court has overturned the death sentence that had been imposed on a British militant for beheading at the American journalist Daniel pearl yes let's get more not now with our correspondent in Islamabad secunda Kamani income money just remind us of the background to this case because it caused a huge amount of shock when it occurred yes that's right it was in two thousand and two Daniel pearl was American journalist working for the Wall Street journal in Pakistan investigating a story about Islamist extremism obviously this was just a few months after the nine eleven attacks in January two thousand and two he went off to meet a source in the port city of Karachi but he was kidnapped and a around a month later a video was released of him being beheaded and it's believed that a British militant man could Oman states Sheikh who was born in London but it gravitated towards Islamist groups in in South Asia I was responsible for setting him up and had organized the kidnapping today does the court overruled the death sentence to it being given down to must say S. HA in two thousand and two although it kept the conviction for kidnapping so it's not quite clear what will happen now because he's been given it a seven year sentence for kidnapping but he served about eighteen years in jail already so we're waiting to find out if the government will appeal against the date today's decision and what will happen to them I say take what he when he will be released to whether he will remain in jail pending further legal action and how is this being views in Pakistan well in buckets sign as elsewhere in the world because the majority of the the the focus at the moment is on the corona virus outbreak said this is not is not getting a huge huge amount of media attention as it preps would have on the at another occasion but sent it this is the case that there's been a huge amount of intrigue about that mean must H. Sheikh was someone who was a very high profile figure in militant circles says it is another step in a in a mystery about a very tragic

Daniel Pearl Wall Street Journal Pakistan Karachi London Kidnapping H. Sheikh Islamabad Secunda Kamani Oman
Coronavirus could see global unemployment rise by 25 million: ILO in India

UN News

04:17 min | 4 months ago

Coronavirus could see global unemployment rise by 25 million: ILO in India

"New assessment by the International Labor Organization Ilo shows the cove in nineteen pandemic could increase global unemployment. By around twenty five million. Arlos calling for an internationally coordinated policy response. Which would be of particular benefit to South Asian countries like India since a large part of its workforce lack social security and employment benefits. News entry. Shama spoke to the director of arlos decent work team for South Asia based in the UN's India Office Dot Malta. We have learned from two thousand eight nine. Financial Crisis at the coordinated. International Policy Response will be much more effective in getting out of this crisis and limit The rise for example in an employment. And what I mentioned before. So really to protect workers in the workplace to stimulate the economy and employment and also to safeguard income for workers. So that would mean for example extension of social protection also finding ways of part-time work fulltime work teleworking and see how how the social partners can respond to this and likewise with the government help to extend actually schemes so how is assisting the countries especially India to fix the situation which is vast right now. Yes we have two major tools. That really can help also instill confidence and trust in the population in particular to favor social dialogue dialogue between the government workers and the employers about the measures solutions to be put in place and at this important actually to have Workers and the people really to idea to them so that implementation becomes effective likewise we have seen before in crisis situation how international labor standards are proven instruments. Really that become build upon to have a common policy response in for example. We have an instrument that this piece of resilience and working and decent work in this context. So that is just one example so we will certainly work. Was everyone the United Nations all our partners and of course their constituents to support this crisis response from the workplaces shutting down in the context of especially where majority of the workforce and then formal economy. What policy measures do you think would help the workers daily which are in their formal sector? Of course they are kind of hard hit because the global economy supply chains said for a grinding to a hole in this scenario. And what we see is that existing schemes that are already there can be used to be topped up and also in particular reach out to more likewise micro small and medium enterprises are really the backbone of the economy in the unorganized sector here in India. And it is important that they get support from the government in terms of for example in benefits that can be extended to also that the balance and the private sector can support this economic local economic tissue. Really that is so important also for for building but really to save these jobs and for social cohesion in particular any message that I would like to give. Yes really I think. In this crisis times is most important to have a heart is that health needs to reach the people because they really need to be reassured and they need to play a role in this is also visit viruses so it is very difficult to come out and say well I am ill at work or something. Don't can't even afforded but even if you are in a work place. You may not want to do that because you're afraid of losing your job. So people centered approaches of essence at the

India International Labor Organizati South Asia India Office Dot Malta Shama United Nations UN Director
Namaste Trump: US president fills world's largest cricket stadium for political rally

Correspondents Report

06:22 min | 5 months ago

Namaste Trump: US president fills world's largest cricket stadium for political rally

"Almost two weeks ago the US president. Donald Trump was in India for a quick two-day tour. They were no major announcements expected but donald trump was to speak in front of over one hundred thousand people at huge cricket stadium in the city of Ahmedabad it was an event that piqued the interest of South Asia correspondent. James Ocean Bash. It turns out local media when more than a little curious why an Australian journalist had decided to go along to the spectacle on me. That's the sound of more than one hundred thousand people welcoming. Us President Donald Trump at a new cricket stadium in Ahmedabad not just any cricket stadium the largest in the world. According to seating capacity the president is used to speaking at large political rallies but even hey admitted awake lighter went back in the US that this was something special. This was a political party. Indian style music was blasting people were dancing in the stands paper masks and Prime Minister Narendra Modi and president trump will being worn with glee and they were baseball caps with trump's name on them. Lots of baseball caps the back of the stadium. I'm sitting among many local media and a few other foreign journalists just trying to absorb it all and then something unexpected happened. An Indian TV journalists came up to me and asked if she could interview me a mistrial Ian replied assuming that she thought I was an American. It doesn't matter. She showed me turns out. She wanted a foreign perspective about Modi meeting trump. Why was an Australian journalist here? Does this change the way USTRALIA views? India is big news back home those sorts of questions now. India has a lot of rolling news channels more than twenty. I'm told and that means a lot of hours have to be filled with content on. Saint Live crosses done here for less so when I figured why. Not and within a minute of saying yes. We relies when all of this about say the cell but I will give you a sense of that. Maybe guests with me right now. James Lee Denisov Eaton. That's fine birth names off food related daily. Denise these all Geisha going to spawn in with ABC The Australian Broadcasting Corporation. James. I want to ask you. You obviously definitely give me the foreign media perspective. Paul you wheeling this particular democracies these elitist. Then you've seen a lot of billboards around which summit ipod nausea you've got the world's largest democracy welcoming the first democracy in fact the most powerful democracy so I certainly pro-meta Strategy and perspective with a lot of interest in how they get along and how countries get along as well On. Tv The interviewer and occupying about a third of the screen. Another thirties live pictures of the rally and surrounding. Those two boxes are distracting amount of flashing graphics with the American Flag Waving on screen and headlines about mody welcoming trump constantly changing before the viewers is Indian media is certainly more shoddy than back harm and that includes the news animations anyway back to the interview Australia itself. It's always how to focus on China and you can say that starting to shift quite significantly and even the fries. Indo Pacific is one that you hear a lot more nowadays now. That's the point of made a fair bit recently. In fact the last time I was on this program I said I expected to hear more from India incoming years but if that's true change will surely be gradual industrial change. The Way Australia looks at in there. I wouldn't say a particularly changes to why you've seen to be honest. I likely wouldn't have gone to Ahmedabad either. Weren't for this. Visual spectacle with Donald Trump went on to discuss Australia Mont possibly join India Japan and the US in naval exercises this year or next and that was the end of the interview. Only Latin that perhaps the media not belong to either in America. Third-country thought that would be the end of it. I sat back down waiting for the main event to start but then a man with a golden microphone started chatting to me. He was a reporter with another news station India. Today within minutes on back on the air answering the sign. Top of questions. There was also a bit of Banter about how Australia no longer had the largest cricket stadium in fact that was repeated to me several times in the Strip opposite studio me like this random person who answered a question about Donald Trump explaining that the M. C. J. was no longer the world's largest cricket stadium minutes after the interview with India. Today I had another request for a TV interview and then another eventually. I decided because I had my own reporting to concentrate on now as I mentioned before. There's a lot rolling news platforms in India. Sorry grubbing may or any foreign Janai for an interview. Could just be filler. But it did get me thinking about the rise of India. He had the president of the United States showering India. And it's people with price. I got the sense that this was a proud moment for many here. Regardless of their politics it signified a in. The wider world is viewing India having foreign journalists to report on that reinforce this view but regardless of what the future holds for India. It seems one thing. That's not in dispute. They now have the world's largest Cricket Stadium Great Story there with South Asia correspondent James Oaten.

