9 Burst results for "South African Council"

"south african council" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

05:53 min | 5 months ago

"south african council" Discussed on Conversations

"It was only much later when I got out of the very predicted cocoon off the school into university that I started to much more be aware of the conflicts, the injustices. In the difficulties was that a shocking realization to to sort of see your homeland with fresh eyes. Well it was a shocking realization that again live to make confessions unfortunately, and you did warn me that I was going to be in the hot seat rather than the other way round and you delivering on your promise theory. I the tensions built up during the time the dollars in university and in nineteen seventy eight, it was the time of the Soweto riots. Opportunity. At that point of going to America which I did and I could indeed of the green card and worked the but it was only when I was really outside of South Africa and hear other discourses and could see much more clearly what was really happening the that are Sudafed I don't know what you call it possibly a spiritual experience or some kind of experience which made me decide that I wanted to go back and make contribution. So I gave up the possibility of the Green Card win back to South Africa joined. Well, it was really in the university infect but I went back to my post that I was leaving was in the process of leaving. And then I became very involved in the actual anti-apartheid movement trying to say top different services outside of the state institutions which was treating. Black. People really badly see you were setting up counselling or psychology services. Up a trauma center was became involved in working with the detainee counseling service, which was looking at people who'd been. Tortured. And I did through the South African Council of Churches get involved in a more underground can't work with township activists Timmy tell me about that about that group of activists would've happened. Okay. So what had happened is at the state really stimulated conflict..

South Africa South African Council of Churc Timmy Soweto America
"south african council" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

05:29 min | 5 months ago

"south african council" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"You've got to try oxy clean odor blasters for yourself to work your magic with oxy clean go to oxy dot com slash try me an order of free sample that's oxy clean dot com slash t. r. y. m. e. for a free odor blaster sample while supplies last. At target, each item you put in your cart brings more good to life like a coffee brand opens more is to black business natural laundry detergent that puts a lighter load on the planet wheelchair friendly Halloween costumes that said, make the lead in motion and make a celebrates beauty and every shade. Peer. The good you want is always within reach because at target we believe in good we can all afford. Hey y'all were rerunning two episodes today, which means that you'll hear to host me and Tracy v Wilson, enjoy the show. Welcome. To this day in history class from how stuff works dot Com and from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the PODCAST. I'm Tracy Be Wilson and it's October seventh Desmond Tutu was born on this day in nineteen thirty one he was born in South Africa and he's most known for his non-violent work against apartheid in South Africa. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. For this work in Nineteen eighty-four. Apartheid was south. Africa's system of racial segregation. It had been implemented by the nation's white-minority government and South Africa had already been segregated long before this point but in nineteen forty, eight, the National Party came to power and the National Party began formulating the system of enforced segregation through government policy. So it was something that the government was actively working on doing an enforcing the population registration act of nineteen fifty. Sorted everyone in South Africa into one of three categories, they wear the black Africans people who are multiracial white people. Later on a category was added for a NHS it was illegal for people in these different groups to marry each other you could only marry a person in your same group laws also outlined where each group were allowed to live and operate businesses and those businesses and public facilities were segregated. Even though the white population of South Africa was a really small minority. These laws favored that white population giving the most advantageous places to live and work and access to almost all of the land. This system was extremely strict. It regulated every facet of life and the South African government was was enforcing it in law at the same time as in the United States the. Civil Rights movement was working to dismantle these types of laws black South Africans along with some white supporters had been resisting these laws as soon as they were proposed, they had been resisting segregation before the laws even existed, and that brings us back to Desmond Tutu after spending a couple of years as a teacher, he attended theological college he was ordained as an Anglican priest. In nineteen seventy eight, he was appointed to be the general secretary of the South African Council of Churches, and it was in this role that he started to become. So well known and his outspoken work against apartheid. This included non violent protests and advocating for other nations to place economic sanctions. On South, Africa he wanted quote a democratic and just society without racial divisions. South. Africa was facing increasing condemnation from other parts of the world by the time to was awarded the Nobel Prize that again happened in Nineteen eighty-four. The prize itself was also a signal that the issue of South African apartheid was an important one in the world of global humanitarian struggle in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, the South African government finally started repealing these laws and a new constitution followed and nineteen ninety-three. It took effect in Nineteen ninety-four that year. So Africa elected its first black President Nelson Mandela. That the social and economic effects of decades of apartheid still persist in south. Africa and they will for a long time you cannot reverse decades and centuries of oppression instantaneously. To has continued to do humanitarian work in the years since apartheid began to be dismantled and he's earned a number of other awards in addition to the Nobel, Peace Prize these include the Albert Schweitzer Prize for humanitarianism in one, thousand, nine, hundred, six, the Dondi prize in two, thousand seven and the Presidential Medal of freedom in two, thousand nine at the same time. He has also come under some scrutiny in recent years for a number of statements including some that are described as antisemitic. The nineteen sixty four Nobel peace prize was also connected to apartheid in South Africa as a side note. It was awarded to Albert the to lead who was president of the African National Congress and led a nonviolent campaign of civil disobedience against South Africa's white minority government. Desmond Tutu is still living as of the recording of this podcast although he has largely retired from public life. Thanks to Christopher Haciendas for.

