35 Burst results for "South America"

Bolsonaro Challenges Brazil Election He Lost to Lula

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:32 min | Last week

Bolsonaro Challenges Brazil Election He Lost to Lula

"The United States media and also the western media have kind of gone silent on Brazil following the Brazilian election. So it's almost like the media left heaved a collective sigh of relief. Oh, our man Lula da Silva socialist has beaten Bolsonaro and basically we are now looking forward to all of Latin and South America falling into the hands of the left. Which by the way is a danger as possibility. But in Brazil, the issue is not settled at all, it seems. There have been continuing massive demonstrations. Most recently a demonstration in front of the military headquarters, apparently over 2 million people. Think about that. 2 million people in Brazil make a big country, but nevertheless, this is a this is one of the largest crowds that you'll see anywhere in the world. And what are the people saying they're basically saying that this is an election that demands to be audited. So in other words, this is, in a sense, familiar territory. They're saying that there was a lot of cheating in the election, particularly in the Rio de Janeiro area, spent some discussion of whether there have been there was pre programming of the machines and apparently there's now a divide in Brazil between the Defense Department and the Supreme Court.

Lula Da Silva Brazil South America United States Latin Rio De Janeiro Defense Department Supreme Court
CBP agent dies in shootout with suspected smugglers

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last week

CBP agent dies in shootout with suspected smugglers

"A costumes and border protection agent and a suspected smuggler died during a shootout off the Puerto Rico coast a unit was on routine patrol when the shots were fired in an area considered a major drug smuggling corridor for cocaine coming out of South America at a Capitol Hill hearing Homeland Security secretary Alejandro mayorkas spoke about the shooting These are a brave members of our air and marine operations within U.S. customs and border protection So the difficulty of this job can not be compared to the difficulty that our frontline personnel face every

Puerto Rico Coast Alejandro Mayorkas South America Homeland Security U.S.
From Minnesota to Peru, Day of the Dead celebrations take many forms across the Americas

AP News Radio

02:06 min | 3 weeks ago

From Minnesota to Peru, Day of the Dead celebrations take many forms across the Americas

"On this week's religion roundup from Minnesota to Peru day of the dead celebrations take many forms across the Americas While many American children gobbled candy on the days after Halloween families across North and South America and the Caribbean Celebrated the day of the dead It's a day when the living remember and honor the departed But with celebration not sorrow What was once an intimate family tradition observed with home altars and visits to local cemeteries has evolved to include festivals and parades The Minnesota state capitol hosted its first ever community altar for the day of the dead Henry Jimenez sees the altar as a meaningful connection between his state and Latin America Connect me to seeing them in Mexico and El Salvador and now they're here in Minnesota Meanwhile in Haiti celebrants flocked to a cemetery in the capital Kicking off the voodoo annual two day festival of the dead And in Peru it was the first time since the coronavirus pandemic began that festival goers could take part in the tradition without restrictions Families gathered at a cemetery in Mexico City for the annual day of the dead festivities A group of traditional Aztec dancers chanted and paid their respects to the deceased It's one of Mexico's most colorful holidays It combines Roman Catholic observances of all souls day with pre Hispanic customs of offering flowers and food or even cigars and tequila to returning souls At another cemetery in southeastern Mexico a family cleans the bones of their parents in a tradition passed down through the generations in their Mayan community As she cleans the bones of her relatives Maria two says she feels the dead are with her and her family during the celebrations I'm Walter ratliff

Minnesota Henry Jimenez Peru Americas South America Mexico Caribbean El Salvador Latin America Haiti Mexico City Maria Walter Ratliff
Nicole Malliotakis: Every Problem in NYC Was Brought by Democrats

The Dan Bongino Show

01:41 min | Last month

Nicole Malliotakis: Every Problem in NYC Was Brought by Democrats

"The city's being led by idiots Is it salvageable Well you're absolutely right that every problem that we're experiencing right now at the city state and federal level has been brought to us by one party Democrat rule whether it's Cassie hulk was ridiculous bailout that she refuses to fix whether it be Eric Adams now with the migrant crisis which by the way you should be telling Joe Biden He should be joining our calls to secure the border and reinstate the policies of president Trump at 7 the flow It actually made sense It was working And on the federal level you know what they're trying to do to try to bring all those New York City policies to the federal level We stopped them They tried to bring the anti police measures The stripping qualified immunity and taking away resources They tried to do that When we stopped them they tried to use taxpayer money to fund political campaigns and ban voter ID laws We were able to stop that too Packing the Supreme Court which was a creation of Jerry Nadler Actually it was a creation of Hugo Chavez and Nicolas Maduro in Venezuela Destroyed the richest country in South America We were able to stop that too thankfully Now if we take back the house and restore some balance I think we would see a lot more leverage to stop Joe Biden reinstate some of these policies that we're working at our border finish the walls Things like that but and that's why my feet so important because we flip this seat two years ago we must hold on to it in order to take back the house And people that want to have are interested in learning more Please go to Nicole for NY dot com because we need every single seat that we won two years ago and we need to make sure that we win the remaining heat necessary So we at least have some type of balance in Washington

Cassie Hulk Eric Adams Joe Biden Jerry Nadler Nicolas Maduro New York City Hugo Chavez Venezuela Supreme Court South America Nicole NY Washington
Justin Bieber Not-So-Shockingly Quits His Tour

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:43 min | Last month

Justin Bieber Not-So-Shockingly Quits His Tour

"Today Justin Bieber exactly one month after announcing he was taking a break from his justice world tour to focus on his health, he revealed that he really can't see resuming it for at least 6 months. The tour was set to end in late March 2023 in Poland, now it seems that's the earliest it might resume. The announcement posted to social media indicates that the justice world tour ended with rock and Rio, which you know he September was the last time he performed. This tour has been postponed 5 times COVID, then he had the in June of 2022. He was battling Ramsay hunt syndrome, which gave him the facial paralysis. Beaver said, I gave everything I have, but it took a real toll on me. Really? What are you fucking 25, 28? Jesus Christ. You should be doing all night. No sleep. Don't miss out. Just cancel the tour. His career is over. I hinted at this weeks ago. The kid got famous with teeny boppers and shopping malls, then they graduated the teenagers in arenas, and now as I said a month or so ago, do you know a 30 year old woman who wants to see Justin Bieber saying? Of course you don't. Do you think he wants to sink to 16 year olds? No. So he hates singing to young girls in Asia and South America or he's not connecting to whatever crowd he sees staring back at him now. Or really more than likely the ticket sales suck and he's depressed, singing to empty seats.

Justin Bieber Poland Ramsay Paralysis Beaver South America Asia
LULAC Decries Gov. Greg Abbott's 'Political Stunts'

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:54 min | 2 months ago

LULAC Decries Gov. Greg Abbott's 'Political Stunts'

"Back to lulac. So they are actually suing Abbott because they think that Abbott's tactic of sending the bus loads to D.C. and where else did he send him, not Martha's Vineyard. That was D.C. in New York. Do you see a New York? So he thought, oh, you are just dehumanizing these people. These Latinos, from Central and South America, they deserve human rights. They deserve to have rights. Well, you know, here's the thing. They are breaking the law, right? So really by that logic, that means that if somebody breaks into our House, what we have to feed them, we have to treat them with respect because they broke into our House. Hello? Well, the situation here though is complicated, I think, because even though you're right, that these are people who are not lawfully in the country, in a way they're not like people who broke into your house because you never collaborated with them to get in the house. Think about it. The Biden administration. Yes, but that would be like, say, our community, HOA, collaborating with them without our consent. Without August. Because that's what's happening. Is that the Biden administration is not asking the folks in the Rio Grande. If it's okay for these people to come over or anybody else. Not to mention the Texas as a state doesn't want them. And so governor Abbott in his sense of saying, listen, you guys claim to be sanctuary cities. Yes. You are pushing for. You know, and the brilliant thing about this is that nobody and I mean nobody is down there at the border, filming these people coming in. So what Abbott did, what desantis did is he's making it an issue. He wants the reporters to report about illegals because otherwise nobody else is reporting about a year. No one knows there's illegals in this country,

Abbott Biden Administration D.C. New York Vineyard Martha South America Governor Abbott Rio Grande Texas Desantis
The History of Really Horrible Ideas With Michael O'Fallon

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:40 min | 2 months ago

The History of Really Horrible Ideas With Michael O'Fallon

"Back to what you talk about post Vatican two, kind of in this area, this kind of period of time. What was it about that period of time, marcuse, you know, that really thing started to become, you started to see institutions pop up around this kind of globalist point of view. Well, if you take a look back to that time period, we're talking about between the early 60s and mid 60s and late 60s to have several different things that were happening at the same time. Number one, you were in a post Stalin era in Russia. You had a change within what was happening within Marxism and communism throughout the world. Both with internationally within Vietnam within Central America within South America within different parts of Africa and so forth. And then as well, you had within Vatican the Vatican two situation, which was happening within the Roman Catholic Church, you had kind of a reimagining of the faith, the center of the catacombs that took place just the beginning of Vatican two. And that's with DOM helder Camara, with many others, were basically they were intentionally trying to move the church, the Roman Catholic Church, to understand it as a faith of the oppressed, which then that theme generatively is then constituted reconstituted within someone by the name of Paula Ferrari. It's a good friend of ours named doctor James Lincoln has been hitting that quite a bit later. In Paul ferreri would write the book the pedagogy of the oppressed. And then as well, the politics of education. And in chapter ten of the politics of education, you would see polyphonia start to basically introduce everyone to the concept that basically what basically what this is is a catechesis or a teaching of these things, not just through education, but as well, you need faith, too.