Donald Trump India President Trump United States Ahmedabad Huge Cricket Stadium Largest Cricket Stadium Prime Minister Narendra Modi South Asia James Lee Denisov Eaton Australia India Japan Baseball IAN James Oaten Indo Pacific
Uncut Gems, Little Women, Microsoft Project Silica, Instagram Profits.

Photography Radio

06:22 min | 6 months ago

Uncut Gems, Little Women, Microsoft Project Silica, Instagram Profits.

"As photographers animators or just digital content creators. Many of us may lament. How. Instagram has changed over the years since facebook bought instagram. Back in twenty twelve for one billion dollars which seems like an insane amount of money to pay for an APP. That didn't have a clear monetization model eight years later. We can see how facebook has integrated ads on the most popular photo sharing platform and according to Bloomberg Business. The one billion dollar investment is paying back at least twenty full. According to insider information from Bloomberg INSTAGRAM's total ad revenue from twenty thousand nineteen was twenty billion dollars a quarter of facebook's total ad revenue for that year now just as a comparison YouTube AD revenue for Twenty nineteen was just over fifteen billion dollars and remember youtube shares or profits from that revenue with their content creators. Instagram does not if these numbers are real first of all that is a lot of revenue second if facebook is creating this much revenue from this platform like Youtube. I think there should be financial compensation for content creators who helped generate this much income for facebook. This may be one of the reasons. Why Many Power Users on Instagram Aka influencers have to use outside sponsors to try to make a living to generate income for themselves? And at the same time. It's something that instagram appears to be trying to curb claiming that it makes the platform and these accounts less transparent or in the least Craig contests I think and pay artists that are featuring instagram's main account and perhaps have monthly features to charities that they donate to more evidence that facebook is not reinvesting back into the platform is when CEO instagram. Adam massery in recent posts on instagram claim that the reason why there is no instagram for IPAD was because he lacked resources. You can believe that now. If a company like facebook only uses inscribed as a vehicle to generate profit without ever giving back to the company itself as well as those who helped make the platform successful I think many will gladly jump ship when it competing platform comes around to usurp instagram and become the new leading social media photo and video sharing platform twitch or talk. Anyone last week I talked about the possible end of the Microsoft Platform and the evidence seemed pretty clear with Panasonic joining the like elmont alliance and the Olympics is recent flagship. The OIL MD EM one more threes lukewarm reception due to mediocre specs on their flagship. However there has been some news that appears to a point in the other direction report out of Japan says that in one thousand nine hundred nineteen the microphone. Third System took number one spot in market share with nineteen point eight percent of all digital interchangeable lens camera sold in Japan in two thousand nineteen. So that is very surprising for many of us here in. North America or Europe. But I've found over the years that the Japanese market is not always the best indicator of Global Trans Japan makes way more money selling to the US and the European market versus own domestic market and the domestic market tends to be a bit quirkier odd know for a fact that small compact and as I mentioned quirky cameras sell well in Japan as well as in much of South Asia. Even though the sales of these cameras maybe duds in the rest of the world as an example the Nikon one and the Pentax q system sold very well in Japan but that trend didn't really sit well with the rest of the world that it whoever it is interesting to see that microphone. Thirds is not only doing well in Japan but it is a number one platform in Japan and again. I'm not surprised in the sense that small and compact and sometimes quirky cameras do very well in the domestic market. But another piece of news that made me think about the popularity of the micro third system and something. Maybe I'm missing here. Is that both Olympics and Panasonic made joint media announcement. Recently that young new media edge Venus optics are all joining the microphone. Third Systems Standard Group. Which means they'll that there will be developing products that lenses camera lights and other accessories specific for the microphone third system which is great for those that currently are invested in the microphone thirds cameras finally on the same day that they made this announcement casino. Japan just announced the new Voice Lander knocked-on Sixty millimeter f point. Nine five lands which has a hundred and twenty millimeter coolant. Thirty five millimeter. A very high performance Lens. So perhaps I have to eat my words from last week. About the end of micro four thirds that perhaps there is a future for this smaller format and platform. Which really is a good thing? I've always said that. Competition is good including competing formats however my point from last week still stands true that Sony really needs to update that old twenty megapixel sensor with something more modern backside luminated Sima Sensor with phased attacked autofocus across entire surface and perhaps an upgrade up to twenty four megapixel my pick for photographer. The Week is previously mentioned Wilson Web. Now we've already talked about Webs of work on the movie little woman as the onset photographer as well as shooting these wet plates for the actors you also worked on other notable movies such as marriage story the secret life of Walter Mitty Zoo lander to men in black three. He started his career in the movie industry. So he's an onset photographer as well as a DP director photography and camera operator.

Facebook Instagram Japan Youtube Bloomberg Instagram Panasonic Global Trans Japan Walter Mitty Zoo Bloomberg Business Nikon Microsoft Olympics South Asia Oil Md Sony Adam Massery North America Wilson Web
China Expels Three Wall Street Journal Reporters