South Africa Africa Desmond Tutu South African Council of Churc Nobel Prize oxy Albert Schweitzer Prize African National Congress Nobel NHS Christopher Haciendas president Tracy Nelson Mandela
"south african council" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

Behind the Bastards

14:31 min | 1 year ago

"south african council" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

"Now Nelson Mandela was released in nineteen ninety and nineteen ninety-two the ANC was unbanned. In the face of massive unrest suddenly the cause of black people having basic rights was legally legitimate in South Africa. Got Hip all the soot. Yeah yeah so basically the ANC had had been like a terrorist group prior to this and like ANZ members of definitely done some terrorism in South Africa. Although it's terrorism in a pretty fundamentally justifiable viable 'cause I had argue but yeah and after nineteen ninety-two the ANC is a legal political party. And the cause of black people having basic rights was like legally legitimate to fight for in South Africa. Now as you might imagine wouter Basson was not happy with this. And he responded by spearheading. Plan to distribute poisoned beard. A black people at bus stops stops. Let's get started stemming from voting if you poison their beer fuck is real piece of shit. Yeah now as I relate these stories. I don't want to discount the role of the South African government or military establishment in any of this just because we're focusing on water His his work enjoyed a broad base of support among the powers that be in his unspeakably shitty government. His work was directed and approved at high levels in supported by a variety of less technically sophisticated methods of repression. Some simple just guys with truncheons beating protesters but Wouter Basson was a unique man within the South African military and medical establishments he did eventually go to trial for his many many crimes. And because of that trial we have some knowledge of the extent of those crimes Johann thorough on one of the operators who worked for Basson admitted personally to the murder of several hundred SWAPO prisoners along with South African defence soldiers identified a security risk so they even killed soldiers in their own military multiple multiple different government agencies managed chemical weapons project over the decade or so that he was active in the late nineteen eighty s as resistance to the apartheid regime picked up Besson's work increasingly focused just on poisoning members of the African National Congress. The South African Communist Party and the South African Council for churches anyone who voiced displeasure with apartheid was subject to poisoning. The testing process for these poisons was as horrific as you'd imagine the Rude Platt Research Laboratory for most of this work was done conducted numerous experiments on dogs and horses and one one study. They poisoned babboons to death over the course of several days. So that's yeah but of course the killing of individuals could only go so far and wouter Basson Asan knew that by the late nineteen eighties. The situation was dire enough for the government that they knew some sort of mass solution to the problem of black people. Winning rights was necessary. Now it was. It's accepted that there were too many black people in South Africa to kill. This was not a moral question. Many people in the government likely would have supported mass murder but they simply did not have the technical capacity passively to do so we logistically. It'll be a nightmare. You guys we just we just. We don't have enough votes. We'll just can't make it work. You gotTA listen well. Low decided to head in a room. Like we're yeah. Yeah we we have to let most of them. I'm live but billy they didn't have to let most of them continue to have babies and this is where Wouter Basson cool yeah So the South African military establishment embarked on a different scheme an anti fertility vaccine. Oh God Dong Ding bats in the United States being like Oh you own abortions. Is that what you want. We'll give Boertien Ocean. We'll give you one for laugh. What no that's yeah? Yeah so fully. Eighteen percent of the projects expand masterminded during his time in the military were focused on what were referred to as fertility and fertility control studies scientists under bandleader testified. That they understood understood they were developing a vaccine which would be administered to black women without their knowledge or consent editor render them infertile. Yes now the initial goal all of Bassin and his fellow scientists was developed vaccine. That would only work on black women. This obviously proved to be impossible because black women are genetically the same as any other kind of women and and it just doesn't things. Don't work that way. It's impossible to target people by skin color in that way. So it's interesting to me billy. That like these incredibly racist scientists start out by wanting wanting to make a vaccine that will render black women infertile and they realized that because black women are the same as every other kind of woman they can't do it and this doesn't lead them to to like realize like. Oh maybe this. Racism is based on nothing Science says we're stupid science says what we're doing is idiotic. But no no. They never had any. That's I know about that. We're smart so there were rational enough to accept that. Their plan of a vaccine to render black women infertile would not what do anything. But they refuse to give up on their plan of stopping black people from having sex while at least from having babies and so things evolved so one one of the scientists who worked under bass later testified as I've alluded to a few times and one of them. A dude named Van Rensburg claimed the effort started back in one thousand nine hundred five And he said he was told that the project initially existed at the request of Jonas Savimbi the Angolan anti-communist rebel leader and Paul Manafort client who is allied with South Africa The story goes that Savimbi was concerned that his female fighters would get pregnant and wanted an anti fertility vaccine. This is widely believed to be complete horse shit designed to provide plausible deniability to the scientists basically scientists were like it. Seems maybe like fucked up that we're trying to render all black people in fertile and if there's ever a war crimes trial we're getting trouble rebel and so their leadership. No it's not too. It's it's for. This guy is female soldiers. He just doesn't want him getting pregnant and battle. He needs because when they get pregnant they. They can't do murderers good exactly better. Excuse yeah and it's like most of the scientists that were like talked to were like. Yeah we knew that was hor- ship like it was you give people a little bit plausible deniability and that that's all it was so the non-proliferation organization has a good write up of the ensuing court case that includes an interview interview with one of Bassin's men and a quote from it now. Of course the scientists did not believe the cover story van Rensburg testified that he could not think that an intelligent man could think we would spend a couple four million on a project like this to control pregnancy. And a few of Savimbi's female soldiers nonetheless. The project got underway and became central to work at the research laboratories after the fall of apartheid heart government a truth and Reconciliation Commission was convened to investigate the unspeakable crimes. The white government had committed against it's black citizens and this is where like all of our interviews from this come from one of Bassin's employees. A guy named Goosen gave fascinating detail into the plan. The interviewer was a fellow named Jerome Chest. Gluten so Chaskalson said It was decided that a front company would