Marcuse Roman Catholic Church Dom Helder Camara Stalin Central America Paula Ferrari South America Russia Vatican James Lincoln Vietnam Paul Ferreri Africa
"south america" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:16 min | 2 months ago

"south america" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is morning edition from NPR news. I'm a Martinez. And I'm Steve inskeep. Pakistan is asking the world for help following devastating floods and exceptional monsoon season and rapidly melting glaciers wrecked vast areas of the country this summer. But in seeking help many Pakistanis say they are not asking for charity. Huma Yusuf who writes for a leading Pakistani newspaper talks of climate reparations or climate justice. Steve today Pakistan has one third of its landmass underwater, 33 million people are homeless and affected, livestock has been killed. And the country's topsoil and all its crops are gone. We're looking at a country that's looking ahead to famine. That's looking ahead to massive food insecurity to conflict, to homelessness, to climate migrants. So the first demand is, frankly, for money. And the long-term demand may be from more money. Countries in what's often called the global south, such as Africa, South Asia, South America are among the first to face this scale of destruction from climate change. Many blame the more developed economies of the United States and Europe. There's growing recognition that countries like Pakistan, which contribute to less than 1% of greenhouse gas emissions are now bearing the brunt of the greenhouse gas emitting activities of industrialized nations that have been happening not just in recent decades, but basically since the industrial revolution and that if you see that the cumulative contribution to the greenhouse gases comes from the G 20. It's not coming for countries like Pakistan or countries like Bangladesh, but that is where the effect is being felt. The industrialized nations that have profited from it are the ones that we now believe should be helping out with this big Bill. I want to make sure that we're getting at some of the nuances here. You're absolutely correct that industrialization came first to places like the UK and the United States and European nations. But today, China is the world's largest climate emitter, India is among the world's largest climate emitters, and even Pakistan is in the top 20 or so nations when we talk about total climate emissions. Is this not something that happens globally even if it comes more from some places? Well, I think the climate justice argument is that the 1.5° warming that we are approaching its cumulative. And that the wealth that has been accrued by industrialized nations over the past few decades through the high emitting activities, it is that which is contributing to the climate change effects that we're seeing in the global south today. I also do recognize though that there is going to have to be clarity in countries like Pakistan, which are increasingly starting to ask for loss and damage facilities or climate reparations of some kind where they need to recognize that they have to make some difficult diplomatic or political choices around how they make these demands. And what I mean by that is that so far, a lot of the global south has been using this idea of saying that look, it's our turn that if they are going to be calls for the globe to cut back on greenhouse gas emissions that the most drastic cut should come from those economies that have already had the chance to profit from high emitting activities, for example. And the developing nations that need to play catch up should now be given that turn. But I think events such as the floods in Pakistan right now have really changed the discourse locally. I think people are recognizing that no one can have a turn that these high emitting activities have to stop and that those countries that are most affected need some kind of climate justice from those that have already benefited in the past. You have just touched on a key part of the political debate and also political resistance to a lot of climate actions in the United States. Americans see other countries demanding their turn to pollute while the United States restrains itself, and you're saying that other countries need to get past that framing. I think that there is going to be a shift to much clearer asks for climate reparations, which take the form in addition to financial aid that you need to deal with things like relief after climate calamity, such as the Pakistan floods, but also support for rehabilitation. But I think going beyond that, what you're going to see is growing demands for support for countries to have a quick green transition. And so that when we talk about climate reparations, it's a broad idea that encourages Western countries, for example, to share green technology or to include skills development as part of the reparations idea to help countries like Pakistan, not try and play catch up through high emitting activities, for example, but to instead leapfrog that stage and go straight into economies that are growing, but growing through sustainable means because they have access to the same technologies that the west is now hoping to use as a way out of the climate change quagmire. What is a way to frame fighting climate change and aiding countries like yours that large democratic majorities in countries like the United States would see as being in their interest. I do think that we are in a new era where all countries yours and mine need better climate diplomacy. Pakistan is currently in a process where it is trying to repair its bilateral relationship with the U.S. after a few difficult years. It's just signed a defense deal to get some F-16s from the U.S.. So you can not from one side have that kind of diplomatic overture and defense relationship on the other side, then try and point to blame finger at the U.S. and say also support us with climate reparations. Exactly the same with China, Pakistan has been turning to China for debt for infrastructure development support Pakistan's foreign debt is primarily owned to China. And as you've already mentioned, China is currently the highest emitting nation. So again, Pakistan is going to have to be clear about what kind of climate diplomacy narrative it opts for. But I don't want this to imply that the onus is on countries like Pakistan to get their climate diplomacy right. This is something that even the U.S. needs to think about. So you're starting to see, for example, the EU has given a paltry summer financial aid to Pakistan in the wake of the flooding at the same time it is spending billions in order to put up all the defenses needed to keep climate migrants from across the global south out of Europe's borders. It's that kind of disconnect between security planning, foreign policy planning and the realities of climate change that I think no country is getting right at this point. Humor Yusef is a columnist for dawn. One of the leading newspapers in Pakistan. Thanks so much. Thank you. This is NPR news. This is doubly NYC, the new fall season of theaters upon us today on all of it, Allison Stewart speaks with New York Times theater reporter

Pakistan NPR news Steve inskeep U.S. Huma Yusuf European nations Martinez South Asia China South America Bangladesh Steve Africa Europe Bill India UK EU Yusef
Chilean Voters Overwhelmingly Reject Proposed Leftist Constitution

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:33 min | 2 months ago

Chilean Voters Overwhelmingly Reject Proposed Leftist Constitution

"We were talking this morning about the kind of near miss in Chile. I think the reason I'm interested in Chile is because this is a prosperous country in South America. And it's prosperous because of markets, it's prosperous because of an explicit commitment to free market principles. And for this reason, the election of this Gabriel Boric, this leftist actually a communist in his youth, very bad guy. Very disturbing because I suppose what it could be is that because Chile is prosperous. They feel like they can take a chance. Well, and I have to say in chiles in the Chilean society, this whole notion of this wokeness has reared its ugly head down there. And so when he campaigned, he made the right wing candidate. I can't remember his name right now. Appear as a hateful, you know, a xenophobic. It didn't like indigenous people, didn't like, you know, people of color and Jose Antonio cast. Right cast. That's right. And so anyway, so that was kind of his, oh, and immigrants, immigrants. He hated immigrants. That was another thing. Very, very similar to the way that the Democrats behave in America. So he was testing the viability of this kind of woke politics.

Chile Gabriel Boric Chilean Society South America Chiles Jose Antonio America
"south america" Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:52 min | 3 months ago

"south america" Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

"Want to talk about the march of leftism across South America, very troubling development, and we've seen it happen in recent months and in recent years. Now, of course, we know a lot about Venezuela. I talk about it in the podcast W, of course, talks about it a lot as well. But a number of other countries, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, even Chile, and Chile was kind of the most unkindest cut of all. And what I mean by that is that Chile has actually enjoyed an economic boom because of capitalism because of free market policies. In fact, free market policy is put into effect. With the advice of American economists like Milton Friedman and going back, almost 50 years or 50 years or more now. Chile created a pension system that produced a decent provision for people as they got into old age. Again, it was a pension system, not like America's social security plan, but a pension system that's invested in the market and as the market went up people saw their fortunes become a lot more comfortable and be able to provide for them when they needed it. And your Chile of all places pivoted to the left by electing a real far leftist. In fact, somebody who has in the past been associated with communism, a guy named Gabriel borik. An activist who came marching in promised a kind of new Chile. In fact, said that he was going to rewrite the Chilean constitution. He says the constitution was put into effect onto a dictator Augusto Pinochet. We're going to redo the whole constitution. There was a referendum in 2020 Anna majority. In fact, a decisive majority of chileans voted, yes, we do need a new constitution.

Chile Gabriel borik The New York Times Milton Friedman Augusto Pinochet Venezuela Ecuador Boric America South America Colombia Bernie Sanders Peru Al Jazeera Anna Chilean court Jose Antonio Michelle Bachelet
The March of Leftism Across South America

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:52 min | 3 months ago

The March of Leftism Across South America

"Want to talk about the march of leftism across South America, very troubling development, and we've seen it happen in recent months and in recent years. Now, of course, we know a lot about Venezuela. I talk about it in the podcast W, of course, talks about it a lot as well. But a number of other countries, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, even Chile, and Chile was kind of the most unkindest cut of all. And what I mean by that is that Chile has actually enjoyed an economic boom because of capitalism because of free market policies. In fact, free market policy is put into effect. With the advice of American economists like Milton Friedman and going back, almost 50 years or 50 years or more now. Chile created a pension system that produced a decent provision for people as they got into old age. Again, it was a pension system, not like America's social security plan, but a pension system that's invested in the market and as the market went up people saw their fortunes become a lot more comfortable and be able to provide for them when they needed it. And your Chile of all places pivoted to the left by electing a real far leftist. In fact, somebody who has in the past been associated with communism, a guy named Gabriel borik. An activist who came marching in promised a kind of new Chile. In fact, said that he was going to rewrite the Chilean constitution. He says the constitution was put into effect onto a dictator Augusto Pinochet. We're going to redo the whole constitution. There was a referendum in 2020 Anna majority. In fact, a decisive majority of chileans voted, yes, we do need a new constitution.