John Batchelor

09:14 min | 6 months ago

China Expels Three Wall Street Journal Reporters

"China expels three Wall Street journal reporters sub head China revoke the press credentials of three wallstreet journal report is based in Beijing the first time in the post Mao era that the Chinese government has expelled multiple journalists from one international news organization at the same time to help us understand this puzzle and also to look beyond this to the up to students of the reporting out of China these last weeks of the covert nineteen crisis we welcome Jonathan ward author of China's vision of victory Jonathan the expulsion of the newspaper reporters for a regime that is fussy about its world image does this make sense our it does this demonstrate in some fashion the brittleness of the Communist Party good evening to good evening John good evening court it's going to be well I I think in reality this is an old piece of the playbook for great for Beijing not just the expulsion of journalists but the desire to control the narrative and they've been doing this to countries with the think they have sufficient power to do so for quite a long time since the days of now say don't next on this with Indian media back in the days of the border where they are doing this in South Asia even today where you have investors from China telling individual newspaper editors of the call that they can't publish this or that on China and today they think they can do this to the United States and it's very similar I think to what they did with the NBA at the end of last year where the essentially said you can't say this you know tweeting about Hong Kong and then asking for an official in the NBA to be hired so this idea that China can intimidate or whether it's media entities are business entities I mean the shows I think if anything the confidence that China has today to state that it can control the narrative not only inside China but outside China because of course the Wall Street journal is being tried as far as I'm aware and so are you know many of the you know weeds in which we use media outside they seek to influence all so a lot of this you know just says to me you know one China's political system is to simply incompatible with that of the United States is incompatible with the modern world and kind of power is growing far too great and that is what we will have to deal with going forward Jonathan you talk about confidence of the senior Chinese leaders let me put this another way so for instance right now those senior leaders face an existential crisis for themselves and for the regime and they need the help of for instance the United States and yet they're doing something that is just going to aggravate their image problems in Washington and elsewhere I would think that this is an instance of China lashing out doing something that is against its own interests and shows therefore that something is really wrong in Beijing what do you think of that theory and and how do you parse through it as you go forward I think we have to understand what China's leaders think that China's interests are this is not a nation state whose regime has hearing that essentially it can unleash a billion people on the world and and come to rule the world because of that so they're very much in their own ideology when it comes to how to appeal power in the sense of what they've achieved in the last thirty years of their sentences so you know the whole idea of the great the Cuban nation of the Chinese nation which is the central narrative of the Communist Party the idea that they will rule the world by the year twenty forty nine the belt and road will be built me to try to twenty twenty five will allow them to dominate every major industry and these ideas have not gone away even with coronavirus on the other hand what you have had is is a a real you know almost shut down slow down in the Chinese economy in the first quarter of this year that I think is is is yes putting the pressure on and showing the world that our dependency on China is going to come at two great a price I mean all sorts of companies initially sought apple missed quarterly earnings and such and those that are really buying into the idea that China will continue to ascend we're gonna have a very tough decade going ahead because of China's confrontation with the United States and I I think that the sense of destiny the sense of the great because the nation that's held by the Communist Party and its core leadership is absolutely a very dangerous path for China because it leads to this confrontation with the world and that that needs to control essentially information even in a time of crisis home Jonathan he maybe I'm out of touch maybe I don't see this but my sense is listening to what you're saying is that we're talking about a leadership in Beijing which is kind of view of the world which doesn't correspond to anything that we know because China right now does appear to be weak and I don't think that they got the position to be able to intimidate countries for very much longer because what we have seen during this crisis is the one victim the one real problem for Beijing is that it's lost its image of invulnerability so I would argue based on what you say China's leaders are just themselves out of touch I think it depends on what the world does to come together against essentially through the rise of China at this point I mean look at what we in Britain and businesses causing huge problems for the US U. K. special relationship and look at China's economic ties in Southeast Asia and the way that that creates a difficulty I think for diplomacy in our ability to bring country centerfold I mean they're able to accomplish a great deal and it's still requires a concerted effort from the rest of the world I think to to say that China's ascendancy at this point cannot go too much further if they're going to have a regime like this and I don't think the world has come together to do that yet but it's what must be done Jonathan is there one explanation for why she gin paying didn't go to the center of the virus right away he simply could Chang why didn't why didn't she go there what it what is the thinking have any leadership in the west would demand it well I I mean some analysts have pointed out that this would be consistent with you know prior for instance now and and others that remaining in control of the crisis it involves you know being pulling back and working from behind the scenes and then sending essentially another delegate out she has tried to cultivate an image of him as a man of the people but you know in this case it probably says more than anything how dangerous this fires with his dangerous yes but he is a puzzle did they have another way of looking at the world when the general doesn't leave he's not the general that said you know I I'm not being fancy here but she marching around in Beijing with a mask on was absurd well John do you know it's interesting that you say that because on social media in China many people were saying that seizure being was a coward and they contrasted him with what you mentioned the Primera Li ka chunk actually going to move on talking to doctors in a hospital and they said see Jim paying just stayed in Beijing and did a photo op yes Jonathan you know as well as I do that you the measure of the leader's how he does in crisis not how he does on a good day right that's true and I think we have yet to see with the with the real consequences are going to be in this I mean you could certainly be an interesting position it also could offer an opportunity for those who are against in circles of power to come together you know I vote for term what about your garden well you know I I just don't see how they get out of this because they're lashing out and whatever friends they need they're alienated them very quickly yes I I you know we used to tease him as being looking like Winnie the Pooh put in that mask in Beijing he didn't look anything like Pooh bear eight eight it looks like a well all right sign leave it alone Jonathan to you they were using the term Chernobyl for awhile the clock is running if that's applicable do you believe explicable because the road the clock says five years and they're gone that's what happened the Soviets is that a fair analogy we have about thirty seconds I think it depends on how well they're able to gain control of information and how effective the surveillance state that they still in you know centric social credit score and all the rest of it is I mean this is going to be a real test of he simply to tell her an apparatus they built are they able to control them that should message sufficiently to essentially roll over all the dissent that will come from this we will see Jonathan lord he is the author most recently of China's vision of victory garden Chang of the daily beast on John

China Beijing Chinese Government Wall Street Journal
China Expels Three Wall Street Journal Reporters

John Batchelor

09:25 min | 6 months ago

China Expels Three Wall Street Journal Reporters

"However tonight there is a twist on the reporting of the casualties and the doubts and the non transparency to twist is this headline in the Wall Street journal China expels three Wall Street journal reporters sub at China revoke the press credentials of three wallstreet journal report is based in Beijing the first time in the post now era that the Chinese government has expelled multiple journalists from one international news organization at the same time to help us understand this puzzle and also to look beyond this to the up to students of the reporting out of China these last weeks of the covert nineteen crisis we welcome Jonathan ward author of China's vision of victory Jonathan the expulsion of the newspaper reporters for a regime that is fussy about its world image does this make sense our it does this demonstrate in some fashion the brittleness of the Communist Party good evening to good evening John good evening court it's good to be well I think in reality this is an old piece of the playbook for great for Beijing not just the expulsion of journalists but the desire to control the narrative and if in doing this to countries with the think they have sufficient power to do so for quite a long time since the days of now say don't need done this with Indian media back in the days of the border what they're doing this in South Asia even today where you have investors from China telling individual newspaper editors of the call that they can't publish this or that bone China today they think they can do this to the United States and it's very similar I think to what they did with the NBA at the end of last year where the essentially said you can't say this you know tweeting about Hong Kong and then asking for an official in the NBA to be fired so this idea that China can intimidate or whether it's media entities are business entities on the shows I think if anything the confidence yeah China has today to state that it can control the narrative not only inside China but outside China because of course the Wall Street journal is beyond trying this person aware and so are you know many of the you know we'd in which we use media outside and they seek to influence all so a lot of this you know just sense to me you know one China's political system is to simply incompatible with that of the United States is incompatible with the modern world in China's power is growing far too great and that is what we will have to deal with going forward Jonathan you talk about confidence of the senior Chinese leaders at this another way so for instance right now those senior leaders face an existential crisis for themselves and for the regime and they need the help of for instance the United States and yet they're doing something that is just going to aggravate their image problems in Washington and elsewhere I would think that this is an instance of China lashing out doing something that is against its own interests and shows therefore that something is really wrong in Beijing what do you think of that theory and and how do you parse through it as you go forward I think we have to understand what China's leaders think that China's interests are this is a a nation state crews Regina has hearing did essentially it can unleash a billion people on the world and and come to rule the world because of that so they're very much in their own ideology when it comes to how to appeal power in the sense of what they've achieved in the last thirty years of their sentencing so you know the whole idea for great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation which is the central narrative of the Communist Party the idea that they will rule the world by the year twenty forty nine but the open road will be built made in China twenty twenty five will allow them to dominate every major industry these ideas have not gone away even with coronavirus on the other hand what you have is is a a real you know almost shut down slowdown in the Chinese economy in the first quarter of this year that I think is is is yes putting the pressure on and showing the world that our dependency on China is going to commit to great a price I mean all sorts of companies in the service on apple missed quarterly earnings and such and those that are really buying into the idea that China will continue to ascend okay never very tough decade going ahead because of China's confrontation with the United States yeah I I think that the sense of destiny the sense of the great because the nation that's held by the Communist Party and its core leadership bond is absolutely a very dangerous path for China because it leads to this confrontation with the world and that that needs to control essentially information even in a time of crisis Jonathan he maybe I'm out of touch maybe I don't see this but my sense is listening to what you're saying is that we're talking about a leadership in Beijing which is kind of view of the world which doesn't correspond to anything that we know because China right now does appear to be weak and I don't think that they got the position to be able to intimidate countries for very much longer because what we have seen during this crisis is the one victim the one real problem for Beijing is that it's lost its image of invulnerability so I would argue based on what you say that China's leaders are just themselves out of touch I think it depends on what the world does to come together against essentially to the rise of China at this point I mean look at what we in Britain this is causing huge problems for the US UK special relationship and look at China's economic ties in Southeast Asia and the way that that creates the difficulty I think for diplomacy in our ability to bring countries into a folder mean they're able to accomplish a great deal and it's still requires a concerted effort from the rest of the world I think to to say that China's ascendancy at this point cannot go too much further if they're going to have a regime like this I don't think the world has come together to do that yet but it's what must be done Johnson is there one explanation for why she didn't being didn't go to the center of the virus right away he simply could Chang why didn't why didn't she go there what it what is the thinking any leadership in the west would demand I mean some analysts have pointed out that this would be consistent with you know prior for instance now and and others that remaining in control of the crisis it involves you know being pulling back and working from behind the scenes and then sending simply another delegate out she has tried to cultivate an image of him as a man of the people but you know in this case it probably shows more than anything how dangerous this fire threatens dangerous yes but he is a puzzle did they have another way of looking at the world when the general doesn't lead he's not the general that's it you know I'm not being fancy here but she marching around in Beijing with a mask on was absurd well John do you know it's interesting that you say that because on social media in China many people were saying that seizure being was a coward and they contrasted him with what you mentioned the Primera Liga Chung actually going to move on talking to doctors in the hospital and they said see Jim being just stayed in Beijing and did a photo op yes Jonathan you know as well as I do that you the measure of the leader's how it does in crisis not how it does on a good day right that's true and I think we have yet to see with the with the real consequences are going to be in the Sunni could certainly be in a dangerous position it also could offer an opportunity for those who are against in circles of power to come together you know I'd love for term where does your garden well you know I I just don't see how they get out of this because they're lashing out and whatever friends they need they're alienated them very quickly yes I I you know we used to tease him as being looking like Winnie the Pooh but in that mask in Beijing he didn't look anything like Robert eight eight it looks like a well all right sign leave it alone Jonathan do you they were using the term Chernobyl for awhile of the clock is running if that's applicable do you believe explicable because the roof the clock says five years and they're gone that's what happens the Soviets is that a fair analogy we have about thirty seconds I think it depends on how well they're able to gain control of information and how effective the surveillance state that they built in you know centric social credit score and all the rest of it is I mean this is going to be a real catastrophe something to tolerate apparatus they built are they able to control connection message sufficiently to essentially roll over all the dissent that will come from this we will see Jonathan war he is the author most recently of China's vision of victory garden Chang of the daily beast I'm John Batchelor