be formed And he was asked. Can you tell us what brief that you were given for. What this front company was In goosen said final brief or the other brief was very important. One was developed the project to curtail the birth rate of the black population in the country. So goosen was asked to give more detail on this and he said the person who instructed us they're asked to do. This was doctor Bassin. There was a lot of talk on the ethics of this and spent some time quoting to us. The census figures of nine hundred eighty two or eighty one or whenever the census was. I can't remember exactly that. The census office stopped counting the black back people when they reached forty five million and the government decided that it was not feasible to make it known to the public that there were forty five million blacks. It was just too many and this was mainly one of our big threats and I think the figure of twenty eight million was made known now if those true facts I wouldn't know up till today. I don't know that was presented to us by Doctor Bassin. So basically Bassin's scientists sister like we feel a little bit questionable about this and one of the things they're told is that you're working to sterilize. These gorillas but they're also told that like there's twice as many black black people in the country as the government is willing to admit on the official census forms. So like if we don't solve this problem of black people breeding soon. We're going to be outnumbered and overwhelmed Or like completely overwhelmed so like this is like the scientists being told this are both simultaneously being told. You're not trying to sterilize. All the black people and also so given evidence that like we have to sterilize all the black people right away or we're fucked show. It's yeah wild arbitrary numbers to like forty five. Stop it stop. Yeah don't count anymore. We can't tell them it's twenty eight. Twenty eight is fine. Yeah and goosing. Later testified based on conversations. He had with different South African General that he thought the anti fertility project was considered by the government to be the most important project for the country. So like as a general rule like the anti fertility project when you like read Stories Bassim as work is portrayed as like one horrible project among others Generally like less awful than the nerve gases and assassination drugs. He made And I don't think that's fair because the the reality once you dig into the documents is that Basson and his colleagues like what they were trying to do with. These drugs was attempted genocide like their goal here was to wipe out the black population of South Africa. They just wanted to do it more peacefully than with gunfire it's like it's pretty staggering during Andrew. It silently yeah silently in like in a way that people don't realize it's happening secretly dosing people with his anti fertility drug. Like that's that's the plan that's being made here. GOOSEN leader testified by the government by the government to sterilize. Forty five million people or so. Oh Yeah One thing I can remember which we spoke about was the effectivity then of the product which needed to be developed whether it is one hundred percent. Permanent Sterilization Shen or whether it's temporary or whether it's eighty percent effective you know how these things work in fact we discussed involving with T. statistics from the university and we discussed getting them secret clearance. What's that they can work on the project for us to work out models what will be the influence on population rate if the project was fifty percent effective for one year? Sixty seventy whatever so. We realized that you cannot really you might not achieve one hundred percent effective sterilization and it was not thought to be necessary. So he's they're saying maybe only stop seventy percent of them from breeding is what he's saying like they. It's but like those are the numbers they're looking at like. This is a real effort to stop two thirds or more as many people as possible possible from breathing's many black people as possible from breeding. And I think that that rises to the level of an attempted genocide. Yeah like seventy eighty percent sterilization like you. You know the the. The Holocaust wiped out roughly half of the world's Jewish population. So you're talking about the goal was something that would have led to an even sharper decline in the population. Relation of South African. Black people like that was the in goal of this. It was a much slower project. But like that's what they're shooting for seventy eighty percent. It's pretty wild. Yeah it's like they're they're. They had a discussion where that well I mean. The Nazis were site too loud in efficient about it. Yeah exactly so so. Can't kill him as fast as they did. That will get you in trouble. Yeah people get real mouthy when you do it like that so you gotta just do get invaded but if we can stop eighty percent of them from having babies well then yeah wild. Yeah so thankfully. The Anti Fertility vaccine was never distributed attributed in mass and we have very little data on how it was tested but we do know that the program was wound down in the early nineteen nineties when president. FW declerk was elected in the death. L. OF APARTHEID was obvious enough for even people like bassin to hear. The new president ordered Project Coast to be gradually killed off but he was not willing to give up on the dream of pacifying. South Africa's Carr's black masses for domination by the white minority instead of sterilization or mass poisoning though President declerk started funding a kinder gentler method of social control. He wanted to test the use of quotes and MD May to pacify the restless population. So that's that's nice okay as it is better Dr. Yeah amount was going to get along a loser. If it was for everyone in the the country I would say. That's a great plan. The racism is what ruins. Oh It's oh I see okay. I missed that part. Not they were just giving them to black back people to stop them from wanting their rights. No no you thought they were just giving lutes to everybody. Yeah unfortunately cool. Yeah if it was just like the army helicopter helicoptering quayle leads an MD.. Made everybody like. I'm fine with that project. That's good use of the military but no this was racist very racist. They always yeah. So it's a catch. Yeah so a scientist named Henny Jordan at a company that acts as a front for Project Coast is generally credited as the person who came up with the formula for what may have been the very best. MDA ever synthesized most sources suggest that it was over ninety five percent purity which is pretty exceptional. Now I can't I can't say for certain whether or not I or you ever took this particular strain of ecstasy But like one of those things I started going through like my memories of the best ecstasy experiences I had in the early two thousands and like wondering like yeah. That was a really good batch was that was that the genocide ecstasy Initially cooked up as a crowd control they wanted to dose got really sad really fast. Yeah it's real bad. This was initially cooked up. They wanted to basically dose millions of black people with MD AMA to like stop them from revolting and stuff but hauer what. What was their delivery device? I don't think they ever got that far. Because like they started they cook up a huge amount of MBA. But I don't think they ever really figure out like how to distribute attributed to people And then the government shuts down the project before they can dose anyone with it. So there's a big tank of Indiana. Yeah yes so they have have millions of doses of MDA and no longer a government. WHO's willing to like? Let them use it for anything And they kind of bassin in his colleagues all kinds of decide that they should use it to fund their retirements..