Chile South America Venezuela Ecuador Colombia Milton Friedman Peru Gabriel Borik America Augusto Pinochet Anna
"south america" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:50 min | 3 months ago

"south america" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"In Central Park service suspended on the New Jersey transit Morris X 6 line between Dover and summit, we'll get you the details shortly in traffic first Michael Barr with what else is going on in New York and around the world. Good morning, Michael. Good morning, Nathan, more than 1000 flights were canceled in the U.S. yesterday. Airports around New York City and in Texas were hit the hardest. Staffing shortages and severe weather were blamed again. Meanwhile, heavy rain fell in parts of the tri state area causing street flooding, cleanup continues in New Jersey. In the Dallas suburb of Mesquite, a body was pulled from a vehicle after it was found in the receding runners, and east Texas severe weather forced schools to close early, including a suspected tornado. Smith county council Josh Joplin. We've had several portable buildings that have been picked up and relocated. Constable Joplin. New York City officials estimate over the weekend about 2800 asylum seekers from Central and South America have arrived by bus from Texas. Mayor Eric Adams is blaming Republican governor Abbott saying his refusal to let New York officials know about potential numbers of migrants on the buses is driving the city to a crisis level. The governor of Texas is not giving any information at all, no matter how much we try to coordinate crises calls on coordination. And he has been really just a person whose mean spirited in the area of helping people in their times in a time of need. Mayor Adams says not coordinating leaving local and state resources nonprofit struggling. New York governor Kathy hochul has the state is rolling back new COVID regulations for this school year, including allowing positive students to stay in class provided they were a mask. Is also urging employees in the state to consider a return to the office as well. I mean, there's a lot of tourists, restaurants are crowded. People are coming back and joining our social life and we'd love to see everybody back going back in their offices or at least on a hybrid situation. Kevin or elko was promising monkeypox vaccines for New Yorkers, acting New York health commissioner doctor Mary Bassett is promising that they will ensure access for those at risk, including the LGBT two community and communities of color. These data show that we are right to be very concerned about equity and access to vaccination. Doctor Bassett says they're preparing to distribute the promise 110,000 doses from the Biden administration. Global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake. Powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts more than a 120 countries, a Michael Barr, this is Bloomberg Nathan. Thank you, Michael. Coming up to 6 ten on Wall Street time for the Bloomberg sports update with John stench out. Thanks, Nathan. We have an upset to start the two game subway series in The Bronx, the mets certainly went in the hotter team and

Michael Barr Central Park service Josh Joplin Constable Joplin New Jersey Mayor Eric Adams Texas New York New York City Mayor Adams Smith county Kathy hochul Dover COVID east Texas Mesquite Nathan Michael Dallas Abbott
What Is a Banana Republic?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:22 min | 3 months ago

What Is a Banana Republic?

"What is a banana republic? It's kind of a strange term, isn't it? First of all, what's this have to do with bananas? Well, first of all, the term appears to have originated out of South America, which is, by the way, banana country. They grow bananas over there. And so the bananas come to symbolize a backward undeveloped in that sense third world outfit. Republic is the strange word here. But as I'm going to suggest kind of appropriate in a weird way. It's a strange word because a lot of banana republics aren't really republics. They are authoritarian regimes. Remember, the word republic, a very ancient word going, go back to the Roman Republic, for example, a republic is a system of government that is accountable to the people. So a government, well, Lincoln says all four and by the people. But a government that is serving the people and not the people serving the regime. That's the definition of a republic. Now, a lot of banana republics aren't like that. They're run by despots, typically a kind of tin pot dictator who calls the shots, but it doesn't have to be a single dictator. If you look at a place like Venezuela today, it's a banana republic. And it's run by a regime. Yeah, there's Maduro at the head of it, but you've got a whole bunch of gangsters under him, so it's a tyranny is collective rather than individual. And of course, socialist tyrannies are that way. Now the key feature of banana republics is that they make up the rules as they go along. They prosecute their opponents and they suppress basic liberties, they manipulate the election process, doing what they can to ensure that they stay in power. They like to pre select as in the quota Islamic Republic of Iran, pre select the candidates if they can, they so they flout the entire ensemble of basic rights and liberties that are characteristic of a republic. And we're seeing that here. But a second feature of banana republics and this is why in a way the term is so appropriate is banana republics do all these things while pretending not to.

Roman Republic South America Republic Maduro Lincoln Venezuela Iran
"south america" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

05:34 min | 4 months ago

"south america" Discussed on WTOP

"Other. Now, to Ukraine, correspondent Charlie dagger reporting on efforts to get badly needed Ukrainian grain to other parts of the world in the middle of a 6 month old war. Ukraine and Russia together account for more than 40% of Africa's wheat, according to the African development bank. But the war has already led to a shortage of 30 million tons of food in Africa, sending food prices soaring around the globe, roughly 200 Haitian migrants are in custody after their packed boat ran aground off the Florida keys. More than 100 others jumped into the water and made it to shore. They're being held in a border patrol detention center. Those who stayed on the boat likely will be returned to Haiti. CBS is more strassman in South America a one time rebel is now the president of Colombia, the first leftist president there, and in the Middle East a shaky truce has ended the latest round of missile and rocket fighting between Israel and militants. This is CBS News. Liberty mutual customizes your car and home insurance, so you only pay for what you need. Visit liberty mutual dot com to learn more. 1203 Monday morning August 8th 2022, 81° going down to the mid 70s. Good morning I'm rich hunter, the top local stories we're following this hour. Election 2022 on WTO, there will be a recount for the democratic nomination from Montgomery county executive, a race that continues to be too close to call. On Saturday, the county board of elections counted basically all of the votes that are left to be counted in this race, Merrill and matters, editor in chief Danielle gaines. Despite David Blair gaining a lot of ground in that final vote count, county executive Mark Ulrich leads the race by 42 votes. That's with 34 votes still to be scanned later on Saturday, elric issued a statement saying he was grateful to be the democratic nominee. However, we also have seen his challenger David Blair issue a statement saying that he will request a full recount in the wraith under Maryland law, a candidate may request a recount anytime the vote count difference is less than .25%. The difference between Al rich and Blair is .03%. Sarah Jacobs WTO news. The county board of elections will meet to certify this week after which the candidates may officially request the recount. Two college aged sisters from our region will be remembered by family and friends on Monday morning. WTO and Kramer reports. I render sister 19 year old Lindsay Weiner will take place at the Washington Hebrew congregation in D.C.. The two were asleep on the second floor of a house, their family was renting in the Hamptons when the fire started. Their father Louis, who is also president of the congregation, was able to escape the flames along with their mother and brother. Both Jillian and Lindsey graduated from the holten arms swollen Bethesda. Gilliam went to the University of Michigan and her younger sister Lindsay went to tulane. Washington Hebrew congregation says it is heartbroken by the deaths of the two, and at the wiener family has touched so many lives and Kramer WTO P news. It's 1205, a teenager is in critical condition after firefighters pulled him out of his burning three story duplex home Sunday afternoon. D.C. fire and EMS responded to calls about a fire in the southeast neighborhood of Mississippi avenue near Wheeler road. When firefighters arrived, flames were coming from the home. Battalion fire chief James Gordon. As soon as they got the juvenile outside, they were able to start their life saving initiatives and transport a priority one, which is a critical patient to the hospital. Currently right now, the fires are completely knocked down. One firefighter was taken to the hospital with minor injuries. Swastika is another anti semitic graffiti were found along the Bethesda trolley trail early Sunday morning, and county and state leaders are responding. A photo tweeted by state delegate Arianna Kelly shows images of two swastikas, the words white power and the numbers 1488 left and spray paint on fencing along the trail, 1488 is a combination of numbers used to endorse white supremacy according to the anti defamation league. In her tweet, Kelly said, hate has no place in our community, in his own statement, county executive Mark elridge says he is, quote, saddened, upset and quite frankly disgusted over the racist vandalism. Adding that it follows other recent incidents of vandalism and hate in the county in the last several months. He's urging anyone with information about what happened to contact Montgomery county police as soon as possible, county police say they responded to the reported vandalism at 6 45 Sunday morning in the Bradley boulevard in Arlington road area of the trail. Opioid overdoses are up all over the country and in fairfax county youth overdoses have already surpassed last year's totals. The number of emergency department visits for opioid overdoses among youth 12 to 17 locally in 2022 has already exceeded that of previous years. Fairfax county's opioid response coordinator Ellen volo presented some of the statistics to the board of supervisors. And fentanyl is really the substance that's involved in most of the overdoses we're seeing locally. Bull says the opioid and substance use task force has already taken several steps to fight the rise in youth overdoses which include implementing a post overdose follow-up process increasing mental health services and expanding treatment options. Coming up after traveling weather,

Russia Washington Hebrew congregation Charlie dagger David Blair strassman Danielle gaines Mark Ulrich WTO Al rich Sarah Jacobs Africa African development bank Lindsay Weiner Kramer Liberty mutual Montgomery county
'Animal Algorithms: Evolution and the Mysterious Origin of Ingenious'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:51 min | 4 months ago

'Animal Algorithms: Evolution and the Mysterious Origin of Ingenious'

"Many things in the book that amazed me. You talk about the Arctic turn of obviously a bird that engages in long distance navigation, manx, sheer waters. Some of the names of these birds are beautiful manx. Shear waters are sure birds that migrate between the east coast of South America and several small islands near Wales and Scotland where they breed and raise their young. Besides the long distance, there are several other notable aspects of sheer water migration. One is that the adults initiate their return flight to South America before the juvenile birds depart. So the young birds must make the journey without any guidance from the adults. This is not uncommon in bird migration and it means that the information defining the navigation route must be pre programmed. Again, that is just astonishing to me. Absolutely astonishing. Yeah, and that's one of the most amazing things about this that we really don't understand completely how this information is actually programmed into these animals, again, it is programmed, so that means presumably that means it's fast down genetically. So it must reside in the genome in some fashion, and then when the next generation of birds are born, they already know what direction to fly to their migration. And everything about that is hard to explain because it involves first of all information. What are the information you can come from? How does it get into the genome if that's where it's located? And then it's programmed into their brains.