Wall Street Journal China Beijing
The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is donating $100 million to coronavirus relief efforts

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 6 months ago

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is donating $100 million to coronavirus relief efforts

"Hall the bill and Melinda gates foundation is donating a hundred million dollars to the corona virus relief effort the foundation issued a statement saying the funds would go not only toward limiting the spread of the virus but also to treating it and toward trying to find a vaccine part of the funds will be donated to the CDC and the World Health Organization with a portion going to health agencies in China and other countries it directly affected by the outbreak mostly in South Asia and

CDC World Health Organization China South Asia Hall Melinda Gates
Singer Katy Perry named Asian charity ambassador by UK's Prince Charles

Donna and Steve

00:31 sec | 6 months ago

Singer Katy Perry named Asian charity ambassador by UK's Prince Charles

"Katy Perry was named as an ambassador of the British Asian trust at the charities annual royal dinner by prince Charles the royal founding patron the focus of the event was anti trafficking with the trust announcing its aims to develop the largest anti trafficking fund ever seen in South Asia Perry said in the statement my work as a UNICEF goodwill ambassador has opened my eyes to many vulnerabilities of children children are vulnerable and innocent and have to be protected absolutely for her that's very

Katy Perry Prince Charles Asia Perry Unicef
Sri Lanka to treat war-missing as dead, issue certificates

BBC World Service

03:27 min | 7 months ago

Sri Lanka to treat war-missing as dead, issue certificates

"Dead this ranking government has always denied that the thousands of Tamils who surrendered in two thousand and nine were held by the security forces after the war ended Mister Rogers taxes it knowledge mint came about during a meeting with a U. N. officials last week death certificates will be issued for the missing well these rooms I mean S. and Petra heard more from a South Asia it is a virus and answer option more than twenty three thousand people are officially listed as missing this also included about five to six thousand soldiers when I was speaking with the seniors for Lincoln government officials they were saying in many of those who killed venom big artillery shell exploded this body's just went in a missing the event into pieces of many of them cannot be accounted for however on the part of the time with civilians and former time of tiger Connors man I spoke to many of the families lasted insulin because they said they were separated as soon as the war ended in a small sliver of land in the northeastern part of Sri Lanka when thousands of people were crammed inside this area they came out and sat in that at that time they said the military was separating the civilians and the time attack a goddess and many said we saw my son my son in law my daughter in law seven bring to the army and they were taken a bus and we have not heard anything from them now the government says that all of them are dead but the families insist for a long time to believe they were kept in some secret person summer insulin got that is what was happening for the last ten years now the announcement by the Sri Lankan president gotta buy another book so who was the defense minister at the time of the wall it is now clearly states that all of them will be considered aspect so how significant is the fact that he's now announce this and how will it be received by the families of the disappeared first and for most this will be a great shock for the families of those disappeared because they were hoping as we speak and many of the families but holding roadside potus in towns like could not see in the northern part of sterling kind but to go no one in Houston part of Sri Lanka for more than two years holding the pictures of their loved ones hoping that the international attention all the pressure would help them to find them some that in hospitals some secret prisons are somewhere the previous government set up an office of the missing persons but they couldn't make much progress because the government this army in the military there are so many departments it was difficult to coordinate all these departments now this will bring an end it brings a closure but why has Mr right talks a done it now and will there be further repercussions no the government has been under pressure to find out what really happened to those missing people we're talking about nearly no more than twenty thousand people many of them time of civilians it also comes just weeks before the U. N. human rights council meeting in Geneva where the Salang Connie she was likely to come up once again now the government also wants to put a full stop to all these inquires and say now these people are dead we have to move along but many Thomas would not agree because they would want to know under what circumstances these people died if they ever for example allegedly killed in extra judicial killings they would want and quietly and they would want to know what circumstances these people were taken into custody and how they died but these questions will remain this is not going to end maybe officially this will bring an end to the the deaths on the other hand the families will continue to have questions and bassinet the Russian this is Denise ring from the BBC

"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

Arms Control Wonk

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

"And then add the BrahMos, which is very very accurate very fast joint venture with the Russians at S four hundred and layered missile defenses. And it looks like. A sustained interest in damage-limitation and potentially counterforce. And so the Pakistanis pick and choose the capabilities seem to support that architecture over the last ten years, I think it was really picked up ten years and the move to see kind of the natural combination that match ration-, but it's just one piece of the larger arms race dynamic that I think is happening kind of under our nose in the western media. We've been talking about getting I've been talking about South Asia, you know, for for years, but it got nowhere near the attention to the North Korea. Got for obvious reasons. I think because North Korea and the US earner have an adversarial relationship it's easy to forget about South Asia. But I think we do so at our peril because I think that right now is probably the most active arms race in the global queer landscape. There's a positive to arms races is that we get to have lots of arms control podcasts about this. You always try we've caused growth industry, it's a growth industry, you know? And we always try and podcast on a happy note. And usually my happy this usually not very much be happy about at the end of podcast because usually it means that there's more nuclear weapons or more missiles. But that means we get to have more podcasts. So with that. I think that's a happy note. I also want to add before we wrap up plugging ARA or Trump JR. No, a lot of fun and Eric figure out what the Turks are doing. With those Augusta ninety bees definitely hit me up. I will I will actually gonna look into that. My guess is that they're in. This is doing a lot of Paul is just the whole maintenance than they're in. They're doing a lot of the electron IX, all let's not be coy. They wanna peak those slickened said that they can get a. Look at the twos. But you'll have Turks wandering around those things. I mean, it is interesting. I'm gonna have to look into that. You know, the Turkish Pakistani relationship is massing. Yeah. They actually very close close relations close ties in its it slides under the radar a lot, but they're closely allied in a long history going back there. So now, you wet my appetite now, I need to go actually figure out what the hell. The these two sides are doing. But with that thanks for joining me and Jeffrey is traveling on the east coast..