Doctor Bassin scientist Wouter Basson South Africa African National Congress Goosen South African Communist Party wouter Basson Asan Jonas Savimbi murder Project Coast Nelson Mandela Van Rensburg president South African Council United States Indiana
"south african council" Discussed on The Waterfall Podcast

The Waterfall Podcast

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"south african council" Discussed on The Waterfall Podcast

"The town squares we refer to situate with over. Thirty, thousand square meters over retail spice, the is unto over three hundred stores over which many of flagships balking this evening sprint over the four corners of the more which makes. Shopping so much more convenient and obviously F- for ease of access jude different stores. We also have an excess of six thousand five hundred parking bays and easy excess from the mine. Arterial routes like the in one I wake I. Law me four ways Torian Joe Book. Interesting fact is that the in one? I always the busiest highway in South Africa due to the most design. and Lie out it is easy to navigate around more, so you don't necessarily get lost or gate. We walk into date INS and we recently launched our new free Wi fi throughout the mall while getting a personal. Two of the more Johan reminisced about the opening day. Well. I think before we speak about how many people came into the more specific day? WHAT'S IMPORTANT MR? What weaned on the night before. Almost three hundred shops preparing. To all open the same time the next day. I'm not even mentioning only tenants just contractors alone that evening we had over six thousand contractors on. That trucks for delivery were. Queuing up probably two to three kilometers deliver some stores to. Seven hours to get delivery as a result of the magnitude of the volumes games through. With an opening all the mold along, we thought some traffic accident. We look out in some week causing an jam. Record of one hundred forty six thousand people present fit the mold. While we walked toward the town square, we further discuss the design of the more. From all of Africa one of the key factors why it's so successful. It's that you have to label of shopping. It's well integrated, and now we integrate the two levels is the wide passengers. High ceilings with a high shopfronts on the lower level shopfronts. Got Up to about four off from Ethan's and on the EPA shopping label. SHOPFRONTS APP to in some places to nine meters, which allows a lot of volume. Lot of natural light comes skin. Another effective links to labeled successfully. Is that your anchor tenants route you will was. You'll, Julius. Multiple thins that's anchor tenants in the mall giant overdue labels, which gives you that gration tactic cluttered all the between the two. So, we walked outside townsquare. Where many of the restaurants are situated? They'll also the fountains way. Kids can be seen enjoying themselves on, day. They love. But they even playing this water winters well. Done what about? Nine this summer. Rush through. Well another. Could send and sippy. The stainless steel railings in the mall likes. I. Total. Link Stainless Steel Andraos from wavy standing now to sentence that he will as the crow flies will link. With Muller Africa. For the second year, running mall of Africa has been voted. South Africa's coolest more. Johan explained why he thinks of so cool at of Africa's a popular hangout spot for the youth and the shopping mixes primarily made up of the income individuals, and just to, but that in perspectives the twenty to twenty nine year olds and the thirty do thirty nine year olds H. Bracket Mall of Africa's unique in the sense that. It's just more shopping experience. It's a lifestyle destination. Is leading the way in the international trend of ending entertainment and event experiences to the retail mix through a number various strategic partnerships, the mole as previously hosted a variety of lifestyle events throughout the year such as the annual. Fee based men award of the year. I'm the SL fashion week means and. Pop shops we've also done. And as a super regional mall model, factors perfectly situated to create a new super hub for the African creative industry. One such initiative is the art collective. A series of four that we host every year. And it is the largest display ever done in an that's never been done in a shopping center before. It's also one of the awards. We one particularly is the arts exhibitions and lost The mall also. Started landmark sculpture. It's a the ones that you see as you driving to the mall. They more than five meters in height, which is a to ethica sculptures. And, we've created that through to Faisal Africa. South Africa's clueless small is only one of many awards that have been one mole of Ethica recently got awarded multiple footprint wards at twenty third. South. African Council of Shopping Centers. which we very proud of the spectrum award was awarded to us for Africa's art collective in the sales and promotions category. We also got to received a gold award Africa's art collective in sales and promotions category as well as in a community relations get. The Solo awards we also received for the beach. Ain't that we lost in the park and the G. Q. based twist in the public relations category motive of Africa has firmly positioned itself in the hearts and minds of shoppers from all over the country with many restaurants and hotspots, being the reason for this well Messiah think the. Town Square and the to ethica sculptures. had been very popular for selfish. You will always find people taking photos the. Fair favorite restaurants would include green Gaza Bella. Ocean Gareth rock a Momma's spur Russia's? BE As it gets close to the end of the year and the holiday season shopping is on everyone's mind. It's the busiest time for anymore. So how is moral of Africa preparing for it? Well, I think we're going to kick off the holiday season with L. and Black Friday sale, which is on the twenty ninth of November. And obviously customers can look forward to exclusive styles from all out throughout the face of season. Families can look forward to a fund Becht holiday programming the PUCK. The bulk will be transformed into a dino adventure park from the seventh of December, and it will run until the fourth of January. Daily activities will include walk with the dinosaurs, climbing walls, exiling Bungee, jump, aline, jungle maze, and much more we will also serve as from the seventh of December extend our trading house. and. That's to accommodate all holiday shoppers. The mall also provide giftwrap solutions and all proceeds. Will be donated.