South America Arctic East Coast Wales Scotland
Americans' Belief in God Dips to 81%, a New Low

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

00:47 sec | 4 months ago

Americans' Belief in God Dips to 81%, a New Low

"It looks like religiosity in terms of belief and practice is declining in America also. Recent Gallup value survey, the number of people who believe in God in America down to 81%. Now 81% may seem still pretty high, it is high compared to Europe. But it's low compared to other societies around the world. When you look at societies in Asia, Africa, South America, Central America, the levels of belief in God are higher. In fact, they approach 90% or a 100%. And here, 81% is down from 87%, and that's only a few years ago. So it's a 6 point decline in a pretty short time.

America Europe Central America South America Asia Africa
Charlie Breaks Down the Latest With Pfizer and Uruguay Vaccines

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:58 min | 5 months ago

Charlie Breaks Down the Latest With Pfizer and Uruguay Vaccines

"Asking questions about Uruguay and the vaccine. He says, Charlie, what's going on in Uruguay and the Pfizer vaccine? It's really confusing to me. So Pfizer, one of the major moneymakers for Pfizer is America and western nations. But part of American foreign policy, it's starting to actually work against Pfizer Pfizer is that it's likely that America tried to offer the Pfizer vaccine to other nations as an act of benevolence. As always, hey, look how great we are. However, there are some very interesting things happening in Uruguay, which is a South American country that doesn't have a lot of coverage. Honestly, I'm told that it's a very beautiful country. It's on the southeastern part of South America right between Brazil and Argentina. And Uruguay, a judge is basically starting to ask some questions. And he's saying, listen, hey Pfizer, can you give me the contents of the vaccine? And he's asking for more information. So he's basically telling asking Uruguay, what's in the vaccine? Can you give me the jab ingredients? Can you give us the internal clinical data? Now mind you. This is a small country, a not a very wealthy country that is asking questions about the preservation of their country and their citizens. They're doing their literally doing their job. And Pfizer is basically hemming and hawing. They're not responding. They're not answering plainly and bluntly. And you got to imagine that Pfizer kind of looks at this whole thing as kind of an annoyance. You got to probably imagine that, that Pfizer looks at this as kind of a man, it's like a bump in the road. It's like whatever. And so Pfizer, there's some reports that Pfizer has pulled out of Uruguay, by the way, that they have pulled the vaccine and they've pulled themselves out of it. Just to

Pfizer Uruguay Pfizer Pfizer America Charlie South America Argentina Brazil Hemming
Congressional Candidate Carmen Maria Montiel Shares Her Story

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:00 min | 5 months ago

Congressional Candidate Carmen Maria Montiel Shares Her Story

"Guys, I'm really happy to welcome to the podcast Carmen Maria montiel. She's running for Congress in Texas's congressional district 18. Now Carmen Maria was born in Venezuela. She was, in fact, miss Venezuela, miss South America, second running up, runner up and Miss Universe pageant in 1984. She's been an anchor woman and broadcaster for TV shows, not just in Venezuela, but in Mexico, Panama and Peru, she's lived in Houston since the 1990s. She's been on TV, telemundo, Houston. There's a book based upon her life stolen identity, which was released this year, and she's running against Sheila Jackson Lee the notorious Sheila Jackson Lee in Texas. Carmen, welcome to the podcast. Thank you for joining me. Let's talk a little bit about your story. Talk a little bit about what your experiences in Venezuela have meant to you and perhaps motivated you to become involved in politics in this country. Well, thank you. First of all, thank you for having me. You know, I have been in the United States for 34 years. I came to college and I stayed. So I have been here long enough to see the changes in this country. And I also left in Venezuela long enough to have the experience of how they changes started and end up in what we all know today. So when I started to see the changes in this country, I started to realize how singular it was of Venezuela. When bureaucracy started to grow, when corruption is starting to appear in this country, which was something unheard of. It was completely, you know, this is the country of law. And thinking about corruption is something that we would have never imagined. But nowadays is part of the culture.

Venezuela Carmen Maria Montiel Carmen Maria Sheila Jackson Lee Houston Texas South America Panama Peru Congress Carmen Mexico United States
Reaching out to People Who Came Here Legally

Mark Levin

01:08 min | 5 months ago

Reaching out to People Who Came Here Legally

"I have been watching all the people coming out from South America And you know talking with people I've got the idea that maybe I don't know maybe 70% or so of them are Christians With Christian values and that means conservative values and I love the idea of taking Soros money and having them spend it on our potential voters Well I'm not touching that guy or his money because I don't want to get a rash That said I am I've decided we have a lot of people in this country who are here legally too And I think they the ones who are voting Democrat are voting against the best interests of their community and the best interest of this country Because Marxism doesn't cut it And it is a growing cancer in this country And I think if we can take the opportunity to reach out to as many people as we

South America Soros Cancer
A highlight from Ears To Hear Are Created

Live Behind The Veil

09:59 min | 5 months ago

A highlight from Ears To Hear Are Created

"Welcome to live behind the veil and atmosphere where men and women of God speak his word to this age and bring his kingdom to this earth. Do you have ears to hear and eyes to see what God is doing in this hour? Let us join our host and the family's conversation as the Holy Spirit is unfolding. The word behind the veil hello, everyone. I'm Ron your host, and on this podcast, we'll be talking about hearing and speaking the word of God. Those who have a drive to bring God's kingdom to the earth. Must first have ears created in them to hear his word before they can speak a word from God. Let's listen in to the teaching of the Holy Spirit, and believed to have created within us ears to hear his word. What I understand of the early church is they did not expound scriptures, they believed and spoke by faith a word from God that changed people's hearts, framed in age, they had to listen to an apostolic word, had to listen to the prophet's speak, and then believe in the impartation of that and open their mouths and speak a word from God. Think about these people, what they were receiving had to come from a living epistle. Speaking the truth and love, that's the true thing of whether it's the word of the lord or not, is whether it's the truth, in love, and that authority of the lord coming through, and they could feel that. I'm sure they could tell the difference between somebody who was narrating just expose saying as opposed to somebody who was really sharing their heart with one another. Thing with Peter is so important because in X two he stood up with the 11, remember, and he started talking about Joel. He quoted from Joel too in the fact that he knew what the scripture said, but he also changed it slightly and kind of updated it for how it applied to their day. And that's the thing about what we call an apostolic word is it brings a live the scriptures for today. And that's what the true life is. I mean, you can read the word without the life without the truth in your heart, and it just becomes something you study. Just like any literature, but you have to have the life in your heart to get it imparted to you and to others while we're speaking about living epistles tonight, or speaking about the difference between what I would consider, I'm not putting down a scholar because there's nothing wrong with studying the word. And being a scholar of the word, but the spirit behind it without the relationship of Christ behind it without the relationship to the body of Christ and the members of the body, it's worthless. It's just a bunch of head knowledge and a pumping up of ego, like Paul, Paul is a perfect example, pharisee of the pharisees, but yet after he had his meeting with the lord. It changed his whole spirit. It changed his whole drive, his whole attitude, his heart, the relationship, that's where things are sparked. That's where things are alive. On that day of Pentecost, one word, save 3000 people. Today it takes 3000 words to save one. The word of God never grows old. Because it's always alive. Exactly, it should always be alive, no matter whose speaking it, they spoke a living word to one another. It was something that was alive. They shared an experience with Christ. Alan, were they better people than us? No, God, no. They had to be special. People because they were probably worse off than we are. They might have been more honest than the American person. Well, there's a truth right there. The point I'm making is we've been talking about the early church and then we're talking about today back and forth and we're talking about Christ. This is probably a controversial. I don't think Christ wanted to be put on a pedestal. Right. I think Christ wanted to be an example to people of how you can walk with God and how you can speak his word and have a relationship with the father to me without that, it's just religion, Christ is the first born of many brethren, and he is the example the pattern son that God sent to the earth to provide a way to be created into those people that God can use in the earth. I want to give a really good example and it's back in Ezekiel 37, but I want to emphasize verse four in chapter 37 again he said to me, prophesy over these bones, and say to them, O dry bones, hear the word of the lord. Now, in Amos again, it talks about there is a famine for hearing the word. What did Jesus do when he was on earth? He spoke what he heard the father speaking. That's what Ezekiel did here. That's what he lied to do. That's what he likes it did. They are not special, even Elijah himself says, you know, basically I put my pants on one leg at a time just like you do. There are people just like we are. What we really should be hearing from this is that the father is looking for people to hear the words, so we speak that word, lord, loose ears to hear. Lord loose the people in America to hear the word of the lord. Loose the people in Africa, South America, the 7 continents. My God, loose the hearing of the word. Right. And loose those who have a prophetic word from God who are like Elijah, I stand in the presence of the lord, and by my word, it's not going to rain for three and a half years, right? That's what Elijah said. Alan, your speaking something, there's a key before you can speak a word from God. You have to have ears to hear a word from God. And if you think about think about it, what Christ said every time you spoke after as he would say, those who have ears to hear, yes, let them hear a word from God. There are a lot of people out there that are preaching. A lot of people out there that are quote speaking a word from God, and it's not a word from God, God has to create ears to hear. Our living word from God, every one of us sitting here didn't start out speaking the word of God. We sat under mentors and they were speaking a word from God, and it created the capacity within us to hear a word from God, exactly. Which then enabled us to begin to speak the word from God. Lord loose people to hear. Loose the hearing of your word father loose the hearing, and the understanding loose the hearts to understand what you're saying. Even the disciples, what did you say? They didn't get it either until after the day of Pentecost. Today there are so many men and women of God out there that are in churches and they're anointed men and women of God, and their speaking and anointed word. So here's two people sitting in the congregation. One person has ears, and when that word spoken, it hits them, it changes them. They walk in it. The other person, it goes right over their head. Yep. Same place, two different people. Well, on this podcast, we found out that having ears to hear God's word is crucial if we are those who are called to speak his word and bring his kingdom to this earth. Experiencing the impartation of God's word through his family is life. As this time in his presence blessed you, then please subscribe to our podcast at live behind the veil dot com. If you would like to contact the family with questions or topics that you would like to discuss, you can email them to living epistles at live behind the veil dot com. Stay connected, tuned in and grow with the family as the lord unveils his word to us live. Behind the veil.