South Asia North Korea Paul Augusta Eric US Jeffrey ten years
"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

Arms Control Wonk

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

"The other variable now is to watch out for potential future. Chinese deployments into the Indian Ocean. Which the Indians have been worried about for a for quite some time now, so basically the Indian Ocean is is turning into a pretty big nuclear hot zone to watch. As far as the arms race dynamics. Go. I think what you think that. But I think I see a lot more of those arms race dynamics really playing out on land between the Indians of the park, sunny still. But I think certainly Pakistan's development of the of this sea-launched leg wasn't something that was really taken for granted, maybe in the mid two thousands. But really now seems to be something that they've really started to invest a lot of effort into. Yeah. Grew with that. I think what we're seeing is a match ration- of arms race that has existed in some form another for you know, since the nineteen eighties. And you know, now, we're entering basically the next cycle, which is things are clicking on the land based force for both Augustan, you know, in the early knots fielded the Nassir system which is a tactical nuclear weapon. Capability plus, you know, both are developing their strategic nuclear forces on land. And so moving to see his was kind of the natural culmination. I think from there, you know, again over determined for or organizational bureaucratic procedures Indian case. And I think there's a survivability logic in the Pakistani case. And so, you know, the the the question will be how these dynamics continue, and you know, the the arms race has really been driven. I think largely by my pocket. Stan so far it believed. It needed battlefield nuclear weapons turn Indian conventional attack than it was worried about survivability of strategic choice if India retaliated with nuclear weapons, so that kind of drove Pakistan to build up its forces, drove them to see and the question will be how India decides to respond, and I think a lot of this turns on, you know, whether India is interested in threatening the survivability of Pakistan's. Strategic nuclear forces. Because if they are then I think, you know, we're entering a new phase where India will have to maintain sustain numbers of systems and warheads to maintain somewhat a counterforce advantage and Pakistan will keep building up and moving them around and make targeting much more difficult. And so we could be entering if Pakistan, and it's enough that Pakistan might fear that that's the case. And until there's until unless there's an explicit Indian clarification about. Accepting the deposits secure second strike, Pakistan is always gonna fear Indian threats to the survivability of nuclear force. And so a lot of this on what India's interest is in terms of nuclear strategy, and you know, what kind of targeting of portfolio wants because along as Pakistan believes that India's interested in counterforce when you're going to have vertical arms race until or unless India decides to basically explicitly opt out of it and say, we have no interest in threatening the strategic your strategic nuclear assets. So I think that that's kind of where we are. Now, there are a lot of reasons why do you might be interested in this? But it does create very destabilizing dynamics on the arms race peacetime arms race dynamics. And then obviously anytime there's there are elements of counterforce targeting and any states strategy or believed to be then you start getting I strike instability problems, the need to go preemptively, go I in order devoid, losing and if your nuclear assets, and so, you know, they're both peacetime applications and crises implications. But I mean, I think we're squarely your Pakistan. He's, you know, well before the Indians started even obliquely talking about counterforce being afraid of any kind of hard because all the systems India has been acquiring talking about what you don't talk about. Accuracy so much of your only interested in countervalue retaliation..

Pakistan India Indian Ocean Augustan Stan
"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

Arms Control Wonk

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

"Does have a lot more people can be a lot more limited on the kinds of anti submarine warfare operations that I can pull off in place like the bay have been gall and off the southern tip of India Arabian Sea is another issue. But yeah, I mean, I think I think with the with the China angle, you really have a very strong case for focusing your development efforts on land based forces. Like the five which will see what's in Agri. Yeah. I agree with that. Yeah. Was why I mean, this may be the time to segue into there have been concurrence moves from Pakistan, maybe not on the ballistic missile trajectory, but on the cruise missile trajectory that suggest that they want an at sea deterrent patrol at deterrent as well. Yeah. That's right. So the Pakistanis in January twenty seventeen tested a variant of their bobber cruise missile which was developed as ground launch cruise missile with a range of front four hundred fifty kilometers the bobber three. It was their first submarine launched cruise missile with an explicit nuclear mission that they described sort of giving explicitly a second strike capability and augmenting their overall deterrence, and they tested this missile again this year in April. So when you hear about the Pakistanis going to see immediately start to wonder about things like command controls Pakistan's been one. Of the problem cases, where we've worried a lot about command control, and as Vince sort of alluded to India, the the difficulties of command control, it see really shouldn't be understated, especially with a country like Pakistan that doesn't have much experience with this in a naval context. And the other thing that really concerns me in the Pakistani context, and this is something that Chris Clarry, and I talked about at some length and paper for the Washington quarterly published last year can link to that in the show notes. But it. One of the issues is that the park is any navy specifically has been targeted repeatedly by non-state groups. So we had the PMS Zulfikar attack where armed gunmen al-qaeda gunmen tried to effectively commandeer a Pakistani navy frigate and the subsequent investigation showed that they were assisted by insiders and Steve Cole actually in his most recent book fan, you know, he he reports that there was apparently some kind of co mingled nuclear assets, which I'm not too sure about given what we know about Pakistani forces. But again, I mean, you know, we know that there are non groups in Pakistan looking to get their hands on this stuff. So that makes this they're sea-launched cruise missile program of particular concerns outlined the four structure, maybe talk about a bit more. So they have three French Augusta ninety diesel-electric submarines around two thousand tons about a sixth of the tonnage of the hunt. So not that much smaller. The hunt is of small SPN, and these are small electric subs- that will be fielding. Short range nuclear weapons. So these are the three submarines on the Pakistan that appears we'll probably end up using a bashing model. The interesting variable, though is Pakistan's plan receipt of around eight Chinese type thirty nine A as twenty diesel-electric submarines. So they will probably get those in the late twenty twenties or early twenty thirties and those could also support their new Slim's. So that will put a lot of Indian targets along the west coast on very easily range. But yeah, command control. I think is really the big thing to worry about in the Pakistani context before you guys jump in go in the back and forth here just explained the listeners because you guys both used at now what the bashing models. Sure VIP, and you wanna take that one. Yeah..