Africa South Africa Town Square Muller Africa Johan Ethica Faisal Africa Wi Joe Book African Council of Shopping Ce townsquare Gaza Bella Julius Ethan PUCK spectrum award EPA L.
"south african council" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

13:30 min | 1 year ago

"south african council" Discussed on Conversations

"This is an ABC podcast if I say, psychotherapist, you might picture Sigmund Freud with these white beard and a cigar in hand. And as you lay on the couch, he fixes you with that penetrating gaze, and says, so tell me about your mother Freud is still the postal for psychotherapy which he developed in Vienna over one hundred years ago. But the talking cure Freud also called it has fallen out of favor a little it's been replaced by quicker. More results driven therapy like cognitive behavioral therapy and by medication. But my guest today, thinks therapy still has a very valuable role to play in helping humans transform ourselves, Jill strike grew up in South Africa, but she's been living and working in a strategy for many years. And with her colleague Jackie wind chip. She's written a book called the talking cure exploring, what happens. Between psychotherapist and patient, hygiene will now I said patient, is that? How you talk about the people who come and see you at your practice Syria. You are plunging us immediately. Difficult area because do be patient. We say client, or do we say analysts sand which I found an interesting word because it implies that the analyst and analysts to give trying to analyze the problem. So within the field anyone of the three will go, and they've all got slightly inflections like patient and client feel quite different to me will use they do. And I think patient maybe has got the bit of bed rep because we associated with mental ill-health. And I think in psychotherapy, we tried to focus bit on wellbeing, which does mean you have to deal with the inverted, commas ill-health all the problems that seating you. So it's problematic on that level. But on another level, you know, if you repay tient to some extent you. Might be able to relax it and think that the other person might be taking in taking on board. And using the Mont to kind of work with it client, it's as if it's a more commodity driven that you sort of the customer, and it puts therapist in a different kind of position of. Having to deliver goods. And it's not sure what the goods are. They're so mean to be delivered. And the endless endless end is also problematic are, honestly because it is associated with Freud. And we've come a long long way the lost hundred years, plunged to it complexities everywhere we turn in this field till you grew up in South Africa. What ideas about identity and belonging? Did you get there? We'll see that goes tonight and kind of personal history because I grew up. Well into school very early, and it was a Catholic school. I was an on Catholic Catholic school. I did why did you start early in y to Catholic school, if you want to catch like, well, I think that my parents were under the allusion that I was advanced, and that are therefore needed to go to school early and to be quite honest. The Catholics with only ones brave. Arm. Up in the Catholic school, where I was twelve years amount, and my mom was not practicing Anglican. My dad was to the end. And what's more we grew up in very Jewish area in which we the Ernie to myself and will alpha in another family with only to change all families. So I think complexity was something that was plunged into from the gate. What was the atmosphere like in South Africa when you were kid, you know, I really sort of. Heff to acknowledge an admit it's really we were cut off from terrible atmosphere growing up. It was sort of the scientific world we in your suburban house with the walls and Emaar particular family. We actually didn't have the black, many that many South African serval turnt, lock the word any but black domestic worker, but we did have a gardener, and I do remember, Sutin moments, like win the bus boycott Sperone that my mother would give a left home to the lady that came into washing us. And I know she was quite scared mom because she knew that they were best boycotts. And she took the person working for a spec to the townships. I had some idea of, in a science and also wanted to, to the men who would for us. Why his children, you know he came at suit and times. But I think as a child, you don't really question, it, it was any match later when I got out of the very predicted cocoon of the school into university. That's I started to much more be aware of the conflicts. The injustices. You know, the difficulties that a shocking, realize ation to, to sort of see your homeland with fresh eyes. Well, it was shocking realization. But again, I have to, you know, make confessions unfortunately, and you warn me that I was going to be in the hot seat, or the other way round and you delivering on your promise. I the tensions built up during the time that I was in university and in nineteen seventy eight it was the time of the Soweto riots opportunity at that point of going to America, which I did. And I couldn't eat of gotta green card and worked there. But it was only when I was really outside of South Africa and could hear other discourses and could see much clearly what was really happening the that are sort of had a I don't know what you'd call it possibly a spiritual experience or some kind of experience, which made need to side that I wanted to go back and make contribution. So I gave up the possibility of the green card went back to South Africa joined while I was really in the university infect. But I went back to my post that I was leaving was in the process of leaving, and then I became very involved in the actual. Tate movement. Trying to see top different services outside of the state institutions, which was treating black people ready badly say you were setting up counselling or psychology services use. We sit up a trauma center was became involved in working with the detainee counseling service, which was looking at people who'd been tortured, and I did through the South African concert of churches get involved. In a more underground can't work with township activists Tim. Tell me about that about that group of activists what had happened. Okay. So what had happened is that the potted state really stimulated conflict between different black groups so early in the eighty s it was really the state versus the townships in that was going badly, and they switch tech, and they created what is called or what was called black on black violence. So they exploited. If Nick differences, political differences, within the black community and it was the ANC, Busey's Encarta and NC boosts in Carter had an explosives. Encounter in one of the townships, the local leader in that area was killed the group of children really, because they between twelve and twenty two who were at the forefront of the revolution because it was a youth revolution. At witnessed this, the police came in because they were on the side of in Carter, the group ran away landed up at a community center, run by the South African concert of churches, which was, in fact, raided the group was arrested. The South African Council of churches brought a court interdict they released and they released back to this community center, amber, highly highly traumatized group. And when you arrived that as a psychologist what did you notice, first of all? Well, first of all, we had to really deal with the group dynamic, because nothing that this is a common group dynamic, and you find it in refugees, or any traumas group that that group from the point of view of the host country or the host has agreed that has biting, the hand that feeds them because riots break art and often around food, which of symbolic way, we associate food with the nutrients care, and with the people thinking about us, the so often conflicts around, you know that the food is terrible. The food is not culturally appropriate or if it's common it wasn't just in at setup. So the first thing we have to do, and we will working, of course, with ANC people on the ground who were not psychologists, therapists, but they were the street credibility that allowed us any excess because that group didn't care about our degrees, or any of those wonderful things. Puts it about the we were spies with the ruby, but we used to sort of navigate the relationship between the group and the hosts into who understand the very upset, they were doing this good thing, and we're being attacked, and then we have to think about ways, which would be appropriate to that group, and they usual healing practices, to try to unpack and deal with some of the traumas of witnessing the shocking, murder assassination, and we about doing that counseling. Look like in a situation as extreme as that one fistful. We worked in a group because it's the most effective ways they can devolve the talking cure was an anathema to that group because they didn't want to about their own individual almost when they were caught up in the revolution. So we. We know that praise Perm singing, dancing, and in tearing tailing, the Ardal history of the community, and what happened would be an excess. So we use that as an excess in slowly in through that individuals started to talk about the own individual trauma. So we have to be a bit creative, Florida. The bell Pence basically the fact that they were on the run meant that you wouldn't have had the usual time access that, that is common in insectologist psychotherapy was that risky to get them to open up to this very profound trauma. But know that you wouldn't be able to stay with them through that. Well, it was and let me say that we actually, try to follow the map. So the in this community into for awhile of all the legal process happened, then the difficulty in integrating them back into the township happened and then they continued sort of anti-apartheid work, many of. Of them were actually on the run going from township township organizing things, but through the council of churches, we did manage to keep contact with the number of the actually follow up, what I would say, is that because it happened in a group. We also try to give the groups it skills to support each other. And if you really think about a and INA and places like that we underestimate that group support. So yes, it was a danger into GMs of the exposure, but trying to do it in a way in which it was contained by the praise perms the history, the connection between the people in the group. And it was also planning for the future that came out holiday. We get back into the township, what sort of plan, so they make to continue the struggle. So it was a very different way of working experience. Jill. Expand your understanding of what a therapist was definitely definitely, I would say that one of the pleasures for me of being in Australia, is that I can feel much freer to do one to one work, although I do think these villa need for community will congr- intervention. But in South Africa because of the limited resources, one had to constantly thinking about how could you make your limited resources as valuable as possible?.