Scripture Word Family Christian Love GOD Joel Elijah Ezekiel Paul RON Alan Peter Amos South America Africa Lord America
Rand Paul: What We Can Learn From South America's Failures

The Dan Bongino Show

01:44 min | 5 months ago

Rand Paul: What We Can Learn From South America's Failures

"Paul Senator I get your point You're right I think in the short term you're correct I don't want to be overly apocalyptic I think Biden's approval numbers are clearly indicative that the argument that we can spend money without consequence is kind of gone by the wayside But I think long-term we just the media keeps blocking running like an offensive tackle blocking the story I'll give you a perfect example not to get into global affairs but Gustavo Petrov and Columbia center the guys that devout communists He just got elected in Colombia In countries in South America some of them were just starting to turn the corner And you have this pernicious idea this socialist idea of top down authoritarianism led by big government spending and economic control that just continues to resurface around the world And you'd think after this inflation crisis we could finally put this thing to bed for once Yeah and there's so much that can be learned by looking at the failures in South America You know my wife and I wrote a book called the case against socialism and in it we tell the story of socialism in Venezuela they've destroyed their money prices are rising at 50% not a year a month there's a lack of food The average person in Venezuela has lost 30 pounds not from dieting but from lack of food And their system their economic system and socialism the generals get fat that dear leader president for life gets fat but the ordinary citizen is grounds around There are actually stories of people eating their pets for lack of food But Venezuela has more oil underground than Saudi Arabia so you can take a rich country with lots of natural resources and destroy it with socialism That's the story we need to keep talking about because some of the young people in our country think it would be a good idea to try socialism But it's been a disaster everywhere it's been tried

Paul Senator Gustavo Petrov Columbia Center South America Biden Venezuela Colombia Saudi Arabia
Biden lauds democratic unity despite no-shows at summit

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 6 months ago

Biden lauds democratic unity despite no-shows at summit

"President Biden calls for the nations of North and South America to work together to protect and strengthen democracy In a speech welcoming the participants to the summit of the Americas in Los Angeles President Biden says democracy is under assault Democracy is not only the defining feature of American histories but the essential ingredient to America's futures Presidents saying the goal should be to work together As true partners with diverse capabilities but equal and mutual respect Biden drew sharp contrast around a central issue saying safe and orderly migration is good for all our economies but unlawful forms are unacceptable Mexico's president Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador and several other leaders are staying away because the U.S. excluded Cuba Venezuela and Nicaragua all send large number of migrants to the U.S. and neighboring countries but they're led by authoritarians I'm Tim

President Biden Nations Of North South America Americas Los Angeles Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador U.S. Biden Mexico Venezuela Cuba Nicaragua TIM
"south america" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:49 min | 11 months ago

"south america" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"There in the country I wonder if you're planning on traveling also to South America and other countries in the western hemisphere Given the fact that China has gained a lot of influence in the region And the second question is what will be your message for residents in this country that are struggle and every time they go to the gas station every time they go to the grocery store and see the prices going high and the pharmacy I happen to come from South Texas where I saw a lot of people struggling financially in the last few months And so I think I wonder what is the message you want to spread to them Well I try to express my best I try to answer that 7 different ways today about how to deal with inflation But let me answer the first question I spend a lot of time in South America and in Latin America When I was vice president I spent the bulk of my 8 years basically in Europe and or in Latin America I'm in contact with the leaders of the countries in the South America We're working closely With making sure that we do everything for example with the to deal with helping the countries in question particularly those in Central America to be able to help them with their ability to deal with the people don't sit around and guatemalans They got a great idea Let's sell everything we have Give them money to a coyote Take us across a terrible dangerous trip up through Central America and up through Mexico and drop us across the border to drop us in the desert We won't that be fun People leave because they have real problems And one of the things I've done when I was a vice president got support with although I don't have much of a topic in sport anymore has provide billions of dollars to be able to say to those countries why are people leaving and how are you going to reform your own system And that's we've worked on a long time It's still needs a lot more work And we focus in on that I also believe I've spent a lot of time talking about and dealing with policy having to do with Maduro who is a little more than a dictator right now And the same thing in Chile and not the same thing but with Chile as well as Argentina So look I made a speech a while ago when I was vice president saying that if we were smart we have an opportunity to make the western hemisphere a united a democratic chemistry And we were moving in the right direction Under our last administration the Obama Biden administration But so much damage was done as a consequence of the foreign policy decisions the last president made in Latin America Central American South America that we now have when I call for some of the democracies I call that in a number of nations showed up for this summit of democracy What is it that's going to allow us to generate we've actually had a reduction in the number of democracies in the world And it seems to me there's nothing more important we used to talk about when I was a kid in college about America's backyard It's not America's backyard Everything south of the Mexican border is America's front yard And we're equal people We don't dictate what happens in any other part of this continent or the South American country We have to work very hard on it But the trouble is we're having great difficulty making up for the mistakes that have been made to.

South America Latin America Central America South Texas Chile China Obama Biden administration Maduro Europe Mexico Argentina America united
"south america" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

05:13 min | 11 months ago

"south america" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Citizens really did something like a revolution because they went out to the streets and said, you know, we're not taking this anymore. But when the political parties said, okay, we have heard and we will agree on a constitutional change in our constitution making process. And that led to the election of a constitutional convention where you are right, the left of the good results and also independence. It was a massive rejection of political parties of the parties that have ruled the country this last 30 years. And that convention has two thirds of its members, not belonging to anybody that helped. They left or right. So this is not a takeover of the leftist but this is many of these people come from social movements and from feminist movements from environmental organizations and don't really trust. We need to practice. If the assembly can't come to a consensus on a new constitution by July of this year, the process ends and then she lands will revert to the old constitution. If that happens, what does that mean for bodies, plans for Chile? I think it's very unlikely that they will not produce some kind of text for two submit for referendum, not for July 2022. I think some kind of document will be presented to the country. If they couldn't do that, of course, that would be a terrible political crisis. Also, I think if they submitted a text and this text was rejected by citizens, so if people thought that the constitution produced was a bad constitution, and it was so bad that it's worse than the dictatorial constitution, we would go back to square one and be left with the 1980 constitution that really created this whole problem in the first place and brought people to the streets to protest and to demand for a new constitution. And I think most sectors left and right are really betting to have a successful process with a legitimized constitution that allows to start rebuilding a political system that has lost the trust of its citizens. What's happening in Chile right now with bori Chan with new constitution? How do you see that reflected across the rest of Latin America as other countries also seem to be moving towards a political left? I think this is a good chance for a kind of left that really respects democracy, pluralism, political parties, communications. We've had a left that has damage, I think, the demands of more social equality, redistribution. And a more active state, a more progressive tax structure, all that has been damaged, I think, by a less that has not respected political opposition and that has not respected the political process in other countries, I think this left that is coming to power is different is really deeply committed to pluralism and to democracy. And I think body has shown his will to build broad coalitions to talk to very moderate groups and also the left part of his own correlation because he represents the moderate part of a leftist coalition. So he's trying really to be a very strong base for this new process that Chile starting through the new constitution and through change of model. But I think he knows and he acknowledges in his discourse that the change will not come from one day to the other that people need to be patient that there are economic restrictions and he has talked a lot about economic responsibility, fiscal responsibility. He knows that there's not unlimited money to do whatever you want. And we are coming out from a very strong crisis after the COVID. Finally, cloud the other new rise of he scared these small across South America. Do you think it's a redemption for leftist ideals or more just a repudiation of the political establishment? I think part of is a rejection of LED politics and the political establishment. And part of it is also a reduction of the new liberalism, I think, of a model that has maintained Latin America and very unequal terms. And I think there's a trend that is not only Latin America that is in the entire world to criticize what has been the paradigm of new classic economics in the last years of a very reduced role of the state. And I think in many countries, we are seeing that the problems of economic unregulated commerce international and regulated commerce bring problems to democratic decisions in countries and I think there's a trend to really question these things that were sort of like a truth unquestioned truth after the Washington consensus. And I think many respected well-known economists around the world are saying that capital needs to be regulated, commerce needs to be regulated, monopolies need to be regulated, otherwise you have a system that has very not only an equal and ethically questionable results, but also inefficient results. And I think that's what we're seeing in Chile with a lot of monopolies of abuses from.