Pakistan India Arabian Sea Pakistani navy China al-qaeda Steve Cole French Augusta India VIP Slim Vince Washington quarterly Chris Clarry four hundred fifty kilometers two thousand tons
"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

Arms Control Wonk

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

"You know, it's always the question of who it is that they're deterring, you know, 'cause been I think on your your sort of tweet storm day that we can linked to down to the show notes is is that the the range of the missile would suggest that it's it's not aimed towards China so much but more towards Pakistan. Yes. So the history of the submarine purple star with the. The history of the triad. I guess in India they have nuclear submarines have have been. I think in India's mind in general for since the nineteen seventies, but mostly nuclear attack submarines the idea of a nuclear arm submarine dates back to the draft nuclear doctrine, the nineteen ninety nine a year after India tested nuclear weapons, and it has always been part of India so called the hallowed nuclear doctrine, which is officially adopted in two thousand three after the nineteen ninety nine draft. And so India has long been committed the triad, but the submarine leg is obviously, you know, like most countries, the the slowest to develop given the difficulties of the reactor design, your S L BM's warheads that can be fitted. And India, it was always, you know, with the land-based airbase force the kind of stewardship in command control procedures that India preferred. Which included either dispersed in D mated weapons fully actually disassembled weapons. In some cases, initially in the program would be very difficult with an SPN over the last decade, we've seen India become as SPN program has developed in parallel seeing India become more comfortable, I think with a more with a higher state of readiness on its land based force. They're moving to cannibalize systems, which are sealed one has to. There's a decent probability that the warhead is made before the hermetic seal is placed on the longer range uglies, we know that they've put gravity bombs in the same. You know, co located those with aircraft all of that happened as yes SPN programs developed, so it's possible that command control for the SPN has enabled a higher stay writing as on on land. But it's taken a while to develop the hunt it which was a prototype with Russian assistance for the reactor, at least design assistance, but. You know, it had this accident. It was developing the S L VM's, which are kinda grafted off some of the land based missiles that indie hip been developing. But so this interest in the trial had been from the beginning. And now we're seeing I think it come to fruition and going to see has its own challenges. There's long been a discussion I've questioned, you know, from the beginning what the point of the triumph was because you could argue that from survivability perspective, given India's geography and the lack of counterforce capabilities from China, Pakistan. India's survivability is actually probably pretty good on land. You You have. have a variety of places to disperse the family of missiles, and the privies and command control is easier. And there's always this question about whether the strategic juice of the SBN is worth the organizational financial in command control squeeze that imposes on on the nuclear force, but India's always been committed to it. And you know, there's a there's a variety of hypotheses out there because you know, the major nuclear powers have it it does maybe impart survivability of you think. Yes. SPF survivable of their questions about whether of the hunt, for example in its successor the dominant. You know, had the signatures to really impart the kind of survivability that we normally socio with an SPN. And there's this question about the missiles like you said the range of the first prototype here. The missile the Cape of teens is seven hundred fifty kilometers, which means to have any impact on China. You have to sail the sing out over to basically the East China Sea in South China Sea. And you know, that's that makes the SPN extreme affordable seven hundred fifty kilometers is really Pakistan's specific there's really not much you can do against China with necessary end with just the.

India China Pakistan East China Sea South China Sea seven hundred fifty kilometers
"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

Arms Control Wonk

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"south asia" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

"For the Middle East. On fellow American. Rings. On what strategy version? Is this your first? Before back in the guys all hype peg. North korea. Of the of the mushroom clouds face here. It's good to have some South Asia back. Jeffries at an undisclosed location on the east coast. So he's left his hermetically sealed containment level, you know, something we don't. I just tried to set it up. He's just he's I'm on the east coast. I have to do this Thursday. So you just go ahead with this. We could do that. I think he's out in these coast, and I will chat later this week. But there's there's some news, right? So launch deterrence patrol. Yeah. Big news out of South Asia today. India announced its first deter patrol of its maiden SBN the Ari hunt. And there are a lot of questions about what exactly they did. And they announced the conclusion of the deterrent patrol. And we have to assume that that means that they loaded the BM's the Cape fifteen which are seven hundred fifty kilometer. To stage. Ballistic missiles, I think the r hunt on Kirkman. I'm Ron twelve Cape. Fifteens? Right. Yeah. Is the load and the alternative is four longer Inchcape force. But this k- four is still in development. And so when they say deterrent patrol. I have to assume that you know, they loaded nuclear weapons on the albums, and this would be the first publicly admitted peacetime deployment of nuclear weapons in India's history that they've they've announced. So it's a big day for India. Well, yeah, I mean, it is a big day. The only alternative that's kind of playing around in my mind right now is that they might have been a little bit generous with the wording here on this was made. Yes, this was maybe validating see two and crew procedures before they load the big things that go boom on their submarine. Yeah. I entirely open that possibility they could be playing fast on loose with deterrent patrol. And normally that implies that it's a fully loaded fully armed system. But there would be it's possible. They've done see trials in the past the hunt. The last couple tests of the K fifteen believer in August. They did a three tests within two days. So wouldn't surprise me. If the Cape fifteen's were on board, but it would be a big step. If India actually loaded nuclear warheads on the SOB put they put it out to see. And then the other question, obviously is how long this patrol lasted that reports uncles had mentioned in August. So that would mean roughly a three month two to three month patrol potentially. Or was it just a a shorter? Test of the hunt in this particular case. So we don't know the answer several questions about what they did in. How long did it for the Indians are known for keeping a pretty good lid, especially lately on their nuclear activities in the RA haunt program gets special treatment, except with some notable exceptions like I think last time I was on arms control on Jeffrey. And I talked about the snafu with the propulsion chamber filling up with seawater which happened last year. But a. Yeah. So otherwise, otherwise, we don't really know how long this patrol was. But we have sort of an idea about the upper bound limit. I mean, I think two months sounds like reasonable to me, but it would be that would be a long time. I would think to have a relatively noisy SPF SBN out there, especially if they actually loaded nuclear weapons on it. And given that the hunt that had this major accident with the propulsion unit. I would be nothing is out of the Roma possibility when it comes to the Indians. But I would be very surprised if they're willing to raise such a long term patrol in give adversaries a chance also to, you know, get acoustic signatures on this thing for two months. My guess is actually I would think if I were them I would do it for much shorter period of time. You wouldn't want it out to sea for this long? I think on its maiden patrol. Let me jump in here. Just just just just for the listeners benefit that. Maybe you guys want back up a little bit about sort of the history of this submarine program in why this represent such a milestone, and.

India Ari hunt Jeffries Cape fifteen South Asia Middle East North korea Kirkman Ron Jeffrey three month two months seven hundred fifty kilometer two days
"south asia" Discussed on Travelogue

Travelogue

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on Travelogue

"Why did the everest base camp track solo with a sherpa i mean yeah no with a very balanced not awesome yeah i just i was in nepal for two weeks and you know that's just what i wanted to do so i hooked it up real quick and it was great i wrote about it it's on the site gap anyway i i've been to sri lanka about three times so low and i had a great time i mean there's just the usual like sideways glances sometimes the odd comments i mean i've actually gotten worse than italy than i got in sri lanka so it it just you know dress 'race respectfully um i would agree with india i'm not a fan of india but i've only been to delhi and i've been told that i have got to go other places the hoeli if before i form an opinion on india uh elsewhere in south asia i have not been did bangladesh the mall dev's as south asia but it's fantastic here uh yeah i i agree southeast asia is great pretty much all around accept that you will get questioned so the taxi driver is the waitresses the bartenders they'll say oh where's scher where's your husband or are do you have a boyfriend you know they'll be very upfront and so i never say oh no i'm alone you know i always have a backup story and a use a damn about to meet a friend in a minute or on i'm you know i know couple people in the city and we're going to meet up for dinner later but i never onion i never say like have a boyfriend her husband because they don't wanna outright be like saying 'i'm dependent on a man right i don't wanna reinforce this idea that they have so we yeah i never say i'm alone do you no no no i i i think it's like a revisit derision capping by yet generally like effect taxidriver is like driving me back.