South Africa Sigmund Freud Catholic school Jill South African Council of churc analyst Vienna ABC ANC council of churches Jackie wind Catholic Catholic school Emaar Carter Soweto Ardal
"south african council" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"south african council" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Veganism here is feels don't care, but knowing dairy vegetarianism and the less unwieldy name on between them they came up with taking the start of the end of vegetarian and getting the first news summary. BBC news with Neil news, Spain's socialist, prime minister, bedrose engines is preparing to form a new government after his party won the most seats in the general election. Mr. Sanchez told jubilant supporters in Madrid that is only conditions. Reforming coalition would be respecting Spain's constitution and promoting social Justice, the far right party vox has entered parliament for the first time thousands of Afghan leaders, including clerics warlords and tribal. Chiefs have gathered in Kabul for the start of a traditional grand assembly or lawyer Jagger the beatings been convened to discuss the peace process with the Taliban. Insurgents have been negotiating with the US for months, but have so far refused to include the Afghan government led by president Ashraf Ghani. Germany and France are hosting a meeting in Berlin today on stability in the west Balkans. The French presidency said it would focus on bringing savvy and Kossovo back into dialogue after e you sponsored talks involving Serbia and its former province collapsed last year. The US navy says it has sailed to warships through the Taiwan Strait in a move that's likely to raise tension with China. The former US Republican Senator Richard Lugar, one of Washington's most prominent foreign policy voices has died in Virginia aged eighty seven that is designed to help former Soviet republics dismantle nuclear weapons bears. His name Columbia has launched a plan to try to stop illegal deforestation in its national parks, which represent a tenth of its territory. President Yvonne Duquet said this would include increased aerial monitoring. And one hundred twenty million people are eligible to vote in. The fourth phase of India's staggered general election. They are three more polling dates ahead. BBC news. Welcome back to part two of the history. Our with max Poisson still to come. We'll be inside the savvy and TV station as it was bombed by NATO jets twenty years ago, and we meet the hardy souls who began the vegan movement back in the nineteen forties that the for that we're going to get an inside as take on one of the most significant moments of the late twentieth century, South Africa's first free multi-racial election. The apartheid system had relegated the country's non white population to an officially oppressed. Second-class status since nineteen forty eight the struggle for equal rights had been long and bloody. By the time. The ANC leader Nelson Mandela was finally released from prison in nineteen ninety fully democratic elections, followed and the Reverend Frank g Connie was part of the electoral commission, which organized the vote to end the apartheid regime. He's been speaking to Rebecca Caspi. In Soweto and all over the country queues form that side polling stations at first light. And that. For the south hit this dream that one day things will come right for us lousy ten now for those of us who are not to vote when nor rights whatsoever, we come from awfully history. And so then was an extra or did that day though, as a great excitement, and there was onset of concern. Worry that somebody could disrupt it, you know, it was too good to believe Reverend Frank Chikane as secretary general of the South African Council of churches. He was appointed to the independent electoral commission the body charged with organizing the first free elections, South Africa had ever had. It was a massive undertaking. None of the normal structures of democracy were in place that been violent clashes between ethnic groups, some parties will refusing to take part and white supremacists. Had tried to sabotage the vote with terror. Thanks. Thirty one right wing is arrested in oil one a policeman. Another police reservist tensions ahead of the elections. Could not have been higher in the townships east of Johannesburg. There was another brutal day at least eighteen people here died in political violence. I was really.