Chile bori Chan Latin America assembly COVID South America Washington
"south america" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

05:56 min | 11 months ago

"south america" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Hey, what's up? It's me. Gustav ariano. As you know, the times podcast is dedicated to bringing you fascinating stories from entertainment news to climate change developments to the random tales we should care about. With your support, you make shows like the times possible and help independent journalism keep you informed. If you haven't already, consider subscribing at just $1 for 6 months. So go to LA times dot com slash exclusive to subscribe today. Gracias. Patrick, we were just talking about the last time that the left was empowered in Latin America. What about today? What kicked off the march this time? I mean, it's almost hard to underestimate the impact economically social politically of the COVID pandemic and much of Latin America. South America was extremely hard. I could not sit at a table without finding a waiter or somebody sitting next to you who had either had COVID or someone had passed away of COVID and just really impacted the country. It sent people into a countryside from the cities, same in Colombia. These countries were extremely hard hit. These economy shrank, and I think that was a detonating point. But one has to say also in Chile, the issue of inequality came to a forefront, even before COVID in 2019, you had mass street protests. It had young people out in the street, demanding equality, which resulted in a vote for a new constitution. So you had, you know, multiplicity of factors, which kind of differ in every country, in Peru, you have better Castillo, kind of a left wing ex teacher coming into office and very close race. And you see him coming to four with kind of a conservative social message, but very liberal message on sharing of mining royalties. And the idea of more of these massive international profits kind of coming down to the average Peruvian, which really resonated in beto. Yeah, and it's not just Peru and Chile, you also have shamara Castro Honduras first female president not related to Fidel and a leftist who recently was elected at the end of last year Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador in Mexico. He was a leftist kind of populist elected there in 2018, even Alberto Fernandez and Argentina, but what surprising to me is that this new crop of leaders have different priorities and interests from that old set of leaders. Chavez and Morales and even Fidel for that matter. Today's leaders particularly govern our borage in Chile, we're seeing kind of more of a millennial much more responsive to issues like feminism to street protests by youth, which have really convulsed the number of countries focusing on inequality, but also on green issues on environmental issues on sharing of resource issues. In many ways, what we're seeing today is, yes, we've seen some leftist governments come to power, strictly in Bolivia, Chile. They do potentially next year in Colombia and Brazil. But it's all comes in the middle and it's still ongoing COVID pandemic crisis, which is battered, these economies. These are anti establishment boats as well as being pro leftist votes. Yeah, on this podcast before we talked about naive bukele from El Salvador or the millennial meme loving president who's another populist, but coming at his governance from the right. But now Chile has her own millennial president, 35 year old Gabriel borage, part of him is old school left, like he throws around the word comrade and has aligned himself with the Communist Party. And after his victory, he took a moment in front of a bust of Salvador Allende to pay his respects. But then he surprised himself by criticizing some of his fellow leftist Latin American leaders like Nicolas Maduro and Venezuela and Daniel Ortega Nicaragua. In Chile, the center has been very strong, has been dominant, really has had a center left and sent to right terms we don't really use in the United States, but there are very significant and Latin American politics. And they've kind of alternated powers since left power in 1990. And what it's just singular in the sense that he's not Michel Bachelet, who was one of the center left presidents. He's to the left of that. He's the one who said, if Chile is the birthplace of neoliberalism, it will also be its grave. It's kind of a motto that's been repeated a lot, although I think he's kind of laid off it lately. He wants to repeal to moderates. I think at one point, what I said said he was going to eliminate the police force now he's talking about reforms. I wanted to reduce the work week. Now he's saying, it takes a long time to rebuild a country. So you see kind of a moderating influence. She's going to have to deal, by the way, but I divided legislature. So anyone who's been to Chile knows is very strong conservative forces there. So I think there's a pretty big expectation that he's going to govern more and more from the middle. Finally, Patrick, when we talk about Latin America, it's always like ebb and flows. I hate to use that cliche, but it's true. You go to the left, and it swings to the right. Then it swings to the left. Then it swings to the right. For this resurgence, do you think this new pink tide is going to be a repetition of that past or is it going to be something a little bit more permanent? I think some of the themes that have come up certainly environmentalism to sharing of natural resource wealth, this backlash against inequality. I think those will linger whomever takes them up. You know, whether they'll be in the guise of the left or the right, I think those are becoming pretty much normal themes and policy goals in the region. And I think those themes will remain, whether they manifest themselves in more left wing candidates or more center left candidates or sent the right candidates trying to kind of seize upon those themes. I think, you know, it remains to be seen, but it's all extremely interesting and dynamic developments really in the southern part of the continent. And one thing to be said, however, is that all of these political transitions were, in fact, political.

Chile Gustav ariano Latin America shamara Castro Fidel Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador Alberto Fernandez Peru Colombia LA times Gabriel borage Patrick Nicolas Maduro Castillo South America Michel Bachelet Honduras Morales Chavez
"south america" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"south america" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Victory speech last night but each promised to bring unity He says he'll be the president of all Chilean men and women and he also outlined some of his plans socially putting a lot of emphasis also in his commitment to combating climate change and on his determination to make Chile a fairer society by expanding the government's role in providing social support and defending rights Chile has been through years of political turbulence you mentioned sometimes it's become violent These were candidates with two very different worldviews What happens next Well one area where this really does make a big difference is to do with the rewriting of the constitution Those mass protests resulted in a national referendum in which chileans overwhelmingly voted to scrap their Pinochet era constitution They went on to elect an assembly a very diverse body half of the members are women and their job is to write a new one So this is a big deal We're talking about writing an entirely new set of rules for the country had cast one that process would have been in jeopardy He was against it It now stands a much better chance of going ahead although the final document must still be approved by popular vote That's NPR's South America correspondent Philip Reeves and Philip always an extra thanks to a reporter up the morning after an election Thank you You're welcome COVID vaccines have been widely available in Nevada but the state had not been reaching out to Spanish speakers in rural communities That is now changing Burt Johnson with member station KU and R reports On a recent Saturday ogle Leon came to saint gall Catholic Church in gardiner vil Nevada to get her second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine The church is an hour south of Reno Leon says at first she was really scared to get the.

Chile Philip Reeves government assembly Burt Johnson NPR South America Philip Nevada ogle Leon saint gall Catholic Church gardiner R Reno Leon
"south america" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"south america" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"Which is a legal thing and take the cash possible to minnesota. they can so yeah cash is also used and But i do want to mention something interesting. Which is we do. We have a product in venezuela interbank. Protocal taegu molly. It's like cell in boulevards and people that are not leaving the capital which has got us use it a lot. Eighty percent of the transactions that are businesses are reporting that they are receiving Molly in bolivars still. They're still using the lebron. Just dida form of it And you still see that. Trend in the hoods or let's say on the less wealthy neighborhoods off of gotta gotta cas which is basically most of caracas over the make of the capital and so a lot of people are still used boulevard And businesses are using are getting paid in bolivars at eighty eight or eighty percent of their transactions so they do have a treasury to manage in hyper-inflationary money and again. That's another opportunity. They were trying to leverage on and just kind of like help all these businesses start to Stable and good luck on that. I got two questions mental. Wrap up first one is what's next for value as you guys continue to build. What's kind of the plan moving forward. How can people who are watching this healthy. Yeah so currently. We're focused on the lower hanging fruit. Which is as small and medium-sized businesses. Minnesota who don't have access to any form of the others. The larger companies retail companies huge. They do have access to us banking. So we're focused first on this group and after that we're going to start focusing on the larger retail businesses because while they do have access to usd. They have all these issues that i'm not going to get into right now with their treasury that we can solve with like crypto infra and like a sable coins so once we start tackling two large businesses. We're going to have a berkeley integrated payment supply chain. Which is kind of like the check made for retention for this currency for a new type of money when a business that is receiving payments from the customers in stable coins can also pay their providers in in the same stable. And so that's kind of like what's going next for us and after that we're going to start thinking about one at the station and that's when we started to think about. How can we lent to people. We're going to have enough transaction and transactional data to create risk models saudi lending ideally increasing the middle class. We can start providing interest bearing accounts and once. We have these kind of we're going to be able to monetize in multiple ways once we have this place. We're going to start to think about Brazil argentina mexico. and and. that's how we plan to to win..

treasury venezuela caracas lebron Molly minnesota Minnesota berkeley Brazil argentina mexico
"south america" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"south america" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"Use usage of Crypto peer peer-to-peer. Exchanges is highly related. And so i do believe that. All the opponents in latin america like foundational problem. We have to solve his solving money. Your commerce steel six percent online commerce which is not not super high but the good thing about latin america. So i've been talking about all the ship. The goofing about letting america's that we haven't established middle-class is increasing growth but it's more tablet and india or other regions. We have gdp that is twice the size of india population. That is twice the size of the united states. Internet penetration that is higher than china and india at seventy percent one of the highest engagements of internet usage in the world at nine hours per day so a relatively young population so the only we need to solve the frigging money problem because people are online. They know how to use the tools. Young large population is growing quickly. The problem is they don't the money is wrong is at exactly so so. That's kind of the general situation down in latin america and another cool cool staff. Is that in the past. Six months. Money has increased a lot nine billion dollars for invested Or even more than nine billion dollars in bc money in highly in high risk startups. That are solving this vicious. We have about two thousand Unicorns about twenty four unicorns which is kind of like new for the region and out of those twenty four about three are crypt of start sort. So twenty four unicorns in latin america. Three or crypto. Yeah for big big compared to other regions. So hopefully we're gonna see more of that. Value will be a billion dollar company of horace. Go have winner-take-all trip. Yeah sure what do you think about. Salvador in terms of them obviously embracing. Bitcoin.