italy sri lanka south asia asia scher everest nepal bangladesh two weeks
"south asia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The wailing that hasn't been heard since the end of the cold war it's been a quarter of a century since people in hawaii ever heard this and for some of the older generation it's going to be quite an unsettling familiar sound to here and it'll be once a month they do these tests in hawaii if it were not a test if it weren't on the first business day of the month it's a warning shelter and play shelter somewhere find sheltered get inside get you know ideally into a basement if there's one of vailable undercover under a bed and you know they say that can help you survive bbc's regan morris pope francis rounds off his asian tour today he's in the bangladeshi capital dhaka addressing college students visiting a hospital run by the order of mother teresa martin bashir has followed the pope throughout his visit to the region he's on the line from bangladesh boston we spoken on this program about the significance of the pope mentioning the reindeer effigies in bangladesh by name the lated lay in some people's eyes how does his position as a moral authority off to the last few days well we've just returned to our accommodation on this the final morning of the pipes weeklong visit to south asia as you say and although some of the meetings and religious services have been overshadowed by the ranger refugee crisis the other purpose of his visit biz has been to encourage the christian minorities in both me and more and bangladesh and myanmar those calling themselves christian whether catholic or protestant is less than two percent of the population it's only a little more in bangladesh and in both countries christians have been the subject of persecution and discrimination so i think it would be wrong to suggest that the entire week has been overshadowed by the hinge issue and so during this morning's and ultimate event we visited the church of the holy rosary here in bangladesh where the congregation was made up of seminarians and other young religious leaders and pope francis returned to one of the.

cold war hawaii bbc teresa martin bashir bangladesh south asia myanmar regan morris two percent
"south asia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Another conditions rab elements of taliban bull join the peace process instead of dollar one of these things have glad president trump has talked openly about is inviting india to get involved in the development of afghanistan is that's something you welcome we do uh india was in the plate a constructive road a supportive ruled has believed in the past two fifteen years but as part of the south asia policy that is a new initiate uh and india's helped afghanistan with billions of dollars of assistances that sensitive because of their relationship with pakistan now no retreived with pakistan also to establish good relations but two unfortunatey the main obstacle dad's been presents off the sanctuaries for taliban and at terrorist groups that that too we have not been able to address it true uh our past engagements as we have reported that reminded our viewers it was just a year ago that you criticised criticized mr ghani the leader of your country as being unfit for office are you still planning to run on the same ticket with mr ghani in two thousand nineteen in the next elections or do you plan to run yourself lost signed onto soon to shoot with two with presented ivy in two of for the a sort of students to nineteen is concerned i think because of the priorities of the people because of the challenges that are people in offpiste but it's important for my salford prison heine to focus on the priorities of the people at this stage and then when the time cams decide to wounding to around who will not to that so you could do you still hold the view that he's unfit the where we are working together in the same jeff adamant he's the president of the county i'm chief executive we both have responsibilities and we have to uh tatty alto to sponsor abilities industry plus and you're not ruling it out at the running for the running for president yourself i think it's is is is to to talk about i've showed that in view breaking news for they will a little bit further than pat abdullah abdullah is the chief executive of afghanistan thank you very much you with.

trump india afghanistan pakistan taliban mr ghani offpiste president chief executive pat abdullah abdullah south asia salford jeff two fifteen years
"south asia" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"The use of improvised explosive devices importantly the rate of afghan nafta security fourth casualties had reduced from last year as you know i just returned last week from a trip to india and afghanistan and can report that general nicholson in the nato team are holding the line forecasts of a significant taliban offensive remain unfulfilled violent and progress do coexist in afghanistan but the young certainty in the region and the nato campaign had been replaced by her to be due to the implementation of president trump's new south asia strategy this strategy had been welcomed almost uniformly by leaders in the south asia region as well as the thirty nine countries contributing troops to the natoled campaign we must always remember we in afghanistan to make america safer and ensure that south asia cannot be used the plot transnational attacks against us homeland or our partners and allies our goal is a stable and secure south asia a political settlement in afghanistan is only possible if the taliban reject support of or conduct of terrorism based on the intelligence community analysis of my own evaluation i am convinced we would have sent ourselves from this region to our ultimate peril our new conditions based approach has set the stage for regional and afghanistan national chain our new strategy vigorously reviewed and approved by president trump is quote our four plus f unquote which stand for regionalized realign reinforce it and reconciliation coupled with sustaining the first arc to regionalize hm recognizes challenges exist beyond afghanistan and adopts a geographic framework with a holistic comprehensive view india pakistan iran russia and china were considered at the outset rather than focusing only on afghanistan do seeing external variables late in our strategic design my visit last week india was in part to thanked them for their continued generous development support in afghanistan we also discussed ways to expand our collaboration to improve longterm regional stability and security we will firmly address pakistan role nato's demand need to be heard and embraced in islamabad in the second are to realign signifies that we are shifting our main effort to align more advisers who can provide training and advisory support at the battalion and brigade level.

nicholson taliban trump afghanistan south asia russia india nato improvised explosive devices president america iran china pakistan islamabad
"south asia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"West has focused its coverage largely on texas something that hasn't escaped the steely gaze of those of you on social media hurricane harvey is now slowly moving across the half inder s barbara over the focus on the flooding in texas and nothing of tool in similar conditions affecting many more people in india are these expendable live plus the south asia region that the annual monsoon there has also caused much greater victor dhlamini in south africa great bbc news has the nerve to talk about the world attention being on texas when will they shifted to india and nepal and bangladesh we're streaming our power although we rotted belcher in the uk why is it that the catastrophic floods in bangladesh and india far worse than in texas have not been reported is the world obsessed with america as you've heard bbc news is also being criticised by some on twitter but the bbc world service seems to have escaped censure georgina out is from social news the team which trolls social media to find out what the world is talking about she recently wrote an article called host and floods but what about all the other disasters what prompted you to look into this in the first place where we need at talked about the issue in our morning editor a meeting that we have every day i've noticed that on twitter some people had started to say look there's also this fighting in south asia but whereas the story why isn't it being covet and we actually commented amongst ourselves about it saying why are we putting all this attention on houston when this other very similar king disaster at happening in south asia and actually the similarity in the footage in the scenes really struck me into his this flooding railway station people walking through the street and if used paternal side by side it would be quite difficult on the first instance the tell which is which which was american mature south asia and yet all story was harvey and texas with completely disproportionate amounts of of people suffering in his company later i mean this is the thing the numbers at this point i think it was around twenty had died from harvey and hundreds have died in in south asia and the osce grew tremendously is will oversee your your initial thoughts were reflected by people on twitter and other social.

twitter nepal bbc osce houston south asia editor social media georgina West america bangladesh uk victor dhlamini india harvey texas
"south asia" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on KKAT

"To discuss them as what are we really care about you know south asia is an increasingly important part of the world for us with there's two nuclear armed powers their india is a tremendous source of economic growth and competitive for china apart for the united states in dealing with china go the link between our our our concerns in the pacific at our concerns or the middle east so we want south asia not a spin out of control and be a disaster like the middle east has become or the streets of europe rate should we wanted to south asia to be stable at we don't we don't want it afghanistan to be a source of instability in asia that's that's a key strategic eat for us the other is is we don't want afghanistan to be a playground for terrorists to be a platform for credit national terrorists to operate from we don't want another night eleven as the president said in a speech of the other terrorist groups that were tracking around the world that we worry about there are more of him in that part of the world at any other than any other part so so what is victory is if afghanistan is mary platform for transnational terrorism and it's not spinning out of control at destabilising the region that's a victory for us it every day that happened is that there victory for us and that that's a real goal it's not a land of milk and honey started westernstyle democracy hit a place that doesn't cause us problems now that's a good that's a good point you want to end at their as opposed to having to fight it here and indian in here and and probably the best analogy for that is remember plan colombia right so here with colombia big country that would on the verge of becoming a narko state so we were a belter have a massive criminal state in the middle of the western hemisphere at did terrorism and all kinds of criminal activity and we said that is that is unacceptable so we.