Spain US BBC South Africa Frank Chikane Nelson Mandela president Ashraf Ghani US navy President Yvonne Duquet Madrid Mr. Sanchez Taiwan Strait Senator Richard Lugar prime minister Taliban Johannesburg South African Council of churc Columbia NATO
"south african council" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

06:12 min | 2 years ago

"south african council" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"It's baritone day, Thurston host of spit iheartradio's newest podcast with twenty three and me that explores how understanding your DNA changes, how we think about ourselves and the world around us. John legend joined us to discuss how are we all related. We're not a nine point, five percent, the same. That point, five percent is an area. We have been eager to explore those small differences, inspired a lot of discrimination. I feel like we're becoming more connected. I feel like we're learning more about how much we have in common, listen to the full episode of spit with twenty three and me. Now in the iheartradio app will wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot com. And from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm Tracy v Wilson and it's October. Seventh. Desmond Tutu was born on this day in nineteen thirty one. He was born in South Africa, and he's most known for his non-violent work against apartheid in South Africa, he was awarded the Nobel peace prize for this work in nineteen Eighty-four apartheid was South Africa's system of racial segregation. It had been implemented by the nation's white minority government and South Africa had already been segregated long before this point, but in nineteen forty eight, the national party came to power and the national party began formulating the system of enforced segregation through government policy. So the government was actively working on doing and enforcing the population registration act of nineteen fifty sorted everyone in South Africa into one of three categories, they wear the black Africans, people who are multiracial and. White people later on a category was added for Asians. It was illegal for people in these different groups to marry each other. You could only marry a person in your same group laws also outlined where each group were allowed to live and operate businesses. And those businesses and public facilities were segregated. Even though the white population of South Africa was a really small minority. These laws favored that white population, giving them the most advantageous places to live at work and access to almost all of the land. This system was extremely strict. It regulated every facet of life, and the South African government was was enforcing it in law. At the same time as in the United States, the civil rights movement was working to dismantle these types of laws black South Africans along with some white supporters had been resisting these laws as soon as they were proposed. They had been resist. Segregation before the laws even existed. And that brings us back to Desmond Tutu. After spending a couple of years as a teacher, he attended theological college and he was ordained as an Anglican priest in nineteen seventy eight. He was appointed to be the general secretary of the South African Council of churches. And it was in this role that he started to become so well known and his outspoken work against apartheid. This included non violent protests and advocating for other nations to place economic sanctions on South Africa. He wanted quote, a democratic and just society without racial divisions. South Africa was facing increasing condemnation from other parts of the world by the time to to was awarded the Nobel prize that again happened in nineteen Eighty-four. The prize itself was also a signal that the issue of South African apartheid was an important one in the world of global humanitarian struggle in one thousand nine hundred ninety. The South African government finally started. Peeling these laws and a new constitution followed and nineteen Ninety-three it took effect in nineteen ninety four that year South Africa elected its first black President Nelson Mandela. Although we should note that the social and economic effects of decades of apartheid still persist in South Africa and they will for a long time, you cannot reverse decades and centuries of oppression. Instantaneously to has continued to do humanitarian work in the years. Since apartheid began to be dismantled and he's earned a number of other awards in addition to the Nobel peace prize. These include the Albert Schweitzer prize for humanitarianism in nineteen Eighty-six. The Gandhi prize in two thousand seven and the presidential medal of freedom in two thousand nine. At the same time. He has also come under some scrutiny in recent years for a number of statements including some that are described as antisemitic the nineteen sixty four Nobel peace prize was also. Elected to apartheid in South Africa. As a side note, it was awarded to Albert the to lead who was president of the African National Congress and led a nonviolent campaign of civil disobedience against South Africa's white minority government. Desmond Tutu is still living as of the recording of this podcast. Although he has largely retired from public life. Thanks to Christopher hussy otas for his research work on today's episode into Tari Harrison for all of her audio work on this podcast. You can subscribe to the stay in history class on apple podcasts, Google podcasts, and wherever else you get your podcast, you can tune into Morrow for a moment of heroism immortalized in film. U-turns the new podcast from how stuff works hosted by Lisa Oz and Jill hers. It's all about change and how people say that change is really hard, but it's possible to make it feel good show is all about switching directions without winding up, totally lost co host Lisa Oz Jill hers dig into, oh, kinds of questions about change in u-turns. That's why. Oh, you turns join them as they navigate their own life changes and talk about exploration, experimentation, and transformation that's u-turns on apple podcasts or wherever else you get podcasts.