"south america" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"south america" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"I'm really positive of like the path to stable coins because of this specific dynamics that i just mentioned people see stable coins the daughters period and they see the benefits of it. They see that they can pain. Exact amounts they see that they can hold it in their phones. They don't have to carry large amounts of cash businesses. Sometimes dude like they have to pay their providers in cash in their providers charging large amounts of cash dollars and so sometimes they have to drive From state to state with a bunch of money and they're just like scared all the time. So you don't know this but now you do. I carry this in my wallet. fifty vr right. Yeah i also carry. My wallet is a ten billion-dollar zimbabwe So fifty ten billion both worthless. How many of these do i need to pay for things. Your gonna swell. There's only fifty. There's a really good picture. Google if they wanna look we. Have we have the picture i think. Where's the chicken with the with the Boulevard we'll we'll put up here in a second. Yeah how how much is chicken. So it changes all the time like. Is it true that the the prices in the stores almost changing like near real time. They have like these digital prices and they basically just can change currency changes at one point in time. That was happening. You'll go to story in the morning in the middle of the day was different price in. That was different price. Sometimes they'd even had these so the store owners have to like just changes by hand or whatever it was crazy the price at the register. Ah out of the bread at we register. It was definitely crazy now. The inflation of prices. Not ask crazy at one point in time the past three months the inflation in prices has been about twenty two percent during a three month period. Crazy that that's not bad. Not as really good for minnesota whether i was just looking at the numbers earlier and it says that there was certainly what you said earlier about ten thousand percent in two thousand nineteen but it says since twenty sixteen the overall inflation rate has increased dipped four thousand. Nope fifty four thousand percent. There's a really interesting way to explain this. Which is the One dollars today is four million bolivars towns. Sounds like but that's a chicken. Yeah put pull it up to buy that. That's how many bolivia are unique on that day. Yeah tonight that is a wild photo. Yeah the you literally need twice the space to carry the cash there to buy it than it takes to carry it home..

zimbabwe Google minnesota bolivia
"south america" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"south america" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"Bolivia at. Can you talk about like just the digital switch that venezuela's seeing from that cash perspective of handing over the twenties in the fifties versus using any type of digital fifties. Twenty on there's no one is so you you're talking about like the digital switch. And how like. How important is that obviously to when you're trying to stable corner bitcoin and use that as the currency. Yeah so that's that's a really good question. So i'm going to ask really quickly about the larry station in minnesota so there's two ways the first one is cash which you just mentioned the second one is that venezuelan elites most of the elites have been flying the united states opening bank accounts here Getting offshore accounts. And now they're using. Ben mo- sell the interbank app. And they're going back to venezuela and kind of like exchanging goods and services with each other paying with cell and ben and it started with the leads and now it's spreading through kind of like i wouldn't call the middle class. Polite other enterpreneurs and things like that and so they. These are people who go open up spaced bank accounts. Yeah come back to venezuela and then they're transacting but it's in the us based accounts rather than in the venezuela counts. I think there's gonna got theory for that. Called the milkshake theory. Which is like you know. The united states is such a large power that it's basically sucking few other economies like people in businesses in emerging economies want to transact and half dollars so this is a perfect sample of that. And it's it's happening at large and another thing that happens because we have a large migration especially now in the us. Recently united states announced that all the people that are leaving here that are going to have a release residents and you can also get like political protection because crazy place and so you have a bunch of migrants from minnesota here actually florida and these people are renting their cell accounts they literally rent them to people in venezuela and people are paying up to thirty percent to use cell account so of course translates into higher prices. And so that's the way people can like moving into the dollar economy and and it's becoming like a trusted way of doing it. The cash daughter economy is very interesting. Because as i mentioned people don't have cash and because if i go to pay in a in a supermarket and the product is worth eight dollars a and m. fifty cent the supermarket prices at ten dollars because they don't have Ones fives but i need my one dollar and fifty cents. Because it's a lot of money in venezuela so i ended up not buying and it reduces can commerce and so and then the supermarket says. Oh i'll give you your change in baltimore's but i don't want the free so it just has a bunch of loopholes and bud i'm again..

venezuela larry station Ben mo united states Bolivia minnesota ben florida baltimore
"south america" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"south america" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Of North and South America will need When Italian merchant with what last name? His first name was Amerigo. This beauty? Yes. And finally an attempt to go Perfect. And you really clobbered Patrick to pay President Teddy Roosevelt got the Bureau of Corporation started and then under President Woodrow Wilson, it evolved into the FTC. What does FTC stand for? Uh, If the No, No, no. It stands for the Federal Trade Commission. Hang 51. Bernie goes perfect again today another remarkable performance. By the Great one. Mark Levin. Bernie McGurk 51 your final score today. Bernie Silica Patrick in Queens. What's up, Patty? Anybody? How you doing? I could be a lot worse. I understand. You work in the public schools. Yeah, Yeah, I was just telling that I said before that I I called you guys back in March and April when, when it was really hitting the fan that all the custodian Jin ears were in the building is doing our job and You guys really kept us going and something that we really appreciated it. Well, it's cool. Thank you, Bob. Well, we we appreciate you, Uh, you think so? You got the kids are out of school. Now. Do you get a vacation like the teachers? No, no, Actually, I have summer school when I have after school, my buildings open all day and all night and, um, Yeah, we we We don't get some breaks like the teachers Wait here. You need a better union. But let me ask you this, Patrick. The schools If I'm not mistaken, don't have air conditioning correct. A lot of lot of them. Do some have Central air. Some have window units and stuff like that. You know, a lot of the schools like my my school does have it. That's what system school so yeah, well, that's cool. All right. Well, listen, because otherwise wearing masks in a air condition less school would be pretty tough, But I'm glad to hear where updating and modernizing us. Now listen. Do you need to, uh,.

Mark Levin Federal Trade Commission Bob Patrick Bernie April March Patty today Bureau of Corporation North President Teddy Roosevelt Amerigo Queens President Woodrow Wilson South America Bernie Silica Patrick Bernie McGurk 51 Italian first
"south america" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"south america" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"This area result in twins most of them according to the legends being blonde haired and blue eyed very curious So why how many are we talking. the birth rate stats for twins. In candido is ten percent which is significantly higher than in the rest of the state where it's only about one point eight percent So this is one of the highest. What you'd call twinning rates in the entire world and this is a noteworthy pattern At least during the early twentieth century. When the i immigrants started to set a precedent arriving with seventeen sets of twins amongst them And if you visit the area today you might still notice that it is like you said ben like instantly something. that's remarkable. How many just how many sets of twins you'll see just on a given day looking around boy. I mean think about that. That's one in ten kids that are born our kids instead of kid. Yes that's crazy and the stats. Can you know you'll suit listeners. Of course you clock that that rate of twins was given his ten percent but then scientists also projected one in five pregnancies. We're we're aware of this discrepancy. It's coming from a couple of different sources. And of course. Birthrates do change. Or they vary over time. But yeah yeah. It's a lot of twins. Yeah that ten percent. I believe in a particular study will look that was between nineteen ninety and nineteen ninety-four rights. We're also talking about ten percent of a very small population which makes it extra noticeable when you it's like wow they're everywhere and you know we know what a mystery twins still continue to be as to what leads to them as like their ability to communicate differently. You know. I mean there are some that you know if you if you know anybody who has a twin sibling. They claim to and i mean. Honestly you can't not believe them have this kind of almost tele kinetic ability or this ability to kind of like a feel things about each other far distances for example Or you know to be able to almost like speak without speaking to each other. It's very very interesting and not a lot is known about that And that totally applies to this case. Only this is an extra weird kind of twist like why so. Many twins in the small area and one of the theories is quite disturbing. Yeah i i have. I do just spoiler alert. Have what i feel like. Ease the explanation here. But let's let's let's walk through the crazy stuff. I wanted to step back. Because there was something i wanted to point out. So yeah this is extraordinary Because of the birth rates in the number of twins relative to the population but for comparison there are places that have you know an absolute numbers much higher tendencies toward the production of twins and nigeria actually leads the world in this regard. Also i always. I always thought it would be cool to have a twin. But i think for most of us the concept is incredibly alien and that's why Singles right even if you have siblings. You're single right in comparison to twins. That's why singles like the majority of us in the audience..

ben nigeria
"south america" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"south america" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Me ben. We're joined as always with our super producer. Paul mission control tech. And most importantly you are you you are here and that makes this the stuff they don't want you to know after taking a very long hiatus from This realm of topics we are returning to the world of the nazis. The nazi party of germany and world war two has become a source of many many proposed. Conspiracies and proven conspiracies as as we learn more and more about the inner workings of of that regime and nowadays. You know we can. We can say with certitude certain statements that would have once been considered controversial or conspiratorial. Like now we can say it is common knowledge that many nazi officials and nazi collaborators escaped to south america in the aftermath of world war two. It's genuine vast conspiracy. You hear him called rat lines right. Thousands of people fled from europe to brazil chile especially argentina and as the world was trying to recover from the atrocities of war. There were these investigators from places like west germany and israel and individuals who were tracking down nazi sifting through rumors trying to hunt these men. Who would be ghost and if you wanna learn more about that checkout operation edessa. I think is the episode. We did on that topic specifically i. We have a lot of a lot of nazi episodes because they did a lot of terrible things. But the the weird weirdest part here is what we're talking about the nazis escaping to south america. We're talking about a true thing. A real event that went on for years But we're also talking about all the rumors that built off that like the idea that adolf hitler himself may have escaped. That's a story for another day but stays episode is one people might not have heard of it concerns the infamous nazi doctor. The so called. Angel of death joseph mandalay and the conspiracy theory that he continued his horrific experiments long after the end of world. War two. Today's episode fellow conspiracy realist. What is can dido godot. And what the hell is happening there. Yes here are the facts. It's a city you probably haven't heard of unless you've heard of this story or unless unless you've visited of a specific part of brazil rio grande do soul so candido..