south asia india china united states middle east asia president europe afghanistan colombia milk
"south asia" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on Here & Now

"For now held spends all day by her daughter side singing and praying harvey may have force them to move across the state four hundred miles from home but this mother inner baby girl are together for here in now i'm stella chavis and what we've been focused on the flooding from harvey there is another flood disaster unfolding on the other side of the world in south asia were the 1200 people have died and tens of thousands more have been displaced by rising waters caused by heavy rains joining us now is the bbc son joy magerram durr in delhi and send joy place this flooding on a map for us what parts of south asia are being affected but jeremy really the worstaffected areas a basically nip poll which has north of india and it's really the eastern half of the country leading into eastern india and then southeast of that into bunga actually can get a fence that it somewhat correct connected and it's basically the fact that rivers most of the major rivers in this part of the region flow in from the himalayas which beginning in nepal and then flew down south from eastern india and then onwards to bangladesh before the empty into the bay of bengal and what's been happening for the past few weeks is of course we were in the monsoon season so it sees a lot of rain in any case but this year the rain has been a little more severe than normal and so many of these rivers simply over florida and until the flooding began in nepal several weeks ago.

harvey stella chavis south asia jeremy india nepal florida bangladesh bay of bengal
"south asia" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"In afghanistan after a for a long time and they still have continued interest there and i think it's because they in their struggle with in saudi arabia's struggle with iran remember saudi arabia is the primary sunni arab moslem state now in the middle east it is the defender the unifier of the sunni as a matter of policy and as a matter of two of its identity the iranians are the shia defenders and there are groups by the way in iran there is one group in particular the has ara who are a sh a shia moslem group ethnic group in in afghanistan that the iranians have been working with in the past because of their shia ties but the iranians will also work with the taliban even though they are sunni right i know or jumping around here it's like game of thrones many south asia style but it's important so iran continues to have i'm sorry saudi arabia as well continues to have major interest on what's going on there because afghanistan as a large thirty million person sunni moslem not arab moslem dominated state it looks at its relationship with afghanistan as strategic death and it's on iran's border it has interviewed iran to the west iran to the east rather in afghanistan in the west they meet so it's a place where they can apply additional pressure so there's a feeding frenzy going on of all these other countries it's important to keep in mind a feeding frenzy of all these other countries trying to jockey for power trying to push and have more influence in afghanistan and they're going to be picking up proxies they're going to be backing different factions and do not think for one moment that the us withdrawal will lead to peace in a laying down of arms if we do withdraw i think we should be prepared for the very real possibility that the taliban gets help from the outside to make more even more aggressive moves against the central government and to eventually march on kabul i mean this is what we're facing afghanistan we should be taking this very seriously our that's our afghanistan buck brief hidden a break here team we're going to talk to you about the opioid epidemic stay with me.

saudi arabia iran taliban us afghanistan sunni arab south asia kabul
"south asia" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

Fareed Zakaria GPS

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

"They can see for themselves with the evidence of their own senses that things are are are really changing for the worse what are we seeing would we lost that very dramatic greenland my thumb footage in april of this year the temperature over green greenland was much higher than normal and be engineer on one of the helicopters took a video during this temperature spike those reports of the glazier just exploding with the high temperatures what exactly are we watching and why is it so important well the landbased ice on on greenland would if at all melted roads sea level world worldwide about twenty feet are the most threatened cities in the world by population or call cardio mombarg guangzhou you can go down the list many of them in asia and south asia by assets at risk the number one city on the world at risk miami i saw fish from the ocean swimming in the streets of miami beach on a sunny day simply because it was a high high tide on harder company ocean bangladesh of course has tens of millions of people in the low lying delta areas some of them got used to rebuilding their lives every twenty years now it's once every six or seven years and so the climate refugees moving northward have caused india to complete the largest steel fence in the world on their southern border with bangladesh and and the migrants from the hard yet drought areas climate related droughts particularly in the eastern mediterranean but in large regions of the middle east and north africa right now according to the united nations twenty million people were at risk of starvation of the largest humanitarian catastrophe since 1945 according to the un in iran a couple of years ago one of their cities had a heat index the combination of heat and humidity of seventy four degrees celsius a hundred and sixty five degrees fahrenheit and no human being can live for more than five or six hours outdoors in those conditions.

greenland engineer miami ocean bangladesh india mediterranean united nations asia south asia north africa iran sixty five degrees fahrenheit seventy four degrees celsius twenty years seven years twenty feet six hours
"south asia" Discussed on WNYC 820AM

WNYC 820AM

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on WNYC 820AM

"Has covered a navy around two kilometres is so they had to push through all that rebel in order to get in the heavy digging equipment that's now being used china's foreign minister one ye is in the afghan capital kabul for talks described as china's attempt to ease tensions between pakistan and afghanistan mr hwang is expected to visit islamabad next juma give ring reports china has been mm cautious about the purpose of this visit saying only in broad terms that it wants to play a positive part in improving relations between afghanistan and pakistan health is needed in recent months both countries have seen an increase had militant violence and in public frustration about the bloodshed each blamed the other supporting crossborder militants as the china this also signals and emerging new role as regional mediator as increases both its investment and its political influence in south asia the colombian eln rebel group have for you to two dutch journalists said kidnapped monday the two men have been working on a television programme looking for the mother of a colombian cia how did opted in the netherlands they've inferred reports this being twenty four hours of confusion off to the colombian rebels i said the two journalists had been released and then withdrew the statement finally the colombian authorities placed a freighter on social media sharing the hand david going ahead the dutch foreign minister bed kundus well welcome the news saying the two were doing pretty well considering the circumstances they've been seized in a remote jungle area near colombia's border with venezuela the tv programme they work for spoilers helps people living in the netherlands trace their biological relatives around the world several thousand people have been evacuated from tel of locks in an area of north london irvine eyes of the checks conducted in the wake of a deadly far and another highrise block exposed far risks the leader of camden county who georgia gould says turks turned the buildings external clubbing was combustible prompting the evacuation we had a huge epa overnight to evacuate people we had six hundred fifty households who had moved out of the blocks we've had everyone council star volunteers on different counselors all coming together with a class others to move people safely out accommodation.

camden county georgia gould irvine venezuela david colombian eln islamabad mr hwang afghanistan china colombia social media netherlands south asia juma pakistan kabul foreign minister twenty four hours two kilometres
"south asia" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"south asia" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"We're talking about like hundreds of thousands of workers the tremor so being felled back in south asia people are worried countries are expressing concern because i worry is if there is any food shortage in the next few weeks the first ones would be affected on the migrant workers on the fear that they could be food riots but again this continues for a few few weeks than this could be the scenario and that's why the philippines which has about quarter of a million migrant workers in qatar it is alderete suspending sending people to qatar because they're worried about what kind of living conditions these workers will have at this situation so from what you say it sounds like if the round drags on between qatar and it serve its arab neighbors that that could be very real economic impact not just for the migrant workers but for their families back home as well for example in nepal thirty percent of the country's gdp is coming from remittances we're talking about three hundred fifty thousand nepalese working in qatar i was in nepal last year late last year doing a cities on migrant workers in that conditions how what kind of conditions they have in qatar in one village very close to the capital cut monday almost ninety percent of the youth they had gone out to work in countries like qatar so the rural economy is run because of it is hard cash we're not talking about exports or credit this is like real hard cash coming from these countries like nepal gets about five billion dollars so that's why anything happens in the middle east the tremors can be felt in south asia.

south asia qatar nepal five billion dollars ninety percent thirty percent