South Africa Desmond Tutu South African Council of churc Nobel prize Albert Schweitzer spit iheartradio John legend Lisa Oz iheartradio Thurston apple president African National Congress Nobel United States
"south african council" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"south african council" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Emerson Mnangagwa was sworn in as the new president of Zimbabwe on Sunday. This comes after the election campaign which was widely seen to be neither free no fair. Although the vote itself was peaceful in the immediate often beyond me shot and killed at least six demonstrators and a campaign of retribution has been taking place against polling agents and opposition supporters across the country. The results of the vote, which in the constitutional court by Nelson Chamisa and his opposition MDC alliance, the court ruling dismissing. The challenge and confirming mnangagwa's president will be it with a smaller percentage of the vote has drawn international condemnation and would appear to indicate that the judiciary is highly partisan. Well, David Coltart is a human rights lawyer and a former MDC minister for education and a Senator in the Zimbabwe government. He joins me on the line from Bulawayo. David was the court case fair. Good morning. Gene note wasn't. It it was. Completely unjust from beginning to end the way the court proceedings were managed in my view was unjust for a very complicated case. The the original petition was over two hundred pages long. It had very detailed allegations, not just of voter fraud, but of constitutional violations. And they gave the lower twenty minutes to put forward his argument before the case even began. The government had fictive denied to me. So three South African Council who again, to argue particular aspects of the case. So just at the beginning, the the case got off to a very poor start. And I mean, when doesn't have to have a lot of legal knowledge to see that the stage being erected for the inauguration before the hearing has been handed down. Kili mean something's up will exactly in famous. The constitution does say that within forty eight hours of the constitutional court handing down its judgment. The new president has to be inaugurated Serse. Suppose they could have used that that argument. But we had far too many other stories going about how prepared they were for Emma Simpson gangway to be the chosen candidate will or others president at which indicated that of course, they knew the result. So what happens next legally can can there be an appeal, any kind of challenge? No, that's the end of the road. The constitutional court is the highest court in the land of the constitution itself is very clear that any challenge to an election ends with that judgment Nelson, Tim ISA has appealed to an African court, but it's largely symbolic. It has no power to dictate to this Imbaba Ian government toot to, for example, reverse any decision. So does it. The government really needs the international community, not least to stabilize the economy what can be done then by other countries is it just seen as interfering in a sovereign state. To the international community going forward is that we don't need any waste of agenda. We simply need international community to. Referred to symboblic constitution as Bob. We actually has a very good constitution was passed by referendum in two thousand and thirteen, although test some Arizona. Generally it is an excellent document and what the international community needs to do is to hold misdemeanor godwit to the principles contained in that constitution. What next then for this very divided country. I mean, there are two schools of thought one is that we just need to pull together and four symboblic to be a nation that works. We must go forward. And there are others who say, no, this is completely unfair, and we should never ever support this man who is really committed genocide and it has stolen election. One point two, Gina, this is known about Amazon. Managua wasn't about Robert Mugabe. It's about an unjust system. At present. It's about the overwhelming control that the military has in our society, and that is what needs to change. We've had thirty eight years of this in particular in the last two decades. We've had the military involved in the DRC involved in business. We've had them she involved in our own diamond fields. We've had the military involved in effecting the outcome of elections and swatting the the will of the people and that is the issue going forward. If we just accept the situation, we will result in it while they will result in in us having a military dictatorship innocence for the next ten twenty years. And if that is the case, Zimbabwe's potential will never be realized. Geiger's catchphrases Zimbabwe's open for business. But when he took over Nov. off to the ta-chou's and bubbas international debt was five billion US dollars..

Zimbabwe David Coltart president MDC Nelson Chamisa Emerson Mnangagwa Gina African court DRC Geiger Bulawayo South African Council Senator Managua Robert Mugabe Emma Simpson US
"south african council" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"south african council" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"And the south african communist party is split and has not strange position which is pleased jacob zuma we want you to go but we're not going to vote officially with the opposition because we don't like lifting the opposition i mean if you can understand that position it's a bit strange said they're all sorts of factors that we justin now now the nc mps a few minutes ago were uh apparently in their caucus meeting they just had a coke smith usa we're singing we support zuma we are unashamed of our president yes that's what they may say when the caucus but what they can't do when they get to a secret ballot considering oh no considering this confusion prokoff using picture of war seems to be happening erber what do you reckon will happen north there's a tough one you know we absolutely honest nobody has the faintest idea what is going to happen the top six in the anc the my senior leadership apparently absolutely gobsmacked when we have this on good authority when the ruling of the speaker was that it be held in secret until than they were completely confident they could win the vote nobody knows and the problem is that the white of support against jacob zuma is enormous men including people of great a minimum merit say this this gel sector the south african council of churches which led the the fight against the party state a along with the anc has allies has come out saying that he his leadership is immoral and rid of the people must vote with their conscience now it doesn't take much to in tip that is saying you've got to vote against him to even if he was narrowly wins this vote.

african communist party jacob zuma nc president anc justin south african