Paul mission control tech nazi party of germany south america ben west germany chile argentina brazil europe joseph mandalay israel adolf hitler rio grande candido
"south america" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"south america" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Sustainable vehicle. Subscribe to day wherever you listen to podcasts. As the united states and other nations see progress in the fight against covid nineteen in south america. The pandemic's the worst. It's ever been home to just five percent of the world's population south america now accounts for a quarter of the global death toll. The economic damage is also significant and could play the region. Well into the future. We want to get an idea of what it's like there. So we're bringing in the journal. South america bureau chief one ferraro. He's joining me from bogota colombia one. Good morning good morning one. Can you just first give us a sense of how bad things are right now. Mark the region is really hard. Hit harder hit than any other continent right now if you look at the top. Ten countries in terms of per capita deaths about seven or eight of them are in in south america. And you're seeing high numbers of deaths in the bigger countries bigger and smaller countries. But when we're talking about just sheer numbers. Two thousand dead every day in brazil. Six hundred dead every day in colombia. Six hundred dead every day a little less in argentina. The numbers are just staggering. These countries have been hard hit from the beginning of the pandemic and they've gone through waves but this latest wave has just been the most difficult. Is this an issue of vaccination is an issue of misinformation would is fueling these higher numbers. I think it's several things one thing that we've written quite a bit about. Is this brazilian variant which was initially called the p. one a now called gamma and this This variant has just torn through these countries these variants per se or not more lethal than the original corona virus. But what scientists say. Dr saint health officials in these countries. That is that it's more infectious. And so since the vaccination drive in these countries is is slower than say in europe. Then it's not been able to take control and be able to vaccinate. High numbers of people means that this virus has been able to spread very quickly and that has caused big problems. There are other factors to people are tired of the lockdowns. People are tired of the pandemic people have to work in the economy's in all these countries half of them are informal. That means that people need to get out there and work there either have their own businesses or their vendors on the streets. Whatever it is people need to go out and make money. And and the lockdowns in south america were quite stringent for a long time where they still exist people are ignoring them and in many places governments have just given up. Let's focus on the economy for for just a moment in brazil. For example there was a big stimulus and people return to normal activity despite calls by scientists to remain locked down. Their economy is doing quite well. Where do things stand now in brazil and beyond that's true brazil spent a lot of money last year. They're spending money still. They have less to spend their latest economic numbers. Were quite rosy saying that. They're basically back to where they were before the pandemic began. That's not the case. In other countries. In latin america peru suffered an eleven percent contraction last year and that that's the highest in the region and coming back from that is going to be very difficult. Columbia You know also suffered like a seven percent. Rob argentinos also quite high. These are countries that are heavily in debt right now also so. This is going to be very difficult. And of course the poorest people in these countries really took a terrible blow so we're seeing a situation where you know. Hunger has increased poverty. His dramatically increased across the region. This year next year are going to be very very difficult across across south america and that is having a political ramifications mark across several countries. It sounds like this. We'll have a long term impact on south america. Yeah exactly let me just tell you about one thing that's happening across the region that i think is very interesting. This is a trend across various countries is is we are seeing people. Turn against the establishment. I mean perhaps the place where to most dramatic is in columbia. We're in late. April protests began. They were particularly heavy throughout may and early june. A lot of people were killed. These were national protests or road blockades that totally paralyzed commerce so that also was a big a big blow to the economy and also to to right the ship here in columbia so mark. I mean the point is is that is that across south america. It's really unclear how things are going to turn out because the political situation in several of these countries a is quite difficult at the moment. The wsj's one ferraro are south. America bureau chief juan. Thank you thank you. And finally the maker of marlboro cigarettes is on trial tobacco. Giant altria is accused of breaking antitrust laws by abandoning.

argentina brazil colombia europe columbia south america eleven percent seven percent Ten countries This year bogota colombia five percent last year Columbia Six hundred dead juan may latin america April early june
"south america" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

06:36 min | 2 years ago

"south america" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"I second. That and Mike. It's really great to be in conversation with you. It's there's no one who knows Nantucket history like you do. Oh, thank you. So the basic thing you know, we're here to tell to talk about the Essex and I suppose the question of the evening we should start with in case anybody who's joining us may not know One of the basic things everybody should know about the Essex tragedy. Yeah, well, the Essex left Nantucket in the summer of 18 19, you know, just the year after the Pacific National Bank was built. She was a typical whale ship about 20 years old. Not in great repair. She had a first time captain George Pollard. Junior first made Owen Chase 21 men. The cabin boy was Thomas Nickerson, and they departed and headed for the Pacific. It was a normal whaling voyage, not ovary, successful one ast. They made their way around Cape Horn up the west Coast of South America, and they decided to venture out farther into the Pacific than the Essex had ever been before to the offshore grounds. And they were after a stop at the Galapagos. They were 3000 miles from the coast of South America when they cited a huge sperm whale. 85 ft Long. This is a huge whale. If you know the huge jaw here at the whaling museum that reputedly came from an 85 ft whale, just massive Particularly when you realize that ship was 85 ft long well, One of the whale boats was in was damaged and so first made Owen Chase dragged that boat up onto the deck of the whale ship. Essex was repairing it, while the other two whale boats were off pursuing whales. Cabin boy Thomas Nickerson, all of 15 years old, was at the helm steering When this huge 85 ft sperm whale appeared to the to the on this they're Starbird on their port side. They didn't think much of it because never before in the history of American whaling. Had a whale attacked a ship, but this whale had a different intention. I began to pick up speed slammed into the side of the ship. Knocked the men to the sides would come back at it again. Drive the ship backwards, crushed the the how, like an eggshell. The ship would not sink, but it would fill up with water the men would take to their whale boats. They all gathered and a Pollard Captain Pollard would eventually arrive and say to Mr Chase because they were Over the horizon. They had seen all what happened would say toe to chase Mr Chase. What is the matter? Thieves were a man of few words I chased simply said we have been stolen by a whale. Now. Many of us have. If you haven't don't know about the Essex, you probably familiar with Moby Dick. This would inspire the climax of that Great American novel. But where Moby Dick ends is just the beginning of the Essex disaster. It would turn into a survival tale like none other Fearful of rumors of cannibals in the islands to the west in the Pacific. Uh they They decided to go for South America 3000 Miles away, Uh, impossible voyage. In the great irony, they would be forced to survival cannibalism. Eventually, Only two of the three whale boats would be cited by rescue craft. Five Nantucket ear's would get out of those whale boats alive. Three others were left on Henderson Island. And when news came to Nantucket and eventually the rest of the country, this was big news. You know, this is before the American West had become the predominant wilderness that incited the American imagination. The sea was the wilderness. This was the Donner party before that all unfolded. Owen Chase would write a new account of it probably ghost written that would become renowned around the country and the world. This was big news. And so the Essex This was a tale that Nantucket ear's. We're not Particularly proud of because there's a voyage that went that, But it was a story full of all sorts of fascination for for those outside America, Nantucket, and so you know, this was a story I realized I needed to write about American history TV with Nathaniel Philbrick. His book and the heart of the Sea and There's some interesting interesting things in this disaster that come to mind as your as your retelling it. Michael Harrison, research chair of the Nantucket Historical Association. Um, you know, On the one hand this this part of the Pacific that they were wailing in the offshore ground had only been discovered by American whalers a year or two before. As being a place rich with sperm whales. And so this wasn't really a part of the ocean that the crew of the Essex or many of their target brethren had been to that. They knew very well. They were sort of Mork comfortable on the coast of South America. Um But there was money to be made and they ventured out. And so on The one hand, they were sort of in the unknown taking a risk, but then here they are cast into their boats with their ship wrecked. And imagine us being cast into a boat in the middle of the Pacific. I don't I don't know how your reputable sailor you you might be able to do some really great stuff. Yeah. I would be like at my wit's hell I I'm with. But here are professional sailors who are able to salvage things from the wreck. They're able to rid their rowing boats to sail. They're actually able. They have all these professional skills they bring to bear. Actually save themselves. And the great irony or tragedy of this, either. Either way is that they're outmatched by the circumstance. They make a decision not to go to the nearest islands.

Essex Owen Chase Nantucket Pacific South America Thomas Nickerson Moby Dick Nantucket Historical Associati George Pollard Pacific National Bank whaling museum Mike Cape Horn Galapagos Pollard Nathaniel Philbrick Captain Pollard Henderson Island